Tag Archives: Stray Kids

#ENGVOCAB: POPULAR INTERNET TERMS AS OF JANUARY 2021 C-I

Hello, everyone! This article is to continue our series on popular internet terms as of January 2021. Here is the first article on the series in case you missed it: PART 1

REMINDER: Most of these terms are slang and SHOULD ONLY be used in an informal interaction.

  1. Cuteness overload (phrase)
    Meaning: an overwhelming cuteness.
    Example:
    “Keanu Reeves playing with puppy is the definition of cuteness overload.”
  2. Cyber-bully (verb, noun)
    Meaning: to bully someone on the internet or someone who bullies another person on the internet.
    Example:
    “Jesy Nelson, a former member of Little Mix, was a victim of cyber-bullying.”
  3. Darn, dang (expression)
    Meaning: somewhat more polite versions of d*mn.
    Example:
    “Dang it, I lost the Wi-Fi connection.”
  4. Deplatform (verb)
    Meaning: to take away someone’s privilege of using a certain social media platform, usually after a series of dangerous, misleading, provocative, abusive, or life-threatening posts.
    Example:
    “I think Twitter did the right thing by deplatforming the president.”
  5. Did I stutter? (phrase)
    Meaning: ‘Do I need to repeat myself?’ or ‘Do I look like I’m kidding?’
    Example:
    A: “I want everything to be done by 5 PM today.”
    B: “But…”
    A: “Did I stutter?”
  6. Doomscrolling/doomsurfing (verb)
    Meaning: the act of consuming a large quantity of negative online news at once.
    Example:
    “Stop doomscrolling. It’s not good for your health.”
  7. Don’t @ me (phrase)
    Meaning: ‘Don’t tag me’ or ‘I don’t want to argue with you on this matter.’
    Example:
    “I like pineapple on my pizza. Don’t @ me.”
  8. Drama (noun)
    Meaning: any scandal or controversial event, sometimes steeming from a trivial argument.
    Example:
    “This influencers drama is giving me a headache. I think I’ll just unfollow them.”
  9. Drama queen (noun)
    Meaning: a gender-neutral term to refer to someone who is overly dramatic.
    Example:
    “Don’t be such a drama queen. You only lost a dozen of followers. So what?”
  10. Eboi/egirl (noun)
    Meaning: a popular internet boy or girl.
    Example:
    A: “Does playing online games a lot automatically make me an egirl?”
    B: “No, unless there is a horde of simps following all of your online activities.”
  11. Edgy (adjective)
    Meaning: daring, bold, and sometimes controversial.
    Example:
    “How to be edgy on social media 101: have an unpopular opinion.”
  12. Everybody gangsta until… (phrase)
    Meaning: everybody is emotionally strong and stable before they see something that could shake them.
    Example:
    “Everybody gangsta until they check their bank account.”
  13. Fake (adjective)
    Meaning: someone acting not as what they preach or advertise to be.
    Example:
    “Be careful of fake friends. They could always throw you under the bus.”
  14. Flex (verb, noun)
    Meaning: to show off or something that we can show off.
    Example:
    “I got an A on the math quiz. I’m gonna flex it on social media.”
  15. Flipping, freaking (adverb)
    Meaning: alternatives to f**king.
    Example:
    “She’s so freaking smart!”
  16. Flying wig/snatched wig (expression)
    Meaning: expressing surprise or shock.
    Example:
    “Things that fly: birds, planes, and our wigs.”
  17. Fr (adverb)
    Meaning: short of ‘for real,’ meaning ‘seriously.’
    Example:
    “You scared me just now, fr.”
  18. Get a life (phrase)
    Meaning: to start doing something meaningful in life.
    Example:
    “Bruh, stop scrolling through your ex’ Instagram posts and go get a life.”
  19. …gets me every time (phrase)
    Meaning: something gives us a strong feeling or emotion, no matter how old it is or how often we see or hear it.
    Example:
    “Queen’s Love of My Life gets me every time. It reminds me of my mother, who loved the song.”
  20. …gives me everything/gives me life (phrase)
    Meaning: something makes me happy.
    Example:
    “Stray Kids’ Hyunjin’s blonde hair gives me everything.”
Stray Kids’ Hwang Hyunjin with blonde hair. Picture credit: Koreaboo.

  1. Go off, sis (phrase)
    Meaning: a gender-neutral phrase to tell someone to express their feelings or emotions through ranting.
    Example:
    “I don’t think I did anything wrong, but yeah, go off, sis!”
  2. Gurl (noun)
    Meaning: an informal version of ‘girl,’ often used in an admonishing tone.
    Example:
    “Gurl, what is you doing?” (Yes, the grammatical error is often intentional).
  3. Happiness noise/happy … noises (phrase)
    Meaning: a phrase originated from a mid-sneeze husky meme. Used to describe joy.
    Example:
    “She squealed with happy girlie noises when she got a text back from her crush.”
  4. …has left the chat (phrase)
    Meaning: someone or something has disappeared.
    Example:
    “I just saw a gif of Stray Kids’ Felix. Now my soul has left the chat.”
  5. …has seen things (phrase)
    Meaning: someone or something has witnessed bad things happen, usually to the extent of getting traumatised.
    Example:
    “This cat has seen things.”
  6. Hecc (expression)
    Meaning: a somewhat more polite alternative to hck or hll.
    Example:
    “What the hecc is happening?”
  7. Henlo (expression)
    Meaning: a pet’s owner way of saying ‘hello.’
    Example:
    “Henlo, this is Coconut Rice Bear (a Samoyed that is popular on the internet).”
  8. Highkey (adverb)
    Meaning: obviously.
    Example:
    “In this day and age, I highkey want to stay at home as much as possible.”
  9. Hubby (noun)
    Meaning: an affectionate way for a wife to call her husband.
    Example:
    “Oh, my hubby calls. I’m sorry, can I get this? This must be important.”
  10. I’ll give you that/I’ll give it to you (phrase)
    Meaning: another way of saying ‘I’ll give you credits for it’ or ‘I applaud you for it.’
    Example:
    “You did finish your task on time, I’ll give it to you, but I think you can do better than this.”

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 22 January 2021.

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#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 A-C

#ENGKNOWLEDGE: MICHELIN STAR

Hi, hello, everyone, how are you today?

Thanks to a new commercial of a certain online marketplace, I discovered a new song that immediately got me hooked, God’s Menu by Stray Kids, which includes the line, “Cookin’ like a chef, I’m a 5-star Michelin…”

Stray Kids’ Felix on God’s Menu music video. Courtesy: JYP Entertainment’s YouTube channel.

The song is such an earworm; I can’t get it out of my head. Now, whether KPop is your cup of tea or not, most of us at least have read or heard about Michelin, a French multinational tyre manufacturer. So, what does a tyre manufacturer have to do with cooking and chefs?

In my opinion, the song is trying to say that Stray Kids is a KPop group that creates music that is one of its kind, just like cooking a special cuisine. The line is a reference to Michelin Guide and its stars, and this is our topic for today.

In 1900, brothers Édouard and André Michelin, who were the founders of car tyre manufacturer Michelin, published a book called Michelin Guide, which was basically a travelling guide for car owners to essential services and points of interest all across France, to respond to the increasing demand of cars.

The book quickly became popular amongst travellers, with several editions for other nations soon followed the French one. The first ever English version was published in 1909.

The publication of the Michelin Guide was temporarily suspended during the first World War. After seeing how the Guide was used as a prop up for a workbench, Michelin decided to charge for it (the Guide had initially been distributed for free).

Over the years, Michelin noticed the increasing popularity of the restaurant section, which then prompted the company to recruit a team of inspectors to visit and review the restaurants anonymously. The restaurant owners were not aware of the inspectors, nor were they aware of being inspected.

The restaurants that managed to impress the inspectors are then awarded with ‘Michelin star’:
– One star means a very good restaurant in its category
– Two stars mean excellent cooking, worth a detour
– Three stars mean exceptional cuisine, worth a special journey

The 3-star restaurants are on the highest tier. This group consists of restaurants that are worth a special trip by themselves, or in other words, we visit the area just to go to the restaurants. It is considered a great honour to be featured and awarded a star, even though there are some controversies as well. There are several editions of the Guide published in Europe, Asia, and America, and there are even editions for major cities in the continents.

As the Guide is published regularly, the restaurant list is also regularly updated. In France, there is always such an anticipation before the latest edition of Michelin Guide is published, one that is said to rival Academy Awards.

Basically, there hasn’t been a 5-star Michelin restaurant yet, but I still think it’s a nice song.

I hope you enjoy this brief article. Stay safe and healthy!

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 7 December 2020.

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