#EngClass: Noun Clause

Today we will learn about noun clause.
Noun clauses are subordinate clauses that can fill the position of noun phrases.
You can learn more here https://englishtips4u.com/2013/02/04/grammartrivia-noun-clause/

A noun clause is a subordinate clause that can function as:
1. A subject
E.g. “What he says is probably true.”
2. An object
E.g. “I will try whatever I can do.”
3. A complement
E.g. “He strummed his guitar when he talked to me.”

Other words that we can use to form noun clauses:
1. Question words, examples:
a. Who
E.g. “Miracles are to those who believe in them.”
b. Why
E.g. “I have no idea why he is hostile to me.”
c. Where
E.g. “He indicated to me where I should sit with a a nod of his head.”
Etc.

  1. Pronouns, examples:
    a. Which
    E.g. “I read the information on the label before deciding which jam to buy.”
    b. That
    E.g. “He knew that she did not wish him to go.”
    c. Whenever
    E.g. “Whenever I have a cold I get a nosebleed.”
    d. Wherever
    E.g. “Wherever they went they were closely followed by security men.”
    Etc.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, February 4, 2018.

#EngTips: IELTS academic writing task 1 (chart data)

Hello, Fellas. How are you? Time flies so fast, doesn’t it? It’s already February.

Today, I’m going to give some tips about performing IELTS academic writing test. For you who have some additional tips, either based on your own experience or the tips and trick guidance you’ve read, are free to share it..

I had actually shared the tips of paraphrasing, which acts as the introduction of your essay, some times ago. If you missed the session, you can read it through this link https://englishtips4u.com/2017/03/21/engtips-ielts-academic-writing-task-1-paraphrasing/

In this session, we will discuss planning the structure of the essay based on data chart. This might seem difficult, but I personally think that writing an essay from data chart is simpler than the others, such as maps and processes.

I read Barron’s Writing for The IELTS as a guidance. It suggests us to make some a list to determine and at the same time classify the data from the chart.

Firstly, we need to make a list that includes general information of the data, such as the object, the recorded time and place(s), and others.

Here is the illustration:

engtips

(Source: Barron’s Writing for The IELTS)
  • Title: Average daily sales, by number of servings
  • What (object): Average daily sales
  • When: winter and summer
  • Where: Vista cafe

Next step, you can make a comparison as well as the details from the object you have figured out.

For example:

Object comparison:

  1. Median daily sales (serving) of foods and beverages in winter

Details:

  • The highest serving: hot coffee (above 70)
  • The second highest serving: soup (50)
  • Medium number of serving: salad and ice cream (25 for each item)
  • The lowest serving: ice coffee (below 5)
  1. Median daily sales (serving) of foods and beverages in summer.

Details:

  • The highest serving: ice coffee (40)
  • The second highest serving: ice cream (35)
  • Medium number of serving: hot coffee (30)
  • Lowest number of serving: salad and soup (25)

From the details given, you can start writing your essay by comparing the data and also describing the details’ information (discussion). According to the example, you can compare the highest and the lowest food/drink serving in each season.

Lastly, make your conclusion. This part can be put either before the or after the discussion. Besides, you can write your conclusion by using the comparison information in general. For illustration, “Overall, hot coffee and soup are the most purchased items in winter while Ice coffee and ice cream reached the highest servings in summer.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, February 1, 2018

#EngTips: Capitalization (2)

Hey, fellas! We meet again. How was your day?
On last week session, we discussed capitalization. Find the recap here: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/01/13/engtips-capitalization/
Today, we will continue to discuss the rules of capitalization. Here we go! #EngTips
1. Do not capitalize compass directions (south, etc.) that aren’t being used as a name.

E.g.: “We’re leaving West Java and heading north this month.” #EngTips
2. Do not capitalize earth’s landscape (e.g.: river, hill, sea) that aren’t being used as a name, especially when the term is used descriptively. #EngTips

E.g.: 

Semeru mountain

Toba lake
2. … However, if the earth’s landscape is being used as a name and being an actual part of a proper noun, it needs to be capitalized. #EngTips

E.g.: 

Mount Krakatau

Sahara Desert

Jimbaran Beach
3. Do not capitalize occupation before full names. However, titles replacing one’s first name are capitalized. #EngTips

E.g.:

“The soccer team was trained by coach James.”

“Here comes Doctor Smith.”
4. Do not capitalize the first item in a list followed by a colon. #EngTips

E.g.: “You need to buy: apples, grapes, and mangos.”
5. Do not capitalize coordinating conjunction (and, but, yet, or, nor, for, so) unless it is first or last word in a title. #EngTips

E.g.: “So Quiet on the Canine Front is a 1930 comedy short film.”

“There are ten movies in Abbot and Costello series.”
6. Do not capitalize an article (a, an, the) unless it is first or last word in a title. #EngTips

E.g.: “The Atlantis Interceptors was influenced by Mad Max.”
That’s all I can share for today, fellas. I hope it could be useful for you.
Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U. Saturday, 27 January, 2018.

#EngClass: Clause

Do you know that a sentence consists of one or more clauses?

Clause means:
1. A group of words containing a subject and a predicate and functioning as a member of a complex or compound sentence (according to Merriam-Webster Dictionary).
Note: You can learn more here https://englishtips4u.com/2013/09/01/engclass-sentences/ and here https://englishtips4u.com/2017/05/22/engclass-complex-sentences/

  1. A particular and a separate article, stipulation, or proviso in a treaty, bill, or contract (according to Google Dictionary).

There are two kinds of clauses:
1. Main/independent clause: a clause that can stand alone as a complete, simple sentence; contains a subject and a predicate.
E.g. “He laughed.”

  1. Subordinate/dependent clause: a clause that can not form a sentence by itself.
    E.g. “Justice must be done even if the sky falls.”

There are three types of dependent clause:

a. Adjective/relative clause: a dependent clause that functions as an adjective within a sentence.
You can learn more here https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/08/engclass-relative-clause/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/09/engclass-relative-clause-2/

b. Noun clause: a dependent clause that functions as a noun within a sentence.
You can learn more here https://englishtips4u.com/2013/02/04/grammartrivia-noun-clause/

c. Adverb clause: a dependent clause that functions as an adverb within a sentence.
You can learn more here https://englishtips4u.com/2011/10/13/engclass-adverbial-clause/

There are seven types of adverb clause:

i. Clause of time: adverb clause to indicate when something happens.
The conjunctions: “after”, “before”, “since”, etc.
You can learn more here https://englishtips4u.com/2016/10/16/engclass-time-related-adverb-clause/

ii. Clause of place: adverb clause to indicate the place where the action happens.
The conjunctions: “where”, “anywhere”, “nowhere”, etc.

iii. Clause of contrast/concession: adverb clause to indicate ideas or actions that are not expected.
The conjunctions: “although”, “in spite of”, “even if”, etc.

iv. Clause of manner: adverb clause to indicate how an action happens.
The conjunctions: “as”, “how”, “like”, etc.

v. Clause of purpose and result: adverb clause to indicate purpose.
The conjunctions: “so that”, “in case”, “in order that”, etc.

vi. Clause of cause and effect: adverb clause to indicate why something happens.
The conjuntions: “because”, “due to”, “therefore”, etc.

vii. Clause of condition: adverb clause to indicate the circumstances of the action.
The conjunctions: “if”, “unless”, “if only”, etc.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 21, 2018.

#WOTD: Cacophony

Hi, Fellas! It’s good to see you again this evening. How’s your day?

In this session we are going to discuss “cacophony.” Is there anyone have an idea of the meaning of this word?

“Ex. Shouting wife.. Lol.” – @cris_zysier

Oxford Dictionary states that “cacophony” is an unpleasant/harsh sound. In a simpler way hand you can also define it as a noise. It is said that “cacophony” was derived from a Greek word called “kakophonia” or “kakophonos.” Kakophonos itself is the combination of “kakos,” which means “bad,” and “phone” (sound).

There are some example of cacophonies in our daily life, such as the sound of vehicles on the road followed by the shouting horns, chatter, or a mixed sound of music. According to Merriam-Webster dictionary, there are some related vocabulary to “cacophony.” They are “blast,” “uproar,” “clatter,” etc.

Lastly, here are some example of sentences that contain “cacophony”

  • “The room is full of people. I think I will stay here since their voices are cacophonies to me.”
  • “The increasing number of personal vehicles is the main cause of cacophony on the road.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, January 18, 2018

#EngTrivia: “Happy” vs “Glad”

Do you know the difference between “happy” and “glad”?

“Happy” and “glad” are both adjectives.

We use them when we want to express pleasure.

The meaning of those words are almost the same but they are different in the term of usage.
“Happy” indicates a stronger feeling than “glad”.

“Happy” is more accented and positive, deeper felt.

“Happy” means:

  1. Feeling or showing pleasure or contentment.

a. having a sense of confidence in or satisfaction with (a person, arrangement, or situation).

E.g. “We are happy to announce the engagement of our daughter.”
b. satisfied with the quality or standard of.

E.g. “I had a very happy childhood.”
c. willing to do something.

E.g. “I’d be happy to help you.”
d. used in greetings.

E.g. “Happy new year, my best friend.”
2. Fortunate and convenient.

E.g. “I’m happy to have known you.”

(According to Google Translate Dictionary)
“Glad” is more formal than “happy”. We usually use “glad” in writing business letters or emails.

“Glad” is generally the opposite of sad and gloomy.

“Glad” means “pleased; delighted” (according to Google Translate Dictionary)

E.g. “I am glad to hear that you have passed the examination with a good record.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 7, 2018.

#EngTips: Capitalization

Hello, fellas! How’s your weekend?
Today’s session discusses the capitalization rules. Capitalization is the action of writing a word with uppercase for the first letter and lowercase for the remaining letters.

Let’s check some rules of capitalization below. #EngTips
1. Capitalize the first word of every sentence. #EngTips

E.g.: “I’m happy that you gave me a huge bouquet of roses. Jim, you really pull out all the stops.”
2. Capitalize the first-person singular pronoun, I. #EngTips

E.g.:

“I want to eat an apple.”

“Where did I put the book?”
3. Capitalize people’s name. #EngTips

E.g.: “Christopher Nolan is an excellent director, screenwriter, and producer.”
4. Capitalize the proper nouns (names of the cities, countries, geological location). #EngTips

E.g.:

“She’s from Maluku, Indonesia.”

“We’ve been to Northern California for a holiday.”
5. Capitalize the proper nouns (historical event, political parties, religion and religious term, races, nationality, languages). #EngTips

E.g.:

“Pearl Harbor was attacked on December 7, 1941.”

“There are many Asians living in America.”

“Thank, God!”
6. Capitalize days of the week, month, holiday. However, do not capitalize the names of seasons (spring, summer, fall, autumn, winter). #EngTips

E.g.:

“Today is Saturday, December 13, 2018.”

“Out of all season, I love spring the most!”
7. Capitalize the proper nouns (names of newspaper, journal, company, and brand name). #EngTips

E.g.:

“Most newspaper have an online edition, including the New York Times.”

“The current trend of South Korean idols is to wear Balenciaga shoes.”
8. Capitalize a formal title when it is used as a form of address. #EngTips

E.g.:

“Thank you for your help, Doctor!”

“Let’s visit Grandfather today.”
That wraps up our session, fellas! See you on another interesting session.
Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, Januari 13, 2018.

#WOTD: Youthquake

Hello, dear Fellas. I wish you a happy new year although the moment has already passed. I hope you will achieve your plans and have a better year!

Today we will have a talk about ‘youthquake.’ Maybe some of you knew that ‘youthquake’ is actually the word of the year in 2017, but this word is new for me and perhaps for one of you, too. Besides, there is no time limit in learning. Don’t you agree?

I saw ‘youthquake’ at the very first time while I was browsing some news in Jakarta Post. It stated that Oxford Dictionary named it as the word of 2017.

Is there anyone who can tell me what it means?

“A change affected by youth?” – @puputrbc

‘Youthquake’ means a significant change in some aspect, such as political, social, business, culture, etc., that was lead by young people. Could you give me some example of something as the product of the change? As a simple illustration, I think the significant raise of cafes is.

“Startup business, I guess.” – @kaonashily

Even though this word is just recently known, but it is said that ‘youthquake’ was mentioned publicly in 1960s by Vague Magazine editor. Here are some example of ‘youthquake’ in sentences:

  • “Have you noticed that youthquake had already existed along with the rapid development of social media?”
  • “Youthquake had silently changed our lifestyle.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, January 4, 2018

#IOTW: Idioms with ‘party’

Hello, fellas! What are you doing in the last days of 2018? New Year will be coming soon! It’s a good time to look at idioms on party and celebration. Here we go!

  1. After-party. Meaning: a relaxed time in which people sit and talk after they have been at a party.
    • Example:
      • “When the New Year celebration finished, they had an after-party in the rooftop.”
  2. Party animal. Meaning: someone who loves going to parties.
    • Example:
      • “Jon is a real party animal. He’s rarely at home.”
  3. Party pooper. Meaning: a person who refuses to join in the fun of a party.
    • Example:
      • “It’s better not to invite my cousin. She’s a party pooper who always leaves first.”
  4. Party hearty. Meaning: to celebrate.
    • Example:
      • “Our basketball team won the competition, so we decided to party hearty!”
  5. Crash the party. Meaning: to attend a party without being invited.
    • Example:
      • “He crashed the party and ended up causing trouble.”
  6. Piss on (one’s) party. Meaning: to ruin or underestimate someone’s efforts, plans, or ideas.
    • Example:
      • “Sorry to piss on your party, but there’s no way we’ll finish the report in one night.”
  7. Party foul. Meaning: a term of behavior that is inappropriate or unacceptable at a party.
    • Example:
      • “You spilled wine on the carpet! That’s a party foul.”
  8. Party piece. Meaning: some ways (trick, song, poem) that someone often do to entertain people at parties.
    • Example:
      • “Her party piece has always been impersonating celebrity’s voices.”
  9. The life and soul of the party. Meaning: someone who’s at the center of all parties.
    • Example:
      • “The party isn’t complete without Dan. He’s truly the life and soul of the party!”
  10. Be a party to something. Meaning: take part in a (secret) plan or agreement.
    • Example:
      • “I don’t know that they held the surprise celebration. Were you a party to this, Nat?”

That wraps up our session, fellas! Have a great time in New Year! Good bye!
Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, December 30, 2017.


RELATED POST(S):

^MD

#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘Happy’

Do you know what other words to describe ‘happy’?

Today we will learn about the substitutes of ‘happy’.

  1. Cheery: bright, optimistic.

E.g. “She gave me a cheery smile.”
2. Jovial: in a good spirit.

E.g. “Grandma was plump and jovial.”
3. Gleeful: delighted, full of joy.

E.g. “The park was full of gleeful children playing on sleds.”
4. Content: happy, satisfied.

E.g. “He seems to be getting more content as he gets older.”
5. Blissful: extremely happy.

E.g. “We spent three blissful weeks away from work.”
6. Radiant: obviously very happy.

E.g. “She announced, with a radiant smile, that she was going to have a baby.”
7. Jubilant: expressing great joy.

E.g. “The government has cancelled agricultural taxes, all the farmers are jubilant.”
8. Exuberant: full of energy, excitement.

E.g. “When the two travellers entered the hut, the old couple beamed with genuine exuberant happiness.”
9. Gratify: please, satisfy.

E.g. “Always do right. This will gratify some and astonish the rest – Mark Twain.”
10. Exultant: triumphantly happy.

E.g. “The exultant crowds were dancing in the street.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, December 24, 2017.

#EngTalk: Your plan on holidays

Hi, Fellas. How are you? How’s your day?

Since the previous week, I can feel the atmosphere of holiday! Maybe it is because of the students in my school have already been in their vacation.

“Me, too.” – @Mirtaindah 

Speaking of holiday, do you have any plan for the holiday?

“Barbecue party on Christmas eve. Stay at home all day on New year.” – @T_Xfen

“Oh I have. I am going home!!” – @riverningtyas

“As a shift-worker, I don’t have any holiday based on ‘red date’ / tanggal merah.” – @shunusuke 

Mine was used to be just lying on my bed until noon because I used to watch movies until almost dawn. I still remember around 6-7 years ago, when I was still a high school student, I would rent a lot of DVDs along the holiday. However, I can’t do that anymore because I barely can keep myself wide awake when the clock hits 10 PM.

On the other hand, I have a friend who always spend the year-end holidays with her family members.

“You know who it is… yeah.. that’s.. ((((((me)))))” –@ferinayuu

She told me that every year they would go somewhere, such as Kaliurang, and rent a villa or hotel rooms for staying. Then the next days, they would go on off road and exploring the tourism sites in Kaliurang. I even spotted the same designed T-shirt for each of her family member. Such a warm family, right?

In spite of the two examples I have shared, I ever saw some people who like spending the holidays to study, for example attending an intensive course. For those who are currently studying in university, they would join the exchange program or a short course. As the alternative, some of them joined a volunteering program.

What about you? Feel free to share your usual activities during the holidays.

“I used to clean my bag, my shoes, my clothes etc. Because I’m working start Monday to Friday. So, I don’t have many times to clean & clear all of my items at home ” – @kalya_soenar 

Well, whatever you’ve planned for this holiday be sure to enjoy it, especially when you are with your closest relatives.

“Happy holiday!!! 🌼🌼🌼🌼🌼🌼” – @mllehesti 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, December 21, 2017

#EngClass: Expressing Conditions

Today we will learn about express conditions.

We can explain a condition by expressing factual implications, hypothetical situations and their consequences.

There are many ways to express conditions. 

Here’s some examples of common words we can use to expressing conditions.
1. If: used to define a condition or supposition.

E.g. “Get out of the kitchen if you can’t stand the heat.”
2. In case: as a provision  against something.

E.g. “I’m worried about washing that shirt in case it shrinks.”
3. Unless: except the condition that.

E.g. “Don’t call me unless it is a real emergency.”
4. So that: indicates purpose.

E.g. “Please speak up so that the people at the back of the room can hear you.”
5. Whether: expressing a doubt or choice.

E.g. “I really don’t know whether to be happy or sad here today.”
6. Otherwise: in circumstances different from those present.

E.g. “Shut the window, otherwise it’ll get too cold in here.
7. Or else: used to define another option or possibility.

E.g. “The book must be here, or else you’ve lost it.”
Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, October 29, 2017.

#EngClass: Appositive Phrase

Today we will learn about appositive phrase.
An appositive is a noun, noun phrase, or noun clause that follows another noun to explain or identifiy it.

The noun identifies a person, place, thing, etc. in a sentence.
An appositive gives another name or more information about the noun beside it.

Appositives often begin with the words ‘a’, ‘an’, or ‘the.’
We already have a session about appositive, you can review it here https://englishtips4u.com/2012/04/23/engclass-and-engquiz-appositive/
An appositive phrase consists of an appositive and its modifiers.

The modifier can be a single word, phrase, or clause.
Appositive and appositive phrase are usually punctuated with commas.
The placement of commas when using appositives:

  1. Before the noun

E.g. “The father of that woman in red, George is standing beside her.”

  1. After the noun but not at the end of the sentence

E.g. “The staff, a girl with glasses and high heels, is coming to join the meeting.”

  1. After the noun and at the end of the sentence.

E.g. “At the last match he will againts a tough opponent, a former national champion.”
Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @Englishtips4U on Sunday, December 10, 2017.

#EngVocab: Phrasal Verbs with ‘Get’

Hey, fellas! How do you do?

It’s time for us to get along  more and discuss phrasal verbs together!
The previous tweet contains a phrasal verb. Phrasal verb is a phrase that consists of a verb with a preposition or adverb or both. The meaning of phrasal verb is different from the original verb.
Below is the list of the phrasal verb with ‘get’ to enrich your vocabulary.

  1. Get along (with something/someone): be friendly.

E.g.: “My classmates and I get along very well. We eat together in lunch time.”


  1. Get out: to leave; used for telling someone to leave. 

E.g.: “I’m studying here! Please get out of my room!” 

  1. Get over (something): to deal with or gain control of something.

E.g.: “She can’t get over her happy feeling.”

  1. Get through to (something): to go forward to the next step of a process.

E.g.: “He got through to the final round of audition.”

  1. Get by: to survive by using the money, knowledge, etc. that you have.

E.g.: “How are you getting by these days?”

  1. Get away: to leave from a person or place.

E.g.: “We’ve decided to visit countryside to get away from this city.”

  1. Get up: to get out of bed after sleeping. 

E.g.: “My sister gets up at 4:30 every morning.”

  1. Get rid of (something): to remove or throw away something. 

E.g.: “Mr. Jo got rid of their old sofa and bought a new one.”

  1. Get off: to escape a punishment; to stop an action from someone or something.

E.g.: “The suspect will get off with a caution.”

“Would you please get your feet off the table?”
10. Get in: to arrive at home or at work.

E.g.: “She never gets in before 6:50 in the morning.”

That’s all for today, fellas! It’s time for #EngVocab session to get away and let another session take over tomorrow.
Written and compiled by @anhtiss on @EnglishTips4U. Saturday, December 16, 2017

#EngTrivia: Choice of words

Hi, Fellas.  How are you today? We meet again in #EngTrivia session.

This evening I will share some words which can be the alternative of daily casual words. You can use these selections in your IELTS test essay performance.

  1. ‘Accelerate.’ Meaning: ‘speed up.’
    • Example:
      • “My friend had join a special class in his high school, so he can accelerate his grade.”
  2. ‘Additionally.’ Meaning: ‘there is more.’
    • Example:
      • “Additionally, we have to prepare the gift for this holiday session.”
  3. ‘Allow.’ Meaning: ‘let.’
    • Example:
      • “My parents allowed me to drive to school.”
  4. ‘Anecdote.’ Meaning: ‘joke.’
    • Example:
      • “There are plenty of silly anecdote in social media nowadays.”
  5. ‘Anticipate.’ Meaning: ‘expect.’
    • Example:
      • “The movie was as good as I have anticipated.”
  6.  ‘Beneficial.’ Meaning: ‘good for (something).’
    • Example:
      • “Do you think this purchasing system would be beneficial for our company?”
  7. ‘Utilize.’ Meaning: ‘use.’
    • Example:
      • “This manual has a detail description of utilizing the incubator.”
  8.  ‘Sufficient.’ Meaning: ‘enough.’
    • Example:
      • “Our country still have a sufficient rice stock and it will last approximately until next year.”
  9. ‘Pleased.’ Meaning: ‘happy.’
    • Example:
      • “Pleased to meet you.”
  10. ‘Perhaps.’ Meaning: ‘maybe.’
    • Example:
      • “I am not sure I would able to attend the meeting on time. Perhaps, my assistant could cover me for several minutes.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, December 7, 2017

#EngClass: Adverbs of Reason

Today we will learn about adverbs of reason.

Adverbs of reason are also called adverbs of purpose.

It explains why a situasion or an action happens.
Here are some adverbs of reason that are commonly used:

  1. As: to indicate something happens when other thing is taking place; by comparison the way that something happens.

E.g. “As the wind blows, you must set your sail.”
2. Since: for the reason that.

E.g. “Since I’ll be away, I’d like to reschedule the meeting.”
3. Because: to introduce the reason or explanation of something.

E.g. “I fake a smile because I don’t want you to worry about what I’m feeling.”
4. Because of: on account of.

E.g. “The match was postponed to the next day because of bad weather.”
5. Due to: caused by; as the result of.

E.g. “The failure is due to inadequacy of preparations.”
6. Hence: as a consequence.

E.g. “It is very late, hence you must go to bed.”
7. The reason for: justification for an action or event.

E.g. “The reason for over crowding is the failure of police control.”
8. Therefore: consequently; on that ground.

E.g. “The store was out of chocolate chips, therefore they would need to use another cookies.”
9. In order to: as a means to.

E.g. “We need more feedback from the costumer in order to improve our goods.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, November 26, 2017.

#IOTW: Fear

Hello, fellas! Did you enjoy the Halloween event few days ago? In the theme of Halloween, we will talk about the idioms related to fear, nervousness, and anxiety. Here we go!

 

  1. Shake like a leaf

Meaning: to tremble violently with fear and nervousness

E.g.: “Before I went into the exam room, I was shaking like a leaf.”

 

  1. Scared stiff

Meaning: utterly terrified that one cannot move

E.g.: “He was scared stiff when the dog barked at him.”

 

  1. Send shivers down (one’s) spine

Meaning: to cause an intense feeling of fear, nervousness, exhilaration, or excitement in someone.

E.g.: “This creepy old house is sending shivers down my spine! Let’s get out from here.”

 

  1. Bated breath

Meaning: if you wait for something with bated breath, you wait in an anxious or excited way to see what’s happen next.

E.g.: “We waited with bated breath for the winner to be announced.”

 

  1. Bundle of nerves

Meaning: someone who is very nervous, anxious, or uneasy.

E.g.: “Ann is doing her college entrance exam today. She’s a bundle of nerves!”

 

  1. Break out in a cold sweat

Meaning: to begin sweating because one is nervous or frightened.

E.g.: “I get nervous at the dentist and usually break out in a cold sweat.”

 

  1. Make one’s blood run cold

Meaning: to shock or horrify someone.

E.g.: “I could tell you a horror story that would make your blood run cold.”

 

 

Source:

  • Cambridge Idioms Dictionary.

  • Farlex Dictionary of Idioms

 

 

Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, November 3, 2017.

#GrammarTrivia: Wish

Today we will learn about the way to use ‘wish’ in sentences.

‘Wish’ means a desire or hope for something to happen.

Here are some explanations on how to use ‘wish’ in sentences.
1. Situation: “My friend don’t come to the party.”

True sentence: “My friend isn’t here to keep me company.”

Wish: “I wish my friend was here to keep me company.”

‘Simple present –> simple past.’
2. Situation: “The school is on holiday.”

True sentence: “The school is starting next week.”

Wish: “I wish the school was starting this week.”

‘Present continuous –> past continuous.’
3. Situation: “My friend has become a mother.”

True sentence: “I haven’t seen my friend in the hospital.”

Wish: “I wish I had seen my friend in the hospital.”

‘Present perfect –> past perfect.’
4. Situation: “I had an argument with my brother.”

True sentence: “My brother didn’t agree with me.”

Wish: “I wish my brother had agreed with me.”

‘Simple past –> past perfect.’
5. Situation: “My friend’s sister is coming to town.”

Wish: “I wish I could see your little sister.”

‘Could.’
6. Situation: “My classmates are late because of traffic.”

Wish: “I wish they would come sooner.”

‘Would.’

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, November 12, 2017.

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