#WOTD: Wanderlust

Hi, Fellas! Good evening. How’s your days? I hope you experienced something great! In this session I would like to talk about ‘wanderlust.’ Have you heard about it?

“I’ve heard about it. But i never know what it means,” – @angelccxo 

“Wanderlust = a desire to travel,” – @Aldo_Bandan 

I saw ‘wanderlust’ as a novel title in Wattpad beforehand. This word sounds nice, doesn’t it? ‘Wanderlust’ is a noun that has a meaning as a strong feeling to wander/travel.  Merriam-Webster Dictionary states that this word was form from a German, “wandern,” and “lust.”

Unfortunately, there is no any related word or synonym of “wanderlust” right now. #WOTD Finally, here are some example on using ‘wanderlust’ in a sentence:

  • “Wanderlust has led her to Paris.”
  • ‘I sometimes get annoyed by Ana because of her uncontrollable wanderlust.’

source:

Merriam Webster Dictionary

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, September 14, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Using ‘Since’ and ‘For’ in Present Perfect Tense

Hello, fellas. How is life today? In this session we are going to learn about time signals frequently used in present perfect tense. They are since and for.

According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, present perfect tense mainly consists of have/has + past participle. It shows that an event occurred or never occurred before now. The time when the event took place is not important.

(More on present perfect tense: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/13/engclass-present-perfect-tense-vs-simple-past-tense/)

However, present perfect tense carries different meaning when since or for is used. Present perfect tense with since or for means that something happened in the past and continues to the present.

There is a difference between since and for. Since is followed by a particular time, while for precedes a duration of time.

Examples:

1) Indonesia has existed since 1945.

2) The students have played football for an hour.

Sources:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, September 12, 2018

#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘Delicious’

Do you know other words to say ‘delicious’?
Today we will learn about the substitutes of ‘delicious’.
Let’s start.

  1. Toothsome: extremely pleasing to the sense of taste.
    E.g. “The restaurant which once served a toothsome steak has closed.”
  2. Savory: full of flavor, delicious and tasty; usually something that someone has cooked.
    E.g. “She placed a huge dish of savory steaming meat before him.”
  3. Zestful: a taste which is spicy and flavorsome.
    E.g. “The drink has a zestful black cherry flavor.”
  4. Scrumptious: extremely appetizing or delicious.
    E.g. “We had a scrumptious lunch.”
  5. Palatable: acceptable to the palate; pleasant to taste.
    E.g. “The meal was barely palatable.”
  6. Luscious: having a pleasingly rich, sweet taste.
    E.g. “The dessert has great appearance and luscious flavor.”
  7. Delectable: looking or tasting extremely good.
    E.g. “The vegetable makes the food delectable.”
  8. Enticing: attractive or tempting; alluring.
    E.g. “An enticing smell came from the kitchen.”
  9. Ambrosial: exceptionally pleasing to taste or smell; especially delicious or fragrant.
    E.g. “We can smell the ambrosial aroma of the roast.”
  10. Sapid: having a strong, pleasant taste.
    E.g. “You should try this, the food has a sapid, harmonic taste.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 26, 2018.

#GrammarTrivia: Noun + of Which

Hello, fellas. After learning about how to use expressions of quantity in relative clauses last week, today we are still going to have a session on another form of relative clauses. It is the use of noun + of which.

(More on expressions of quantity in relative clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/08/30/grammartrivia-expressions-of-quantity-in-relative-clauses/)

According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, the pattern has the same meaning of whose. In other words, both of them show possession. Noun + of which is used in a relative clause modifying a thing and more common in formal written English. It is preceded by a comma.

(More on whose: https://englishtips4u.com/2014/06/01/engclass-how-to-use-who-whom-and-whose/)

Example:

1) Leo Tolstoy wrote a novel. The title of the novel is Anna Karenina.

    Leo Tolstoy wrote a novel, the title of which is Anna Karenina.

2) The student bought a book. The price of the book was affordable.

     The student bought a book, the price of which was affordable.

3) They like Indonesian food. The taste of the food is spicy.

     They like Indonesian food, the taste of which is spicy.

Source:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, September 5, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Expressions of Quantity in Relative Clauses

Hello, fellas. Today we are going to learn about expressions of quantity in relative clauses. An expression of quantity is used to express the number or amount of something. It may precede a noun whose number or amount it describes. Several examples of expressions of quantity are one, two, each, every, both, some, several, a few, a little, many, much, most, etc.

(More on expressions of quantity: https://englishtips4u.com/2017/03/05/engclass-expressions-of-quantity/)

In relative clauses, expressions of quantity with of come before the pronouns. However, the pronouns are only whom, which and whose. This pattern is preceded by a comma and more common in writing than speaking.

Examples:

1) There are 23 players in the German national team. Most of them are from Bayern Munich. (There are 23 players in the German national team, most of whom are from Bayern Munich.)

2) Pramoedya Ananta Toer wrote several books. Two of them are “Bumi Manusia” and “Anak Semua Bangsa”. (Pramoedya Ananta Toer wrote several books, two of which are “Bumi Manusia” and “Anak Semua Bangsa”.)

3) Students are reading the biography of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. One of his works is “The Marriage of Figaro”. (Students are reading the biography of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, one of whose works is “The Marriage of Figaro”.)

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @englishtipsforyou on Sunday, August 26, 2018

#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘Go’

Do you know other words to say ‘go’?
Today we will learn about the substitutes of ‘go’.

Let’s start.

  1. Pace: walk at a steady and consistent speed.
    E.g. “She quickened her pace when she thought someone was following her.”
  2. Stroll: walk in a slow, relaxed manner.
    E.g. “We sometimes stroll along the beach.”
  3. Travel: to make a journey, usually over a long distance.
    E.g. “My friend is travelling alone to United States.”
  4. Waddle: walk with short steps in a clumsy swaying motion.
    E.g. “My little brother is waddling around the living room.”
  5. Wander: walk or move in a leisurely, casual, or aimless way.
    E.g. “We are wandering all day around the city.”
  6. Lope: run or move with in an easy and relaxed way, taking a long bounding strike.
    E.g. “They would lope out to the park two miles away and walk back.”
  7. Move: the act of changing location from one place to another.
    E.g. “He stood up and began to move around the room.”
  8. Hurtle: move with a rushing sound.
    E.g. “His motorboat hurtled along the river.”
  9. Abscond: run away; usually includes taking something along.
    E.g. “He attempted to abscond from the punishment.”
  10. Evade: escape or avoid something either physically or mentally.
    E.g. “I could tell that he was trying to evade the issue.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on August 12, 2018.

#GrammarTrivia: Abridged Noun Clauses

Hello, fellas. In this session we are going to learn about the abridgement of noun clauses. A noun clause is a clause used as the subject, object or complement of a sentence. It can begin with a question word (who, whom, what, which, where, when, whose, why or how), that, if or whether.

(More on noun clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/02/06/engclass-noun-clause/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2013/02/04/grammartrivia-noun-clause/)

Noun clauses beginning with one of the question words or whether can be abridged. However, the abridgement is only possible if these requirements are fulfilled:

1) The main clause and the noun clause have the same subject or the subject of the noun clause is the same as the object of the main clause; and

2) The noun clause contains a modal verb either can/could or should.

There are 3 steps in the abridgement of noun clauses:

1) Omit the subject;

2) Omit the modal verb; and

3) Change the verb into an infinitive.

Examples:

1) I know what I should do. (I know what to do.)

2) She told me when I should go. (She told me when to go.)

3) Students learn how they could write journals. (Students learn how to write journals.)

Source:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @englishtipsforyou on Sunday, August 19, 2018

#WOTD: Paroxysm

Hi, Fellas! Good evening. How’s your days? I hope you experienced something great! In this session I would like to talk about ‘paroxysm.’ Have you heard about it?  

Well, the first time I saw ‘paroxysm’ was when I seeing through my Pinterest timeline. It caught my eyes because I felt like there was something behind this word. ‘Paroxysm’ is a noun that has a meaning as a sudden burst of emotion. it has to be a strong feeling and you cannot control it. As a simple illustration, jealousy!

On the other hand, according to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, you could also say that ‘paroxysm’ can also refers to an action.  There are some words that are similar to ‘paroxysm,’ they are ‘explosion,’ ‘eruption,’ ‘outburst,’ ‘convulsion,’ etc.

Here are some example on using ‘paroxysm’ in a sentence:

  1. “Paroxysm of laughter erupted when she was telling her funny experience.”
  2. ‘i was overwhelmed by paroxysm of jealousy when I saw him with another girl.’

source:

  • Cambridge Dictionary
  • Merriam Webster Dictionary

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, August 24, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Adjective Clauses as the Object of a Preposition

Hello, fellas. In everyday usage, the subject and verb of an adjective clause (relative clause) precede a preposition. On the other hand, to make it more formal, the clause is used as the object of the preposition.

(More on relative clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/08/engclass-relative-clause/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/09/engclass-relative-clause-2/)

According to Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, a preposition is a word used before its object (a noun, a noun phrase, or a pronoun), connecting it to another word. It usually shows a temporal, spatial or logical relationship of its object to the rest of a sentence. Examples of prepositions are about, at, by, for, from in, on, through, to, with, and without.

(More on prepositions: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/09/17/engclass-prepositions/)

If the preposition is followed by the adjective clause, pronouns to use are only whom or which. It is never followed by that or who.

Examples:

  • He is the man whom we talk about.

         He is the man about whom we talk.

  • The lecturer whom you should listen to is explaining course materials.

         The lecturer to whom you should listen is explaining course materials.

  • The view which we look at is breath-taking.

         The view at which we look is breath-taking.

  • Surabaya is the city which I live in.

         Surabaya is the city in which I live.

(in which has the same meaning as where)

Source:

Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition

GrammarBook.com, https://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/probPrep.asp

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @englishtipsforyou on Sunday, August 12, 2018

#EngClass: Blending Words (4)

Today we will learn more about ‘blending words’.

You can review the first lesson here englishtips4u.com/2012/06/27/engclass-blending-words/
You can review the second lesson here englishtips4u.com/2018/06/17/engclass-blending-words-2/
You can review the third lesson here englishtips4u.com/2018/07/01/engclass-blending-words-3/

Here are some examples of blending words:
1. Globish (global + English).
Meaning: a simplified version of English used by non-native speakers, consisting of the most common words and phrases only.

  1. Medicare (medical + care).
    Meaning: maintenance and restoration of health by the treatment and prevention of disease especially by trained and licensed professionals (as in medicine, dentistry, clinical psychology, and public health).

  2. Urinalysis: (urine + analysis).
    Meaning: analysis of urine by physical, chemical, and microscopical means to test for the presence of disease, drugs, etc.

  3. Hi-tech (high + technology).
    Meaning: resembling or making use of highly advanced technology or devices.

  4. Transistor (transfer + resistor).
    Meaning: a small electrical device containing a semiconductor, used in televisions, radios, etc.

  5. Vash (volcanic + ash).
    Meaning: very small solid particles ejected from a volcano during an eruption which have intermediate axes measuring 2 mm or less.

  6. Workfare: (work + welfare).
    Meaning: a welfare system that requires those receiving benefits to perform some work or to participate in job training.

  7. Mediclaim (medical + claim).
    Meaning: medical bill submitted to health insurance carriers and other insurance providers for services rendered to patients by providers of care. When you go to the doctor, hospital or other provider, your service generates a bill.

  8. Skylab (sky + laboratory).
    Meaning: a space station used for scientific, research and development, medical and/or dental testing, experimentation and/or research.

  9. Vegeburger (vegetable + burger).
    Meaning: a patty resembling a hamburger but made with vegetable protein, soybeans, etc., instead of meat.

  10. Lecdem (lecture + demonstration).
    Meaning: presentation of an example of what the lecturer is discoursing about.

  11. Infotech (information + technology).
    Meaning: The hardware, software, and associated technology and businesses that are composed or related to the practice and business of information technology.

References:
http://www.collinsdictionary.com
http://www.merriam-webster.com
Google dictionary
http://www.vocabulary.com
dictionary.cambridge.org
http://www.skybrary.aero
classroom.synonym.com
http://www.dictionary.com

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, July 29, 2018.

#GrammarTrivia: Reduced Adverb Clauses of Reason

After discussing reduced relative clauses and reduced adverb clauses of time, today we are going to learn the reduction of adverb clauses of reason.

(More: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/07/26/grammartrivia-reduced-relative-clauses/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2018/08/02/grammartrivia-reduced-adverb-clauses-of-time/)

Adverb clauses of reason are also called adverb clauses of cause and effect. They are introduced by conjunctions, such as because, now that, since, due to the fact that, and owing to the fact that. Like the other kinds of adverb clauses, they function as the dependent clause in a sentence.

(More on adverb clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/10/13/engclass-adverbial-clause/)

The reduction of an adverb clause of reason to an adverbial phrase is only possible when its subject is the same as the subject of the main clause. Omit the conjunction, so that it is not included in the adverbial phrase, and change the verb to its –ing form.

Example:

Because she lives far from her family, Nancy does everything herself.
Living far from her family, Nancy does everything herself.

Having + past participle means because.

Example:

Because I have read the novel, I want to give it to you.
Having read the novel, I want to give it to you.

It is also possible to change be in an adverb clause of reason to being.

Example:

Because she was sick, she did not attend the class.
Being sick, she did not attend the class.

Source:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @englishtipsforyou on Friday, August 10, 2018

#EngVocab: What to say instead of using ‘very’ (2)

Hi, Fellas! Happy Friday night! How’s your work/school? This evening I am going to share some words that is used to substitute a strong expression, such as ‘very beautiful,’ ‘very smart,’ etc. 

  1. Exhausted.’ Meaning: ‘very tired.’ 
    • Example:
      • ‘I have many classes today and I still need to attend reading club meeting. I’m exhausted.’
  2. Gorgeous.’ Meaning: ‘very pretty’.
    • Example:
      • ‘You look gorgeous in that dress.’
  3. Hysterical.’ Meaning: ‘very funny.’
    • Example:
      • ‘Look at his hysterical act. I can barely laughing.’ 
  4. Exact.’ Meaning: ‘very accurate.’
    • Example:
      • ‘That was the exact answer I want to hear!’
  5. Obvious.’ Meaning: ‘very clear.’
    • Example:
      • ‘I know Jess likes Andrew. It is obvious.’’ 
  6. Captivating.’ Meaning: ‘very interesting.’ 
    • Example;
      • ‘She is the most captivating girl I have ever met.’ 
  7. Compelling.’ Meaning: ‘very powerful’ (effect).
    • Example:
      • ‘I have no doubt he would win the competition, his arguments are compelling’’ 
  8. Essential.’ Meaning: ‘very necessary.’
    • Example:
      • ‘Vitamin C is one of essential nutrients for our body.’ 
  9. Exceptional.’ Meaning: ‘very special.’ 
    • Example:
      • ‘You can have my dresses, even my jewelries, but not my books. They are exceptional!’ 
  10. Innovative.’ Meaning: ‘very creative.’
    • Example:
      • ‘I think her idea is innovative.’’ 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, August 10, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Reduced Adverb Clauses of Time

Hello, fellas. Last week we learned how to reduce relative clauses.

(More on reduced relative clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/07/26/grammartrivia-reduced-relative-clauses/)

In this session, we are still going to discuss the reduction of clauses. It is the reduction of adverb clauses of time.

(More on adverb clauses of time: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/10/13/engclass-adverbial-clause/)

In a sentence, an adverb clause functions as the dependent clause. It must be attached to the main clause or the independent clause (More on clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/01/26/engclass-clause/). An adverb clause of time begins with a conjunction, such as after, before, since, when, and while.

The reduction of an adverb clause of time to an adverbial phrase is only possible when its subject is the same as the subject of the main clause. There are two ways of reducing the adverb clause of time:

1) Omit the subject and be
Example:
While I was studying, I fell asleep.
While studying, I fell asleep.

2) If there is no be, omit the subject and change the verb to its –ing form
Example:
Jane has lived abroad since she pursued her education.
Jane has lived abroad since pursuing her education.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @englishtipsforyou on Thursday, August 2, 2018

#EngVocab: Types of injuries

Hi, Fellas! Happy Friday night! How’s your day? I hope you have a great one.

“I feel so excited because tomorrow I am gonna meet my old friends…’ – @mukmukhsin

“Exhausting day.” – @Albet_isla 

“I feel so great because today is the last day of exam, and of course I’ll be free from my lectures.” – @FathiaRD

This evening we are going to talk about injuries. Do you know what kind of
injuries we usually have? Bruise? Sprain?

“Hamstring, football fans must be familiar with this injury haha.. It is a muscle strain injuries. It happens when the athletes do acceleration rapidly that can torn their muscle, or maybe overused their knee.” – @Albet_isla

  1. ‘Cut.’ Meaning: a wound that is caused by incision of sharp edged
    things, such as a knife.

    •  Example:
      • ‘Don’t touch my hand. I’ve just had a paper cut.’
  2. ‘Fracture.’ Meaning: one kind of injuries that is caused by the cracking/breaking of your bones.
    • Example:
      • ‘He got an arm fracture from falling down the stairs.’
  3. ‘Bruise.’ Meaning: a bluish/purplish color on your skin led by the bursting of your blood vessels.
    • Example:
      • ‘I’ve just accidentally knocked my knee. I hope it wouldn’t cause any bruise.’
  4. ‘Splinter.’ Meaning: a small and thin break on your skin. I think in
    Bahasa it is known for ‘goresan.’

    • Example:
      • ‘In spite of a cut, you can get a splinter if you use the knife carelessly.’
  5. ‘Sunburn.’ Meaning: a reddening skin (inflamation) because of the overexposure of ultraviolet.
    • Example:
      • ‘I was told that Aloe vera is used to treat sunburn.’
  6. ‘Whiplash.’ Meaning: asuddent jolt, e.g., on the neck, limbs, or arms, which cause an injury.
    • Example:
      • ‘I experienced whiplash on my knee when I was started
        yoga for the very first time.’
  7. ‘Bite.’ Meaning: a kind of injuries that formed if you were bitten by someone or animals, such as dogs, cats, or maybe snakes.
    • Example:
      • ‘The dog’s bite left a mark for a quite long time.’
  8. ‘Sting.’ Meaning: a wound that is form by (usually) a sharp object that pierce through your skin, such as needles.
    • Example:
      • ‘I have a bee sting on my shoulder.’

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, July 27, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Reduced Relative Clauses

Hello, fellas. How is it going? Today we are going to learn how to reduce relative clauses. According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, a relative clause is a dependent clause modifying a noun. Further information about a noun is described, identified, or given by the clause. It is also called an adjective clause.

(More on relative clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/08/engclass-relative-clause/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/09/engclass-relative-clause-2/)

Relative clauses with relative pronouns as subjects (who, which, or that) can be reduced to adjective phrases.

There are two ways in which a relative clause is changed to an adjective phrase:

1) If the relative clause contains be, omit the pronoun and be.
Relative clause: The research which was conducted by the students is published.
Adjective phrase: The research conducted by the students is published.

2) If there is no be in the relative clause, omit the pronoun and change the verb to its –ing form.
Relative clause: Students who conduct research should write in journals.
Adjective phrase: Students conducting research should write in journals.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @englishtipsforyou on Thursday, July 26, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Double Comparatives

Hello, fellas. How do we say “Semakin cepat, semakin baik” in English? Yes. We say it through double comparatives “The sooner, the better”. But, wait. Is it correct to use article the with comparative comparison (-er, more)? Let’s check it out.

Comparisons are used to assess the value of one thing and another. They are equal comparison (as…as), comparative comparison and superlative comparison (-est, the most).

(More on comparisons: https://englishtips4u.com/2012/01/20/engclass-degrees-of-comparison/comment-page-1/)

Double comparatives comprise of two parts, each of which begins with the. The second part is the result of the first one. In double comparatives, both parts have parallel structures.

There are three structures of double comparatives:

1) the + comparative, the + comparative
e.g. The fresher, the tastier.

2) the + comparative + the noun, the + comparative + the noun
e.g. The greater the experience, the higher the salary.

3) the + comparative + subject + verb , the + comparative + subject + verb
e.g. The harder you work, the more you accomplish.

Sources:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition
Deborah Phillips, Longman Complete Course for the TOEFL Test
Michael A Pyle and Mary Ellen Munoz Page, Cliffs TOEFL Preparation Guide

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @englishtipsforyou on Thursday, July 19, 2018

 

#EngVocab: Medical Conditions (3)

Today we will learn about some other words that are used to describe medical conditions.

You can review the first lesson here englishtips4u.com/2018/05/06/engvocab-medical-conditions/

And the second lesson here https://englishtips4u.com/2018/05/14/engvocab-medical-conditions-2/

Let’s start:

  1. Cyst: lined cavity containing fluid or a solid material.
    E.g. “My brother had a painful cyst near his kidney.”

  2. Atopy: alergic skin disease caused by enviromental antigen.
    E.g. “Her atopy is getting worse.”

  3. Alopecia: partial or complete hair loss.
    E.g. “The new drug does not cure alopecia.”

  4. Abcess: subcutaneous collection of puss.
    E.g. “The doctor has to drain an abcess in his arm.”

  5. Dehydrated: in need of water.
    E.g. “Drink lots of water to avoid becoming dehydrated.”

  6. Focal: the infection is limited to one part of the body.
    E.g. “The symptom is leading to focal brain dysfunction.”

  7. Bariatric: relating to the causes and the treatment of obesity.
    E.g. “The doctor has to perform bariatrix surgery.”

  8. Infantile: affecting young children.
    E.g. “My cousin is suffering from infantile eczema.”

  9. Crippling: causing someone to be physically disabled, especially unable to walk.
    E.g. “The crippling disease kept him in bed for months.”

  10. Febrile: relating to a fever.
    E.g. “The epidemic febrile disease comes with severe headache.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, July 15, 2018.

#EngGrammar: Active vs Passive (IELTS Writing Task 1 Process)

Hi, fellas. Last week we learned how to structure our writing about a process in IELTS Task 1 (More: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/07/07/engtips-process-ielts-writing-task-1/). Today we will focus on when to use active voice or passive voice in such kind of writing.

1) Active Voice

Active voice is used to describe natural processes or events occurring autonomously in nature, where humans are not involved, such as rain and formation of clouds.

e.g.

task 1 rain

(http://ielts-simon.com/ielts-help-and-english-pr/2011/04/ielts-writing-task-1-water-cycle-essay.html)

Beginning at the evaporation stage, 80% of water vapour in the air comes from the oceans. Heat from the sun causes water to evaporate, and water vapour condenses to form clouds. At the second stage, precipitation, water falls as rain or snow.

2) Passive Voice

Passive voice is used to report processes of manufacturing a product in a factory or workshop. In passive voice, the action is more important than the person performing it.

(More: https://englishtips4u.com/2012/06/26/engclass-the-passive/)

e.g.

task 1 bricks

(https://www.ielts-mentor.com/writing-sample/academic-writing-task-1/988-process-by-which-bricks-are-manufactured-for-the-building-industry)

At the fourth stage in the process, the clay bricks are placed in a drying oven for one to two days. Next, the bricks are heated in a kiln at a moderate temperature (200 – 900 degrees Celsius) and then at a high temperature (up to 1300 degrees), before spending two to three days in a cooling chamber. Finally, the finished bricks are packaged and delivered.

Sources:
Ebrahim Tahasoni, Master IELTS Visuals (Academic Writing Task One): Course Materials & Supplements for Academic Candidates
Diana Hopkins and Pauline Cullen, Cambridge Grammar for IELTS with answers
IELTS Writing Task 1 Simon
Alireza Ramedani, IELTS Writing Compact: GRAPH REVIEW (Academic Task 1)

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @englishtipsforyou on Tuesday, July 10, 2018

 

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