#EngTalk: Generation Equality

Hi, hello, everyone! How are you doing today? Yesterday, we celebrated the International Women’s Day so this article will be related to it.

As we know it, the theme for this year’s International Women’s Day is ‘I Am Generation Equality: Realizing Women’s Rights.’ So what do you think about the theme, fellas?

calendar conceptual data date
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

For me, equality is about no discrimination towards someone regardless of whether the person is a male or female. The same opportunity, the same appreciation, and consequently, the same responsibility. I’d love to read your thoughts about it. I think I was fortunate to grow up in an environment that emphasises how women should be encouraged and supported to be the best version of themselves and I think everyone should have the same chance. Do you agree, fellas?

We have made progress, but there’s still so much to do to ensure that we could become the generation equality. I will start with promoting a safe environment for women to live in and to thrive, be it in a family, at school, or at the workplaces. The work that needs to be done is not necessarily exclusive to one type of sex or gender. We should always respect, support, and care about each other.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 9 March 2020.


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#GrammarTrivia: Be + To Infinitive

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn how to use be + to infinitive.

Be + to infinitive is used to express formal or official arrangements or to give formal instructions or orders.

Examples:
1) The Prime Minister is to visit Indonesia next month. (formal or official arrangements)
2) All students are to attend the class. (formal instructions or orders)

The structure is often used in newspaper, radio and television reports to talk about future events and expresses near certainty.

Examples:
1) The government is to increase tobacco duty.
2) A man is to appear in court this morning charged with the murder of the footballer.

Be + to infinitive is commonly used in conditional sentences to express a precondition.

Examples:
1) They will have to study hard if they are to pass the exam.
2) If I am to catch the train, I shall have to go now.

Sources:
BBC Learning English, https://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/learnit/learnitv103.shtml
English Practice, Be + infinitive, https://www.englishpractice.com/improve/infinitive/
Grammaring, BE + TO-infinitive, https://www.grammaring.com/be-to-infinitive

Compiled and written @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Tuesday, March 3, 2020

#UKSlang: Slang in Harry Potter Books

Who here is a Harry Potter fan? Even though the books and movies were all released, except for the Fantastic Beasts, I’m feeling a little flashback to Hogwarts. We are sharing some slang used on Harry Potter books.

JK Rowling

 

“Bloody hell!”
We know this one to be used a lot by Ron. It is a common expression in Britain, Australia, and New Zealand. It could express a lot, from surprise to disgust to anger, etc.

Bloody hell

 

“Blimey.”
A popular British word to express surprise. Similar to ‘wow.’

“Bollocks!”
This is a word we should not use carelessly, as it means male genitalia parts. However, it’s used in the same way as ‘nonsense.’

“Codswallop!”
Also means ‘nonsense.’

“Git.”
Somewhat derogatory, git is used to describe a foolish person. Hagrid used it once to refer to Mr Filch.

Mr Filch

 

“Mental.”
Meaning crazy or insane.

Mental

 

“Peckish.”
The feeling of small hunger, wanting to eat but not quite hungry yet.

“Snog.”
To kiss passionately, to make out.

 

Feel free to add more on the comment section below!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 5 March 2020.


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#EngTrivia: Ways to Express Condolences

Fellas, have you ever tried comforting someone who has just lost his/her/their loved ones? What do you usually do or say on such occasion?

selective focus photography of red petaled flower
Photo by Azim Islam on Pexels.com

When someone has just lost someone he/she loves, it is tempting to say something that goes like, “When I lost (insert our loved ones) this is what happened/this is how it went.”

We might think that by saying it, it could help the other person to realise that he/she is not alone. However, a tragedy is a tragedy, whether it happens to us or to someone else. Therefore, refrain from saying something like that as it can be perceived that we are comparing other people’s misery to ours.

We should also avoid saying, “It’s a part of life/it will get better soon/you will feel better soon,” because it could mean that we are trivialising the other person’s loss.

It is also not advisable to ask a grieving person, “Are you okay?” or “How are you feeling?” because of course losing someone we love will never feel okay. This is crucial especially if you are considering to become a journalist who covers the life of famous people.

So what can we do to express our condolences?
Say something that offers sympathy and understanding.
E.g.:
“I’m sorry for the passing of your…”
“I’m sorry for your loss.”
“This must be hard for you.”
“Our sincere sympathy for you and your family.”

Say something that offers help.
E.g.:
“I’m here if you need anything.”
“Take a rest while I take care of everything else.”

Be there for the grieving person.
If it is possible for you to be present, be there for the grieving person. Often a person who has just lost someone he/she loves needs time to process the grief and it is not an easy process. It also doesn’t finish overnight. Be a moral support by ensuring the said person gets enough rest or eat healthy food and try not to exhaust them with the necessity of making a decision.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 26 February 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: Word of the Year

Hi, fellas, did you know that Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year 2019 is ‘climate emergency?’

We face more and more weather and climate-related crisis every year, so it is natural that people all around the world are getting more curious about the term ‘climate emergency’ and decided to look it up on the dictionaries.

As defined by Oxford Dictionaries, climate emergency is “a situation in which urgent action is required to reduce or halt climate change and avoid potentially irreversible environmental damage resulting from it.”

But what is ‘Word of the Year’ and how did this tradition start?

words text scrabble blocks
Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

 

Word(s) of the Year refers to any of various assessments as to the most important word(s) or expression(s) during a specific year.

The first known version of this tradition is the German one, Wort des Jahres, which was started in 1971. The American Dialect Society is the oldest English version, started in 1991. By early 2000s, a lot of organisations began to announce their versions of Word(s) of the Year for various purposes and with various criteria for the assessment.

Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year for the last five years are:

2015: Face with tears of joy emoji or laughing-crying emoji, the first emoji to have ever been selected.
2016: Post-truth.
2017: Youthquake.
2018: Toxic.
2019: Climate emergency.

The American Dialect Society also chose the Word of the Decade, which is ‘web’ for 1990s, ‘to google’ for 2000s, and singular ‘they’ for 2010s. According to the Society, the Word of the 20th century is jazz and the Word of the Past Millennium is ‘she.’

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 20 February 2020.


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#GrammarTrivia: Objects of Prepositions

Hello, fellas. This session is about objects of prepositions. They are objects following prepositions in prepositional phrases.

Common prepositions are:
about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, between, beyond, by, despite, down, during, for, from, in, into, like, near, of, off, on, out, over, since, through, throughout, till, to, toward(s), under, until, up, upon, with, within, without

(More on prepositions: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/09/17/engclass-prepositions/)

The object of a preposition is a noun, pronoun, gerund, or noun clause. Objects of prepositions are not the subject of a sentence.

Examples:
1) The student comes to the library.
2) They studied together without you.
3) She is interested in learning English.
4) The teacher is thinking about what he can do to motivate her students.

Sources:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition
Deborah Phillips, Longman Complete Course for the TOEFL Test

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Tuesday, Februari 18, 2020

#ENgvocab: Sick, ill, pain, Aiche, hurt and injury

Hello fellas, How was your day?

Let’s imagine, if you are a Doctor, what would you ask for your patience when they coming to check up?

Yes, you can ask: “What do you have”? or “What’s wrong”?

According to that situation, Today we will discuss #EngVocab Sick, Ill, Pain, Ache, Hurt and Injury in the sentences. Let’s get started!

  1. Sick and ill are adjectival. These words are similar in meaning.

E.g:

I feel ill.

I feel sick.

We also can use Sick in this sentence:

E.g: ” I’m so sick of this song. Can you turn it off“?

2. Pain and Ache are nouns.

E.g:

I have pain in my arm“.

My whole body feels painful“.

We only use Ache, when the words are connected.

E.g:

I have a headache and a stomach ache and a backache“.

3. Hurt is a verb. It is used to show your sick feeling

E.g: ” Aw, that hurts! Don’t touch me there“.

4. The injury usually uses when you got pain and that give effect for your life.

E.g:

I am Injured

She survived the accident without injury“.

Fellas, now you can use these words in the right sentences and situation. Thank you for attention, See you tomorrow!

Compiled by @2013happyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, 12 February 2020

#EngVocab: Words Related to Mobile Phone

Nowadays, a mobile phone has become a permanent part to our hands. We check our phones constantly even if there is no notification of incoming messages or calls or anything important on social medias. Do you also experience the same, fellas?

person taking photos of food
Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

This article will discuss words related to mobile phones.

1. Credit
This is a common term for prepaid mobile phone service, where we purchase some amount to use the provider’s service. In Indonesian, the term ‘phone credit’ has the same meaning as ‘pulsa.’

2. Data
(Mobile) data is what connects the phone to the internet when it is not connected to a Wi-Fi network.

3. Plans
Plans mean a package that might include a number of SMS, several minutes of phone calls, and some gigabits of mobile data that we purchase from the provider on a one-off occasion or on a regular basis.

Made Wirautama (@wirautama): In Indonesian we call it “paket data”.

4. 4G and 4.5G
4G means the fourth generation of mobile phone connection. It allows a mobile phone to connect to the internet with a relatively high download speed, which is 7-12 Mbps (megabits per second), and converts the phone to a mobile multimedia. 4.5G is an improved version of 4G with faster connection that could reach 14-21 Mbps. At the moment, we’re all excited for 5G, of course.

5. 4K
What is a 4K video? A video with 4K on it means that it was shoot with a lens with 3840 x 2160 pixels. It provides clearer, less fuzzy motions.

6. 720p
720p is currently the most common number to describe screen resolution. ‘P’ means progressive-scan and ‘720’ is the number of horizontal lines on the display. Higher screen resolutions are 1080p, 2160p (4K), and 8K.

7. HD
HD stands for high definition, which is also another name for a video with 720p resolution. 1080p is full HD (FHD). 1440p is Quad HD (QHD). 2160p or 4K is Ultra HD (UHD).

8. Lite
A lite version is a ‘lighter’ version of an application. It typically takes smaller space of the phone memory, displays media with lower resolutions, and has limited features compared to the full version.

9. Beta version
A beta version generally refers to a version of a piece of software that is made available for testing, typically by a limited number of users outside the company that is developing it, before its general release.

10. International roaming
The term refers to a feature that allows us to use the service of the provider in a foreign country where the service is not available. It usually costs more than the regular service.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 10 February 2020.


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#EngTalk: Adverbs without -ly

Hi, fellas! Most of us know that an adverb is a part of speech which is usually (not always) formed by adding the suffix -ly to an adjective.

Example:
Usual –> usually
Regular –> regularly
Beautiful –> beautifully
Angry –> angrily
Actual –> actually
Bad –> badly
Kind –> kindly

ask blackboard chalk board chalkboard
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

In recent years, more people using adverbs without -ly.
Example:
“He spoke loud and clear.”

The sentence still makes sense, too, because we understand that ‘he’ who spoke did so in a loud and clear way.

Naturally, it became a hot topic; should we omit -ly from an adverb? What do you think, fellas?

@pepe_2604: Hello there. I’m an English teacher in Mexico. I’ve found lots of changes in the language, not only a foreign but mine as well, due to media content, among other factors. So, I think it’s not a big issue to avoid -ly in an adverb since we face different problems for spoken production, and if we manage to make our students confident about producing a spoken language, I see no big deal with it. It is not that I don’t care but I can deal with it in further lessons.

 

I personally am used to putting -ly on an adverb. However, languages were developed to help humans understand each other. As long as we could understand what the sentence means, especially on spoken interaction, I think it’s fine.

The case could be different on written materials, where using proper grammar will help us understand the context better. But that’s just my personal opinion. What do you think, fellas?

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 6 February 2020.


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#GrammarTrivia: Using “Of” in Expressions of Quantity

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn how to use of in expressions of quantity.
Of is always contained in several expressions of quantity:

a lot of
lots of
a number of
a great deal of
a majority of
plenty of

Examples:
1) A number of books have been sold.
2) A number of my books have been sold.

Some expressions of quantity sometimes contain of and sometimes not. They use of when the noun is specific or preceded by any possessive, this/that/these/those, or the. Of is not used if the noun is nonspecific.

all (of)
most (of)
almost all (of)
many (of)
much (of)
a few (of)
a little (of)
one (of), two (of), three (of), etc
both (of)
several (of)

Examples:
1) Many of my students are foreigners.
2) Many of those students are foreigners.
3) Many of the students are foreigners.
4) Many students are foreigners.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, January 20, 2020

#GrammarTrivia: Be Supposed To

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn how to use be supposed to.

(More: https://englishtips4u.com/2012/02/24/engtrivia-suppose-supposed-to-supposed-to-be/)

Be supposed to is used to convey the idea that someone expects something to occur. Be supposed to often conveys expectations about scheduled events or correct procedures.

Examples:
1) The meeting is supposed to begin at 11:00.
2) The election of the government is supposed to be carried out by secret ballot.

Be supposed to also conveys expectations about behaviour.

Example:
You are supposed to park here.

In the past, be supposed to conveys unfulfilled expectations.

Example:
She was expected to participate in our discussion last night. (The speaker expected her to participate, but she did not)

Sources:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition
Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary – 4th Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Tuesday, February 4, 2020

#EngTrivia: ‘to dedicate to’ or ‘to dedicate for?’

Hi, fellas! How are you today? Did you get to see the Grammy award ceremony? Did your favourites win?

During an award acceptance speech/winning speech, often the winner says something that goes, “I dedicate this award ____ everyone who has supported me.”

What is the correct preposition to fill the blank, fellas? We have 2 options, ‘to’ and ‘for.’

Grammy_Award_2002
The Grammy (picture by Wikipedia).

Yes, the answer is ‘to.’

‘to dedicate something to something/someone’ is a phrase that means to reserve something for a particular purpose regarding something else or someone.
E.g.:
“Mom, I dedicated this song to you.”
“She dedicated her life to being a nurse.”

I understand that this can be confusing to us Indonesian, because the direct translation for both ‘to’ and ‘for’ is ‘untuk.’ Sometimes, we might use ‘for’ instead of the correct word, ‘to.’

However, as it is a phrase, we should always try to remember the correct form, ‘to dedicate ____ to.’

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 28 January 2020.


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#IOTW: Idioms about Transport (3)

Today we will learn more about transport idioms.
Do you know other idioms related to transport?

Let’s start.

  1. At a fork in the road.
    Meaning: a time when you have to make a difficult decision about something important.
    E.g. “I came at a fork in the road after my graduation.”
  2. Backseat driver.
    Meaning: someone who gives unwanted advice, unnecessarily criticizes, or lectures another person who is doing something.
    E.g. ” My aunt is a backsat driver. She needs to stop interfering the family discussion.”
  3. Clear the decks.
    Meaning: finish up less important tasks so that a more important project can start.”
    E.g. “I’m trying to clear the decks before Chinese Newyear.”
  4. Asleep at the wheel.
    Meaning: not paying attention to important things; failing to attend to one’s responsibilities or duties.
    E.g. “The charity party is cancelled because the event organizer was asleep at the wheel.”
  5. All hands on deck.
    Meaning: everyone is needed to help in a particular situation.
    E.g. “We need all hands on deck to make this event possible.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 19, 2020.

#EngGrammar: Infinitive Verbs

Hi, fellas, how are you today?

There are several parts of speech in English: noun, pronoun, adjective, determiner, verb, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection.

One of them, verb, specifically infinitive verbs, are our topic for this article. Can you define infinitive verbs? What is the difference between infinitive verbs and base/finite verbs?

text on shelf
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

Base verbs are verbs that can be used in their original forms.
E.g.:
run every day.
check my social media accounts 8 to 10 times a day.

Infinitive verbs are non-finite verbs or verbs that cannot stand independently as the main verbs on a sentence. Infinitive verbs are usually preceded by the word ‘to.’ Infinitive verbs are also usually used after the following words:
Modal verbs (can/could, may/might, must, shall/should, will/would)
E.g.:
She must go to the airport by 3 hours prior to the flight.
John should consider a career in acting; he’s so talented.

Several other verbs
Several other verbs that are followed by infinitive verbs are afford, agree, aim, appear, arrange, attempt, determined, beg, care, choose, claim, dare, decide, demand, deserve, expect, fail, happen, help, hesitate, hope, learn, long, manage, mean, need, neglect, offer, plan, prepare, pretend, proceed, promise, refuse, resolve, seem, stop, swear, tend, threaten, use, volunteer, vow, want, wish, would hate, would like, would love, and would prefer.
E.g.:
The child appears to be ill.
I beg to differ.
It helps to have a friend who is a tech-savvy.
He refused to sign the agreement.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 23 January 2020.


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#IOTW: Idioms about Transport (2)

Today we will learn more about transport idioms.
Do you know other idioms related to transport?

Let’s start.

  1. Jump the track.
    Meaning: suddenly switch from one thought or activity to another.
    E.g. “We have to postpone the meeting because our boss jumped the track.”
  2. Train wreck.
    Meaning: something that fails completely or goes extremely badly.
    E.g. “Her life hit the train wreck after she dropped out of school.”
  3. Fly high.
    Meaning: having a great extent; at high point or high rank in one’s career.
    E.g. “My colleague flew high after getting the promotion.”
  4. Fifth wheel.
    Meaning: someone who has no real place or purpose in a situation.
    E.g. “I’m tired of being trated like the fifth wheel.”
  5. Sail through.
    Meaning: to move or proceed through in an easy, quick, and smooth way.
    E.g. “My brother sailed through the agreement and got the deal.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 6, 2020.

#EngKnowledge: Common Misconceptions in English Learning

Hi, hello, fellas! How are you?

With the increasing use of English in every field, English proficiency is a must-have skill. We in Indonesia, however, could find a lot of challenges when trying to learn English, some of them came from the misconceptions that we still believe to be true until now.

By changing our mindset about these misconceptions, we will be better prepared to embrace English learning or learning any other foreign languages as a part of our daily life.

What are those misconceptions?

 

abstract blackboard bulb chalk
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

English (or any foreign languages) is hard. I will never be good at it.
Trust me, fellas, I also had the same mindset when I first started learning English. It turned out that it was just in my mind. And so, I tried a variety of learning methods. One that helped me a lot was doing a lot of exercise and practice, whether it was reading, listening, or structure/grammar. Take your time while learning something new and be patient with yourself.

We can learn English better and faster with a native speaker.
Not always true. Most native speakers learn English through language acquisition when they were young, which means they might not experience the difficulty of learning a new language at a later age. Native speakers can often follow English grammar patterns without knowing what that grammar pattern is, so they can use English well but might not be able to teach it.

I can never master the correct British/American/Australian accent.
Again, this is not always true, fellas. With practice, you can acquire the accent, but the more important thing is the correct pronunciation as well as your confidence in yourself to use English on a daily basis.

Grammar is the most important part of English learning.
The correct statement is all elements of English learning are equally important. Grammar at times can be the most intimidating part, but as you grow to love what you are learning and notice the pattern on which a grammar is used, you will find no difficulties using grammar.

Someone who speaks English is more intelligent than others.
Proficiency in English does not equate intelligence, fellas. It’s true that by being proficient in English, the opportunity to learn new things will open widely. However, it will depend on the person whether he/she/they can use the opportunity and the resources well, including understanding the subject.

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 13 January 2020.


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#EngTips: How to Improve Vocabulary

woman in front of her computer
Photo by Ree on Pexels.com

It is not easy to learn a new language, fellas. Especially with the structure, grammar, and all the tenses. We could also find difficulties adding new words to our vocabulary. We have to know the meaning of the word, how to pronounce it correctly, and in what context it is used.

However, we can always try by learn and learn more. Here are some tips to help you improve your vocabulary:

Read and listen
It might sound simple, fellas, but it is about building a habit. The more we try to find new words by reading English texts, watching the news, or listening to podcast, the more familiar we are with them.

Keep a journal
Writing a word down in a journal could help us memorise it better. You can also use any notes on your mobile phone if you feel more comfortable doing so.

Dictionary and thesaurus are handy
If you are still unsure about the difference between a dictionary and a thesaurus, you can simply think of a dictionary as a list of words in alphabetical order with their meanings and the pronunciation, while a thesaurus shows what words are synonymous or antonymous.
With technology nowadays, install a dictionary and a thesaurus app on your mobile phone to quickly help you when you find a new word.

Use the new words
Never be hesitant to practice by using the words in a written form or in a conversation. You can also ask your studying partner to correct you.

Group words that surround the same theme
Instead of listing the words one by one, try grouping them into the same theme. For example, if you love dining out, then collect words that are related to food and restaurant and cooking. So every time you learn a new word from this theme, it will be easier to remember.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 9 January 2020.


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#GrammarTrivia: Irregularities in Subject-Verb Agreement (2)

Hello, fellas. Tonight we have the second session of several irregularities in subject-verb agreement.

(More: https://englishtips4u.com/2019/12/24/grammartrivia-irregularities-in-subject-verb-agreement/)

People, police, and cattle are plural nouns and followed by plural verbs, even though they do not end in –s.

Example:
Many people learn English to study overseas.

Some nouns of nationality ending in –sh, -ese, and –ch can refer to language or people, e.g., English, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Portuguese, French. They can be followed by singular or plural verbs.

Examples:
Chinese is an international language.
The Chinese are hard workers.

Several adjectives can be preceded by the and used as a plural noun (with no final –s) to refer to people having the quality, e.g., the poor, the rich, the young, the elderly, the living, the dead, the blind, the deaf, the disabled.

Example:
The young want a change.

Source:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, January 6, 2019

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