Tag Archives: Work

#BusEng #EngKnowledge: Old-School Career Rules for Millennials

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Picture from Pexels/Wordpress

People who were born from 1981 to 1997 are often being referred to as millennial generation or simply ‘millennials.’ This age group is also the one who prides itself as 90s kids, as the people who belong to it spent their childhood and teenage era in the 90s.

Now, most millennials have grown up to the productive age when they start working as professionals. Fast-thinking, self-assured, and a high adaptability to technology are often considered as millennial workers’ strengths.

Sadly, millennials often get labelled as disloyal, quickly jumping from one job to the next, having high expectation, and having a great deal of entitlement. Millennials also tend to get bored easily. If they feel they are stuck, they will find a way to be unstuck, which makes them seem difficult to deal with. These traits make millennials easily misunderstood by their coworkers and employers who are from older generation.

So, how can millennials solve this? I’d like to share several old-school career rules that millennials can apply to their professional life.

  1. Communication matters.
    Even when we’re working in the same workplace, people come from varied backgrounds. This means that we need to explain ourselves from time to time. So, there shouldn’t be ‘I thought you already knew’ or ‘Nobody told me that.’
  2. Be on time.
    By being on time (or early, if possible) we show people that we respect their schedule and we take them seriously. Besides, a delay often leads to other delays. If we don’t finish a task in a timely manner, it is very likely that the other tasks are delayed. In a fast-paced working environment, things can easily get out of hand.
  3. Eyes on the details.
    Be it on the way we dress, the way we write our emails with proper and acceptable manners in business relationship, or the way we refrain ourselves from checking our phones during important meetings, pay attention to small details. Again, we want to show our partners that working with them is important to us.
  4. Never underestimate any tasks.
    “I didn’t spend 5 years in the university only to work on Excel spreadsheets,” was my thought on the first day of my first job. Do you also have a similar experience, fellas? Well, no matter how much we dislike trivial assignments, they are actually necessary to learn the workflow at the workplace. If we can handle trivia, we can always ask for more responsibilities to our supervisor.
  5. Give time for a change to happen.
    Oftentimes, we as millennials want to see some changes to immediately happen once we utter the ideas. A new coworker to share our workloads with, a promotion, a more challenging position, or anything similar. What we should realize is that our supervisor or employer makes a decision that concerns many other people. Therefore, they might take some time before making up their mind.

 

That’s all I can share, fellas. Let us as millennials be a good example for our generation, while also being an agent of change to the workforce.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 7 May, 2018.


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#IOTW: Idioms about hard work

Hi, fellas! How are you? I’ve been working my fingers to the bone to finish my tasks today, to exaggerate a bit.

If any of you are students, these days might be your busiest too, I guess, because the end of the school term is pretty close. Before you get the holiday you deserve at the end of this month, you have to work hard for exams first.

So maybe you want to know some idioms you can use to express the hard work you’re going through. Well, here are some idioms related to hard work that we have curated for you:

  1. Blood, sweat and tears. Meaning: a lot of effort and suffering.
    • Example:
      • It must have taken the author’s blood, sweat, and tears to write this really good novel.
  2. Fight tooth and nail. Meaning: to use a lot of effort to oppose someone or achieve something.
    • Example:
      • He’s fighting tooth and nail to get his manuscript accepted by the end of this year.
  3. Go the extra mile. Meaning: to do more and make a greater effort than is expected of you.
    • Example:
      • I have achieved the monthly sale goal, but there is nothing wrong with going the extra mile to get more items sold.
  4. Go into overdrive. Meaning: to start working very hard.
    • Example:
      • As this term reach its end, the students go into overdrive and review their notes every day.
  5. Keep nose to grindstone. Meaning: to continue to work very hard without stopping.
    • Example:
      • She has been keeping her nose to grindstone for the SNMPTN test next week.
  6. Make headway. Meaning: to make progress.
    • Example:
      • Kevin continues to make headway to become a good animator.
  7. Pull out all the stops. Meaning: to do everything you can to make something successful.
    • Example:
      • Jan has been pulling out all the stops to get accepted to a medical school and now her efforts have paid off.
  8. Sink your teeth into. Meaning: to start to do something with a lot of enthusiasm.
    • Example:
      • Software development is something she has always wanted to sink her teeth into.
  9. Burn the candle at both ends. Meaning: to get little sleep because you are busy.
    • Example:
      • With the deadline only one week away, he has to burn the candles at both ends to finish his draft.
  10. Pull your socks up. Meaning: to make an effort to improve your work.
    • Example:
      • You have to pull your socks up if you want to get an A on this subject.

Source: Cambridge Idioms Dictionary

 

Compiled and written by @Fafafin for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, December 1, 2016

 

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^MQ

#EngTips: How To Be Productive

Here are some tips on to be more productive I’ve collected for you to try. Grab your notes, fellas!

1. Write it down.
Grab your pen and paper! Every task should be written down to free your mind from trying to remember them.

2. Distance yourself from any distraction.
Turn off your phone, disconnect the internet, and give yourself time to focus on work.

3. Do the hardest task first!
Finish the most overwhelming task first so you can enjoy the rest of the day finishing other tasks.

4. Give the Pomodoro Technique a try!
The Pomodoro Technique is a time management method developed by Francesco Cirillo in 1990s. It is named after the tomato-shaped kitchen timer that Cirillo used as a university student. Here’s the step-by-step of the method:

  1. Pick a task and break it down to some smaller ones if possible.
  2. Set your timer for 25 minutes.
  3. Work on the task until your timer rings, then put a check on your list.
  4. Take a five-minute break. Get up and move your body to keep you fresh.
  5. Repeat the the step! You can take a longer break after finishing 4 Pomodoros.

Here’s an infographic about it:

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May these tips be helpful to y’all procrastinator out there!

 

Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, August 13, 2016

 

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^MQ

#IOTW: Work related idioms

  1. Start/get the ball rolling. Meaning: to take the first step to begin a process.
    • Example:
      • This February, we’ll start the ball rolling on the new project.
  2. Line of work. Meaning: job field; type of work.
    • Example:
      • The construction worker said that injuries were common in his line of work.
  3. Talk shop. Meaning: to talk about work-related things.
    • Example: 
      • Next outing day, let’s not talk shop and have a lot of fun instead!
  4. Call the shots. Meaning: to make the decisions.
    • Example: 
      • Tina needs to call the shots because her boss is away.
  5. Be in the red. Meaning: at a deficit; running at a loss; losing money.
    • Example:
      • The store has been in the red since the end of last year.
  6. Red tape. Meaning: bureaucracy; formal rules that usually make something hard to do.
    • Example:
      • Jessica’s working permit was held up for 2 months because of red tape.
  7. Slack off. Meaning: to work unproductively and lazily.
    • Example:
      • Because the boss is on holiday, everyone at the office slacks off.

 

Compiled and written for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, 20 January, 2016

 

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^MD

#BusEng: How to write a good resume (curriculum vitae)

after-helping-his-friend-design-this-resume-rick-mundon-now-sells-resume-formats-online
(Source: businessinsider.tumblr.com)

In this post, we are going to discuss some important tips in composing CV or Resume. Although this session mainly focuses on business/professional work, you could also apply these strategies in your CV for your study or scholarship application.

Here are some strategies to compose a good CV or resume that we have successfully compiled for you:

  1. Don’t lie. Never lie. Simple, tell the truth. Lying makes your CV seems dubious.
  2. Always include an overview paragraph in the head of your CV. This gives a glimpse of your qualifications to the reviewers.
  3. Be succinct. A good CV should not be more than 2 pages long (A4).
  4. Tailor your CV. Read the desired qualifications carefully and selectively pick up relevant professional experiences to include in your CV.
  5. Use effective diction. Some companies use word-search engine so make sure you employ relevant terms/keywords in your CV.
  6. Use ‘doing’ words, such as ‘developing,’ ‘organizing,’ ‘facilitating,’ ‘assisting,’ etc.
  7. Elucidate your experiences efficiently. Avoid jargons. Mention your achievements and challenges you overcame.
  8. Use percentage in your achievements. It gives a clear depiction on how capable you are in doing your job.
  9. A survey by Hilden reveals the top 5 aspects being looked for in a CV:
    1. Previous related work experience
    2. Qualifications and skills
    3. Readability
    4. Accomplishments
    5. Spelling and grammar
  10. Meanwhile, there are 5 common mistakes that applicants frequently commit in their CV’s:
    1. Spelling and grammar
    2. Not tailored to the job
    3. Poor work history
    4. Poor format
    5. No accomplishments
  11. Correct punctuation matters; some companies might consider the absence of a comma and a period as a sign of careless.
  12. Use professional word style. Choose Arial, Lucida Sans, or Times New Roman.
  13. Check, check, check. Make sure your CV is free from misspellings and grammar mistakes.

That’s all for today. Thank you so much for your attention. Good luck with your CV preparation.

 

Compiled and written by @wisznu at @EnglishTips4u on Wednesday, January 7, 2016

 

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^MD

#ENGQUOTE: Work

Hi, fellas! How is your Monday going so far? I hope it is going great for you.

Anyway, since today is the first working day for some of us, I would like to share seven English quotes related to ‘work’ with you. #EngQuote

“Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.” (Confucius) #EngQuote

“The best preparation for good work tomorrow is to do good work today.” (Elbert Hubbard) #EngQuote

“Working hard and working smart sometimes can be two different things.” (Byron Dorgan) #EngQuote

“Laziness may appear attractive, but work gives satisfaction.” (Anne Frank) #EngQuote

“Opportunities are usually disguised as hard work, so most people don’t recognize them.” (Ann Landers) #EngQuote

“When you form a team, why do you try to form a team? Because teamwork builds trust and trust builds speed.” (Russel Honore) #EngQuote

“It is the working man who is the happy man. It is the idle man who is the miserable man.” (Benjamin Franklin) #EngQuote

Therefore, those are seven English quotes related to work I can share with you in this session, fellas. #EngQuote

For more interesting English stuffs, visit us on englishtips4u.com and facebook.com/EnglishTips4U. Cheerio, fellas!

Source: brainyquote.com

Compiled by @aditriasmara at @EnglishTips4U on March 30, 2015.