#EngKnowledge: The origin of Thanksgiving

Hi, Fellas, happy weekend! How are you doing during this week? Have you sensed holiday atmosphere in the air? Speaking of holiday, in this season I would like to share some information about the origin of thanksgiving

When you hear the word “thanksgiving,” what does suddenly come to your mind? Is it turkey? Or autumn? Family gathering? Do you know when was Thanksgiving celebrated for the first time? And where was it?

It is said that the first Thanksgiving was celebrated in North America, 1621. The tradition itself had been brought by English Pilgrims that came to Massachusetts. Some history stated it was acknowledged when The Pilgrims shared meals with the native, Wampanoag Indians, as a celebration of good harvest.

However, a historian named Michael Gannon stated that the culture had been existed around fifty years before. On September 1565, there were some colonists in St. Augustine, Florida, shared the Thanksgiving banquet to the natives.  Despite of the original start of Thanksgiving, an information from History.com stated that for more than two centuries since 1621, Thanksgiving was  celebrated in a different time by the colonist and Americans.  And in some moments, Thanksgiving was celebrated for different purpose, too. As Illustrations, during American Revolution, Thanksgiving even celebrated more than one day a year.

After that, in 1789, George Washington hold Thanksgiving to celebrate America’s independence and to express gratitude of successful American ratification. Finally,  in 1863, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed that Thanksgiving should be celebrated each year on final Thursday of November as a national event in America. However, the celebration was revised on the fourth Thursday of November by Franklin Roosevelt due to induce retail sale during Great Depression during 1930s. Ultimately, I think that nowadays’ Thanksgiving day is celebrated according to Roosevelt basis.
source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, November 30, 2018

#EngClass: Blending Words (5)

Today we will learn more about ‘blending words’.

You can review the first lesson here englishtips4u.com/2012/06/27/engclass-blending-words/
You can review the second lesson here englishtips4u.com/2018/06/17/engclass-blending-words-2/
You can review the third lesson here englishtips4u.com/2018/07/01/engclass-blending-words-3/
You can review the fourth lesson here englishtips4u.com/2018/08/15/engclass-blending-words-4/

Here are some examples of blending words:

  • Cinedigm (cinema + paradigm).

Meaning: a new paradigm in cinema.
E.g. “The musical poetry become a cinedigm in recent years.”

  • Cosplay (costume + play).

Meaning: dressing up and pretending to be a fictional character.
E.g. “The most popular cosplay theme is anime character.”

  • Docudrama (documentary + drama).

Meaning: a dramatized television movie based on real events.
E.g. “They are making a docudrama about the controversial court case.”

  • Knowledge base (knowledge + database).

Meaning: a database used for knowledge sharing and management.
E.g. “Building a knowledge base system becomes one of the key point in the study.”

  • Imagineering (imagination + engineering).

Meaning: the implementation of creative ideas in practical form.
E.g. “This imagineering can probably attract the attention of the crowd.”

  • Ginormous (gigantic + enormous).

Meaning: extremely large.
E.g. “Our orders came in two ginormous boxes.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, December 2, 2018.

#EngProverb: Proverbs related to love

Picture1

Hey ho, fellas! How’s your day? I think today was a cold day.
Do you know what love is? Everyone would answer that question differently.
Some People think it is care, affection, and understanding.
Tonight, I’m going to share some proverbs related to love to you. Here they are…

1.“Love is blind”
Meaning : when you love someone and you may don’t see about their pyhsical and faults.
E.g. “Have you seen Bella’s new girlfriend? Love is blind I must say.”

2.“Love at the first sight “
Meaning : once people met, they felt in love each other.
E.g. “Julio and Siska met at party.It was love at first sight.”

3.“Pop the question”
Meaning : people propose to marriage someone.
E.g. “ Roy popped me the question after we have been together for two years.

4.“ Kiss and make up”
Meaning : people forgive each other and be friends again.
E.g. ”Ozi and Raline always have an argument twice a week, but then they eternally kiss and make up.”

5.“Go steady “
Meaning : having a romantic a relationship with someone.
E.g. ”Jonny wants to go steady with Lusi, but I think she is not interested.”

6.“Break up”
Meaning : people become separated after being relationship or engagement.
E.g. “Richard broke up with his partner of two years when he found out that she was dating another man.

7.“Ask out “
Meaning : the man invite someone to go out, escpecially make a date.
E.g. “My friend asked us out for dinner to celebrate the success of his new job.”

 

Alright, fellas, those are some proverbs related to love.
Thank you for being with me, fellas! Today is a wrap!
Enjoy fellas!

 

Compiled by @ijoojii for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 06 December, 2018.

 

#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘Beautiful’ (2)

Today we will learn more about other ways to say ‘beautiful’.
You can review the first lesson here https://englishtips4u.com/2018/11/18/engvocab-substitutes-of-beautiful/

Let’s start.

  • Marvelous: causing great wonder; extraordinary.

E.g. “It was a marvelous performance.”

  • Angelic: exceptionally beautiful, innocent, or kind.

E.g. “She had an angelic smile.”

  • Slick: smooth and glossy (of skin or hair).

E.g. “His hair was dark brown and perfectly slick.”

  • Striking: noticeable, outstanding, attracting notice or attention.

E.g. “His eyes are his most striking feature.”

  • Swell: great or excellent; wealthy; elegant person (slang).

E.g. “You look swell in that dress!”

  • Enchanting: delightfully charming or attractive.

E.g. “The birds in the aviary at the zoo were enchanting.”

  • Flawless: without any blemished or imperfections; perfect.

E.g. “She had flawless olive skin and huge eyes with clear and bright pupil.”

  • Refined: elegant and cultured in appearance, manner, or taste.

E.g. “He has refined taste and manners.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, November 18, 2018.

#EngTips: OTHER WAYS TO SAY “I THINK”

Slide14

Good Evening, Fellas! How was your day?
Today we are going to give you some tips about other ways to say ‘i think’.
There are many different ways of saying thought in English. Let’s find out!

  1. In my opinion
    E.g. “In my opinion the issue should be finished in this way.”

  2. The way I see it
    E.g. ”The way I see it is just technical issue.”

  3. As far as I can see
    E.g. “As far I can see my friends are innocent.”

  4. .I consider
    E.g. “I consider a lot of information should be kept very secret.”

  5. I believe
    E.g, “I believe that they slept because of exhaustion.”

  6. To my way of thinking
    E.g. “To my way of thinking we are doing very well.”

  7. I would say
    E.g. “I would say that the girl is very humble.” #EngTips

It’s a wrap for now. Thank you for joining me. Give it try and let me know how it works for you.
Enjoy fellas! #EngTips

Compiled by @ijoojii for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 22 November, 2018.

#GrammarTrivia: Inverted Subjects and Verbs with Negative Expressions or Comparisons

In the session titled #GrammarTrivia: Omitting If, we have learned the inversions of subjects and verbs in conditional sentences. When a conditional sentence contains should, were, or had, the subject and verb of the if-clause are inverted. Inversion is also possible in sentences with negative expressions or comparisons.

(More on Omitting If: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/11/10/grammartrivia-omitting-if/)

1) Inversion with Negative Expressions

A negative expression, when it precedes a subject and verb, causes them to be inverted. It is to emphasize the negative element of the sentence.
List of negative expressions:
– no
– rarely
– not
– hardly
– never
– only
– neither
– rarely
– nor
– scarcely
– seldom

Examples:
1. Never were they so enthusiastic.
2. Hardly does she attend the class.

2) Inversion with Comparisons

Inverting the subject and verb of a sentence which contains a comparison is optional and rather formal.

Examples:
1. China is larger than Japan.
2. China is larger than Japan is.
3. China is larger than is Japan.

Sources:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition
Deborah Phillips, Longman Complete Course for the TOEFL Test

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, November 19, 2018

#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘Beautiful’

Do you know other words to say ‘beautiful’?
Today we will learn about the substitutes of ‘beautiful’.

Let’s start.

  • Exquisite: very beautiful and delicate.

E.g. “Her wedding dress was absolutely exquisite.”

  • Splendid: excellent; very impressive.

E.g. “The fireworks looked very splendid in the dark sky.”

  • Astonishing: causing a feeling of great surprise or wonder; very surprising.

E.g. “The old man had an astonishing performance.”

  • Magnificent: very good; deserving to be admired.

E.g. “The scenery has a magnificent view.”

  • Breathtaking: inspiring or exciting.

E.g. “The house has breathtaking views from every room.”

  • Divine: extremely good, pleasant, or enjoyable.

E.g. “Their new place is quite divine.”

  • Ravishing: unusually attractive, pleasing, or striking.

E.g. “She looked absolutely ravishing in that dress.”

  • Delightful: giving great pleasure; highly pleasing.

E.g. “It has been a delightful evening.”

  • Dazzling: briliantly or showily bright, colorful, or impressive.

E.g. “The actor gave a dazzling smile in the movie premiere.”

  • Fetching: pleasant or attractive.

E.g. “You look very fetching in that hat.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, November 4, 2018.

#WOTD: Valorous

Hello, Fellas! How are you today? Isn’t today a lovely day since it’s weekend! Anyway, how’s your week so far? Mine is great because I finally got something I need in order to pursue my desired plan, or maybe you can say it my future.

Well, back to Englishtips4u session, this evening we are going to talk about a word called ‘valorous.’ Is there someone familiar with this word?

According to Merriam-webster dictionary, ‘valorous’ is an adjective with “brave” as a meaning. It is said that ‘valorous’ was originally derived from French ‘valeureux,’ but there is another statement that this word came from Latin ‘valorosus.’ In addition, there are some synonyms of ‘valorous,’ such as:

  • ‘bold,’
  • ‘dauntless,’
  • ‘valiant’ and
  • ‘courageous.’

Here are some example of the usage of ‘valorous’ in a sentence:

  • “I think someone who have courage to criticise our government is such valorous person.”
  • “He tackled the thief who was going to attack me with a knife. What a valorous act!”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, November 16, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Noun Clauses with ‘If’ or ‘Whether’

Hello, fellas. How is life today? In this session we are going to learn noun clauses beginning with if or whether. According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, a noun clause is a clause used as a subject or an object of a sentence.

(More on noun clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/02/06/engclass-noun-clause/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2013/02/04/grammartrivia-noun-clause/)

When a noun clause begins with if or whether, it means that the clause is changed from a yes/no question. There is no difference in meaning between noun clauses using if and whether. However, whether is more formal and if is more common in speaking.

Examples:

1. Yes/No Question: Will he go?
Noun Clause:
a) They know whether he will go.
b) They know if he will go.

2. Yes/No Question: Does she understand the lesson?
Noun Clause:
a) We wonder whether she understands the lesson.
b) We wonder if she understands the lesson.

The expression or not may be added in noun clauses.

Examples:

1. We wonder whether or not she understands the lesson.
2. We wonder whether she understands the lesson or not.
3. We wonder if she understands the lesson or not.
4. Whether she understands the lesson or not is unimportant to us.

Sources:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, November 14, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Omitting If

Hello, fellas. In this session we are going to discuss another form of conditional sentences. According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, a conditional sentence typically comprises of a conditional clause (an if-clause) as well as a result clause. However, the sentence can also be made without using if.

(More on conditional sentences: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/06/04/engclass-conditional-sentences-revisit/)

To omit if in a conditional sentence, make sure that the if-clause contains should, were, or had (past perfect). After if is omitted, the subject and verb of the if-clause are inverted.

Examples:

  1. If you should need my help, please tell me.
    Should you need my help, please tell me.
  2. If I were you, I would buy the book.
    Were I you, I would buy the book.
  3. If they had prepared themselves better, they would have passed the test.
    Had they prepared themselves better, they would have passed the test.

Sources:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition
Deborah Phillips, Longman Complete Course for the TOEFL Test

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, November 7, 2018

#EngTrivia: Commonly misspelled and missused vocabulary (2)

Hi, Fellas! Good evening and happy Friday! How’s your week so far? Well, in this evening I would to continue our session about  some vocabulary that are usually confusing due to similar letter arrangement. For you who missed the topic two weeks ago, you can read the article by following this link 

“Stationery” vs. “stationary”

Before I start explaining them, is there anyone know the difference of those words?

“Stationary means stability there is no change. While stationery means writing paper and everything related with write process.” – @al3ajalabead

“Stationery” is known as a noun, which means something that is used for writing, such as papers, pens, pencils, etc. Meanwhile, “stationary” is an adjective to refer something that is not moving. There are some similar words of “stationary” to make it clear, such as

  • “immobile,”
  • “static,” and
  • “motionless.”

Example:

  • “I am going to stationery shop to get some pencils.”
  • “Wall is a simple example of stationary material.”

“Principle” vs. “principal.”

“Principle” acts as a noun that means basic/fundamental belief or concept. On the other hand, “principal” can be either a noun or an adjective. As a noun, “principal” means an important person in an organisation, but as an adjective, this word means the most important.

EaEmple:

  • “I have a principle to not intervene my personal life with work.”
  • “Mr. Heidi is our school principal.”

“Affect” vs. “effect.”

“Affect” is a verb that means to give an impact to someone or something, while “effect” is the impact itself (noun).

Example:

  • “Deforestation affects the increase of global temperature.”
  • “Extinction of some species is one of the effects of global warming.”

source:

  • Merriam Webster

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, November 2, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Verbs + Gerunds/Infinitives

Hello, fellas. How is your first day in November? Let’s start this session with a question. Which one is correct: Lionel Messi began playing football since his childhood or Lionel Messi began to play football since his childhood?

Today we are going to discuss verbs and their objects, especially gerunds and infinitives. According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, some verbs can come before gerunds or infinitives. However, the meaning can be similar or different.

1) No difference in meaning
begin, like, hate, start, love, can’t stand, continue, prefer, and can’t bear

Examples:
She began writing a book.
She began to write a book.

The two sentences carry no difference in their meaning. A gerund is usually used if the main verb is progressive, e.g.: She was beginning to write a book.

Note:
prefer + gerund: I prefer watching a movie to reading a book.
prefer + infinitives: I prefer to watch a movie than (to) read a book.

2) A difference in meaning
remember, forget, regret, and try

remember + gerund: remember or recall something that took place in the past
e.g.: He remembers going to the beach.

remember + infinitive: remember to perform responsibility, duty, or task
e.g.: He remembers to open the window.

forget + gerund: forget something that took place in the past
e.g.: They forget playing football together.

forget + infinitive: forget to perform responsibility, duty, or task
e.g.: They forget to pay the bills.

regret + gerund: regret something that took place in the past
e.g.: We regret watching the movie.

regret + infinitive: regret to say, to tell or inform someone of some bad news
e.g.: We regret to tell him about his failure.

try + gerund: experiment with a new or different approach to see if it works
e.g.: I try accessing the computer file.

try + infinitive: make an effort
e.g.: I try to understand trigonometry.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, October 31, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Reduced Adverb Clauses of Time (2)

Hello, fellas. On August 2, 2018, we learned how to reduce adverb clauses of time. There are two ways of reducing the adverb clause of time: (1) omit the subject and be (if any); or (2) if there is no be, omit the subject and change the verb to its –ing form. However, there are still other ways of the reduction.

(More on reduced adverb clauses of time: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/08/02/grammartrivia-reduced-adverb-clauses-of-time/)

If a sentence begins with an –ing form, it may be due to the reduction of an adverb clause of time using while, expressing the idea of “during the same time”.

Examples:

While I was walking to school, I witnessed a car accident.

Walking to school, I witnessed a car accident.

An adverb clause of time beginning with when can also be shortened to upon/on + -ing.

Examples:

When I finish my study, I will come back to Indonesia.

Upon finishing my study, I will come back to Indonesia.

On finishing my study, I will come back to Indonesia.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, October 26, 2018

#EngVocab: Phrasal Verbs Related to Work (2)

Do you know phrasal verbs related to work?
Today we will learn more about phrasal verbs related to work.
You can review the first lesson here englishtips4u.com/2018/06/01/engvocab-phrasal-verbs-related-to-work/

Let’s start.

  • Call off.

Meaning: to decide that a planned event will not happen.
Example: “My boss decided to call off the meeting.”

  • Run by.

Meaning: tell someone about an idea or plan so that they can give you their opinion.
Example: “It would be better to run by the idea with your manager first.”

  • Fill in for.

Meaning: to do somebody’s job for a short time while they are not there.
Example: Can you fill in for me for a few minutes?”

  • Drum up.

Meaning: to get support or business through hard work and effort.
Example: “He was trying to drum up the project.”

  • Take on.

Meaning: to agree to be responsible for something.
Example: “Don’t take on more than you can handle.”

  • Burn out.

Meaning: to become very phisically and emotionally tired by working too hard over a period of time.
Example: “Stop doing this high pressure job. You could burn out young.”

  • Draw up.

Meaning: prepare something in writing, especially an official document.
Example: “Both companies agree to draw up the contract.”

  • Knock off (informal).

Meaning: to leave work at the end of the day or stop working for a short break.
Example: “Do you want to knock off early today?”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, October 7, 2018.

#EngTrivia: Commonly missused and misspelled vocabulary

Hi, Fellas! Good evening and happy Friday! How’s your week so far? I hope you experienced something great! Well, in this evening I would share some vocabulary that are usually confusing because most of them have almost similar letter arrangement or typography if I’m not mistaken.

“A lot” vs. “alot.”

Before I start explaining them, is there anyone know the the meaning of each of them and how we should use it?

“Not so good at explaining, but here’s my shot. “A lot” is for a particular ‘bunch’ of items. Eg: There’s a lot of books for A there, a lot of pencils for B here.” – @educareer_jp 

It is generally known that “a lot” can act as a pronoun or an adverb, which means many/pleunty.  Meanwhile, “allot” is verb, which means to distribute or to assign. There are some words that are related to “allot,” they are “allocate,” “administer,” “hand out,” etc.

Example:

  • “We have a lot of problem to deal with.”
  • “You are alloted 20 minutes to present your research findings.”

“Awhile” vs. “a while.”

Both “a while” and “awhile” means “a short period of time.” However, each of them have a different role in a sentence. “Awhile” acts as an adverb that explain something happens in a short time. On the other hand, “a while” is a noun phrase.

Example:

  • “I think I’m going to stay here awhile.”
  • “Pasta will be ready in a while.”

“Desert” vs. “dessert.”

“Desert” means to abandon/to leave something (verb), while “dessert” is food that usually served after meal and generally it’s sweet (noun).

Example:

  • “This town is very quiet it’s looked like deserted place.”
  • “I want cheese cake as my dessert.”

source:

  • Merriam Webster
  • Grammarly

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, October 19, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Expressing Necessity using ‘Have Got To’

Hello, fellas. In English, necessity can be expressed using must, have to, and have got to. For the use of must and have to has ever been discussed, this session is going to focus on that of have got to.

(More on the use of must and have to: https://englishtips4u.com/2014/06/09/grammartrivia-the-use-of-must-and-have-to/)

Even though have got to also carries the meaning of necessity, it is more typical to use have got to in spoken and informal English.

Examples:

1) I have got to take the IELTS test.

2) She has got to study hard.

In speech, have got to is usually pronounced gotta and have is omitted.

Example:

We gotta go to the bank.

Sources:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, October 17, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Expressing Cause and Effect with “Such…That” and “So…That”

Hello, fellas. Our session today is about other ways of expressing cause and effect relationship. Usually it is introduced by prepositions, like because of and due to, or conjunctions, such as because.

(More on cause and effect: https://englishtips4u.com/2012/01/10/engclass-because-for-since-as-because-of-due-to/)

However, we can use the following constructions to show cause and effect.

1) Such…that
Such…that is used with a modified noun. The pattern is:
such + adjective + noun + that
Examples:
1. It was such a sunny day that we went to the beach.
2. She wrote such interesting books that everyone wanted to read them.

2) So…that
An adjective or adverb is enclosed by so…that. The pattern is:
so + adjective/adverb + that
Examples:
1. The day was so sunny that we went to beach.
2. Luka Modric performed so well that he was named as the best player.

So…that can also be used with expressions of quantity: many, few, much, and little.
Examples:
1. They had so little water that we could not take a bath.
2. She wrote so many books that she was awarded a prize.

Sources:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition
Michael A. Pyle and Mary Ellen Muñoz Page, Cliffs TOEFL Preparation Guide

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, October 11, 2018

#EngVocab: British vs. American vocabulary (2)

Hi, Fellas! Good evening. How are you today? In this session I would like to continue the topic of some differences on British and American vocabulary. 

  1. BrE: ‘flashlight’ vs. AmE; ‘torch.’
    • Example,
      • “Do you have a torch?”
      • “Do you have a flashlight?”
  2. BrE: ‘underground. vs. AmE: ‘subway.’
    • Example:
      • “Do you know which underground I should take to go to city’s library?”
      • “Do you know which subway I should take to go to city’s library?”
  3. BrE: ‘post’ vs. AmE: ‘mail.’
    • Example:
      • “You got a post from your mother.”
      • “You got a mail from your mother.”
  4. BrE: ‘trainers’ vs. AmE: ‘sneakers.’
    • Example:
      • “Where did you put my trainers?”
      • “Where did you put my sneakers?”
  5. BrE: ‘windscreen.’ vs. AmE: ‘windshield.’ 
    • Example:
      • “I think the windscreens are broken.”
      • “I think the windshields are broken.”
  6. BrE: ‘rubber’ vs. AmE: ‘eraser.’
    • Example:
      • “May I borrow your rubber?”
      • “May I borrow your eraser?”
  7. BrE: ‘courgette’ vs. AmE: ‘zucchini.’
    • Example:
      • “I think I’ll have baked courgette as side dish.”
      • “I think I’ll have baked zucchini as side dish.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, October 5, 2018

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