#GrammarTrivia: Conditional Sentences Using ‘As If’, ‘As Though’ and ‘Like’

Hello, fellas. How’s life today? On this occasion we will learn several forms of conditional sentences. According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, a conditional sentence usually comprises of an adverb clause of condition or if-clause, which contains a condition, and a result clause, which shows a result. Besides, an adverb clause can be introduced by whether or not, even if, in case, in the event that, unless and only if.

(More on conditional sentences: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/06/04/engclass-conditional-sentences-revisit/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2019/02/05/grammartrivia-other-forms-of-conditional-sentences/)

Conditional sentences can also be formed by using as if, as though and like. The use of as if or as though usually carries the same meaning as an untrue conditional sentence.

Examples:
1) She kept playing as if she were a child.
Fact: She is not a child.
2) He explained the lesson to his classmates as though he had learned all the materials.
Fact: He did not learn all the materials.

In conditional sentences, like precedes a clause. However, it is not generally considered appropriate in formal English and more common in informal English.

Example:
It looks like it is going to be sunny.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Tuesday, August 13, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: The Past Perfect Progressive

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn the past perfect progressive.

To begin with, we need to understand the past perfect first. The past perfect conveys an idea that an activity was completed before another activity or time in the past.

(More on the past perfect: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/12/26/engclass-past-perfect-tense/)

Example:
Felix had finished his study when Mary started her tertiary education.
First: Felix finished his study.
Second: Mary started her tertiary education.

In the past perfect progressive, the emphasis is put on the duration of an activity that was in progress before another activity or time in the past.

Example:
She had been reading a book for two hours before I came.

The past perfect progressive may also express a meaning that an activity was in progress close in time to another activity or time in the past.

Example:
He was tired because he had been running.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 4, 2019

#EngVocab: Phrasal Verbs with ‘Beat’

Today we will learn about phrasal verbs with ‘beat’.
Do you know any phrasal verbs with ‘beat’?

Let’s start.

  • Beat to.

Meaning: to do something before someone else.
Example: “My company wants to release the same idea but another company has beat us to it.”

  • Beat out.

Meaning: to defeat or finished before the competitor.
Example: “The new leader beat out the rival company leader and won the contract.”

  • Beat up.

Meaning: to blame or critisize yourself or someone else.
Example: “Don’t beat up yourself up. You need to let it go.”

  • Beat down.

Meaning: to force someone to accept a lower price than what they wanted.
Example: “You need to beat down the seller to the price that suits you.”

  • Beat off.

Meaning: to stop someone or something from succeeding.
Example: “The small shop beat off the supermarket in selling the accesories.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, July 21, 2019.

#GrammarTrivia: Relative Clauses to Modify Pronouns

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn the use of relative clauses to modify pronouns.

According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, a relative clause is a dependent clause modifying a noun. Further information about a noun is described, identified, or given by the clause. It is also called an adjective clause.

(More on relative clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/08/engclass-relative-clause/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/09/engclass-relative-clause-2/)

Relative clauses can also be used to modify indefinite pronouns (everyone, everybody, everything, someone, somebody, something, anyone, anybody, anything, no one, nobody, nothing)

Example:
1) There is somebody whom she wants to see.
2) Anything which they said was irrelevant.

Pronouns such as the one(s) and those can be modified by relative clauses, too.

Example:
1) Catherine was the only one whom I talked to in the class.
2) The governments provide scholarships for those who are unable to pay their tuition fees.

Relative clauses are extremely rarely used to modify personal pronouns (I, you, she, he, it, we, they). Even though it is possible, it is very formal and uncommon.

Example:
It is I who help the students.

Source:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, July 19, 2019

#WOTD: Embezzle

Hi, Fellas! How do you do along this week?

In this session, I would like to share some information about “embezzle.” Have you heard about this word?

“Embezzle” is adopted from the word “embesiller” Anglo-French, which means “to make a way with.” According to Merriam Webster Dictionary, this word acts as a verb with a meaning “to steal money you’ve been trusted with.”

In my view, this word refers the ones who work in finance division that steal the company’s or organizations’s fund.

There are some related words to “embezzle,” such as “misappropriate,” “misuse,” “preempt,” “peculate,” etc. Lastly, here are some examples of sentences that contains embezzle:
1. “She was arrested from emblezzing his company’s.”
2. “He’s aware that his boss embezzle the company’s money, but he pretends to not know about it.”

 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, July 19, 2019

#EngQuiz : Words in the News

Fellas, do you like to read the news? We can get many information from the news. The sources we can read the news from vary. We can read the news on the newspaper, magazine, or online news portals. Reading the news in English can also improve our vocabulary.

On today’s session, we will start with this paragraph:

It’s the temple that brought Londonderry together. On Saturday they burnt it down.

Catholics and Protestants have a long history of conflict in this Northern Irish city.

But volunteers from both communities came together to build the structure. Thousands left personal messages of peace inside.

Organisers say the fire symbolises letting go of the past.

From the paragraph, we can find some vocabularies like:

  • Temple = a building used to pray
  • To burn something down = to destroy it with fire
  • Conflict = a serious disagreement or argument between two people or more
  • Volunteers = people who offer to work without being paid
  • Symbolise = to represent an idea

Fellas, let’s start the quiz! Fill in the blank with vocabularies that we found from the news that I shared previously. Use hashtag #EngQuiz to share your answer.


1. Since the last train left in 1998, the once regal station has come to (…..) Detroit.

2. Whatever the issue was, the (….) between Rachel and Soga remained.

3. The camp ground was manned on a (….) basis.

4. She was worried that the house might (….) while they were away.

5. This year, the date on which Gandhi was murdered was marked by attempts by right-wing Hindus to build a (….) to honour the Gods.

The answer are:

  1. Symbolise
  2. Conflict
  3. Volunteer
  4. Burn down
  5. Temple

Source from: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/features/witn/ep-150325

Thats all for today fellas, see you tomorrow!!

Compiled and written by @2013happyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, July 17, 2019

#EngVocab: Phrasal Verbs with ‘Throw’

Today we will learn about phrasal verbs with ‘throw’.
Do you know phrasal verbs with ‘throw’?

Let’s start.

  • Throw off.

Meaning: get rid of something that has prevented you from doing what you want or behaving in the way you want.
Example: “It took me a week to throw off my cold.”

  • Throw in.

Meaning: add something extra without asking for more money.
Example: “I printed extra pictures and they threw in a photo album.”

  • Throw up

Meaning: produce something new in a hurry.
Example: “The company threw up other colours in the design.”

  • Throw away

Meaning: to waste something.
Example: “Don’t throw away this opportunity!”

  • Throw out.

Meaning: to discard something worthless or unnecessary.
Example: “We decided to throw out all our old clothes.”

  • Throw down.

Meaning: cause something to drop.
Example: “She threw down the magazines and went out.”

  • Throw on.

Meaning: to put on a piece of clothing quickly and carelessly.
Example: “I just threw down a pair of jeans and a T-shirt.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, July 4, 2019.

#GrammarTrivia: “Always” in the Progressive

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn the use of always in the progressive.

Always is usually used in the simple present to describe habits or everyday activities.
Example: I always go to school at 6:30.

It may be used in the present progressive to complain, express annoyance or anger.
Example: She is always coming late!

Beside always, the words forever and constantly can also be used in the present progressive to convey annoyance.
Example: She is always/forever/constantly coming late!

Always, forever, and constantly may be used in the past progressive to express annoyance or anger.
Example: She was always/forever/constantly coming late.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, July 6, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: The Present Progressive and the Simple Present to Express the Future

Hello, fellas. In the previous session of #GrammarTrivia on June 11, 2019, we learned how the future is expressed in time clauses.

(More on the future in time clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2019/06/15/grammartrivia-expressing-the-future-in-time-clauses/)

Our session today is about using the present progressive and the simple present to express the future.

The future is expressed by the present progressive when a sentence concerns a planned event or definite intention. Its future meaning is conveyed by future time words or the context.

Example:
My sister is seeing a doctor next Wednesday.

The simple present may also be used to express the future in a sentence if it concerns a definite schedule or timetable. It usually contains future time words. Only several verbs are used in this way, e.g., open, close, begin, end, start, finish, arrive, leave, come, return.

Example:
The competition starts tomorrow.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, June 19, 2019

#WOTD: Gash

Today we will learn about ‘gash’.
Do you know the meaning of the word ‘gash’?

‘Gash’ is a noun.
‘Gash’ is pronounced as /ɡaSH/.
‘Gash’ is an English slang word.
#WOTD

‘Gash’ means a long, deep cut in your skin or in the surface of something.
#WOTD

Some synonims of ‘gash’:
1. Laceration.
2. Tear.
3. Split.
4. Rip.
5. Gouge.
#WOTD

Examples of ‘gash’ in sentences:
“The explosion left a wide gash in the rock.”
#WOTD

Examples of ‘gash’ in sentences:
“He was bleeding from a gash on his head.”
#WOTD

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, May 26, 2019.

#EngTrivia: “Happy” vs “Glad”

Do you know the difference between “happy” and “glad”?

“Happy” and “glad” are both adjectives.

We use them when we want to express pleasure.

The meaning of those words are almost the same but they are different in the term of usage.
“Happy” indicates a stronger feeling than “glad”.

“Happy” is more accented and positive, deeper felt.

“Happy” means:

  1. Feeling or showing pleasure or contentment.

a. having a sense of confidence in or satisfaction with (a person, arrangement, or situation).

E.g. “We are happy to announce the engagement of our daughter.”
b. satisfied with the quality or standard of.

E.g. “I had a very happy childhood.”
c. willing to do something.

E.g. “I’d be happy to help you.”
d. used in greetings.

E.g. “Happy new year, my best friend.”
2. Fortunate and convenient.

E.g. “I’m happy to have known you.”

(According to Google Translate Dictionary)
“Glad” is more formal than “happy”. We usually use “glad” in writing business letters or emails.

“Glad” is generally the opposite of sad and gloomy.

“Glad” means “pleased; delighted” (according to Google Translate Dictionary)

E.g. “I am glad to hear that you have passed the examination with a good record.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 7, 2018.

#UKSlang: UK Slang (11)

Today we will learn about other UK slangs  apart from those we have talked about in past sessions.

Let’s start!
1. Laughing gear: one’s mouth.

E.g. “It’s not funny. Shut your laughing gear!”
2. Know one’s onions: well versed on a subject.

E.g. “That guy sure knows his onions.”
3. Hard cheese: expression of bad luck.

E.g. “The new rules is a hard cheese for the employees.”
4. Go to spare: become angry or frustrated.

E.g. “All his problems make him go to spare.”
5. Eating irons: eating utensils.

E.g. “Let us prepare the eating irons.”
6. Do one’s nut: become enraged.

E.g. “I gave him the news, and he did his nut.”
7. Bang to the rights: caught in the act.

E.g. “The police came and caught the robber bang to rights in front of the store.”
8. Argy-bargy: heated confrontation.

E.g. “I don’t want us to get into argy bargy just because of this small problem.”
9. All mouth and no trousers: all talk, no action.

E.g. “He’s all mouth and no trousers. Nobody wants to listen to him.”
10. Sad arse: pathetic person.

E.g. “You are a sad arse! Can’t you even boil an egg?”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 6, 2017.

#UKSlang: UK Slang (11)

Today we will learn about other UK slangs  apart from those we have talked about in past sessions.

Let’s start!
1. Laughing gear: one’s mouth.

E.g. “It’s not funny. Shut your laughing gear!”
2. Know one’s onions: well versed on a subject.

E.g. “That guy sure knows his onions.”
3. Hard cheese: expression of bad luck.

E.g. “The new rules is a hard cheese for the employees.”
4. Go to spare: become angry or frustrated.

E.g. “All his problems make him go to spare.”
5. Eating irons: eating utensils.

E.g. “Let us prepare the eating irons.”
6. Do one’s nut: become enraged.

E.g. “I gave him the news, and he did his nut.”
7. Bang to the rights: caught in the act.

E.g. “The police came and caught the robber bang to rights in front of the store.”
8. Argy-bargy: heated confrontation.

E.g. “I don’t want us to get into argy bargy just because of this small problem.”
9. All mouth and no trousers: all talk, no action.

E.g. “He’s all mouth and no trousers. Nobody wants to listen to him.”
10. Sad arse: pathetic person.

E.g. “You are a sad arse! Can’t you even boil an egg?”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 6, 2017.

#EngQuote: Encouragement

Hi Fellas! How are you doing this week? I hope you enjoyed whatever you were doing. In this session I would like to share some quotes I got from the musics I listened.

  1. “Every choice you make when you’re lost, every step you take has it’s cause. And though it seems your sorrow never ends, someday its gonna make sense.” MLTR – It’s gonna male sense.
  2. “Feel the rain on your skin. No one else can feel it for you.
  3. Only you can let it in, no one else… Live your life with arms wide open. Today is where your book begins. The rest is still unwritten.” Unwritten – Natasha Bedingfield.
  4. “They don’t always happen when you ask and its easy to give in to your fears. But when you’re blinded by your pain, can’t see the way get through the rain. A small but still, resilient voice says hope is very near.’ When you believe – Mariah Carey.
  5. “Cause it makes me that much stronger. Makes me work a little bit harder. It makes me that much wiser. So thanks for making me a fighter.” Fighter – Christina Aguilera
  6. “This is the real, this is me. I’m exactly where I’m supposed to be now. Gonna let the light shine on me. Now I found who I am. There’s no way to hold it in. No more hiding who I want to be.” This is me – Demi Lovato.
  7. “If it’s over let it go and come tomorrow it will seem so yesterday… Laugh it off and let it go, and when you wake up it will seem so yesterday, so yesterday.” So yesterday – Hillary Duff.
  8. “There’s a hope that’s waiting for you in the dark. You should know you’re beautiful just the way you are. And you don’t have to change a thing, the world could change its heart. No scars to your beautiful, we’re stars and we’re beautiful.” Scars to your beautiful – Alessia Cara.
  9. “Mama told me not to waste my life. She said spread your wings my little butterfly. Don’t let what they say keep you up at night, and they can’t detain you. ‘Cause wings are made to fly.” Wings – Little Mix.
  10. “There’s not a star in heaven that we can’t reach. If we’re trying, yeah we’re breaking free.” Breaking free – Zac Effron.
  11. “We live and we learn to take one step at a time. There’s no need to rush. It’s like learning to fly or falling in love. It’s gonna happen and it’s supposed to happen.” One step at a time – Jordin Sparks.

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, Ju June 21,  2019

#ENGVOCAB: Music Vocabulary

People all over the world love listening to music. Sometimes, They love going to concerts to hear live music, and listening to recordings of their favourite artists.

There are three genres of music as following:

  • Traditional music (for example, folk music)
  • Art music (for example, classical music)
  • Popular music (for example, hip hop or rock music)

List of Music Terms:

Artist: A professional singer, musician or songwriter.

Art music: Music written and performed by professional musicians mostly for the upper classes, like classical Indian music and European opera.

Beat: The regular pulse in music that dancers move to and audiences clap to.

Classical Music: European orchestral and keyboard music that’s written by composers.

Catchy: Describes a song or tune that is enjoyable to listen to and easy to remember.

Chorus: Part of a song that is repeated several times.

Composer: Person who writes music.

Country Music: A genre of American music with origins in the rural folk music of Europe.

Folk Music: Traditional music from a particular region or country.

Genre: A kind or style of music, movie, TV show, painting, etc. In this case, we only focus on music.

Harmony: Pleasant sound created when two musical notes are played or sung at the same time.

Hip hop: A musical genre in which artists rap over beats and sampled sound.

Jazz: A genre in which artists improvise within a rhythmic and harmonic framework.

Live: Played at a concert in front of an audience.

Lyrics: Words of a song.

Melody: A tune, or the notes of a song.

Pop music: A popular music genre with short, melody songs that are easy to remember.

Recording: A piece of music that’s recorded in a studi

Rhythm a pattern of beats and sounds that musicians play/music.

Resoucers:

http://www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/music.htm

bbclearningenglish.com

Compiled and written by @nurulhasanahmoslem for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, June 15, 2019.

#GrammarTrivia: Expressing the Future in Time Clauses

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn how to express the future in time clauses.

A time clause is an adverb clause beginning with such words as when, before, after, as soon as, until, and while. However, will or be going to is not used in a time clause. The clause carries future meaning despite its simple present tense.

Example:
Dave will arrive soon. When he arrives, we will see him.

Sometimes a time clause uses the present progressive to express an activity that will be in progress in the future.

Example:
While I am studying overseas next year, I am going to visit several tourism destinations.

To emphasize the completion of the act before the other act takes place in the future, the present perfect is used in a time clause.

Example:
She will take a rest after she has finished her project.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, June 7, 2019

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Whisper’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘whisper’.
Do you know other words to say it?

Let’s start.

  • Murmur.

Meaning: say something in a low, soft, or indistinct voice.
E.g. “He took the mug of coffee with a murmur of thanks.”

  • Mutter.

Meaning: speak quietly and in a low voice that is not easy to hear, often when you are worried or complaining about something.
E.g. “The woman next in line began to mutter of discontent to herself.”

  • Mumble.

Meaning: say something indistinctly and quietly, making it difficult for others to hear.
E.g. “I wish you wouldn’t mumble. I can’t hear you clearly.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, June 9, 2019.

#EngProverbs: African proverbs about life

Hi, Fellass… how are you doing this week? I hope you’ve been doing well. I also want to wish Happy Eid Mubarak to those who celebrate it. Well, In this occation I would like to share some African proverbs that tell about life.

1) “Only a fool tests the depth of a river with both feet,” Meaning: you can’t be involve into a situation without thinking about it first.

2) “Sugarcane is sweetest at its joint.”

Meaning: the best things of our life may be hard to be achieved, but in the end, it is worth it.

3) “Life is like a mist or a shadow; it quickly passes by.”
Meaning: it has a similar meaning to “Life is too short, and you only live it once.”

4) “The Rain does not fall on one roof.”

Meaning:  everyone will certainly have problems and challenges she/he should face.

5) “It takes a whole village to raise a child.”

Meaning: someone’s characters, manners, and behaviour are affected by his/her interaction with the society.

6) “He who does not know one thing knows another.”

Meaning: the one who doesn’t know about something doesn’t mean he/she knows nothing

7) “Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.”

Meaning: don’t focis on your failures/mistakes, but the reason behind it. Otherwise, you may repeat the same mistake again.

 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, Ju June 7, 2019

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