#EngClass: Expressing Illness (2)

Today we will talk about expressing illnesses.
Illness means a disease or period of sickness affecting the body or mind.
You can review the first lesson here englishtips4u.com/2011/06/19/engclass-expressing-illness/
We use the word ‘illness’ to talk about times when we are in poor health, or are feeling generally unwell.
If a part of the body feel hurt or pain, we can use the word ‘ache’.
Ache means that your body suffer a continuous, prolonged dull pain.
To say that a part of your body is hurt, you can combine it with the word ‘ache’.

Some common words with ‘ache’:
1. Earache: pain in the ear.
E.g. “I’ve got a terrible earache and a sore throat.”
2. Backache, usually called ‘back pain’: pain in low or upper back.
E.g. “Poor posture for a period of time is worsening my backache.”
3. Bellyache: pain in the bowels.
E.g. “The bad water gave me bellyache.”

Other common illness:
1. Diarrhea: repeated bowel movement in which makes the body’s solid waste more liquid.
E.g. “My brother got severe diarrhea.”
2. Hemorrhage: an escape of blood from a ruptured blood vessel.
E.g. “He sank into coma after suffering a brain hemorrhage.”
3. Acne: the occurence of inflamed or infected sebaceous glands in the skin.
E.g. “She had terrible acne when she was younger.”
4. Asthma: a medical condition (spasms in the broncho of the lungs) that makes breathing difficult.
E.g. “I think he’s having an asthma attack.”
5. Nausea: a feeling of sickness with an inclination to vomit.
E.g. “He was overcome with nausea after eating some bad food.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 14, 2018.

#WOTD: Phubbing

Hola, Fellas. Happy Thursday! How are you doing this week?

This evening we are going to have #WOTD session. I’ll share some things about “phubbing.” Have you ever heard about that word?

I was reading an article in Time news portal when I found it. At the time I was a little bit confused because ‘phubbing’ was related to health, especially in mental health.

Apparently, “phubbing” is a combination of “phone” and “snubbing.”

There are some meaning of “snubbing” in dictionary, but in this case it means to neglect (someone).

So, “phubbing” means neglecting someone (you’re talking to) to your smartphone.

For example, you are replying to your friend’s comment while you are checking your instagram or twitter.

As another illustration and it is commonly found in your daily life, you didn’t hear to your friend’s remarks because you were focusing on your phone. So, in the end you are asking for repeat.

Merriam-webster states that some language experts were the first initiator of this word. Then, it became a trending topic in Australian news portal.

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, April 12, 2018

 

#EngGame: Nationality (2)

Hi, Fellas. This mini game is actually had been performed before. If you missed the first part, you can check it by following this link.

Just like the previous game, I will give the names of the country and you will tell me and the other Fellas the nationality of the people who live in the given country. I will give you 8 clues which are the suffix usually put after the name of the country. They are: “-ian,” “-ean,” “-an,” “-ese,” “-er,” “-ic,” “-ish,” and “–i.”

 Ok, let’s start..

 

  1. Yemen: _______
  2. Luxembourg: ________
  3. New Zealand: ________
  4. Pakistan: _______
  5. Venezuela: ________
  6. Qatar: _______
  7. Myanmar: ________
  8. Denmark: ______
  9. Austria: _______
  10. Germany: _______

ANSWER

  1. Yemeni
  2. Luxembourgish
  3. New Zealander
  4. Pakistani
  5. Venezuelan
  6. Qatari
  7. Bumese
  8. Danish
  9. Austrian
  10. German

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, March 29, 2018

#EngVocab: Adjectives That Describe Personalities (3)

Hi, fellas! How are you?

We meet again in another series of adjectives that could describe someone’s personality. For the first and second installment of this topic, please visit: https://englishtips4u.com/2012/07/13/engvocab-adjectives-that-describes-personality/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2018/03/12/engvocab-adjectives-that-describe-personalities-2/

Daft = silly, foolish (informal use).
“There is nothing daft about my fondness for Daft Punk. Their music suits my taste.”

Daft Punk.jpg
Daft Punk (pic from grammy.com)

Deranged = mad, insane.
“Police managed to stop that deranged gunman before he could shoot anyone.”

Debonair = from old French ‘de bon aire,’ meaning stylish, charming, and confident. Usually used to describe a man.
“Many who have met Nicholas Saputra described the actor as debonair.”

Dapper = Neat, well-dressed. Also used to describe a man.
“The Academy Awards were crowded by charming ladies and dapper gentlemen.”

Eloquent = fluent and persuasive in speaking or writing.
“She is quite an eloquent young lady. She would make a good public speaker.”

Enchanting = delightfully charming or attractive.
“Unlike her casual daily appearance, she became an enchanting lady on her wedding day.”

Expressive = effectively conveying thoughts or feelings.
“Emilia is such an expressive person. We could know how she feels by looking at her face.”

Emilia clarke
Emilia Clarke (pic from pinterest).

Fair = in accordance with rules or standards.
“If you should become a leader, be a fair one.”

Faithful = loyal, devoted.
“Her late husband was a faithful person. He always spent his free time with the family.”

Fearless = bold, brave.
“Naomi Campbell is a fierce, fearless woman. No wonder she has the longest running career as a supermodel.”

Flirtatious = behaving in such a way to suggest a playful attraction.
“Who was the flirtatious guy you were talking to? He seemed to make you uncomfortable.”

Frank = open, honest, and direct in speech or writing, especially when dealing with unpalatable matters.
“Is she always so frank, even though not so many people agree with her?”

Funky = modern and stylish in an unconventional or striking way.
“Lady Gaga is funky and quirky, in an extraordinary way.”

Lady Gaga.jpg
Lady Gaga (pic from pinterest).

 

There they go, fellas! As ever, the best way to practice and memorise new vocabularies is by using them a lot. Start incorporating these new words in your daily conversation. Check your dictionaries often to understand the context better.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 9 April, 2018.


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#EngQuote: Stephen Hawking

Stephen Hawking.jpg
Stephen Hawking, 1942-2018 (Pic from Twitter).

Hundreds of people saw Stephen Hawking off at his funeral last week. The celebrated scientist left the whole world in mourning when he passed away on 14 March 2018.

On his most popular work, the book A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to the Black Holes, Stephen Hawking wrote in non-technical terms about the structure, origin, development and eventual fate of the universe, making the information accessible to non-specialist readers with no prior knowledge of scientific theories. Dubbed by many as the greatest physicist of our generation, Stephen Hawking’s legacy will forever change our way of understanding time, space, gravity, the Universe, and most importantly, ourselves.

On this article, I would like to share some of his quotes that are intriguing and mind-boggling just as they are inspirational.

  1. Theoretical physics is one of the few fields in which being disabled is no handicap – it is all in the mind.
  2. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken-down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark.
  3. We only have to look at ourselves to see how intelligent life might develop into something we wouldn’t want to meet.
  4. My goal is simple. It is a complete understanding of the universe, why it is as it is and why it exists at all.
  5. Life would be tragic if it weren’t funny.
  6. Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change.
  7. However difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at. It matters that you just don’t give up.
  8. I have noticed even people who claim everything is predestined, and that we can do nothing to change it, look before they cross the road.
  9. We are just an advanced breed of monkeys on a minor planet of a very average star. But we can understand the Universe. That makes us something very special.
  10. It would not be much of a universe if it wasn’t home to the people you love.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, 4 April, 2018.


 

Related Post(s):

#EngClass: Superlative Adjectives

Today we will learn about superlative adjectives.
Superlative adjectives are used to compare three or more nouns.

The form of superlative adjectives:
1. For one syllable word: “The + Adj + -est”.
E.g.
a. Fast –> fastest.
b. Great –> greatest.
c. Soft –> softest.

  1. For two syllables word ending with -y: “The + Adj (-y changes to -i) + -est”.
    E.g.
    a. Pretty –> prettiest.
    b. Easy –> easiest.
    c. Busy –> busiest.

  2. For two syllables (not ending with -y): “The + most + Adj”.
    E.g.
    a. Complex –> the most complex.
    b. Famous –> the most famous.
    c. Clever –> the most clever.

  3. For three or more syllables: “The + most + Adj”.
    E.g.
    a. Dangerous –> the most dangerous.
    b. Difficult –> the most difficult.
    c. Popular –> the most popular.

Some adjectives have irregular forms when made into superlative adjectives.
E.g.
a. Bad –> worst.
b. Good –> best.
c. Far –> farthest.
d. Little –> least.
e. Much –> most.
f. Some –> most.
g. Many –> most.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 1, 2018.

#EngQuiz: The Determiners (the, a, an)

Gary Oldman Oscar.jpg
Gary Oldman won an Oscar in the 2018’s ceremony (Pic from mirror.co.uk)

 

Using a determiner the, a, and an can sometimes be tricky. So, let’s have another practice to brush it up. The rules are easy: fill the blanks with the correct determiner.

TIPS: Before you start answering, read this article on determiners: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/08/21/engtips-the-determiners-the-a-an/

  1. Here is _____ useful article about gardening that I found ______ few days ago.
  2. Have you heard? It snowed in _____ Sahara.
  3. He bought me _____ ‘Orange Is the New Black’ DVD box set as _____ birthday gift.
  4. When do you plan to return _____ book to me?
  5. I think I’m going to wear _____ white shirt for _____ interview tomorrow.
  6. After performing for almost 40 years, Gary Oldman finally received _____ Oscar in 2018.
  7. Which one do you think I should take, _____ TOEFL or _____ IELTS?
  8. It’s such _____ honor to perform for _____ Queen.

 

Answers:
1.a, a
Explanation: ‘Useful’ makes a yoo sound, which sounds like there is a consonant ‘y,’ therefore it is ‘a useful article.’ ‘a few days’ is clear enough.

2.the
Explanation: The Sahara is a specific area, only one in the world.

3.an, a
Explanation: ‘Orange Is the New Black’ begins with a vowel, therefore the determiner is ‘an.’ ‘a birthday gift’ is clear enough.

4.the
Explanation: People in the conversation have already known which book the speaker is referring to, so ‘the’ is the correct article.

5.a, the
Explanation: ‘a white shirt’ is the correct form as the shirt was not specified enough. ‘the interview’ is the correct form because it is already specified that it will happen ‘tomorrow.’

6.an
Explanation: ‘Oscar’ begins with a vowel.

7.a, an
Explanation: Both noun refer to general TOEFL/IELTS, but it is also acceptable not to put any articles, since TOEFL & IELTS are already established names.

8.an, the
Explanation: Although ‘honor’ starts with a consonant, the ‘h’ is mute or unread. Therefore, we put ‘an’ as the determiner. For the second part, a nation normally has only one queen, so ‘the Queen’ is the correct form.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 26 March, 2018.


 

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#IOTW: Idioms Related to Transportation and Travel

Hello, fellas! How’s your weekend?
Let’s discuss idioms related to transportation and travel! Here we go! #IOTW
On the same boat: sharing a particular experience or circumstance with someone else. 

E.g.: “You’re not the only one who failed to get the concert ticket. We’re on the same boat!” 

Jump on the bandwagon: to join or follow something once it is successful or popular. 

E.g.: “I heard Black Panther movie is phenomenal, but I’m not going to jump on the bandwagon and watch it. Superhero movie isn’t my cup of tea.”

Paddle one’s own canoe: to be able to act independently. 

E.g.: “Since I turned 25 this year, mom expected me to paddle my own canoe.”

Backseat driver: someone who tells the others how to do things. 

E.g.: “I don’t need a backseat driver on this project. Stop pestering me with all your advice.”

Hit the road: to leave, especially on a road trip.

E.g.: “Let’s hit the road before dawn.”
Itchy feet: the need to leave or to travel. 

E.g.: “Seeing the picture of a beach really gives me the itchy feet.”

Sail through (something): to complete something quickly and with ease. 

E.g.: “My thesis sailed through the professor with no debate.”

A third/fifth wheel: An unwanted or unnecessary person. 

E.g.: “Ann invited me to go to the movies, but if she also invited her boyfriend, I wouldn’t be joining. I would feel like a third wheel there.”
That wraps up our session, fellas! See you on another session.

Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, March 24, 2018.

#UKSlang: Sherlock (1)

Who here is a fan of BBC’s Sherlock and just can’t wait for the next season? The detective, along with his sidekick, Dr Watson, has captured the hearts of many across the world. In my opinion, the modern twist added to the latest adaptation only made the iconic detective story fresher and more relatable. If you haven’t seen it, go check the original DVDs.

Sherlock SS1.jpg
BBC’s Sherlock.

Most characters on BBC’s Sherlock are well-articulated, and although it makes it a little difficult for non-native speaker to understand what they are saying, it does provide a good amount of new words to add into our vocabulary.

This article will discuss some of the slangs. If you are using these words, use them with caution, because some of them are quite impolite. We’ll start with season 1.

  1. “Sorry — gotta dash. I left my riding crop in the mortuary.” – Sherlock (S01E01).
    Gotta dash (v.) = to have to go quickly, to be in a hurry.

  2. “I’ll make you that cuppa. You rest your leg.” – Mrs Hudson (S01E01).
    Cuppa (n.) = a cup of coffee or tea.

  3. John: “What do people normally say?”
    Sherlock: “’Piss off!’” (S01E01).
    Piss off (v.) = Go away.

  4. “Either way, you’re wasted as a cabbie.” – Sherlock (S01E01).
    Cabbie (n.) = taxi driver.
    Cab (n.) = taxi.

  5. “Because I had a row, in the shop, with a chip-and-PIN machine.” – John (S01E02).
    Row (n.) = quarrel, fight.

  6. “Well, grab a pew.” – Sebastian (S01E02).
    Grab a pew (v.) = take a seat.

  7. “Your friend… he’s an arrogant sod.” – Dimmock (S01E02).
    Sod (n.) = an obnoxious person.

  8. “Nine million quid, for what?” – Sherlock (S01E02).
    Quid (n.) = pound sterling.

  9. “We end up havin’ a bit of a ding-dong, don’t we?” – Murder suspect (S01E03).
    Ding-dong (n.) = an argument.

  10. “Told you you should’ve gone with the lilo.” – Sarah (S01E03)
    Lilo (n.) = an inflatable plastic or rubber mattress.

If you have others, drop them on the comment section below!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, 21 March, 2018.


 

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#EngVocab: Animal Phrasal Verbs (2)

Today we will continue to learn more about animal phrasal verbs.
You can review the first lesson here https://englishtips4u.com/2018/03/05/engvocab-animal-phrasal-verbs/

Here we go:

  1. Fish out: take or pull something out, especially after searching it for some time.
    E.g. “She fished out a tissue from her bag.”

  2. Ferret out: to discover something (such as information) by careful searching.
    E.g. “The team is trying to ferret out missing details.”

  3. Fish for: look for or try to get something.
    E.g. “I will fish for an idea.”

  4. Rabbit on: talk for a long time about something that is not important nor interesting.
    E.g. “My mother rabbiting on my brother’s attitude all day.”

  5. Hawk around: try and persuade people to buy or accept something.
    E.g. “They are hawking around the market to promote the food.”

  6. Crow about: to brag about something.
    E.g. “He’s always crowing about his latest triumph.”

  7. Cock up: something done badly or inefficiently.
    E.g. “His secretary cocked up his travelling schedule and he’s furious about it.”

  8. Hound out: to force someone out of something or some place, often because other people are constanly criticizing them.
    E.g. “He was hounded of his job because people disapproved his views.”

  9. Fawn on: try to win favor by flattering; praise someone too much and give them a lot of attention.
    E.g. “The relatives fawned on the rich old man.”

  10. Squirrel away: to hide or store something in order to use it in the future.
    E.g. “She had money squirreled away in various bank accounts.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, March 18, 2018.

#WOTD: Scilicet

Hello, Fellas. Welcome back to #WOTD sesion. How did you do today? This evening I would like to discuss the word “scilicet.” Has any of you heard about this? If so, could you tell us the meaning of “scilicet”?

I found “scilicet” when I accidentally look “word of the day” section in Merriam Webster dictionary.

The dictionary describes “scilicet” is an adverb that is synonymous to “namely.” “Scilicet” is derived from Latin, “scire,” which means ‘to know’ and “licere,” which means ‘to be permitted.’

It is also said that this word is usually can be found in a legal related instruments. In addition, Oxford dictionary states that “scilicet” has a function to explain an ambiguous or obscure statement. There are some words that is synonymous to “scilicet,” they are “namely” and “to wit (that is to say).”

Lastly, here are some example of “scilicet” contained sentences:

  1. “The top ten happiest countries are come from Europe, scilicet Finland, Denmark, and Sweden.”
  2. “In some region funeral can attracts people, scilicet the funeral in Bali (Ngaben) and in Toraja have their cultural value and uniqueness that lead other people to witness the ceremony.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, March 15, 2018

 

#EngVocab: Adjectives That Describe Personalities (2)

We know that English is very rich in expressions. We can describe anyone and anything with so many ways; idioms, phrases, and words amongst many others. We will discuss one of them.

Before you continue reading, you might want to check our previous article on this subject: #EngVocab: Adjectives That Describe Personalities.

Anhedonic = unable to feel happiness.
“In the ‘Winnie the Pooh,’ Eeyore is described as a depressed, anhedonic stuffed donkey.”

Agreeable = pleasant, enjoyable.
“She’s an agreeable companion. You won’t get bored.”

Assertive = self-assured, confident (without being aggressive).
“As a team leader, you should be more assertive.”

Bold = strong, brave, willing to take a risk.
“She’s so bold. She does not wait for anyone to introduce her to the CEO.”

Brooding = showing deep unhappiness.
“He’s always brooding; I don’t know what’s wrong with him.”

Childish = immature.
“She’s so childish that she always throws tantrums over small problems.”

Childlike = innocent, having good qualities associated with a child.
“Her laughter is childlike; it’s contagious.”

Chirpy = cheerful, lively.
“Quenzino is such a chirpy little fella. I wanna pinch his cheeks.”

pexels-photo-774910.jpeg
A chirpy baby (Picture from WordPress).

 

Dark = mysterious.
“Whenever I forget to bring my driving license with me, the police always look like dark and intimidating figures.”

Dim = stupid (informal use) OR dim-witted = slow (in Bahasa Indonesia: lemot).
“Please don’t use sarcasm with him. He’s dim; he won’t get it.”

To make it easier to memorize them, try to use one of the words on the list on your daily conversations. Be careful with some words that have a negative connotation.

P.S.: The list will continue.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 12 March, 2018.


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#GrammarTrivia: Brackets

Hello, fellas! How’s your day?

Today we will talk about “brackets.” Here we go! 

Brackets are symbols mainly used as separator for additional information to a sentence or a main content. If we remove the brackets, the sentence would still make good sense. There are two main types of brackets: round () and square []. British English (BrE) and American English (AmE) define them differently.
BrE: (  ) = round brackets or brackets

AmE: (  ) = parentheses

BrE: [  ] = square brackets

AmE: [  ] = brackets

Round brackets or parentheses are used to add extra information to a sentence.

E.g.: “Lake Toba (Indonesia: Danau Toba) is the largest volcanic lake in the world and is in Sumatra, Indonesia.” 
Round brackets or parentheses are used to indicate plural or singular nouns.

E.g.: “My new shelf need book(s).”
Round brackets or parentheses are used to add a personal comment.

E.g.: “Kuta Beach is the most beautiful beach in Bali. (I prefer Sanur Beach  to Kuta Beach.)”
Round brackets or parentheses are used to define abbreviations.

E.g.: “The link above will take you to a PDF (Portable Document Format) version.”

Square brackets are used to modify another person’s words, especially when we want to make it clear that the modification has been made by us, not by the original writer. 

E.g.: 

The witness said: “He [the policeman] hit me.”
Square brackets are used to add information.

E.g.: “The two teams in the finals of the first FIFA Football World Cup were both from South America [Uruguay and Argentina].”
Square brackets are used to add missing words.

E.g.: “It is [a] good question.” 
Square brackets are used to modify a direct quotation.

E.g.:

He “love[s] driving.” (The original words were “I love driving.”)
That’s all for today, fellas! I hope it’ll be useful for you. Good night!
Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U. Saturday, March 10, 2018.

#EngVocab: Animal Phrasal Verbs

Today we will learn about animal phrasal verbs.
Do you know which phrasal verbs contain animal names in them?

Let’s start:
1. Pig out: eating a large amount of food.
E.g. “I’m starving! Let’s pig out.”

  1. Horse around: fool around in a rough and noisy way.
    E.g. “I horse around quite a lot, just to keep me from getting bored.”

  2. Beaver away: to work in a very active and energetic way.
    E.g. “He’s been beavering away at the accounts all morning.”

  3. Chicken out: decide not to do something because of fear.
    E.g. “Unfortunately, many people chickened out at the last moment.”

  4. Wolf down: consume something with great speed.
    E.g. “Don’t wolf down your food. Eat slower.”

  5. Leech off: take advantage of someone for personal gain.
    E.g. “He never seems to notice when people leech him off.”

  6. Duck out: leave suddenly without telling anyone.
    E.g. “I will duck out of the office early if I can.”

  7. Monkey around: doing something random and unplanned to waste time.
    E.g. “Don’t monkey around here. I need to clean up the place!”

  8. Clam up: become silent (when shy or nervous), do not want to talk about a particular subject.
    E.g. “He always clams up when we ask him about his family.”

  9. Rat on: betray on someone, break an agreement.
    E.g. “Rat on me, I will let you have nothing.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, March 4, 2018.

#IOTW: Idioms related to books and reading

Hello, Fellas. How’s your day? Do any of you love reading? Do you realise that tomorrow is a World Book Day? In order to welcome the day, I would like to share some idioms with the word ‘book.’

The first one is the famous one. I bet you regularly find it in some literature or even in your daily communication.

  1. “An open book.” Meaning: something/someone that is easily to be understand.
    • Example:
      • “My mom always know my way of thinking like an open book.
  2. “To take a leaf out of someone’s book.” Meaning: to imitate someone.
    • Example:
      • “Sometimes my sister irritates me because she always take a leaf out of my book.
  3. “To read between the lines.” Meaning: looking for an implied meaning.
    • Example:
      • “When you feel the world pushing you down over and over again, try to read between the lines. I believe something happens in order to lead you to be better or to a better place.”
  4. “The oldest trick in the book.” Meaning: the dishonest action that had been used over and over again.
    • Example:
      • “Aren’t you bored with the same oldest trick in the book, Matt?”
  5. “In someone’s good books.” Meaning: an expression that show if someone is pleased with you.
    • Example:
      • “His performance was in the jury’s good book.”
  6. “Bring someone to book.” Meaning: to punish someone.
    • Example:
      • “Charlie was brought to the book because of his fight with Ben.”
  7. “Balance the book.” Meaning: a process to make sure that your income and outcome match with your (bank) account note.
    • Example:
      • “I think you should balance the book. It’s strange that you always run out of money before the end of the month.”
  8. “Use every trick in the book.” Meaning: you have used every possible way to get/do something.
    • Example:
      • “I have used every trick in the book to pursue her, but she doesn’t even notice it.”
  9. “Have your nose in the book.” Meaning: to read all the time. On the other hand it also means to refer someone who is being oblivious to her/his surrounding because s(he) is to absorbed to the book.
    • Examples:
      • “She won’t respond if you call her while she’s having her nose in the book. Trust me.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, March 1, 2018

#EngTalk: How to Start a Conversation

pexels-photo-515169.jpeg
Image by WordPress

 

Sometimes, we could feel nervous when we are about to start a conversation in English. The feeling of awkwardness of saying something in a foreign language, coupled with the concern about saying something wrong or grammatically incorrect, could be overwhelming.

However, the more you familiarise yourself with speaking in English, the more confident you could be. Therefore, always practice when you have a chance. You can start with everyday conversation with a friend or a colleague.

When passing a friend on a hallway at school or meeting somewhere else, we can say:
– How are you?
– Hey, what’s up?
– Hi, how is it going?

If it’s a colleague at work, a more formal interaction is expected. We can start with:
– How are you today?
– What have you been up to lately?
– How was your weekend? (if weekend has just passed) OR Have you got plans for the weekend? (if weekend is about to come).
– Have you heard of that news?

But what if we are in a situation when there is no one we are familiar with?
When you are in a party or a gathering, and there is no one there whom you know, you can always start a conversation and turn a stranger into an acquaintance.

Here are some sentences you could use to start a conversation with a stranger:
–  I don’t believe we have met. I’m Katie.
– What is it that you do for a living?
– Do you go to school near here?
– Do you live around here?
– This is such a great event. What do you think?

You can also start with complimenting a person’s appearance or performance. For example:
– I like your outfit. Where did you buy it?
– I couldn’t help but staring at your necklace. It’s beautiful.
– You gave an interesting speech. I’d like to know your thoughts about…

Making comments about someone’s physical appearance is fine if we are already good friends with him/her, but never point out what a stranger’s lacking as it is considered impolite. For example:
– You look uncomfortable in that clothes ×
– It seems like you have gained some weight ×

 

If you feel that you might require some helps getting into a conversation with strangers, bring a friend. After a while, you should be confident to do it on your own.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 26 February 2018.


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#EngKnowledge: Chinese New Year tradition

Hola, Fellas! What a beautiful day, isn’t it? Well, it must be because we are going to have a long weekend. For those who are going to celebrate Chinese New Year tomorrow, I hope you’ll have a wonderful family reunion tonight. Speaking of Chinese New Year, this evening I am going to share some information about Chinese New Year tradition.

Traditionally, when Chinese New Year is coming most people will clean their house. It is believed that cleaning the house will sweep away the bad luck. Celebrating a new year means welcoming a new beginning. Thus, removing all of the matters of the past would give a space for a new hope, prosperity, and fortune. That is why cleaning the house on Chinese New Year is prohibited.

Besides cleaning the house, some people will have a new hair cutting, buy some new outfits and other stuffs as a completion of the new start. After cleaning the house, Chinese will have a Chinese New Year eve dinner with their family, which is today. It is similar to having a family reunion in Thanksgiving, Christmas eve, as well as (if I’m not mistaken) Eid Mubarak eve. This is the most important event of Chinese New Year celebration because it would be a moment for a family to be rebound and share happiness.

Some sources states that dumpling is the most important food in this family dinner, especially in northern China. Its pocket like shape is believed will bring wealth, harmony and happiness to those who eat it. The various fillings of the dumplings will related to the fortune that awaits you in the next year.

The next thing I am going to talk about is generally the main focus of Chinese New Year, the red packet! (hong bao in Chinese). it is publicly known that a red packet contains a certain sum of money. The red packet is traditionally given from married couple to their parents and younger relatives. This is a symbol of blessing and the red color of the envelope is a symbol of happiness.

Lastly, in the following days Chinese usually go to temple and pray before visiting their another family member and relatives. That was a general tradition of Chinese New Year. People may have a similar yet a quite different one because it might be adjusted to another local tradition.

Well, I may have to call it a night. Happy Chinese New year for those who celebrate it. Have a joyful moment with your family and enjoy your special dinner.

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, February 15, 2018

#EngVocab: Business Phrasal Verbs

Today we will learn about business phrasal verbs.

A phrasal verbs is a verb that is made up of a main verb together with an adverb or a preposition, or both (according to Oxford Dictionary).

The phrasal verb can have a different meaning than the verb itself.

Some commonly use business phrasal verbs are listed bellow:
1. Note down: to write a piece of information that one wants to remember.
E.g. “I note down everything the teacher said.”

  1. Branch out: to start doing something new or different from normal work or activities.
    E.g. “From car retail, the company has decided to branch out into car leasing.”

  2. Close down: ending the operations of something (esp. a place of business).
    E.g. “The company closed down because the combination of internal and external factors.”

  3. Fill out: complete a form with necessary information.
    E.g. “Please fill out your purchasing order and send it to vendor.”

  4. Step down: withdraw or resign from an important position or office.
    E.g. “She reluctantly agreed to step down as managing director.”

  5. Sort out: organizing or put things in order or in their correct place.
    E.g. “They gave the expert a free hand to sort out the problem.”

  6. Take over: assuming control of something, like buy out the ownership of a company.
    E.g. “His greatest wish was for his daughter to take over the business.”

  7. Hand in: to give something to an authority or responsible person.
    E.g. “I want you to hand in this homework by Friday.”

  8. Fall through: the plan or agreement fails to happen or didn’t work out for some reasons.
    E.g. “There is still a risk that the whole deal will fall through.”

  9. Carry out: perform a task, do a research or investigation to complete something.
    E.g. “We need to carry out a proper evaluation of the new system.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, February 18, 2018.

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