#ENGTALK: TWITTER WITH NO RETWEET?

If you haven’t updated your Twitter app yet, Twitter has temporarily replaced its retweet function by quote tweet.

This is one of the efforts to curb false information, especially with everything going in the world right now. This does not mean that we cannot retweet at all; we can still give a retweet by leaving the quote part blank.

Today, let’s practice our English by discussing this. What do you think of this new feature, fellas? Do you think it’s more convenient? Do you think it’s a sufficient tool for Twitter to decrease spam and false information? Share your thoughts!

Personally, I would prefer an edit button. It’s so annoying when one of our tweets goes viral with a typo. However, Twitter’s Jack Dorsey said in an interview HERE that as Twitter started as something similar to SMS, Twitter wants to retain the feeling of not taking back what we have said.

I would also appreciate the policing against bot, spam, and something that is proven to be inaccurate, for example, conspiracy theories or false news. But lately there have been many things done in this regard.

State-owned media, for example, are now marked as such. Pictures and videos are also curated to determine whether they might have been doctored. We even get pop-up notification before retweeting news article whose title does not represent the whole article.

So, at least we are getting there. But I’m still curious to read your thoughts on Twitter’s retweet. Drop it on the comment section below.

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 22 October 2020.

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#IOTW: IDIOMS WITH THE WORD ‘EYE’

Have you ever heard the phrase ‘the apple of her parents’ eyes,’ fellas? It means that a child is so loved by the parents.

@NoviTanurarini: I ever heard about this phrase… Emm, I’m not sure, maybe it’s in the “Rain-Bruno Mars” lyrics…
@diptaulia: Translated to Indonesian as “anak semata wayang”

Photo by wendel moretti on Pexels.com

On this article, we are going to discuss idioms that use the word ‘eye.’

‘An eye for an eye’
It means that a person who causes suffering to other(s) should also suffer from the same injury or damage.

‘To see eye to eye’
It means two or more parties having the same agreement or a mutual understanding on a topic.

‘To turn a blind eye’
It means that we choose to ignore or pretend not to see something.

‘To keep one’s eyes open/peeled’
It means being alert or watching someone or something carefully.

‘To have an eye for something’
It means that we admire something and we want to have it.

‘To cry one’s eyes out’
It means to cry bitterly and for a long time.

‘To catch one’s eyes’
It means that something or someone has caught our attention.

‘To hit the bull’s eye’
It means hitting the target precisely.

‘Without batting an eye’
It means doing something big without a change of expression, without showing any emotions, and acting like there’s nothing unusual.

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 12 October 2020.

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#IOTW: Idioms Related to Body Parts (4)

#EngVOCAB: VARIOUS WAYS TO SAY ‘TO CRY’

This is such a time to be alive, fellas. Not only are we in a middle of a global pandemic and climate crisis, many people are struggling to make ends meet (to survive). Sometimes, it’s okay to take a break and sort out the emotions you are feeling.

Crying is one of some healthy ways to cope with stressful situations. However, it’s sometimes underrated because someone who cries is perceived as fragile or weak, whereas we know that expressing our emotions in a healthy way is actually a sign of strength.

Photo by burak kostak on Pexels.com

On this article are going to discuss several words we can use as an alternative of ‘to cry.’

1. To sob (terisak) = To shed tears audibly or sometimes noisily.

2. To weep/to shed tears (meneteskan air mata) = Usually used to describe someone who sheds tears quietly.

3. To wail (menangis sambil berteriak) = A cry caused by a deep pain, grief, and anger.

4. To bawl (menangis keras dan lama) = Typically more dramatic, more noisy, and lasting longer than sobbing.

5. To snivel (menangis pelan) = To cry and sniff in a feeble way.

6. To blubber (menangis tak terkendali) = To sob noisily and uncontrollably.

7. To squall (menangis keras, biasanya dilakukan bayi atau anak-anak) = Of a baby or a small child to cry noisily and continuously.

I hope you find this article useful. Having feelings or emotions is not wrong, fellas, and we could learn to handle them in a healthy way, as not to overwhelm us and the people around us. Stay safe and healthy!

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 8 October 2020.

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Expressing purpose using ‘so that’

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn how to express using so that.
Like in order to, so that expresses purpose. The word that is often omitted in speaking.

Example:
I turned off the radio so (that) my friend could sleep.

When the idea of ability is being expressed, so that is often used instead of in order to. Can is used in the adverb clause for a present/future meaning. Furthermore, could is used after so that in past sentences.

Examples:
1) I am going to earn money so that I can buy the book.
2) I earned money so that I could buy the book.

Sometimes, the simple present is used after so that in place of will. It carries a future meaning. Would is used in past sentences.

Examples:
1) I will have a breakfast so that I will not be hungry.
2) I will have a breakfast so that I am not hungry.
3) Yesterday I had a breakfast so that I would not be hungry.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

#EngQupte: The Time Keeper-Mitch Albom

Hi, Fellas! How are you? I hope you are fine. Today I will share some quotes form a book, The Time Keeper by Mitch Albom. Has anyone read this book? Ok, let’s start.

1. “We all yearn for what we have lost. But sometimes, we forget what we have.”

2. “With endless time, nothing is special. With no loss or sacrifice, we can’t appreciate what we have”

3. “When you are measuring life, you are not living it.”

4. “There is a reason God limits our days…. To make each one precious.”

5. “Before you measure the years, you measure the days.”

6. “It is never too late or too soon. It is when it is supposed to be.” – @trieeeeekw

7. “Learn what you do not know. Understand the consequences of counting the moments.”

8. “This time was different. The tools of this era–phones, computers–enabled people to move at a blurring pace. Yet despite all they accomplished, they were never at peace.”

9. “Ends are for yesterdays, not tomorrows.”

10. “When you are measuring life, you are not living it…”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, October 2, 2020

#ENGTRIVIA: PUNS

“A bicycle can’t stand on its own because it is two-tired.”
Can you guess what is happening in this sentence, fellas?

If you’re thinking of a pun, you guessed correctly. A pun, also called paronomasia, is a form of word play that exploits multiple meanings of a term, or of similar-sounding words, for an intended humorous or rhetorical effect.

We have a bicycle on the example, which is said not being able to stand on its own because it’s ‘two-tired.’ ‘Two-tired’ here is a reference to the bicycle having two tires as well as being ‘too tired.’

In some parts of the world, puns are almost similar to dad jokes. They often make us cringe for how unfunny they are, but we laugh regardless. Here are some examples of puns that I hope will brighten your Monday evening.

1. A dog gave birth to puppies near the road and was cited for littering. (yourdictionary.com).
Explanation: A bunch of puppies is called a litter. At the same time, ‘littering’ also means throwing away trash carelessly. This is why the mama dog was cited for littering, or giving birth to a litter.

2. What do you call a camel with three humps? Pregnant. (Zootopia).
Explanation: A camel normally has one or two humps. The third hump is the pregnant belly.

3. Why do cows have hooves instead of feet? They lactose. (Twitter user @getthebagcoach).
Explanation: Cows produce milk that contains lactose. They also ‘lack of toes.’

4. I wondered why the baseball was getting bigger. And then it hit me. (Wikihow).
Explanation: The baseball was getting bigger because it was getting closer to the speaker. The sentence ‘and then it hit me’ explains that the ball hit the speaker and at the same time, the speaker realised what was happening.

5. (Source: Unknown).
Explanation: Taken from Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody lyrics, “Is this a real life or is this just fantasy?”
But fantasy is written as Fanta-sea which is showed in the picture as a sea of orange Fanta.

6. (Source: mentioned on the picture).
Explanation: The ‘home’ says to the ‘honey’ that he is home, referring to how someone says to the significant other, “Honey, I’m home.”

7. She’s a skillful pilot whose career has really taken off. (Merriam-Webster Dictionary).
Explanation: An airplane takes off and lands or touches down. Meanwhile, ‘to take off’ also means to be successful. Therefore, the sentence has double meanings. The first meaning is that the pilot takes off with her plane and the second is that her career is successful.

8. What’s the difference between a hippo and a zippo? One is really heavy and the other is a little lighter. (boredpanda.com).
Explanation: A hippopotamus is heavier than a zippo, which is a lighter.

Stay excellent, everyone!

Artwork by: Lisa Slavid/peadoodles

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for EnglishTips4U on Monday, 28 September 2020.

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#ENGVOCAB: SIMILAR WORDS, DIFFERENT MEANINGS

There are similar words that have different meanings and they are often confused with one another. Raise your hands if you’ve ever mixed up ‘dateline’ and ‘deadline.’

Photo by Jordan Benton on Pexels.com

Here are some of them:

Bully and bullish

These two words might seem similar, but they actually have different meanings.
‘Bully’ is an action of or a person who is intimidating those who seem more vulnerable.
‘Bullish’ is of someone who has personal qualities that resemble a bull: strong, assertive, and confident.

Childish and childlike

‘Childish’ means having personal qualities like a child but in an immature context.
‘Childlike’ means similar to a child in an adorable and innocent way.

Dateline and deadline

Some of us might have used ‘dateline’ to describe the latest time by which something should be completed, whilst we should have used ‘deadline’ instead.
‘Dateline’ is a line at the head of a news article that shows the time and place of when and where the article was written.
‘Deadline’ is the latest time by which something should be completed.

Exhausted and exhaustive

‘Exhausted’ means tired, drained, or spent.
‘Exhaustive’ means thorough or detailed.

Fiend and friend

Ever heard of or read the word ‘fiend,’ fellas? It looks similar to ‘friend,’ right? It actually has a completely different meaning because a ‘fiend’ is an evil spirit or a demon.
A ‘friend’ is a companion.

Handy and handful

These two words came from the root ‘hand.’
Something is ‘handy’ if it is useful.
Something is ‘handful’ if it has the quantity that fills our hands.
Someone is ‘handful’ if they are difficult to deal with.

Invisible and invincible

Something is ‘invisible’ if it cannot be seen.
Something is ‘invincible’ if it cannot be defeated.

Vile and veil

‘Vile’ is of someone who is extremely unpleasant, morally bad, or wicked. ‘Vile’ is synonymous with ‘evil.’
‘Veil’ is a piece of clothing that covers the face, usually worn by a woman.

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 24 September 2020.

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#EngTrivia: Commonly Misused and Misspelled Vocabulary (2)

#EngTalk: Accents

Hi, hello, everyone. How are you today? I hope you are safe and healthy.

Who here is a fan of British accent? I know I am. It just sounds strong, distinct, and unique, although sometimes it takes me a while to understand what the speaker is saying. I often find myself trying to imitate the accent. Most people that I speak with say that I have American or Australian accent, though, so I’m not sure what happened. What do you think of the many, many accents from English speaking people?

@NeNi961111: OH MY!! MEEEEE. I like British accent so much, want to speak, but end up with American accent.

@RAKemal: I used to have (mimic?) standard British accent. Then I went to a week-long Indonesian-American joint-conference and there went my accent.

@sfn520: I don’t know what accent I’m using, I just speak English.

@mrivaldi__: I am! i feel mesem2 sendiri, if i’m watching british got talent. Their voices was quite sexy.

@fatimatulKN: I am a big fan of harry potter movies, jolly (british-korean youtuber), sorted food (british cooking youtube channel). British accent itu kedengeran classy, sophisticated, well educated, kayak yg pinter gt orangnya yg ngomong.

Photo by Ian Panelo on Pexels.com

English came from the UK but even in its home country, there are several areas where people speak with different accents and dialects. Cockney, Geordie, Scottish, and Estuary English are some of them.

@NeNi961111: I only know Scottish, and that’s quite difficult but never the other 3 before.

@Keystone_Eng: Yes, its one of the things I love about England, there are loads of different accents. There are many different accents in the UK. For example, my native accent is a Yorkshire accent. It’s very different to the other accents.

One of my friends has a strong Cockney accent despite being born and growing up in Indonesia. If you are looking for an example of Cockney accent, watch the movie My Fair Lady (1964). The leading lady, Eliza Doolittle (Audrey Hepburn), speaks in a strong Cockney accent and is then transformed into an upper class lady by a phonetics professor, Henry Higgins.

“The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plain…”

The trailer of My Fair Lady (1964).

Personally, I consider correct pronunciation is more important than trying to acquire an accent. After all, the purpose of language is to help two people communicate, so as long as both have the same understanding on the topic, it is fine.

Of course the case would be different if you are taking a test to measure your English proficiency in relations to scholarship or work opportunities, for example TOEFL or IELTS. The institution that requires the test might apply a certain standard.

Do you agree that paying attention to correct pronunciation is more important than accents?

@gluon0x: We are on the same page.

@sfn520: Yes, I agree. I don’t pay much attention to my accent, as long as my pronunciation is understandable. And I learn English so that I can read some English movies, comics, etc.

@fernandoqc6: Yeah, totally agree. Additionally, there are some other strong accents. These kind of accent (such as French, Indian) should be tough to “change” it.

@NeNi961111: Agreee

Compiled and written by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 10 September 2020.

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#EngTrivia: Idioms and Expressions with the Same or Similar Meanings in English and Indonesian

What are you doing for the Saturday night? I hope that you are staying safe at home but if you must go outside for essential purposes that cannot be delayed, please exercise safety precautions.

Several years ago, we posted an article about common expressions in English and its Indonesian counterparts. You can check it here: Expressions in English and Their Indonesian Counterparts Part 1 and Part 2. 

The background of these articles was that there are expressions in English that we cannot quite translate into Indonesian; we just know what they mean, thus we were trying to find similar expressions in Indonesian to help understand the English version better.

For this article, we are going to do something similar: we’ll start a series of idioms and expressions that have similar or even the same meanings in English and Indonesian. An example submitted by one of our followers on Twitter:

@fatfukuro: Don’t judge a book by its cover (Eng) and jangan menilai buku dari sampulnya (Ina).

pexels-photo-267669.jpeg
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

So here is the list of what we compiled so far:

  1. Backbone (Eng) = Tulang punggung (Ina)
    Meaning: the chief support of a system or an organisation.

  2. Backstab (Eng) = Menusuk dari belakang (Ina)
    Meaning: the action or practice of harming someone’s reputation whilst feigning friendship.

  3. Big-headed (Eng) = Besar kepala (Ina)
    Meaning: conceited or arrogant.

  4. Big-hearted (Eng) = Besar hati (Ina)
    Meaning: kind and generous.

  5. Big mouth (Eng) = Besar mulut (Ina)
    Meaning: a boastful person.

  6. Blue blood (Eng) = Darah biru (Ina)
    Meaning: a person of noble or royal birth.

  7. Bookworm (Eng) = Kutu buku (Ina)
    Meaning: someone who loves reading.

  8. Brainwash (Eng) = Cuci otak (Ina)
    Meaning: force someone to adopt a radically different belief.

  9. Brokenhearted (Eng) = Patah hati (Ina)
    Meaning: overwhelmed by grief or disappointment.

  10. Cold-blooded (Eng) = Berdarah dingin (Ina)
    Meaning: deliberately cruel or violent.

  11. Cool-headed (Eng) = Kepala dingin (Ina)
    Meaning: calm.

  12. Empty-handed (Eng) = Tangan hampa (Ina)
    Meaning: unsuccessful, fruitless effort.

  13. Fall in love (Eng) = Jatuh hati (Ina)
    Meaning: develop romantic feelings towards someone or deep liking for something.

  14. Flesh and blood (Eng) = Darah daging (Ina)
    Meaning: someone related to us by blood.

  15. Get some fresh air (Eng) = Cari angin (Ina)
    Meaning: go outside to take a break from a possibly stressful situation.

  16. Go in one ear, out of the other (Eng) = Masuk kuping kiri, keluar kuping kanan (Ina)
    Meaning: of a piece of information that is quickly forgotten.

  17. Golden child (Eng) = Anak emas (Ina)
    Meaning: a favoured child amongst a group of children.

  18. Half-heartedly (Eng) = Setengah hati (Ina)
    Meaning: not feeling fully committed or engaged to an activity.

  19. Head of the family (Eng) = Kepala keluarga (Ina)
    Meaning: someone who leads a family.

  20. Heavy heart (Eng) = Berat hati (Ina)
    Meaning: with much sadness and regret.

  21. Hot seat (Eng) = Kursi panas (Ina)
    Meaning: being in a position of heavy duty and responsibility.

  22. Iron fist (Eng) = Tangan besi (Ina)
    Meaning: of a government or someone exercising power in a ruthless or oppressive manner.

  23. Law of the jungle (Eng) = Hukum rimba (Ina)
    Meaning: of a world where those who are strong and apply ruthless self-interest will be most successful.

  24. Lift one’s hat to… (Eng) = Angkat topi (Ina)
    Meaning: praise, salute, congratulate, or pay tribute to someone.

  25. Open arms (Eng) = Tangan terbuka (Ina)
    Meaning: a warm welcome.

  26. Open secret (Eng) = Rahasia umum (Ina)
    Meaning: of a secret who is known to many people.

  27. Out of control (Eng) = Hilang kendali (Ina)
    Meaning: of something that’s no longer possible to manage.

  28. Pen pal (Eng) = Sahabat pena (Ina)
    Meaning: someone with whom we develop friendship by sending letters to one another, particularly if we live in different countries.

  29. Put one’s hands up (Eng) = Angkat tangan (Ina)
    Meaning: raise one’s hands to surrender.

  30. Quick on one’s feet (Eng) = Cepat kaki (Ina)
    Meaning: able to think and take quick action.

  31. Right hand (Eng) = Tangan kanan (Ina)
    Meaning: an assistant, the most important position next to someone.

  32. Scapegoat (Eng) = Kambing hitam (Ina)
    Meaning: someone who is blamed for the wrongdoings, mistakes, or faults of others.

  33. Silent witness (Eng) = Saksi bisu (Ina)
    Meaning: an object that displays traces of evidences of a crime.

  34. Stage fright (Eng) = Demam panggung (Ina)
    Meaning: nervousness before or during an appearance before an audience.

  35. Stepping stone (Eng) = Batu loncatan (Ina)
    Meaning: an action or event that helps someone to make progress towards a specified goal.

  36. Take something to one’s heart (Eng) = Memasukan ke dalam hati (Ina)
    Meaning: take criticism seriously and be affected or upset by it.

  37. Tangled web (Eng) = Benang kusut (Ina)
    Meaning: of a situation or a problem that is confusing or difficult to solve.

  38. Throw a towel (Eng) = Lempar handuk (Ina)
    Meaning: stop trying or doing something because lacking of determination or conviction that one can win or be successful.

  39. Turn a blind eye (Eng) = Tutup mata (Ina)
    Meaning: pretend not to notice something is happening, usually something bad.

  40. Two-faced (Eng) = Bermuka dua (Ina)
    Meaning: of someone being insincere or acting one way in certain situations and then in a contrary manner in others.

  41. Walk away (Eng) = Ambil langkah seribu (Ina)
    Meaning: easily, casually, or irresponsibly abandon a situation in which one is involved or for which one is responsible.

  42. Wash one’s hands of… (Eng) = Cuci tangan (Ina)
    Meaning: not wanting to be involved with someone or something, not taking responsibility of someone or something.

  43. Watch one’s mouth (Eng) = Jaga lidah/mulut (Ina)
    Meaning: being careful of what one says.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 11 July 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngQAs 6 July 2020: ‘in the bed’ or ‘on the bed,’ How to Improve English for Children, and Is Grammar Important?

On our special #EngQAs, our followers on Twitter are invited to send their questions related to English learning and we will try to answer it within the session. Here are some questions that were sent to us on 6 July.

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

  1. By @lvlcnrn: Which one is correct: in the bed or on the bed?
  2. By @SDN2_PanSi: How to improve English skills for elementary students?
  3. By @Adith_Thyo: Grammar dalam bahasa Inggris perlu/pentingkah?

 

Answers:

  1. I personally prefer using ‘on the bed’, as in my understanding, the preposition ‘on’ means physically in contact with or supported by a surface. The phrase ‘in the bed’ might refer to being inside the bed, as in the bedroom. More on preposition: #GrammarTrivia: “in” vs. “at” (Prepositions of Place)
  2. It’s important to constantly repeat the parts of speech (word types) and improve the children’s vocabulary. Here are some tips that you can also try: #EngTips: Learning at Different Ages
  3. Sangat penting, karena grammar adalah tata bahasa yang membantu kita berkomunikasi dengan lebih efektif. Akan tetapi, jangan khawatir berbahasa Inggris karena takut salah grammar. Dipelajari saja sambil jalan. More on whether grammar is important: #EngClass: Understanding the Basics of English Grammar

 

Remember that our DM on Twitter and our mention tab are open for you to discuss any topics that are related to English learning. Mention us or send us a DM.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 6 July 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngTalk: Lunch and Snacks

Some of you might have returned to work at the office and we are all aware of the risks and difficulties. Take care of yourself, fellas, and keep your surroundings clean and hygienic.

Over the past few days, Indonesian Twitter users have been engaged in quite an odd debate about packed lunch. It started when a lady uploaded ideas for lunch boxes that she’d been preparing for her husband and apparently some people thought she was being too nice to her husband. Some also questioned whether she did that because she was a woman and assumed that it was her duty to be in the kitchen.

I personally think the lunch box was sweet and commendable. Preparing food for our loved ones is an act of love. It’s just as simple as that. Bear in mind that anyone can prepare food for anyone they love, regardless of the gender. After all, cooking is one of the basic surviving skills.

Furthermore, preparing our own meal ensures that we know what goes into the meal and helps us control our portion as not to overeat.

What do you think about this matter, fellas?

agil (@IvIcnrn): well said here. just can’t understand why some people got mad about it.

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Photo by Keegan Evans on Pexels.com

For health reasons, I have been eating mostly plant-based food. I limit meat and poultry consumption to once a week or once in two weeks. I still eat fish and eggs and dairy products, though, so I cannot really say I am a vegetarian or pescatarian.

I have also limited my carbohydrates intake and, if possible, replacing the carbs with something that contains a lot of fibres and low glycemic index. Our metabolism rate slows as we age, so unless we are really, really physically active, all the excess carbs will turn into fat. By now you must have started guessing how old I am, LOL.

Instead of having three big meals a day, I limit my daily intake to one big meal in the morning and then settle for fruits and vegetables for the rest of the day, usually 3-4 times.

My favourite type of vegetable dish to prepare is ‘pecel’ or assorted boiled vegetables (usually spinach, water spinach, bean sprouts, and long beans) with spicy peanut sauce. I love peanut sauce and the taste it gives to the vegetables.

I feel so fortunate living in Indonesia because we have plenty of vegetables to go with our daily meals. We can simply go to a small neighbourhood stall in the morning to buy a pack of vegetables with affordable price. And we can cook them in various ways, too. We can be creative with carrots, green beans, mustard greens (sawi), bok choy, cabbages, lettuces, tomatoes, and many more.

Don’t forget tempe and tofu, which are basically Indonesian staple food. They also have good amount of protein in them. Sometimes, I simply boil them and prepare separated dipping chili sauce.

For the snack, if I feel really hungry, I go with yam, sweet potato, edamame, or a bowl of fresh fruits as watermelon, pineapple, and papaya are pretty easy to find.

What about you, fellas? What are your favourite lunch menu and snacks in between meals? Share it on the comment section below.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 2 July 2020.


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#EngTrivia: Extended Family Members

When it comes to family members, we have our immediate family members consisting of our parents, siblings, spouses, and children. This group might also include our half-siblings (siblings we have from different parents).

And then there are our close relatives, such as grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, and cousins.

What we also count as our relatives are the extended family members, who are still related to us by blood but not as close as our immediate family members or our close relatives. Who are they and how do we address them?

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Photo by Craig Adderley on Pexels.com

Say, my grandfather has a younger brother. In Indonesian, I will simply call him ‘Kakek’ or grandfather, just as how I call my grandfather. But in English, I will refer to him as my great uncle. The same applies to great aunt.

And then I have a cousin, who is a child of my parent’s sibling. I will refer to this cousin as my first cousin. If my parent’s cousin has a child, that person is my second cousin. My child will also refer to the child of my cousin’s as the second cousin.

What about my parent’s cousins? In Indonesian, I will call them uncles and aunts. In English, they are still called cousins only with ‘removal’, that implies different generation. For example, my father’s first cousin is my first cousin once removed. The term applies both ways. My father’s first cousin will also refer to me as his/her/their first cousin once removed. My children will refer to them as the first cousin twice removed and vice versa.

The last but not least, we have the in-laws, who are related to us by marriage. Our spouse’s parents are our parents in law and our spouse’s siblings are our siblings in law.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 20 June 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: Twitter Handles to Expand Your Vocabularies

Many of us are on self-quarantine due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Not only to keep ourselves safe and healthy, we are doing this to prevent further transmission of the virus to other people with whom we interact. We might not be showing symptoms (asymptomatic), but it does not always mean we are not carrying the virus with us. For me, it is better to be safe than sorry.

However, being on self-quarantine does come with challenging times. Eventually, I noticed my sleep pattern changes as I sleep or take frequent naps during the day and stay awake almost the whole night. Do you also experience the same?

I figured that I needed to find new interests to keep me busy and I decided to read and learn more especially about topics that I had never really touched before the pandemic.
Recently, I completed the 30-day word challenge by Merriam-Webster Dictionary.

Merriam Webster
Source: Merriam-Webster Dictionary’s Twitter handle

On this article, I’m going to share some accounts that will help you expand your vocabularies and learn grammar effectively.
1. Merriam-Webster dictionary
@MerriamWebster provides you with Word of the Day, the background story behind words and phrases, and trending words.

  1. Dictionary.com
    @Dictionarycom also provides word of the day and trending words, with quite a sassy and hilarious manner.
  2. The Oxford English Dictionary
    My most favourite feature of @OED is its Word of the Year, which doesn’t only cover the most searched word of the year as it might also introduce a new word that is widely used but not registered on any dictionaries yet.
  3. The Yuniversity
    @The_YUNiversity posts daily vocabulary and grammar lessons in just a few tweets and helpful infographics. Its explanation is also really easy to comprehend. Bonus: KPop fans will relate so much to this handle.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 11 June 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: World Environment Day 2020

Hello everyone, how are you doing? It’s been raining a lot here in Bali, Indonesia, despite we have entered dry season. By the way, did you know that 5 June is celebrated every year as World Environment Day?

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Photo by Akil Mazumder on Pexels.com

World Environment Day (WED) is observed every year on 5 June to raise global awareness to take positive environmental action to protect nature and the planet Earth.

UN designates 5 June as World Environment Day in 1972 and two years later (1974), WED is celebrated for the first time under the slogan “Only One Earth.” During 1974-1983, WED was celebrated 10 times but only in three countries (USA, Canada, and Bangladesh).

World Environment Day 2020 is focusing on biodiversity and will be hosted in Colombia in partnership with Germany. The theme of World Environment Day 2020 is “Celebrate Biodiversity.” Videos highlighting the biodiversity and environmental achievements of different regions of Colombia will be featured throughout the day, including images and drone footage of strategic ecosystems. We can join the conversation online with the hashtag #ForNature.

Air pollution, overpopulation, deforestation, and climate crisis have been some of the major factors that affect our environment. By actively participating to decrease the impact of any factors above, we might have hope for a better environment. Humans are not the only species on this planet and our actions have significant impact on the existence of other species. Furthermore, studies show deforestation and loss of wildlife cause increases in infectious diseases, including the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

We have only one Earth and we live on this world together, fellas. Let’s let nature be nature and do our parts to help reduce the negative impact of climate crisis. Stay safe everywhere you are.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, 5 June 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: Eid al-Fitr 2020

Hi, hello, everyone, how was your Eid holiday?

I’ll admit that to me it felt different as we have been in self-quarantine for a while that I lost count of what day it is. Do you also experience the same? Share your story!

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Photo by Khairul Onggon on Pexels.com

Eid al-Fitr is an important holiday for Muslims worldwide. In Indonesia, it is usually marked by 7-10 days of holiday to accommodate those who do homecoming trip. We didn’t see the hustle and bustle this year as much as the previous years due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

It is also marked with visiting the houses of our close friends and relatives to ask and give forgiveness for our wrongs, which is usually ended with dining together. The signature dishes are ketupat (rice cake wrapped in coconut leaf), opor ayam (braised chicken soup), and rendang. What about in your countries?

Aside of that, we also provide assorted cakes and cookies, such as nastar (pineapple tart), putri salju (literally snow princess), and kaasstengels (soft cheese sticks), accompanied with cold juice to the guests. Given the pandemic, most of us might skip all these traditions and some might not get the chance to meet our families.

Stay strong, fellas. Sometimes we need to make a sacrifice to keep ourselves and our loved ones safe.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 25 May 2020.


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#EngTips: Eid al-Fitr During COVID19 Pandemic

A big holiday is coming in less than a week for us in Indonesia, but sadly, it’s most likely that this year’s Eid al-Fitr will be very different than the previous years. Regardless, it’s a difficult situation for all of us so we need to work together to help flatten the curve.

What can we do on this year’s Eid? Here’s what we recommend.

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Photo by Tayeb MEZAHDIA on Pexels.com

  1. Save the funds for emergency.
    I think we can put less priority on new clothing or lavish celebrations in favour of emergency funds and donation to those who are in need.
    Do you agree, fellas?

  2. Stay in the city.
    I understand that the situation is very different from one person to another but if you still can stay in the city where you’ve been living, consider not doing the homecoming trip until we get the situation under control. This is to avoid spreading the COVID-19 virus to our family and relatives in our hometown.

  3. Minimise movement and keep physical distance.
    The Eid prayer is an important part of the Eid holiday. If the local government considers it safe to do so, still maintain your distance from other people. Keeping a safe distance between two people could reduce the risk of getting infected by the virus.

  4. Make use of the technology.
    Make use of our smartphones to contact our loved ones by, perhaps, having a virtual celebration. It is very important to stay connected as well as checking up on each other.

Those are the tips that we can share, fellas. Happy holiday and stay safe!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 18 May 2020.


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#EngVocab: Healthcare Professionals

Hi, everyone! I hope you are doing well. It’s an awful time for all of us around the world, but I think we have to give special credits to our healthcare professionals who might be working tirelessly during this pandemic.

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Photo by Retha Ferguson on Pexels.com

On this article, we are sharing some occupations that can be called healthcare professionals. Healthcare professionals are defined as people who may provide health care treatment and advice based on formal training and experience.

  1. Physician/doctor/medical practitioner: a person qualified to practice medicine.
  2. Surgeon: a medical practitioner qualified to practice surgery.
  3. Physician’s assistant: someone qualified to assist a physician and carry out routine clinical procedures under the supervision of a physician.
  4. Nurse: a person trained to care for the sick or infirm, especially in a hospital.
  5. Dentist: a person qualified to treat the diseases and conditions that affect the teeth and gums.
  6. Midwife: a person (typically a woman) trained to assist in childbirth.
  7. Physiotherapist/physical therapist: a person qualified to treat disease, injury, or deformity by physical methods such as massage, heat treatment, and exercise.
  8. Psychiatrist: a medical practitioner specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of mental illnesses.
  9. Psychologist: an expert in the scientific study of the human mind and its functions, especially those affecting behavior in a given context.
  10. Pharmacist: a person who is professionally qualified to prepare and dispense medicinal drugs.

Aside of those mentioned above, let’s not forget to thank all the support workers that help run a health facility. Donate if you can, fellas, and follow the government’s instruction of staying home and keeping our personal hygiene and health to help ease the work of healthcare professionals.

Stay safe, everywhere you are.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 14 May 2020.


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#EngVocab: Family Phrasal Verbs

Today we will learn about family phrasal verbs.
Do you know some useful phrasal verbs to talk about family?

Let’s start.

  1. Get together.
    Meaning: to meet in order to discuss something or to spend time together.
    E.g. “All the members of the family get together once a year.”
  2. Take after.
    Meaning: to look or behave like an older member of your family.
    E.g. “Your daughter doesn’t take after you at all.”
  3. Put up with.
    Meaning: tolerate or accept someone with unpleasant behaviour.
    E.g. “His wife must have been a saint to put up with him all those years.”
  4. Get along with.
    Meaning: to have a friendly relationship with someone.
    E.g. “I don’t really get along with my sister’s husband.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, May 10, 2010.

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