Tag Archives: vocabulary

#EngVocab: Adjectives That Describe Personalities (3)

Hi, fellas! How are you?

We meet again in another series of adjectives that could describe someone’s personality. For the first and second installment of this topic, please visit: https://englishtips4u.com/2012/07/13/engvocab-adjectives-that-describes-personality/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2018/03/12/engvocab-adjectives-that-describe-personalities-2/

Daft = silly, foolish (informal use).
“There is nothing daft about my fondness for Daft Punk. Their music suits my taste.”

Daft Punk.jpg
Daft Punk (pic from grammy.com)

Deranged = mad, insane.
“Police managed to stop that deranged gunman before he could shoot anyone.”

Debonair = from old French ‘de bon aire,’ meaning stylish, charming, and confident. Usually used to describe a man.
“Many who have met Nicholas Saputra described the actor as debonair.”

Dapper = Neat, well-dressed. Also used to describe a man.
“The Academy Awards were crowded by charming ladies and dapper gentlemen.”

Eloquent = fluent and persuasive in speaking or writing.
“She is quite an eloquent young lady. She would make a good public speaker.”

Enchanting = delightfully charming or attractive.
“Unlike her casual daily appearance, she became an enchanting lady on her wedding day.”

Expressive = effectively conveying thoughts or feelings.
“Emilia is such an expressive person. We could know how she feels by looking at her face.”

Emilia clarke
Emilia Clarke (pic from pinterest).

Fair = in accordance with rules or standards.
“If you should become a leader, be a fair one.”

Faithful = loyal, devoted.
“Her late husband was a faithful person. He always spent his free time with the family.”

Fearless = bold, brave.
“Naomi Campbell is a fierce, fearless woman. No wonder she has the longest running career as a supermodel.”

Flirtatious = behaving in such a way to suggest a playful attraction.
“Who was the flirtatious guy you were talking to? He seemed to make you uncomfortable.”

Frank = open, honest, and direct in speech or writing, especially when dealing with unpalatable matters.
“Is she always so frank, even though not so many people agree with her?”

Funky = modern and stylish in an unconventional or striking way.
“Lady Gaga is funky and quirky, in an extraordinary way.”

Lady Gaga.jpg
Lady Gaga (pic from pinterest).

 

There they go, fellas! As ever, the best way to practice and memorise new vocabularies is by using them a lot. Start incorporating these new words in your daily conversation. Check your dictionaries often to understand the context better.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 9 April, 2018.


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#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘very’ (2)

How often do you use the word ‘very’? How many times have you used it today alone?

To intensify or emphasis on an adjective, we often use the word ‘very‘ in front of the adjective. For example:

  • very good,
  • very bad,
  • very funny,
  • very slow,
  • etc.

However, do you know that there are some words to substitutes ‘very’? We’ll share a few this evening. Check them out!

  1. Very afraid – terrified.
    • Example:
      • I have no idea why anyone would be terrified of snakes. They’re so cuddly.
      • I have no idea why anyone would be very afraid of snakes. They’re so cuddly.
  2. Very boring – dull.
    • Example:
      • My life’s dull without you.
      • My life’s very boring without you.
  3. Very clear – obvious.
    • Example:
      • She made it obvious that she won’t be staying.
      • She made it very clear that she won’t be staying.
  4. Very dear – cherished.
    • Example:
      • A cherished friend of mine is getting married this Sunday.
      • A very dear friend of mine is getting married this Sunday.
  5. Very eager – keen.
    • Example:
      • The kids were keen to go swimming.
      • The kids were very eager to go swimming.
  6. Very frightening – terrifying.
    • Example:
      • There was a terrifying accident at the airport toll just last week.
      • There was a very frightening accident at the airport toll just last week.
  7. Very hungry – starving.
    • Example:
      • I never have time for dinner and always come home starving.
      • I never have time for dinner and always come home (feeling) very hungry.
  8. Very mean – cruel.
    • Example:
      • Even a lioness would never be cruel to her cubs.
      • Even a lioness would never be very mean to her cubs.
  9. Very old – ancient.
    • Example:
      • The book looked ancient, so he handled it carefully.
      • The book looked very old, so he handled it carefully.
  10. Very short – brief.
    • Example:
      • It’s getting late. Let’s keep the meeting brief.
      • It’s getting late. Let’s keep the meeting very short.

There go all 10 substitutes of ‘very’ for now, fellas! I hope the examples are clear enough. Otherwise, mention us to ask.

There are many more to come and I promise to share more in future sessions and articles. Meanwhile, also check out the first installment: #EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘very’

 

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, April 22, 2017

 

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#USSlang: Internet slang (2)

In this article, we’ll share some slang words we would most likely find on the internet. Do remember that we should avoid using slang words in formal situation.

Slang words are ideally only used in casual conversation and text. They are popular only for a certain period of time. Let’s start , shall we?

 

  1. Sus. Meaning: someone sketchy, shady.
    • Example:
      • I told you that guy over there was sus.
    • ‘Sus’ comes from the word suspect. As a slang, ‘sus’ suggests that someone is sketchy or shady.
    • Other than that, ‘sus’ can also mean ‘see you soon.’ Example:
      • I’m getting off work now. Sus.
  2. Boots. Meaning: emphasis, very much.
    • Example:
      • I had a very long day. I’m tired boots.
    • Tired boots = very tired
    • Add ‘boots’ to the end of an adjective or verb to emphasize on whatever you’re saying.
  3. Hunty. Meaning: a term of endearment for friends, usually used in the drag community.
    • Example:
      • Hey hunty, I’m home!
    • ‘Hunty’ is a combination of two words, ‘honey’ and ‘c*nt.’ It can sometimes be used in a demeaning way.
  4. Stan. Meaning: an obsessed fan (n.), admire (v.)
    • Example:
      • There’s a bunch of Stans waiting right outside the concert hall.
    • ‘Stan’ originated from Eminem song about an obsessed fan. ‘Stan’ was the main character in the song.
  5. OTP (One True Pairing) Meaning: your favorite relationship in a fandom, a couple that other people think matches the best.
    • Example:
      • My OTP is Glenn Alinskie Chelsea Olivia. They’re such a cute couple.
  6. Tea. Meaning: gossip, news or personal information belonging to someone else.
    • Example:
      • Spill the tea about what happened at the party.
  7. DR (double rainbow). Meaning: a term used to convey extreme happiness.
    • Example:
      • I got a promotion at work and have been seeing DRs all day.
  8. ICYMI (in case you missed it). Meaning: often used by people who missed things (often important) in social media or chat rooms.
    • Example:
      • ICYMI, my cat is sick and it ruined half of my wardrobe.
    • ICYMI can also be used in humorous way to point something which is already obvious.
  9. IMMD (it made my day). Meaning: a term used to show happiness, something awesome.
    • Example:
      • OMG! My boss just gave me a huge raise. #IMMD
  10. AMA (ask me anything). Meaning: a term to invite people to ask questions.
    • Example:
      • I have been studying for that exam all day. AMA.

There goes 10 internet slang words for now, fellas! Now that you have 10 more slang words in your repertoire, it’s time to put them to practice.

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, March 15, 2017


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#EngQuiz: ‘Live’ vs. ‘alive’

In this occasion, we’ll test how well you understand when to use the words ‘live’ and ‘alive.’ We’ve actually talked about this in a previous article. If you missed the discussion, feel free to head over to #EngVocab: ‘Live’ vs. ‘alive’.

Without further ado, let’s start, shall we?

Read the questions carefully. Click the word of your choice.

1. Where do you [live/alive]?
live
Correct! Here, ‘live’ is a verb which means to reside.
alive
2. I [live/alive] in Jakarta.
live
Correct! Here, ‘live’ is a verb which means to reside.
alive
3. This music makes me feel [live/alive].
live
alive
Correct! Here, ‘alive’ is an adjective which means active, not dead.
4. I’ve always wanted to [live/alive] in Bali.
live
Correct! Here, ‘live’ is a verb which means to reside.
alive
5. Some people feel most [live/alive] when they are busy with work.
live
alive
Correct! Here, ‘alive’ is an adjective which means active, not dead.
6. I wish Michael Jackson was still [live/alive].
live
alive
Correct! Here, ‘alive’ is an adjective which means active, not dead.
7. Some people [live/alive] every day like there is no tomorrow.
live
Correct! Here, ‘live’ is a verb which means to conduct a life.
alive
8. We went to watch the match [live/alive] at the stadium.
live
Correct! Here, ‘live’ is an adjective which means actual, present.
alive
9. These are [live/alive] animals.
live
Correct! Here, ‘live’ is an adjective which means living.
alive
10. A man was hit by a car this morning. Is he [live/alive]?
live
alive
Correct! Here, ‘alive’ is an adjective which means active, not dead.

There goes all 10 questions for today. How did you do? How many correct answers did you score?

 

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @Englishtips4U on Thursday, March 9, 2017

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#EngVocab: ‘Live’ vs. ‘alive’

Someone asked us on LINE about the difference between ‘live’ and ‘alive’ on LINE. So, instead of keeping the answer between the two of us, I’ll talk about it in this article and share with all of you. Let’s start, shall we?

Meaning of ‘live’ and ‘alive’

First off, let’s talk about the meaning of ‘live’ and ‘alive.’ In a glance, both have something to do with life.

  • ‘Life’ (noun), dibaca laif, is the period between birth and death, during which something is active and functioning.
  • ‘Life’ (noun), dibaca laif, also refers to the living person or being.

‘Live’ is both a verb and an adjective.

As a verb, ‘live,’ yang dibaca liv, means to exist, to be alive, to reside, to conduct a life. Example:

  • “I live in Jakarta.”
  • “They lived happily ever after.”

As an adjective, ‘live,’ yang dibaca laiv, means living, actual, present. Example:

  • ‘live show,’
  • ‘live animal,’
  • ‘live broadcast.’

‘Alive’, dibaca əlaiv, is an adjective.

‘Alive’ describes the condition of living, active, and not dead. Example:

  • “The happiest woman alive.”
  • “Grandpa is still alive.”

Now we’ve talked about the meaning of ‘live’ and ‘alive.’ Let’s look at more examples:

RIGHT

WRONG

Live show

Alive show

Live bait

Alive bait

I am alive.

I am live.

Keep your hope alive.

Keep your hope live.

Look at the examples again. Did you notice the difference? Clue: position. Did you notice how ‘live’ is placed directly before a noun and ‘alive’ is placed after a verb?

Live‘ is an attributive adjective. Attributive adjectives are positioned before the noun they describe.

Alive‘ is a predicative adjective. Predicative adjectives are positioned after verbs such as be, become, grow, look or seem.

And there you have it! That’s the end of today’s talk on how to differentiate when to use ‘live’ and ‘alive.’ If you have other questions regarding this topic, or any other topic at all, feel free to hit us up on Twitter or drop a comment in the comment box below.

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @Englishtips4U on Wednesday, March 8, 2017

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#WOTD: Nitpick

Hi fellas, have you ever corrected someone’s insignificant typo or other ignorable mistake? Well, did you know there’s a word for that? It’s “nitpick“.

 

did-you-mean-16aeead7a349d1cbf62d2ddd71b37971
Did you mean: nitpick

 

Nitpick” can act as a verb or a noun. The word means criticizing small and unimportant detail. For example, when your friend type “Youre welcome” in a text message and you correct him saying he missed an apostrophe, you’re nitpicking at him. When using “nitpick” as a verb with an object, you can say “nitpick at” or “nitpick about“.

Here are some example sentences with “nitpick”:

“It’s a really well-designed house, I can’t find thing to nitpick about.”

“People can nitpick all they want but I’m still proud of my first published book that I worked very hard for.”

“We get along very well although sometimes we can’t help nitpicking at each other.”


Compiled and written by @Fafafin for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, March 2, 2017

#EngTrivia: ‘Staring’ vs. ‘gazing’

Have you ever heard or read lines like these ones below?

 Why are you staring at me?

I’m not staring. I’m gazing.

I heard those lines when I watched The Vampire Diaries. What immediately came to my mind was, “Gazing? What is that?” because all I saw was Elena was staring, but she said ‘gazing.’ So, in this article, we will have a discussion about the two words. What is the difference between ‘staring’ and ‘gazing?’

If you checked the dictionary, ‘stare‘ is defined as to look fixedly or vacantly, while ‘gaze‘ is defined as to look steadily and intently, at something or someone for a long time. They are similar. The difference is we use ‘stare to indicate senses and feelings, such as curiosity, anger, boldness, admiration, bored, stupidity, etc; while ‘gaze to indicate sense of pleasure, like awe, admiration, fascination, and love.

Here are some examples to point them out:

  1. She gazes/stares admiringly at Warren.
  2. She stares at me blankly. (You can’t use ‘gaze’ in this sentence.)
  3. I stare at him with anger. (You also can’t use ‘gaze’ in this sentence)
  4. Yudith gazes/stares at the beautiful view of the sea.
  5. He stares/gazes at his sleeping child

From the example we can say that ‘gaze’ is used to show positive feelings, while ‘stare’ is used to show both positive and negative feelings (neutral).

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Tuesday, January 31, 2017

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#EngVocab: Obsolete words – a trip to the past

As language advances, lots and lots of words are invented. Unfortunately, some words went obsolete because of this. But today we will take a look to some of the obsolete words.

  1. Fudgel. Meaning: pretending to do work while actually do nothing.
    • Example:
      • I got fired because my boss caught me fudgeling.
  2. Brabble. Meaning: to argue loudly about something unimportant.
    • Example:
      • I’m not going to brabble with you. Let’s just go home for now.
  3. Snoutfair. Meaning: it is what you say to a good looking person.
    • Example:
      • Despite of his age, Keanu Reeves is still a snoutfair.
  4. Slugabed. Meaning: a lazy person that stays in bed for too long.
    • Example:
      • Wake up, slugabed! It’s already 11 am!
  5. Hoddypeak. Meaning: ‘fool’ or ‘simpleton.’
    • Example:
      • He’s not very bright; he’s a hoddypeak with a very kind heart.
  6. Jollux. Meaning: a sophisticated way of saying ‘fat.’
    • Example:
      • A: “Honey, do I look fat?”
      • B: “Baby, you’re just a little bit jollux.”
  7. Kench. Meaning: to laugh loudly (LOL).
    • Example:
      • I’m trying so hard not to kench in class while reading your text yesterday!
  8. Gorgonize: Meaning: to have paralyzing or mesmerizing effect on someone.
    • Example:
      • Zooey Deschanel’s eyes gorgonize me. I’m petrified just by looking at her eyes.
  9. Groak. Meaning: to silently watch someone while they are eating, hoping to be invited.
    • Example:
      • Don’t groak! I’ll buy you a doughnut if you stop staring at me like that.
  10. Crapulous. Meaning: to feel ill after eating or drinking (way) too much.
    • Example:
      • I always feel crapulous on holidays, mostly because my mom’s homemade food is too good.

Compiled and written by @bintilvice for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, 8 January 2016

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#EngVocab: Other ways to say ‘Love’

Valentine’s Day is coming! It is very closely related to love. Unfortunately, sometimes, the word love is banal, overused, and mainstream.

Well, today is special session for those of you who want to profess your love in a different way: I will give you some other ways to say “Love”! Before I start, I want you to know some things about the words I will share to you.

  1. This word is probably the most similar to love because it means “love or respect someone deeply.”
  2. It means “a gentle feeling of fondness or liking.”
  3. An intense but temporary and short-lived feeling for someone.
  4. A love, loyalty, or enthusiasm for something or someone.
  5. Respect and warm approval to someone or something.
  6. This one is for you, poets. It means the state of being under a spell. A love spell, for this occasion.

So instead of using the very overused “I love you,” you could switch to:

  • “I adore you,”
  • “I feel affection for you,”
  • “I’m devoted to you,”
  • “I’m infatuated by you,”
  • “I admire you or,”
  • “I’m enchanted by you.”

Of course, there are so many ways to say I love you to someone. But words mean nothing without actions.

Compiled and written by @bintilvice for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, February 12, 2016

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#WOTD: Cloudburst

Have you ever heard of ‘Cloudburst’? Do you know what the word means? Here are some fellas’ guesses about the word.

Awan badai –

Cloud means awan, and burst means ledakan. So cloudburst means awan puting beliung? – 
Yes, all the answers above are correct.
According to Merriam-Webster, ‘cloudburst’ is a noun which means a sudden and very heavy downpour.
The word ‘cloudburst’ was first used in the early 1800s. It may be the translation of a German noun, Wolkenbruch. Here are some synonyms of it: deluge, downpour, storm, and torrent.
Here are some examples of cloudburst in a sentence:
  1. “The weatherman warned of possible cloudbursts in the afternoon.”
  2. “On September 6, 2014, there was a cloudburst in Kashmir valley killing more than 200 people.”
Here are some other examples from our fellas:
  1. “The cloudburst on Korea two weeks ago was very terrifying.” – 
  2. “I am not able to go somewhere due to cloudburst comes at the moment.” – 
Source: dictionary.com; Merriam-webster.com
Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, November 20, 2016

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EngQuiz: Different Ways to Walk

Hello, fellas. Yesterday, we have shared some vocabularies about different types of walking, which you can review here. Now let’s do an #EngQuiz on those vocabularies. Choose a word inside the brackets to fill in the blank.

  1. They _____ around the stage as if they were some famous fashion models. (stomp/strut/shamble)
  2. We try not to make any sound by _____ across the room because grandpa is asleep in front of the fireplace. (tiptoeing/limping/stepping)
  3. The dim light inside the theater makes him trip on someone’s foot and _____ towards his seat. (tiptoe/stumble/pace)
  4. The siblings _____ along the street, enjoying the nice weather. (stalk/step/amble)
  5. Julian _____ towards the chair next to me, telling me he just fell off his bike. (stomps/marches/limps)
  6. It’s almost 7 am. The students who stroll begin to _____ so as to not come late to school. (stride/march/saunter)
  7. My little sister is pretending to be a giant. She _____ around the kitchen while making noises in a made-up deep voice. (steps/stomps/stumbles)
  8. He likes to _____ back and forth in the room when he’s thinking. (pace/shamble/stalk)

Here’s the recap of our #EngQuiz session on Twitter. You can scroll through it to see the correct answers.

Compiled by @Fafafin for @EnglishTips4U on December 9, 2016.

#EngVocab: Different ways to walk

Do you know you can describe the way you walk if you use a different verb in your sentence? For example, when you’re having a leisure time in a park, you walk slowly and enjoying your surroundings. You can say you stroll around the park. That means you walk in a leisurely manner, no rush at all. So, here are some verbs to describe the different ways of walking.

1. Amble: to walk slowly or leisurely (similar to stroll).

Example: 

  • Fred ambles along the path towards Beth’s house.

2. Limp: to walk lamely, especially with irregularity, as if favoring one leg. 

Example:

  • 👩: Why are you limping👧: I sprained my ankle.

3. March: to walk steadily and rhythmically forward in step with others.

Example:

  • The scouts marched towards their leader.

4. Pace: to walk or stride back and forth across; to walk (a number of steps) in measuring a space.

Example:

  • Upon waiting for the test result, he paces the corridor nervously.

5. Saunter: to walk slowly in a casual way (similar to amble and stroll).

Example:

  • She points at the girl who is sauntering across the hall.

6. Shamble: to walk in an awkward, lazy, or unsteady way.

Example:

  • I can hear the sound of someone shambling outside my house.

7. Stalk: to walk with a stiff, haughty, or angry gait.

Example:

  • My sister stalked off my room because I refused to share my chocolate with her.

8. Step: to walk a short distance to a specified place or in a specified direction.

Example:

  • Please do not step on that white line. The paint is still wet.

9. Stomp: to walk with forcible, heavy steps.

Example:

  • The fierce instructor stomps into the room.

10. Stride: to walk with long steps, especially in a hasty or vigorous way.

Example:

  • In this campus, people don’t walk; they stride everywhere.

11. Strut: to walk in a pompous manner.

Example:

  • Ramona struts into her house with the butterflies she managed to catch, leaving Howie who got nothing at all.

12. Stumble: to miss one’s step in walking or running; trip and almost fall.

Example:

  • Exhausted from the soccer practice, he stumbles into his room and throws himself onto the bed.

13. Tiptoe: to walk or move quietly on one’s toes.

Example:

  • The baby is now asleep, so Mom tiptoes out of the room to do another chore.

Definitions are taken from thefreedictionary.com

 

Compiled and written by @Fafafin for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, December 8, 2016


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#EngVocab: Filler Words

 

A filler word, also known as a pause filler or hesitation form, is a word or phrase we use to fill silence when we speak. So, the function of a filler word is to give you a break while you think, without an awkward, silent pause. Using the right amount of filler words will even make you sound like native English speaker.

1) Well…
I guess we’re all pretty familiar with this word. It’s probably the most common word anyone would say to hesitate.

A: How much are those shoes?
B: It’s $129, Ma’am.
A: WELL..,(thinking why are they so expensive) What about those one?

2) You know…
It’s usually added onto the end of a sentence to make sure that the listener just understands what you mean.

Example 1:
A: Where do we stay tonight?
B: We stay at that hotel, YOU KNOW, the one down the street from Times Square.

Example 2:
A : Shopping has always been Lily’s way of dealing with problems, you know?
B : Uh huh.

3) I guess / I suppose …
They’re usually used to hesitate when you’re not really sure about what you’re saying.

A: I suppose (or guess) it’s going to rain today.
B: Oh, I don’t know. Maybe so, maybe not.

4) At the end of the day…
It is a phrase that means “in the end” or “in conclusion.”

You don’t have to study hard, but at the end of the day, it will be you who will have bear the consequences.
5) I mean…
It is used to clarify or emphasize how you feel about something.
A: What do you think about him? He’s great, isn’t he?
B: I mean, he’s a great guy, I’m just not sure if he’s good for me.
6) You see…
It’s usually used when you explained something that you assume the listener doesn’t know.
A: My computer keeps lagging all day long.
B: So you see, rebooting the computer fixed the entire problem

Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, December 3, 2016

 

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#EngVocab: Travel phrasal verbs

This time, we will learn about travel phrasal verbs.

A phrasal verb is made up of a verb plus a preposition or an adverb that function as a single verb. Let’s start!

  1. Drop off. Meaning: to take someone to a place and leave them there.
    • Example:
      • “Where do you want me to drop you off?”
  2. Touch down. Meaning: arrive on land (planes).
    • Example:
      • “Our plane touch down before midday.”
  3. Check out. Meaning: to leave and pay for your stay at a hotel.
    • Example:
      • “Jane checked out of the hotel and took a taxi to the airport.”
  4. Pick up. Meaning: to go and fetch someone from a place and take them somewhere else.
    • Example:
      • “Would you mind picking me up at 11.00?”
  5. Set out / set off. Meaning: to start a journey.
    • Example:
      • “We have to set off very early on Saturday.”
  6. Take off. Meaning: when a plane leaves and begins to fly.
    • Example:
      • “The plane is going to take off. Hold my hand!”
  7. Get in. Meaning: when a plane arrives on an airport.
    • Example:
      • “What time does your flight get in?”
  8. Speed up. Meaning: to increase speed.
    • Example:
      • “We’re late, speed up please!”
  9. Look around. Meaning: to explore what is near you, in your area.
    • Example:
      • “After we arrive there, we take a look around.”
  10. Hurry up. Meaning: to rush and not waste time.
    • Example:
      • “You’d better hurry up, we’re running out of time.”
  11. See off. Meaning: to go the airport or station to say goodbye to someone.
    • Example:
      • “We took Cilla to the airport to see her off.
  12. Stop over. Meaning: to change a flight in a city; stay at a place on the way to your final destination.
    • Example:
      • “When I went to Manila we stopped over in Qatar.”
  13. Get away (from someone or somewhere). Meaning: leave or escape from a person or place, often when it is difficult; to take a short break
    • Example:
      • “Matt asked Alice why she wanted to have a get away all of a sudden.”
  14. Back up. Meaning: vehicles have to wait in a long line because of congestion.
    • Example:
      • “The traffic has started to back up because of the accident.”
  15. Get on (a vehicle). Meaning: go onto a bus, train, plane or boat.
    • Example:
      • “We got on the train at 9 o’clock but it didn’t leave until 9.30.”
  16. Hop on (informal). Meaning: go onto a bus, train, plane or boat.
    • Example:
      • “With a one-day travel card you can hop on and off as many buses as you like.”
  17. Get off (a vehicle). Meaning: leave a train, bus plane or boat.
    • Example:
      • Get off at the bus stop after the cinema and I’ll meet you there.”
  18. Check in. Meaning: confirm your arrival at a hotel / airport.
    • Example:
      • “We need to check in two hours before the flight.”

 

 

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, November 13, 2016

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^MQ

#WOTD: Clean, clear

Have you ever wondered if you’ve been using ‘clean’ and ‘clear’ correctly, fellas? Now, it has nothing to do with facial product with the same name.

Clean, Clear.JPG

Talking about those two words will bring us to a wide and broad explanation. I would summarize it in this #WOTD post.

 

As adjectives

As an adjective, ‘clean’ means free from dirt, marks, or stains; morally uncontaminated, pure, innocent; free from unwanted substances.

On the other hand, ‘clear’ means obvious, visible, or easily understood.

Saying somebody’s face is clean means the face is spotless (no acne, no blemish, etc.). Saying it clear means the face is visible.

More examples, fellas.

  • I really love this town. The air is so clean. (The air is unpolluted in that town).
  • He keeps his place very clean. (His place is neat and spotless).
  • Am I making myself clear? (Am I understood/do you understand what I mean?)
  • It’s not clear yet who will be the head of the committee. (The head of the committee is not known/obvious yet).

 

As verbs

If the words function as verbs, ‘to clean an object’ is to remove anything that makes the object dirty.

‘To clear an object’ means to remove anything that hinders it from being obvious or visible.

Example:

  • Clean the table (Wipe off the dirt from the table).
  • Clear the table (Remove any objects on the table to create more space).

‘To cleanse’ means to clean up something by/as if by washing.

Example:

  • This purification ceremony is held to cleanse our spiritual being.
  • Don’t forget to cleanse your face before bed.

That’s what I can share for now! Hope the explanation is clear enough.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 24 October, 2016

 

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^MQ

#EngVocab: Words to describe specific tastes and flavors

Have you ever wanted to describe the taste of the food or drink that you’re having but you just couldn’t find the right word, fellas? Well, today I have collected some adjectives to describe tastes that are more specific than sweet, sour, salty, or bitter.

Astringent: sour or bitter with dry and chalky sensation, making your mouth pucker, e.g. the taste of an unripe banana and tea.

Bittersweet: tasting bitter and sweet at the same time.

Brackish: (especially of water) slightly salty and unpleasant. Brackish water is not pure and probably contains some salt.

Fiery: producing a burning sensation, such as the taste of curries.

Syrupy: thick, sweet, and sticky like the taste of undiluted syrup.

Watery: weak or pale; overly diluted, e.g., watery milk.

Tangy: pleasantly sharp such as the flavor of lemon juice.

Pungent: having a sharp rather unpleasant flavor like chili pepper or garlic.

There you go, fellas. Do you have more words to add to the list? Don’t hesitate to drop a comment!

Compiled and written by @Fafafin for @EnglishTips4U on September 29, 2016.

#WOTD: On a par with

‘On a par with’ is often written as ‘on par with’, without ‘a.’ But, both writing styles have the same meaning: equals to or similar to someone or something.

Now, let’s see how the phrase is used in sentences. Example:

  • The hospitality of this home-stay is on a par with a hotel’s.
  • I think women should be on a par with men in having the same opportunities and gaining appreciation in one’s workplace.

Additional example from a fella on Twitter:

We are on a par with others in front of God. – @fijarhajianto

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 5 September, 2016

 

Related post(s):

 

^MQ