Tag Archives: word

#EngClass: Portmanteau

Cronut.jpg
A cronut (croissant + donut). Pic from Wikipedia.

Have you ever heard or used the word ‘portmanteau?’

A portmanteau (/pɔːrtˈmæntoʊ/) or portmanteau word is a blend of words, in which parts of multiple words or their sounds are combined into a new word. A portmanteau is also called blending word. For initial information of blending words, check out https://englishtips4u.com/2012/06/27/engclass-blending-words/

There are many portmanteau words that have been widely used, such as ‘smog’ (from ‘smoke’ + ‘fog’), ‘netizen’ (from ‘internet’ + ‘citizen’), or ‘workaholic’ (from ‘work’ + ‘alcoholic’).

If we categorize them, we will find that there are portmanteau words for:

  1. Animals.
    A new breed is usually named with a portmanteau word.
    E.g.:
    A ‘liger’ is the offspring of a male lion and a female tiger.
  2. Popular culture.
    E.g.:
    – ‘Brangelina’ is a portmanteau of Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie’s name.
    – ‘Bromance’ is a portmanteau of ‘brother’ and ‘romance,’ usually used to describe a tight friendship between two men.
  3. Vehicle.
    E.g.:
    – ‘Motorcycle,’ from ‘motorized’ + ‘bicycle.’
    – ‘Taxicab,’ from ‘taxi’ + ‘cabriolet’ (a type of horse carriage). Now, taxicab is more commonly known as simply ‘taxi’ or ‘cab.’
  4. Cuisine.
    E.g.:
    – ‘Brunch,’ from ‘breakfast’ + ‘lunch.’
    – ‘Cronut,’ from ‘croissant’ + ‘doughnut.
  5. General use.
    E.g.:
    – ‘Brexit,’ from ‘Britain’ + ‘exit.’
    – ‘Hangry,’ from ‘hungry’ + ‘angry.’
  6. Internet and computing.
    E.g.:
    – ‘Email,’ from ‘electronic’ + ‘mail.’
    – ‘Internet,’ from ‘international’ + ‘network.’
    – ‘Skype,’ from ‘sky’ + ‘peer-to-peer.’
  7. Organizations/companies.
    E.g.:
    – ‘Pinterest,’ from ‘pin’ + ‘interest.’
    – ‘Microsoft,’ from ‘microcomputer’ + ‘software.’

 

@Rnfadillaa: I just knewwww netizen means internet citizen. Thanksss @EnglishTips4U.
@laptamy: How about Frienemy? Is it a portmanteau too?
Yes, ‘frenemy’ comes from ‘friend’ + ‘enemy,’ used to describe someone with whom we have a love-hate relationship.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, 18 April, 2018.


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#USSlang: Internet slang (2)

In this article, we’ll share some slang words we would most likely find on the internet. Do remember that we should avoid using slang words in formal situation.

Slang words are ideally only used in casual conversation and text. They are popular only for a certain period of time. Let’s start , shall we?

 

  1. Sus. Meaning: someone sketchy, shady.
    • Example:
      • I told you that guy over there was sus.
    • ‘Sus’ comes from the word suspect. As a slang, ‘sus’ suggests that someone is sketchy or shady.
    • Other than that, ‘sus’ can also mean ‘see you soon.’ Example:
      • I’m getting off work now. Sus.
  2. Boots. Meaning: emphasis, very much.
    • Example:
      • I had a very long day. I’m tired boots.
    • Tired boots = very tired
    • Add ‘boots’ to the end of an adjective or verb to emphasize on whatever you’re saying.
  3. Hunty. Meaning: a term of endearment for friends, usually used in the drag community.
    • Example:
      • Hey hunty, I’m home!
    • ‘Hunty’ is a combination of two words, ‘honey’ and ‘c*nt.’ It can sometimes be used in a demeaning way.
  4. Stan. Meaning: an obsessed fan (n.), admire (v.)
    • Example:
      • There’s a bunch of Stans waiting right outside the concert hall.
    • ‘Stan’ originated from Eminem song about an obsessed fan. ‘Stan’ was the main character in the song.
  5. OTP (One True Pairing) Meaning: your favorite relationship in a fandom, a couple that other people think matches the best.
    • Example:
      • My OTP is Glenn Alinskie Chelsea Olivia. They’re such a cute couple.
  6. Tea. Meaning: gossip, news or personal information belonging to someone else.
    • Example:
      • Spill the tea about what happened at the party.
  7. DR (double rainbow). Meaning: a term used to convey extreme happiness.
    • Example:
      • I got a promotion at work and have been seeing DRs all day.
  8. ICYMI (in case you missed it). Meaning: often used by people who missed things (often important) in social media or chat rooms.
    • Example:
      • ICYMI, my cat is sick and it ruined half of my wardrobe.
    • ICYMI can also be used in humorous way to point something which is already obvious.
  9. IMMD (it made my day). Meaning: a term used to show happiness, something awesome.
    • Example:
      • OMG! My boss just gave me a huge raise. #IMMD
  10. AMA (ask me anything). Meaning: a term to invite people to ask questions.
    • Example:
      • I have been studying for that exam all day. AMA.

There goes 10 internet slang words for now, fellas! Now that you have 10 more slang words in your repertoire, it’s time to put them to practice.

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, March 15, 2017


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#EngVocab: The way to describe someone’s voice

There are types of the way someone talk with others. As illustrations, a person who always talk in high volume or someone who speak in a low voice and full with emotion. We can find it in the people around us, but we usually do not notice it. We can also find the description in the novel we read. But the author did not write it as long as the example I gave you.

Did you ever notice how the author describe the way his or her characters speaking? Well, tonight I will share some vocabulary to define voices. Maybe, you found it in the novels you read before.

  1. Breathy. Meaning: to speak with a loud breathing noise.
  2. Brittle. Meaning: to speak as if you are about to cry
  3. Croaky. Meaning: to speak in a low rough voice that sounds as if you have a sore throat.
  4. Penetrating. Meaning: a voice which is so high or loud that makes you slightly uncomfortable
  5. Wobbly. Meaning: a voice which sounds up and down because you are frightened or not confident or you are going to cry
  6. Tight. Meaning: a voice shows that you are nervous or annoyed
  7. Shrill. Meaning: to speak in unpleasant way with a very loud and high voice.
  8. Monotonous. Meaning: a boring and unpleasant voice because there is no intonation
  9. Husky. Meaning: a deep voice and it sounds hoarse, but in attractive way.
  10. Guttural. Meaning: a deep voice which made at the back of your throat.
  11. Hoarse. Meaning: to speak in a low rough voice.
  12. Taut. Meaning: a voice that shows someone is nervous or angry.
  13. Wheezy. Meaning: to speak with a noise because someone has difficulty in breathing.
  14. Ringing. Meaning: a voice which is very loud and clear.
  15. Tremulous. Meaning: an unsteady voice because you are afraid or excited.

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Tuesday, March 14, 2017.


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#IOTW: Idioms related to Education and School (2)

Hello, last week I shared some idioms related to education and school. If you missed it, you can write the article by click here. And today, I would like to add some into the list. They are:

1. Town and gown. Meaning: the relation (often bad) between a town and the university and university students who are located in that town.

  • Example:
    • There were town and gown conflicts in graduation party in Purwokerto.

2. Three R’s. Meaning: the basic skills for basic education, reading; (w)riting, and (a)rithmatic.

  • Example:
    • Did you get three R’s when you were in pre-school or in elementary school?

3. Single file. Meaning: a line with one person standing behind another person.

  • Example:
    • The students line up single file before entering the auditorium.

4. Show of hands. Meaning: a rising hands in a class or group to vote or to see what people think about something.

  • Example:
    • There is no show of hands to the option of hiking.

5. Show and tell. Meaning: (in the lower grade of elementary school) children bring something interesting to show it to the rest of the class.

  • Example:
    • Almost every girl used to do this, show and tell their new belongings.

6. Flunk out. Meaning: to fail a course, to fail and then leave school.

  • Example:
    • If you decide taking international education experience, you better prepare it well or you would flunk out.

7. Draw a blank. Meaning: to get no respond from someone when you ask her or him a question.

  • Example:
    • I draw a blank when I ask her about her study plan.

8. Eager beaver. Meaning: someone who works very hard and is very enthusiastic.

  • Example:
    • It is well known that the students in Japan and South Korea are eager beavers.

9. Pass with flying colour. Meaning: to pass something easily and with a high score.

  • Example:
    • I am sure I can pass the Biology test with flying colour.

10. Play hooky. Meaning: to not go to school when you should.

  • Example:
    • My mom knew I was playing hooky. And she was mad at me.

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Tuesday, February 28, 2017.

#WOTD: Whilst

‘Whilst’ is a conjunction (kata sambung), a word used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause.

As a conjunction, ‘whilst’ means the same as ‘while‘. Both mean ‘during the time that something else happens.’

Example:

  • She reads a novel whilst waiting for her boyfriend.
  • She reads a novel while waiting for her boyfriend.

‘Whilst’ and ‘while’ indicate that two events are happening at the same time.

On going events:

  • reading a novel
  • waiting for boyfriend

Not just that, both ‘whilst’ and ‘while’ can also mean ‘in contrast with something else.’

Example:

  • Her top is white, whilst her pants are black.
  • Her top is white, while her pants are black.

Here’s another example of using ‘whilst’ in showing contrast.

Example:

  • Whilst ‘of’ refers to possession, ‘from’ refers to origins.

 

So, you may now ask:

When should we use ‘whilst’? Or should we use ‘while’ instead?

Actually, the real question is not ‘when’ to use them; but ‘where‘ you should use ‘whilst.’

For Americans, the word ‘whilst’ tends to have an archaic ring. ‘Whilst’ is rarely used in American English. The use of ‘whilst’ gives the impression that the writer is British. ‘Whilst’ is fairly common in British publications.

So that sums up our discussion on the word ‘whilst.’ I hope the explanation was clear enough and not too boring. However, if you still have any question on how to use ‘whilst’ (or any other topic), feel free to hit us up.

 

Compiled and written by @Miss_Qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, February 24, 2017

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#IOTW: Idioms related to education and school

  1. Easy as ABC. Meaning: very easy.
    • Example:
      • “Learning mathematics is easy as ABC.”
  1. Bookworm. Meaning: someone who reads a lot
    • Example:
      • “No wonder she is genius. She is a bookworm.”
  1. Brainstorm. Meaning: try to develop idea or think of a new idea.
    • Example:
      • “In this group discussion, we need to brainstorm for our environment campaign.”
  1. Call the roll. Meaning: call students’ names on a roll and expect them to answer if they are there.
    • Example:
      • “Every morning when the class starts, the teacher calls the roll.”
  1. Cap and gown. Meaning: a special cap called a mortarboard and a special robe which is worn in academic ceremony.
    • Example:
      • “The students wore cap and gown on their graduation day.”
  1. Count noses. Meaning: to count the number of people.
    • Example:
      • “The teacher stopped to count the nose several times during the field trip.”
  1. Cover a lot of ground. Meaning: to complete a lot of material in a class or course.
    • Example:
      • “I covered a lot of ground in Physics class last semester.”
  1. Cow college. Meaning: a school where farming or agriculture is studied.
    • Example:
      • “He graduated from cow college in America.”
  1. Crack a book. Meaning: to open a book to study (usually used in the negative)
    • Example:
      • “It shocked me when I got my test result. It was good although I didn’t crack a book that much.”
  1. Crank out a paper. Meaning: to write a paper or essay in mechanical way.
    • Example:
      • “I have to crank out a paper to pass this subject.”

 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Tuesday, February 21, 2017

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#EngQuote: Paolo Coelho

Do you like reading? Have you read any book of Paolo Coelho? I haven’t touch a single book of him yet, but my friend said his books are really good.

Maybe she was right, because I found some beautiful quotes from his.

1.2017-02-04-20-41-07

2.

2017-02-07-18-40-10

3.

2017-02-04-20-41-53

4.

2017-02-04-20-42-32

5.

2017-02-04-20-43-20

6.

2017-02-04-20-44-46

7.

2017-02-04-20-45-21

8.

2017-02-04-20-46-47

9.

2017-02-04-20-47-19

10.

2017-02-04-20-47-49

Actually there are many beautiful words came from him, especially when it comes to love matter. But I intentionally gave these quotes for you, Fellas. It’s a new year, find something excites you. Chase your dream and stay positive.

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Tuesday, February 7, 2017.

 

#EngVocab: Obsolete words – a trip to the past

As language advances, lots and lots of words are invented. Unfortunately, some words went obsolete because of this. But today we will take a look to some of the obsolete words.

  1. Fudgel. Meaning: pretending to do work while actually do nothing.
    • Example:
      • I got fired because my boss caught me fudgeling.
  2. Brabble. Meaning: to argue loudly about something unimportant.
    • Example:
      • I’m not going to brabble with you. Let’s just go home for now.
  3. Snoutfair. Meaning: it is what you say to a good looking person.
    • Example:
      • Despite of his age, Keanu Reeves is still a snoutfair.
  4. Slugabed. Meaning: a lazy person that stays in bed for too long.
    • Example:
      • Wake up, slugabed! It’s already 11 am!
  5. Hoddypeak. Meaning: ‘fool’ or ‘simpleton.’
    • Example:
      • He’s not very bright; he’s a hoddypeak with a very kind heart.
  6. Jollux. Meaning: a sophisticated way of saying ‘fat.’
    • Example:
      • A: “Honey, do I look fat?”
      • B: “Baby, you’re just a little bit jollux.”
  7. Kench. Meaning: to laugh loudly (LOL).
    • Example:
      • I’m trying so hard not to kench in class while reading your text yesterday!
  8. Gorgonize: Meaning: to have paralyzing or mesmerizing effect on someone.
    • Example:
      • Zooey Deschanel’s eyes gorgonize me. I’m petrified just by looking at her eyes.
  9. Groak. Meaning: to silently watch someone while they are eating, hoping to be invited.
    • Example:
      • Don’t groak! I’ll buy you a doughnut if you stop staring at me like that.
  10. Crapulous. Meaning: to feel ill after eating or drinking (way) too much.
    • Example:
      • I always feel crapulous on holidays, mostly because my mom’s homemade food is too good.

Compiled and written by @bintilvice for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, 8 January 2016

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#WOTD: Woebegone

Although my day went great, my friend’s wasn’t so much since he looked woebegone. I asked, of course, as a good friend. He said he was fine, but that sad look hinted that he wasn’t telling the truth.

From the illustration above, you should have guessed which word we will discuss in this session.

Woebegone is an adjective. It means strongly affected by woe or exhibiting a great sorrow. It could also mean being in a sorry state.

Woebegone originated in the 13th century, derived from a phrase “me is wo begon woe has beset me.” There are some synonyms of ‘woebegone,’ namely:

  • suffering,
  • troubled,
  • forlorn, and
  • gloomy.

Let’s see how we use it in sentences, shall we?

  • “He looked woebegone (sad looking) after his date left him for another man.”
  • “Wow, you look woebegone (being in a sorry state)! Get some shower or I’ll have you kicked out of your room!” I said.

Compiled and written by @bintilvice for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, 19 February 2016

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#WOTD: Cloudburst

Have you ever heard of ‘Cloudburst’? Do you know what the word means? Here are some fellas’ guesses about the word.

Awan badai –

Cloud means awan, and burst means ledakan. So cloudburst means awan puting beliung? – 
Yes, all the answers above are correct.
According to Merriam-Webster, ‘cloudburst’ is a noun which means a sudden and very heavy downpour.
The word ‘cloudburst’ was first used in the early 1800s. It may be the translation of a German noun, Wolkenbruch. Here are some synonyms of it: deluge, downpour, storm, and torrent.
Here are some examples of cloudburst in a sentence:
  1. “The weatherman warned of possible cloudbursts in the afternoon.”
  2. “On September 6, 2014, there was a cloudburst in Kashmir valley killing more than 200 people.”
Here are some other examples from our fellas:
  1. “The cloudburst on Korea two weeks ago was very terrifying.” – 
  2. “I am not able to go somewhere due to cloudburst comes at the moment.” – 
Source: dictionary.com; Merriam-webster.com
Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, November 20, 2016

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#WOTD: Eloquent

Hi, fellas! How did you spend your day?

I want to highlight that I spent my breaks from work today to watch some inspiring TED Talks. What I admire about the speakers in those talks is how eloquent they are. I think their eloquence is part of what makes their talks powerful and persuasive.

Anyway, that brings us to our #WOTD today: Eloquent.

Eloquent is an adjective. The word means having the ability to use language clearly and effectively. An eloquent person is good at speaking and persuading people. Eloquent can also mean clearly expressing feeling or meaning when the word is used to describe speech or a writing. Words synonymous to eloquent are articulate, expressive, and fluent.

In addition to the sentence that I tweeted earlier, here are more examples of how to use eloquent in a sentence:

  • Her argument was expressed so eloquently that the audience can’t help but agree with it.
  • That eloquent storyteller has published a very beautiful novel recently.

 

Compiled and written by @Fafafin for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, November 24, 2016

 

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#WOTD: Clean, clear

Have you ever wondered if you’ve been using ‘clean’ and ‘clear’ correctly, fellas? Now, it has nothing to do with facial product with the same name.

Clean, Clear.JPG

Talking about those two words will bring us to a wide and broad explanation. I would summarize it in this #WOTD post.

 

As adjectives

As an adjective, ‘clean’ means free from dirt, marks, or stains; morally uncontaminated, pure, innocent; free from unwanted substances.

On the other hand, ‘clear’ means obvious, visible, or easily understood.

Saying somebody’s face is clean means the face is spotless (no acne, no blemish, etc.). Saying it clear means the face is visible.

More examples, fellas.

  • I really love this town. The air is so clean. (The air is unpolluted in that town).
  • He keeps his place very clean. (His place is neat and spotless).
  • Am I making myself clear? (Am I understood/do you understand what I mean?)
  • It’s not clear yet who will be the head of the committee. (The head of the committee is not known/obvious yet).

 

As verbs

If the words function as verbs, ‘to clean an object’ is to remove anything that makes the object dirty.

‘To clear an object’ means to remove anything that hinders it from being obvious or visible.

Example:

  • Clean the table (Wipe off the dirt from the table).
  • Clear the table (Remove any objects on the table to create more space).

‘To cleanse’ means to clean up something by/as if by washing.

Example:

  • This purification ceremony is held to cleanse our spiritual being.
  • Don’t forget to cleanse your face before bed.

That’s what I can share for now! Hope the explanation is clear enough.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 24 October, 2016

 

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#EngVocab: Coffee

Do you like coffee, Fellas? If you do, then this is the perfect article for you to enrich your vocabulary about coffee! Please do chime in anytime! I’m not an expert in coffee-ology but I love it so much I decided to compose an article about it.

  1. Barista. Meaning: You already know this. A person who makes coffee drinks as a profession.
  2. Espresso. Meaning: not expresso. Strong dark coffee prepared by forcing near-boiling water under pressure to finely ground coffee beans.
  3. Americano. Meaning: one or two shots of espresso with additional water.
  4. Cappuccino. Meaning: 1/3 of coffee, 1/3 of milk, 1/3 of foam. Sometimes topped with chocolate powder.
  5. Crema. Meaning: reddish substance that appears on top of espresso during the brewing period.
  6. Latte. Meaning: Coffee with a lot (approx.: 8 oz.) of steamed milk. Flavoring may be added to form flavored lattes.
  7. Decaf/decaffeinated. Meaning: Coffee without its psychoactive substance aka caffeine. (But why?)
  8. Mocha/Caffè Mocha. Meaning: may refer to many kinds of coffee but basically it is chocolate caffè latte.

So that was it, Fellas! I hope now you know the difference between cappuccino and latte!

Compiled and written by @bintilvice for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, October 14, 2016

 

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#WOTD: On a par with

‘On a par with’ is often written as ‘on par with’, without ‘a.’ But, both writing styles have the same meaning: equals to or similar to someone or something.

Now, let’s see how the phrase is used in sentences. Example:

  • The hospitality of this home-stay is on a par with a hotel’s.
  • I think women should be on a par with men in having the same opportunities and gaining appreciation in one’s workplace.

Additional example from a fella on Twitter:

We are on a par with others in front of God. – @fijarhajianto

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 5 September, 2016

 

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#WOTD: Precocious

The word we’re going to talk about in this post is ‘precocious’. Have you ever heard of it?

‘Precocious’ is an adjective used to describe an early mature in development, especially mental development. ‘Precocious’ comes from Latin word ‘praecox,’ which means ‘early ripening‘ or ‘premature.’

By 1650, English speakers turned the word ‘praecox‘ into ‘precocious’. It was used to describe plants that produced blossoms before their leaves came out.

By the 1670s, ‘precocious’ was also being used to describe humans who developed skills or talents before others typically did.

Here are some examples of it in a sentence:

  • A precocious child, she went to university at the age of 15.
  • A precocious musician, he was giving concerts when he was seven.

Here is another example from one of our fellas, @micah_adrian:

  • My cousin is a precocious girl. She thinks like an adult from such a young age and yes, she’s a very serious person.

 

Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, August 21, 2016

 

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#WOTD: Salience

 

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In this occasion, we are going to discuss a word that I just discovered when reading a research on language teaching and the word is ‘salience.’ Salience (noun) means is the state or condition of being prominent. (Salient; adjective)

Oxford dictionary defines the word ‘salience’ as most noticeable or important. Meanwhile, Cambridge defines the same word as the fact of being important to or connected with what is happening or being discussed.

The word is prominently found in linguistics and other fields of studies, such as sociology, psychology, and political studies. In psychology, for example, we have ‘social salience,’ which means a set of reasons which draw an observer’s attention toward a particular object.

‘Salience’ comes from the Latin ‘salire‘, meaning ‘to leap.’

In short, we could draw a conclusion that ‘salience’ shares the same sense to ‘importance.’

Some examples of ‘salience’ in sentences are:

  • The salience of these facts was questioned by several speakers.
  • Our birthday will always be a date that jumps out at you with a lot of salience.
  • Away from these predominantly liberal arenas, however, white identity has found a more potent form of salience. (The New Yorker)
  • The researchers saw a drop in activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, part of the salience network of the brain. (Time)
  • Crises, particularly wars, may increase the salience of national considerations. (Salon)

Those are some information on the word ‘salience’ that we have gathered for you. Hope it’s clear enough to sufficiently introduce you to the word and its usage.

Thanks for your attention today!

 

Compiled and written by @Wisznu for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, August 11, 2016

 

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#EngVocab: Air travel vocabulary (3)

Hi guys, is any of you planning to travel by air? This time, we are having a discussion on air travel vocabulary. We have collected 10 important vocabulary that you might need when you are travelling by air. Here they are:

  1. Aisle. Meaning: corridor in aeroplane between the seats [there are usually one or two].
  2. A standstill. Meaning: a stop or an end.
  3. A tray-table. Meaning: a small table that is stored in the back of the seat in front of you on a plane.
  4. Skycap. Meaning: a person who works at an airport carrying luggage.
  5. Runway. Meaning: a place where airplanes take off and land.
  6. Control tower. Meaning: the building in an airport where air traffic is routed in and out of the airport.
  7. Airstrip. Meaning: a small path or field for planes to take off and land.
  8. Carry-on. Meaning: a bag that is carried on an airplane, bus, etc., instead of being stored in the luggage compartment.
  9. Long-haul flight. Meaning: a flight that travels a long distance in one go, e.g., a long-haul flight would be flying from New York to Sydney.
  10. Stopover (layover). Meaning: if you are traveling on a long-haul flight, you usually have to have a short stop in another country first. This stop is called a stopover or a transit.

Those are the 10 vocabulary of air travel that we have collected for you. Hope you like them.

 

Compiled and written by @Wisznu for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, May 12, 2016

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#WOTD: Ambrosial

Hello hey hi, fellas! How are you all?

Have you ever heard of the word ‘ambrosial’, fellas? Today we are going to talk about it!

Ambrosial is an adjective. It means highly pleasing, especially to the sense of taste.

The word ‘ambrosial’ was first used in 1590s.

It comes from Latin ambrosius, from Greek ambrosios, which means “immortal, divine”.

Ambrosial also means ‘having a pleasant smell’.

Some synonyms of ambrosial:

fragrant, aromatic, perfumed, delicious, appetizing, dainty, flavorful, delish.

Some antonyms of ambrosial:

smelly, stinky, distasteful, flavorless, tasteless, yucky.

Example use:

As I stood wiping quietly I could smell the ambrosial odours from the kitchen.

– The Friendly Road

That is all I can share for now, fellas. I hope it could be useful for you :)

Compiled and written by @waitatiri at @EnglishTips4U on August 2, 2016.