#GrammarTrivia: The Present Progressive and the Simple Present to Express the Future

Hello, fellas. In the previous session of #GrammarTrivia on June 11, 2019, we learned how the future is expressed in time clauses.

(More on the future in time clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2019/06/15/grammartrivia-expressing-the-future-in-time-clauses/)

Our session today is about using the present progressive and the simple present to express the future.

The future is expressed by the present progressive when a sentence concerns a planned event or definite intention. Its future meaning is conveyed by future time words or the context.

Example:
My sister is seeing a doctor next Wednesday.

The simple present may also be used to express the future in a sentence if it concerns a definite schedule or timetable. It usually contains future time words. Only several verbs are used in this way, e.g., open, close, begin, end, start, finish, arrive, leave, come, return.

Example:
The competition starts tomorrow.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, June 19, 2019

#WOTD: Gash

Today we will learn about ‘gash’.
Do you know the meaning of the word ‘gash’?

‘Gash’ is a noun.
‘Gash’ is pronounced as /ɡaSH/.
‘Gash’ is an English slang word.
#WOTD

‘Gash’ means a long, deep cut in your skin or in the surface of something.
#WOTD

Some synonims of ‘gash’:
1. Laceration.
2. Tear.
3. Split.
4. Rip.
5. Gouge.
#WOTD

Examples of ‘gash’ in sentences:
“The explosion left a wide gash in the rock.”
#WOTD

Examples of ‘gash’ in sentences:
“He was bleeding from a gash on his head.”
#WOTD

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, May 26, 2019.

#EngTrivia: “Happy” vs “Glad”

Do you know the difference between “happy” and “glad”?

“Happy” and “glad” are both adjectives.

We use them when we want to express pleasure.

The meaning of those words are almost the same but they are different in the term of usage.
“Happy” indicates a stronger feeling than “glad”.

“Happy” is more accented and positive, deeper felt.

“Happy” means:

  1. Feeling or showing pleasure or contentment.

a. having a sense of confidence in or satisfaction with (a person, arrangement, or situation).

E.g. “We are happy to announce the engagement of our daughter.”
b. satisfied with the quality or standard of.

E.g. “I had a very happy childhood.”
c. willing to do something.

E.g. “I’d be happy to help you.”
d. used in greetings.

E.g. “Happy new year, my best friend.”
2. Fortunate and convenient.

E.g. “I’m happy to have known you.”

(According to Google Translate Dictionary)
“Glad” is more formal than “happy”. We usually use “glad” in writing business letters or emails.

“Glad” is generally the opposite of sad and gloomy.

“Glad” means “pleased; delighted” (according to Google Translate Dictionary)

E.g. “I am glad to hear that you have passed the examination with a good record.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 7, 2018.

#UKSlang: UK Slang (11)

Today we will learn about other UK slangs  apart from those we have talked about in past sessions.

Let’s start!
1. Laughing gear: one’s mouth.

E.g. “It’s not funny. Shut your laughing gear!”
2. Know one’s onions: well versed on a subject.

E.g. “That guy sure knows his onions.”
3. Hard cheese: expression of bad luck.

E.g. “The new rules is a hard cheese for the employees.”
4. Go to spare: become angry or frustrated.

E.g. “All his problems make him go to spare.”
5. Eating irons: eating utensils.

E.g. “Let us prepare the eating irons.”
6. Do one’s nut: become enraged.

E.g. “I gave him the news, and he did his nut.”
7. Bang to the rights: caught in the act.

E.g. “The police came and caught the robber bang to rights in front of the store.”
8. Argy-bargy: heated confrontation.

E.g. “I don’t want us to get into argy bargy just because of this small problem.”
9. All mouth and no trousers: all talk, no action.

E.g. “He’s all mouth and no trousers. Nobody wants to listen to him.”
10. Sad arse: pathetic person.

E.g. “You are a sad arse! Can’t you even boil an egg?”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 6, 2017.

#UKSlang: UK Slang (11)

Today we will learn about other UK slangs  apart from those we have talked about in past sessions.

Let’s start!
1. Laughing gear: one’s mouth.

E.g. “It’s not funny. Shut your laughing gear!”
2. Know one’s onions: well versed on a subject.

E.g. “That guy sure knows his onions.”
3. Hard cheese: expression of bad luck.

E.g. “The new rules is a hard cheese for the employees.”
4. Go to spare: become angry or frustrated.

E.g. “All his problems make him go to spare.”
5. Eating irons: eating utensils.

E.g. “Let us prepare the eating irons.”
6. Do one’s nut: become enraged.

E.g. “I gave him the news, and he did his nut.”
7. Bang to the rights: caught in the act.

E.g. “The police came and caught the robber bang to rights in front of the store.”
8. Argy-bargy: heated confrontation.

E.g. “I don’t want us to get into argy bargy just because of this small problem.”
9. All mouth and no trousers: all talk, no action.

E.g. “He’s all mouth and no trousers. Nobody wants to listen to him.”
10. Sad arse: pathetic person.

E.g. “You are a sad arse! Can’t you even boil an egg?”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 6, 2017.

#EngQuote: Encouragement

Hi Fellas! How are you doing this week? I hope you enjoyed whatever you were doing. In this session I would like to share some quotes I got from the musics I listened.

  1. “Every choice you make when you’re lost, every step you take has it’s cause. And though it seems your sorrow never ends, someday its gonna make sense.” MLTR – It’s gonna male sense.
  2. “Feel the rain on your skin. No one else can feel it for you.
  3. Only you can let it in, no one else… Live your life with arms wide open. Today is where your book begins. The rest is still unwritten.” Unwritten – Natasha Bedingfield.
  4. “They don’t always happen when you ask and its easy to give in to your fears. But when you’re blinded by your pain, can’t see the way get through the rain. A small but still, resilient voice says hope is very near.’ When you believe – Mariah Carey.
  5. “Cause it makes me that much stronger. Makes me work a little bit harder. It makes me that much wiser. So thanks for making me a fighter.” Fighter – Christina Aguilera
  6. “This is the real, this is me. I’m exactly where I’m supposed to be now. Gonna let the light shine on me. Now I found who I am. There’s no way to hold it in. No more hiding who I want to be.” This is me – Demi Lovato.
  7. “If it’s over let it go and come tomorrow it will seem so yesterday… Laugh it off and let it go, and when you wake up it will seem so yesterday, so yesterday.” So yesterday – Hillary Duff.
  8. “There’s a hope that’s waiting for you in the dark. You should know you’re beautiful just the way you are. And you don’t have to change a thing, the world could change its heart. No scars to your beautiful, we’re stars and we’re beautiful.” Scars to your beautiful – Alessia Cara.
  9. “Mama told me not to waste my life. She said spread your wings my little butterfly. Don’t let what they say keep you up at night, and they can’t detain you. ‘Cause wings are made to fly.” Wings – Little Mix.
  10. “There’s not a star in heaven that we can’t reach. If we’re trying, yeah we’re breaking free.” Breaking free – Zac Effron.
  11. “We live and we learn to take one step at a time. There’s no need to rush. It’s like learning to fly or falling in love. It’s gonna happen and it’s supposed to happen.” One step at a time – Jordin Sparks.

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, Ju June 21,  2019

#ENGVOCAB: Music Vocabulary

People all over the world love listening to music. Sometimes, They love going to concerts to hear live music, and listening to recordings of their favourite artists.

There are three genres of music as following:

  • Traditional music (for example, folk music)
  • Art music (for example, classical music)
  • Popular music (for example, hip hop or rock music)

List of Music Terms:

Artist: A professional singer, musician or songwriter.

Art music: Music written and performed by professional musicians mostly for the upper classes, like classical Indian music and European opera.

Beat: The regular pulse in music that dancers move to and audiences clap to.

Classical Music: European orchestral and keyboard music that’s written by composers.

Catchy: Describes a song or tune that is enjoyable to listen to and easy to remember.

Chorus: Part of a song that is repeated several times.

Composer: Person who writes music.

Country Music: A genre of American music with origins in the rural folk music of Europe.

Folk Music: Traditional music from a particular region or country.

Genre: A kind or style of music, movie, TV show, painting, etc. In this case, we only focus on music.

Harmony: Pleasant sound created when two musical notes are played or sung at the same time.

Hip hop: A musical genre in which artists rap over beats and sampled sound.

Jazz: A genre in which artists improvise within a rhythmic and harmonic framework.

Live: Played at a concert in front of an audience.

Lyrics: Words of a song.

Melody: A tune, or the notes of a song.

Pop music: A popular music genre with short, melody songs that are easy to remember.

Recording: A piece of music that’s recorded in a studi

Rhythm a pattern of beats and sounds that musicians play/music.

Resoucers:

http://www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/music.htm

bbclearningenglish.com

Compiled and written by @nurulhasanahmoslem for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, June 15, 2019.

#GrammarTrivia: Expressing the Future in Time Clauses

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn how to express the future in time clauses.

A time clause is an adverb clause beginning with such words as when, before, after, as soon as, until, and while. However, will or be going to is not used in a time clause. The clause carries future meaning despite its simple present tense.

Example:
Dave will arrive soon. When he arrives, we will see him.

Sometimes a time clause uses the present progressive to express an activity that will be in progress in the future.

Example:
While I am studying overseas next year, I am going to visit several tourism destinations.

To emphasize the completion of the act before the other act takes place in the future, the present perfect is used in a time clause.

Example:
She will take a rest after she has finished her project.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, June 7, 2019

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Whisper’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘whisper’.
Do you know other words to say it?

Let’s start.

  • Murmur.

Meaning: say something in a low, soft, or indistinct voice.
E.g. “He took the mug of coffee with a murmur of thanks.”

  • Mutter.

Meaning: speak quietly and in a low voice that is not easy to hear, often when you are worried or complaining about something.
E.g. “The woman next in line began to mutter of discontent to herself.”

  • Mumble.

Meaning: say something indistinctly and quietly, making it difficult for others to hear.
E.g. “I wish you wouldn’t mumble. I can’t hear you clearly.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, June 9, 2019.

#EngProverbs: African proverbs about life

Hi, Fellass… how are you doing this week? I hope you’ve been doing well. I also want to wish Happy Eid Mubarak to those who celebrate it. Well, In this occation I would like to share some African proverbs that tell about life.

1) “Only a fool tests the depth of a river with both feet,” Meaning: you can’t be involve into a situation without thinking about it first.

2) “Sugarcane is sweetest at its joint.”

Meaning: the best things of our life may be hard to be achieved, but in the end, it is worth it.

3) “Life is like a mist or a shadow; it quickly passes by.”
Meaning: it has a similar meaning to “Life is too short, and you only live it once.”

4) “The Rain does not fall on one roof.”

Meaning:  everyone will certainly have problems and challenges she/he should face.

5) “It takes a whole village to raise a child.”

Meaning: someone’s characters, manners, and behaviour are affected by his/her interaction with the society.

6) “He who does not know one thing knows another.”

Meaning: the one who doesn’t know about something doesn’t mean he/she knows nothing

7) “Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.”

Meaning: don’t focis on your failures/mistakes, but the reason behind it. Otherwise, you may repeat the same mistake again.

 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, Ju June 7, 2019

#IOTW: Idioms with the word ‘hit’

Hello fellas, how are you today? First of all, I want to wish you a happy Eid al-Fitr for you who celebrate it.

In today’s session we will be going to discuss some idioms formed with the word hit. Fellas, can you mention what is the meaning of ‘hit?’

The verb ‘to hit’ means ‘memukul’ in Indonesian language. When put in an idiom, ‘hit’ can change meanings. So fellas, here are idioms with ‘hit’:

1. Hit me
It means ‘say it now’ or ‘tell me’ or ‘give it to me right now.’ It could also mean that something is ‘clear to me’ or ‘I understand.’
E.g.: “And then it hit me. The weather feels so much warmer because of the humidity.”

2. Hit my funny bone
It means ‘something causes me to laugh.’
E.g.: “The word ‘pollywog’ always hits my funny bone.”

3. Hit the nail on the head
It means to ‘say the right word’ or ‘suggest a good idea.’
E.g.: “Your comment hit the nail on the head. You spoke the truth.”

4. Hit speeds of
It means to ‘travel at speeds of.’
E.g.: “The stolen car was hitting speeds of 120 kilometres per hour in the city.”

5. Hit the books
It means to ‘begin studying.’
E.g.: “Exams begin next week. It’s time to hit the books.”

6. Hit the rock bottom
It means to face a very unfortunate situation and and to feel very depressed about it.
E.g.: “After his farm was seized, he hit rock bottom and lost all hope.”

Fellas, now try to answer what exactly is the meaning of the idiom ‘hit and run?’

Thank you for your joining me today, fellas. You can use idioms with the word ‘hit’ to improve your English conversation skill. See you tomorrow.

Compiled and written by @2013happyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, June 5, 2019.

#GrammarTrivia: Using Already, Yet, Still, and Anymore

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn the use of several adverbs. They are already, yet, still, and anymore.

1) Already
• Meaning: Something occurred before now.
• Position: Midsentence.
• Example: The computer is already there.

2) Yet
• Meaning: Something did not take place before now (until this time), but it may happen in the future.
• Position: End of sentence.
• Example: The mail has not come yet.

3) Still
• Meaning: A situation continues its existence from past to present with no change.
• Position: Midsentence.
• Example: We can still play the guitar.

4) Anymore
• Meaning: A past situation has changed or does not continue at present. It has the same meaning as any longer.
• Position: End of sentence.
• Example: She does not teach English anymore.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, May 20, 2019

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Difficult’ (2)

Today we will learn more about other ways to say ‘difficult’.

You can review the first lesson here https://englishtips4u.com/2019/05/12/engvocab-other-ways-to-say-difficult/

Let’s start.

  • Onerous: involving a great deal of effort, trouble or difficulty (of a task or responsibility).

E.g. “This is the most onerous task I have ever done.”

  • Herculean: requiring great strength or effort.

E.g. “Moving the stove will be a herculean endeavor.”

  • Knotty: extremely difficult or intricate

E.g. “The new management team faces some knotty problems.”

  • Cumbersome: difficult to use or handle; very complicated and inefficient.

E.g. “Although the machine looks cumbersome, it is actually easy to use.”

  • Sisyphean: impossible to complete (of a task).

E.g. “It is a sisyphean endeavor to get the two company to work together in a constructive manner.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, May 12, 2019.

How to Use Either and Neither (1)

The English words either and neither can cause some problems for native and non-native speakers of English. Sometimes you can use either one and sometimes you have to choose either one or the other, but neither one is very difficult. While ‘either’ has a positive connotation, ‘neither’ holds a negative significance. You will always find them paired up this way: either/or and neither/nor.

Either… Or

Either... or is used to offer a choice between two possibilities:

  • Either Mike or Lisa will be there.
  • Either you leave me alone or I will call the police.

Either can also be followed by some or all of the following: one + of + group of two:

  • Either one of us could do it.
  • Either one of you should know.

Neither… Nor

Neither… nor is equivalent to not… either… or.

  • Neither Mike nor Lisa will be there.
  • He speaks neither English nor French.
  • We brought neither coffee nor tea.

Neither can also be followed by some or all of the following: one + of + group of two:

  • Neither one of us has any money.
  • Neither one of them is ready.

The Bottom Line

Either means one and goes with or, neither means none and goes with nor. “Not either” equals neither.

Reference:

Lawless, Laura K. 2019. Either and Neither. Retrieved from:  https://www.lawlessenglish.com/english-mistakes/either-and-neither/

Compiled and written by @nurulhasanahmoslem for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, May 18, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: Predicate Adjectives

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn predicate adjectives.

According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, adjectives are words describing nouns. They are usually placed right before nouns. An adjective can also follow a linking verb such as be, feel, look, smell, sound, taste, appear, seem, and become.

(More on linking verbs: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/08/23/engclass-linking-verb/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2012/03/12/engclass-linking-verbs/)

However, several adjectives only occur after linking verbs and they cannot come directly before nouns they describe. A predicate adjective should be changed into its corresponding form to use in front of a noun.

Here are predicate adjectives and their corresponding forms:

alike= like similar

alive= live living

alone= lone

afraid= frightened

asleep= sleeping

Examples:

1) The two brothers look alike.

2) We completed our projects in a similar manner.

3) The girl is afraid of heights.

4) The frightened child cried for his mother.

Sources:
Deborah Phillips, Longman Complete Course for The TOEFL Test
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, May 8, 2019

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Difficult’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘difficult’.
Do you know some synonyms of ‘difficult’?

Let’s start.

  • Arduous: hard to accomplish or achieve; needing a lot of effort and energy.

E.g. “She took the arduous task and devote her heart and soul to it.”

  • Toilsome: involving hard or difficult work, or great effort.

E.g. “Housework after a long journey is toilsome.”

  • Strenuous: something that takes a lot of effort, work or energy to do.

E.g. “The doctor advised my brother to avoid strenuous exercise.”

  • Operose: involving or displaying much industry or effort.

E.g. “The expanding process of my company is too slow and operose.”

  • Grueling: extremely tiring and demanding.

E.g. “The freshmen were put through a week of grueling endurance tests.”

  • Laboriuos: requiring considerable effort and time (especislly of a task, process, or journey).

E.g. “Collecting the experiment materials is a long and laborious task.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 28, 2019.

#IOTW: Idioms related to work

Hi, Fellass… how are you doing this week?

Honestly, I’m a little bit unwell around these two months because I mostly worked overtime. Some of you might used to this work pattern while I’m not. Well, speaking of working, today I’m going to share some idioms related to work.

  1. “Ramp up” Meaning: increasing something.

Example:

  • “The manager push us to ramp the revenue up.”
  1. “On the back burner.” Meaning: something is less important at the moment.

Example:

  • “You can finish your task for today, this problem is on the back burner.”
  1. “Put (something) off.” Meaning: to delay something.

Example:

  • “Please put your current activity off. We have an urgent meeting.”
  1. “People person.” Meaning: someone with a great social skill.

Example:

  • “You need to be a people person if you are working as a marketing.”
  1. “Have a lot on your plate.” Meaning: you have a lot of work/resposibilities at the moment.

Example:

  • “I see you will have a lot on your plate next quarter.”
  1. “Selling like hotcakes.” Meaning: something is bought by customer in a brief moment.

Example:

  • “This book was popular. It was selling like hotcakes.”
  1. “Learning curve.” Meaning: the time that is needed to learn about the system.

Example:

  • “I found that this company has a difficult learning curve. I don’t quite understand until now.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, May 10, 2019

#IOTW: Idioms related to Bullying

Hey ho, fellas! How’s your day? I think today was a cold day.
What is definition of bullying fellas?

Bullying is something that 1 in 2 people under 25 will experience in their lifetime.

Here are a few things you should know that will help you identify it, and hopefully understand it a little better.

 

Picture1

1.Big Bully
Meaning  :Someone who is overly critical, domineering, or authoritative, or who is physically or psychologically abusive.

E.g “do not take what se says too much to heart, she is just a big bully.Agnes’s been a big bully since she got promotion.”

2.Bully pulpit
Meaning : A public position that allows a person to speak with authority and share their views with a large audience.

E.g “ James used his position of class president as a bully pulpit to raise awareness about cyberbullying.”

3.Bullyragging

Meaning :To bother or badger someone.

E.g “Would you quit bullyragging me? I didn’t do anything wrong, I swear!.”

4.Bully rag
Meaning :To haras someone

  1. g “ hey jessica do not bully me just because you are upset”.

5.Bully for somebody

Meaning : used to show that you do not think that what somebody has said or done is very impressive

E.g “riko’s just won a free holiday in Spain.’ ‘Oh, bully for him! She’s so rich anyway, she can afford to go away whenever he wants to.’

Alright, fellas, those are some idioms and let’s know

No one is born a bully – true story. Bullying is a learnt behaviour and not an innate characteristic of anyone.

Thank you for being with me, fellas! Today is a wrap!

Enjoy fellas! #IOTW

 

 

compiled by @ijoojii for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 2 May, 2019.

 

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