Tag Archives: Slang

#ENGVOCAB: POPULAR INTERNET TERMS AS OF JANUARY 2021 T-Z

Hello, everyone! This article is to the last one of our series on popular internet terms as of January 2021. Here are the previous articles on the series in case you missed it: PART 1PART 2PART 3, PART 4

REMINDER: Most of these terms are slang and SHOULD ONLY be used in an informal interaction.

  1. That’s a you problem (phrase)
    Meaning: an informal way of saying ‘that’s your problem.’
    Example:
    “I’m telling the truth and I have witnesses. If you don’t believe me, I think that’s a you problem.”
  2. That’s just me (phrase)
    Meaning: an informal way of saying ‘that’s just my opinion.’
    Example:
    “I don’t think it’s right to meet up and hang out now, but that’s just me.”
  3. Thicc (adjective)
    Meaning: curvy, slightly overweight.
    Example:
    “I feel like I’d rather be thicc than being underweight.”
  4. This could have been an email (phrase)
    Meaning: of a professional gathering that seems to be a waste of time.
    Example:
    “This whole meeting could have been an email.”
  5. This isn’t even my final form (phrase)
    Meaning: ‘I can improve or do better than this.’ Originated from Songoku’s or any Saiyan’s transformation to a Super Saiyan in the Dragon Ball franchise.
    Example:
    “Wait, wait, wait, this isn’t even my final form. You will be shocked.”
Credit: Meme Generator

  1. Three much (adjective, adverb)
    Meaning: more exaggerated than ‘too much.’
    Example:
    “Girl, you are really three much! Stop making a fuss.”
  2. Throw someone under the bus (phrase)
    Meaning: to betray someone.
    It gained popularity because of the movie Mean Girls (2004) despite not being actually said on the movie and despite having been coined a long time before the movie was released.
    Example:
    “How do you expect to have loyal friends if you constantly throw them under the bus?”
  3. Tiny (adjective)
    Meaning: someone or something being small and cute.
    Example:
    “She’s adorable when she speaks in tiny voice.”
  4. Toxic (adjective)
    Meaning: of an environment or a person’s behaviour that could be detrimental to someone’s mental health.
    Example:
    A: “Why did you deactivate your Instagram account?”
    B: “No specific reason; I just think it’s become toxic.”
  5. Trigger (noun)
    Meaning: something that could potentially upset someone, especially someone with mental health issues.
    Triggering (adjective)
    Meaning: upsetting.
    Triggered (adjective)
    Meaning: getting upset or worked up by something.
    Example:
    “Don’t show her this; it could trigger her.”
  6. Unbothered (adjective)
    Meaning: of someone not being affected by something negative said about them.
    Example:
    “Despite the rumours, she remains unbothered.”
  7. Unpopular opinion (noun)
    Meaning: an opinion that is different to the opinion of the general public, sometimes controversial.
    Example:
    “Unpopular opinion: working overtime is not something we should glorify.”
  8. Uwu (expression)
    Meaning: a written version of this smiley (◡ ω ◡). Nowadays, it’s also said as a response to something adorable.
    Example:
    “I just found out that Benedict Cumberbatch didn’t know how to pronounce ‘penguin.’ I’m uwu-ing so hard right now.”
  9. We stan (phrase)
    Meaning: we support.
    Example:
    “Michelle Obama is so inspirational. We stan an intelligent woman.”
Credit: Pinterest.

  1. Weird flex, but ok (expression)
    Meaning: a reaction we give to other people who act over the top or outlandishly.
    Example:
    A: “Yes, I won 500 Candy Crush levels, all with three stars!”
    B: “Weird flex, but ok.”
  2. Whipped (adjective)
    Meaning: being obsessed or controlled, often used on someone dominated by their significant other.
    Example:
    “Getting home right after work instead of out drinking with your friends is not being whipped. It means you prioritise your family and health.”
  3. Who hurt you? (expression)
    Meaning: a question we ask to someone who seems to be unreasonably upset.
    Example:
    “Did you really fight with a shop assistant just because they ask you to wear a mask? Really, who hurt you?”
  4. Wholesome (adjective)
    Meaning: heartwarming or feel-good.
    Example:
    “During my lunch break, I often look at some wholesome memes. They always cheer me up.”
  5. Wifey (noun)
    Meaning: an affectionate term for a husband to refer to his wife.
    Example:
    “Wifey got mad at me for leaving the front door unlocked.”
  6. Wild (adjective)
    Meaning: exaggerated, extreme, over-the-top, unusual.
    Example:
    “This mukbang with living animals is so wild. I can’t watch it.”
  7. Yeah, right (expression)
    Meaning: a double positive words that somehow carries a negative, sarcastic tone.
    Example:
    “You said you didn’t study but you still got an A on the math quiz. Yeah, right.”
  8. Yee to one’s haw (noun)
    Meaning: something or someone that makes us feel complete.
    Example:
    “Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture is the yee to my haw. It’s a piece that can cheer me up anytime.”
  9. Yeet (expression, verb)
    Meaning: an expression that was initially used to show excitement, approval, or surprise, but is now also used as an informal version of ‘to throw something away.”
    Example:
    “He accidentally yeeted his phone out of the window on the second floor.”
  10. Zen (adjective)
    Meaning: a peaceful and relaxed feeling.
    Example:
    “My zen side was tested during the entire 2020.”

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 16 January 2021.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 A-C
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 C-I
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 I-P
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 P-T

#ENGVOCAB: POPULAR INTERNET TERMS AS OF JANUARY 2021 P-T

Hello, everyone! This article is to continue our series on popular internet terms as of January 2021. Here are the previous articles on the series in case you missed it: PART 1PART 2, PART 3

REMINDER: Most of these terms are slang and SHOULD ONLY be used in an informal interaction.

  1. Protec, attac… (phrase)
    Meaning: the intentionally misspelled version of ‘he protects, but he also attacks,’ accompanied with the third phrase that rhymes with both words.
    Example:
    He protec, he attac, but most importantly, he wants some snac.
  2. Pumped (adjective)
    Meaning: excited.
    Example:
    “I’m so pumped to get 1,000 subscribers.”
  3. Reality check (phrase)
    Meaning: a phrase to use to bring someone back to reality.
    Example:
    “Yes, some of us do make less than Rp 20,000 a day that we can’t barely afford decent clothes and housing. I bet it’s a reality check for you.”
  4. Receipt (noun)
    Meaning: a proof of a scandal, a claim, or an accusation.
    Example:
    “Do you want me to dig up some receipts? I’m sure there’ll be plenty on the internet.”
  5. Relatable (adjective)
    Meaning: a state of something that we can relate to, something we can understand, or something that can make us say, “It’s so me.”
    Example:
    “This quote is so relatable.”
Credit: @tinybuddha on Twitter

  1. Rn (adverb)
    Meaning: short of ‘right now.’
    Example:
    “This song is so beautiful. I’m dying rn.”
  2. Sadboi/sadgirl (noun)
    Meaning: someone who is being very open about their emotions that are usually related to a complicated love life.
    Example:
    “He’s just being a sadboi right now, always emotional.”
  3. Sassy (adjective)
    Meaning: of someone, usually a woman or a girl or those identify as such, to be unapologetically bold.
    Example:
    “Sassy remarks are to be expected from her. Be prepared.”
  4. Screen-capture (verb, noun)
    Meaning: to capture a screen where a piece of important information is shown.
    Example:
    “I have screen-captured this conversation. Just in case.”
  5. Serving (verb)
    Meaning: providing a good look, good internet posts/contents, or good artistic material.
    Example:
    “He’s been serving us a lot of behind-the-scene from his latest movie.”
  6. Shaking/quaking (verb)
    Meaning: someone or something is possibly intimidated by someone’s hidden ability or talent.
    Example:
    A: “Your acting skill is top notch. Hollywood is shaking.”
    B: “You’re being sarcastic.”
  7. Shameless plug (noun)
    Meaning: an improperly placed promotion or advertisement.
    Example:
    “His promoting his YouTube channel on a natural-disaster-related Instagram post feels like a shameless plug to me.”
  8. Share one braincell (phrase)
    Meaning: two or more people doing something silly or ridiculous together.
    Example:
    “My classmates and I shared one braincell during the exam. We literally had no idea what we were doing.”
  9. S**t hits the fan (phrase)
    Meaning: something bad happens.
    Example:
    “She always does controversial things, but when s**t hits the fan, she momentarily disappears from social media.”
  10. Sike (expression)
    Meaning: an incorrect spelling of the slang ‘psych’ that was popular in 1990s. It’s similar to adding ‘not’ or ‘no’ at the end of a sentence to imply sarcasm or a joke.
    Example:
    “You look good with that platinum blonde hair… Sike.”
  11. Simp (noun, verb)
    Meaning: an insult for a male follower who is obsessed with and desperate to get the attention of a female social media celebrity.
    Example:
    “You bought her bath water? D**n, I didn’t know you were such a simp.”
  12. Sketchy (adjective)
    Meaning: untrustworthy, disreputable, suspicious.
    Example:
    “This website seems sketchy to me. Are you sure it’s not a scam?”
  13. Slay (verb)
    Meaning: to greatly impress.
    Example:
    “Mariah Carey slays with her ‘All I Want for Christmas Is You.'”
  14. Sleep with one eye open (phrase)
    Meaning: to live in fear.
    Example:
    “I sleep with one eye open thanks to my overbearing boss.”
  15. Smol (adjective)
    Meaning: a cute way to say ‘small.’
    Example:
    “Look at this smol puppy.”
A smol puppy. Credit: @smoldogpics on Twitter.

  1. Snap (verb)
    Meaning: to do something agressively or to do something greatly.
    Example:
    “Ariana Grande snapped with her ‘Thank You, Next.'”
  2. Snatch/steal someone’s wig (phrase)
    Meaning: to steal the show or to humiliate someone publicly, giving the same embarrassment to the target as literally taking off their wig.
    Example:
    “I sincerely apologise for snatching your wig, but this is what happens when you badmouth me.”
  3. So done (adjective)
    Meaning: tired, bored.
    Example:
    “I’m so done with your antics. Can you go disturb someone else?”
  4. Soft (adjective)
    Meaning: moved, touched.
    Example:
    “The interaction between Keanu Reeves and his fans makes me soft.”
  5. Sploot (verb, noun)
    Meaning: for a pet to lie flat on a surface and stretch their back legs. A wordplay of ‘split.’
    Example:
    “As soon as we got back from the walk, my dog sploot and smiled widely.”
  6. Sure, Jan (expression)
    Meaning: something we say when we know someone is lying right to our face. Taken from the movie A Very Brady Sequel (1996).
    Example:
    “So you left me on read because your phone died? Sure, Jan.”
  7. (Kinda) sus (adjective)
    Meaning: (kind of) suspicious.
    Example:
    “Do you trust her story? It seems kinda sus.”
  8. Take the heat (phrase)
    Meaning: to withstand disapproval or controversies.
    Example:
    “She always causes drama, but when she gets confronted, she’s unable to take the heat herself.”
  9. Thank you, next (expression)
    Meaning: the title of Ariana Grande’s 2018 hit single. Nowadays, it’s used to express that someone wants to move on from a hurtful experience.
    Example:
    “The last thing I want is to have my ex back into my life. Thank you, next!”
  10. That didn’t age well (phrase)
    Meaning: of someone or something that has a negative ending despite a promising start.
    Example:
    “That actor was selected as one of the first people to get vaccinated, but he went straight into a party afterwards. That surely didn’t age well.”

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 16 January 2021.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):
#EngVocab: New Words on Internet
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 A-C
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 C-I
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 I-P

#ENGVOCAB: POPULAR INTERNET TERMS AS OF JANUARY 2021 I-P

Hello, everyone! This article is to continue our series on popular internet terms as of January 2021. Here are the previous articles on the series in case you missed it: PART 1, PART 2

REMINDER: Most of these terms are slang and SHOULD ONLY be used in an informal interaction.

  1. I- (expression)
    Meaning: an expression that represent speechlessness. Often comes in its variation ‘I cannot,’ ‘I can’t’ or ‘I can’t even.’
    Example:
    “I just got a notification that I won a giveaway. I-“
  2. In Spain, but without ‘s’ (expression).
    Meaning: being in pain.
    Example:
    “Her crush didn’t want to go out with her. She is in Spain, but without ‘s’ right now.”
  3. In this economy? (phrase)
    Meaning: we cannot carry out something because it’s a financial burden.
    Example:
    “Buying the latest phone? In this economy?”
  4. Influencer (noun)
    Meaning: an internet celebrity who can possibly influence other people’s opinion or decision. Nowadays, it generally refers to someone who was relatively unknown but gradually became famous as they gained huge following on social media.
    Example:
    “Yet another influencer throwing a party in the middle of a worldwide pandemic. Are they for real?”
  5. Instant regret (phrase)
    Meaning: a regretful feeling that comes instantly after saying something, making a wrong decision, or doing something wrong.
    Example:
    “I bought this phone on a flash sale, but I didn’t know that it didn’t support dual SIM cards. Talk about an instant regret.”
  6. Irl (phrase)
    Meaning: the abbreviation of ‘in real life,’ distinguishing our life on and off the internet.
    Example:
    “I imagine she’s not as sassy irl, but that’s just me.”
  7. Issa (phrase)
    Meaning: a slang for ‘is a’ or ‘it is a.’
    Example:
    “The football match issa fire.”
  8. Karen (noun)
    Meaning: a pejorative term for women seeming to be entitled or demanding beyond the scope of what is normal.
    Example:
    “I just saw a Karen arguing with a shop assistant who advised her to wear a mask.”

  1. Leave one on read (phrase)
    Meaning: to leave a message on read and not send any responses.
    Example:
    “She leaves you on read all the time, man. I think it’s time you take the hint.”
  2. …lives in one’s head rent free (phrase)
    Meaning: of someone not being able to forget or move on from someone else or something.
    Example:
    “His remarks live in your head rent free, but you should know he said that as a joke.”
  3. Lost it (phrase)
    Meaning: losing one’s temper or not being able to control oneself.
    Example:
    “When he started raising his voice, I lost it.”
  4. Love that for you (phrase)
    Meaning: ‘I’m happy for you,’ sometimes used in a sarcastic tone.
    Example:
    A: “I got this LV knockoff for $200.”
    B: “Love that for you.”
  5. Lowkey (adverb)
    Meaning: secretly.
    Example:
    “I lowkey want to travel but I don’t want to spread the virus.”
  6. Make it make sense (phrase)
    Meaning: make something clear, transparent, or comprehensible.
    Example:
    “So, you want to travel in the middle of a pandemic? Make it make sense.”
  7. Make no mistake (phrase)
    Meaning: ‘do not be mistaken.’
    Example:
    “Make no mistake, she’ll also be 10 minutes late to this meeting.”
  8. Mess (noun)
    Meaning: a problem, a complicated situation.
    Example:
    “That mess is gonna be hard to clean up, especially since a lot of netizen have apparently screen-captured their Instagram stories.”
  9. Miss me with that (nonsense) (phrase)
    Meaning: another way of saying ‘I don’t believe you’ or ‘I don’t buy your excuses.’
    Example:
    “You were being honest? Miss me with that nonsense. I knew you’ve been texting other girls.”
  10. Mom, come pick me up, I’m scared (phrase)
    Meaning: an expression to use when we see something scary on the internet. Originated from a scene in the movie Mean Girls (2004).
    Example:
    “Aaarrgghh, I can’t watch this horror movie trailer. Mom, come pick me up, I’m scared!”
  11. Mood (noun)
    Meaning: a representation of our current state or feelings.
    Example:
    “This lazy cat is such a mood.”
Picture credit: Pinterest

  1. Mukbang (noun)
    Meaning: an eating broadcast originated from South Korea to accompany those who live and eat alone. A currently popular theme for a YouTube content.
    Example:
    “How do people do mukbang and stay healthy? I’m honestly curious.”
  2. …never gets old (phrase)
    Meaning: something is never boring.
    Example:
    “This joke never gets old.”
  3. No one, literally no one (expression)
    Meaning: a reaction we give to something unexpected.
    Example:
    No one: …
    Literally no one: …
    Disney: ruining Mulan’s live action.
  4. No s**t, Sherlock (expression)
    Meaning: a reaction to someone explaining something that’s a common fact or blatantly obvious. Example: “You eat junk food every day and now you’re complaining that you gained weight? No s**t, Sherlock.”
  5. Nothing to write home about (phrase)
    Meaning: not special or distinguished enough.
    Example:
    “Yeah, my YouTube channel is monetised, but it’s nothing to write home about, yet.”
  6. Nvm (expression)
    Meaning: a contraction of ‘never mind.’
    Example:
    “Nvm, I’ll just order pizza.”
  7. Ok, boomer (expression)
    Meaning: an expression commonly used by millennials and Gen-Z to mock baby-boomers and Gen-X for their outdated thinking.
    Example:
    “A woman’s place is in the kitchen. Yeah, right. Ok, boomer.”
  8. On fleek (adjective)
    Meaning: looking good, perfectly done, or just about right.
    Example:
    “My eyebrows are on fleek today.”
  9. People are sleeping on it (phrase)
    Meaning: people are ignoring a good content or a talented person.
    Example:
    “This song is moving, but people are sleeping on it. Wake up, people!”
  10. Period (expression)
    Meaning: a simplified way of saying ‘end of a discussion.’
    Example:
    “i was right, you were wrong. Period.”
  11. Petition to/for… (phrase)
    Meaning: a phrase to demand something to be done or someone to be treated in a certain way.
    Example:
    “Petition to Netflix to have all Lord of the Rings movies on its catalogue.”

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 16 January 2021.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):
#EngVocab: Internet Slang
#EngVocab: New Words on Internet
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 A-C
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 C-I

#ENGVOCAB: POPULAR INTERNET TERMS AS OF JANUARY 2021 C-I

Hello, everyone! This article is to continue our series on popular internet terms as of January 2021. Here is the first article on the series in case you missed it: PART 1

REMINDER: Most of these terms are slang and SHOULD ONLY be used in an informal interaction.

  1. Cuteness overload (phrase)
    Meaning: an overwhelming cuteness.
    Example:
    “Keanu Reeves playing with puppy is the definition of cuteness overload.”
  2. Cyber-bully (verb, noun)
    Meaning: to bully someone on the internet or someone who bullies another person on the internet.
    Example:
    “Jesy Nelson, a former member of Little Mix, was a victim of cyber-bullying.”
  3. Darn, dang (expression)
    Meaning: somewhat more polite versions of d*mn.
    Example:
    “Dang it, I lost the Wi-Fi connection.”
  4. Deplatform (verb)
    Meaning: to take away someone’s privilege of using a certain social media platform, usually after a series of dangerous, misleading, provocative, abusive, or life-threatening posts.
    Example:
    “I think Twitter did the right thing by deplatforming the president.”
  5. Did I stutter? (phrase)
    Meaning: ‘Do I need to repeat myself?’ or ‘Do I look like I’m kidding?’
    Example:
    A: “I want everything to be done by 5 PM today.”
    B: “But…”
    A: “Did I stutter?”
  6. Doomscrolling/doomsurfing (verb)
    Meaning: the act of consuming a large quantity of negative online news at once.
    Example:
    “Stop doomscrolling. It’s not good for your health.”
  7. Don’t @ me (phrase)
    Meaning: ‘Don’t tag me’ or ‘I don’t want to argue with you on this matter.’
    Example:
    “I like pineapple on my pizza. Don’t @ me.”
  8. Drama (noun)
    Meaning: any scandal or controversial event, sometimes steeming from a trivial argument.
    Example:
    “This influencers drama is giving me a headache. I think I’ll just unfollow them.”
  9. Drama queen (noun)
    Meaning: a gender-neutral term to refer to someone who is overly dramatic.
    Example:
    “Don’t be such a drama queen. You only lost a dozen of followers. So what?”
  10. Eboi/egirl (noun)
    Meaning: a popular internet boy or girl.
    Example:
    A: “Does playing online games a lot automatically make me an egirl?”
    B: “No, unless there is a horde of simps following all of your online activities.”
  11. Edgy (adjective)
    Meaning: daring, bold, and sometimes controversial.
    Example:
    “How to be edgy on social media 101: have an unpopular opinion.”
  12. Everybody gangsta until… (phrase)
    Meaning: everybody is emotionally strong and stable before they see something that could shake them.
    Example:
    “Everybody gangsta until they check their bank account.”
  13. Fake (adjective)
    Meaning: someone acting not as what they preach or advertise to be.
    Example:
    “Be careful of fake friends. They could always throw you under the bus.”
  14. Flex (verb, noun)
    Meaning: to show off or something that we can show off.
    Example:
    “I got an A on the math quiz. I’m gonna flex it on social media.”
  15. Flipping, freaking (adverb)
    Meaning: alternatives to f**king.
    Example:
    “She’s so freaking smart!”
  16. Flying wig/snatched wig (expression)
    Meaning: expressing surprise or shock.
    Example:
    “Things that fly: birds, planes, and our wigs.”
  17. Fr (adverb)
    Meaning: short of ‘for real,’ meaning ‘seriously.’
    Example:
    “You scared me just now, fr.”
  18. Get a life (phrase)
    Meaning: to start doing something meaningful in life.
    Example:
    “Bruh, stop scrolling through your ex’ Instagram posts and go get a life.”
  19. …gets me every time (phrase)
    Meaning: something gives us a strong feeling or emotion, no matter how old it is or how often we see or hear it.
    Example:
    “Queen’s Love of My Life gets me every time. It reminds me of my mother, who loved the song.”
  20. …gives me everything/gives me life (phrase)
    Meaning: something makes me happy.
    Example:
    “Stray Kids’ Hyunjin’s blonde hair gives me everything.”
Stray Kids’ Hwang Hyunjin with blonde hair. Picture credit: Koreaboo.

  1. Go off, sis (phrase)
    Meaning: a gender-neutral phrase to tell someone to express their feelings or emotions through ranting.
    Example:
    “I don’t think I did anything wrong, but yeah, go off, sis!”
  2. Gurl (noun)
    Meaning: an informal version of ‘girl,’ often used in an admonishing tone.
    Example:
    “Gurl, what is you doing?” (Yes, the grammatical error is often intentional).
  3. Happiness noise/happy … noises (phrase)
    Meaning: a phrase originated from a mid-sneeze husky meme. Used to describe joy.
    Example:
    “She squealed with happy girlie noises when she got a text back from her crush.”
  4. …has left the chat (phrase)
    Meaning: someone or something has disappeared.
    Example:
    “I just saw a gif of Stray Kids’ Felix. Now my soul has left the chat.”
  5. …has seen things (phrase)
    Meaning: someone or something has witnessed bad things happen, usually to the extent of getting traumatised.
    Example:
    “This cat has seen things.”
  6. Hecc (expression)
    Meaning: a somewhat more polite alternative to hck or hll.
    Example:
    “What the hecc is happening?”
  7. Henlo (expression)
    Meaning: a pet’s owner way of saying ‘hello.’
    Example:
    “Henlo, this is Coconut Rice Bear (a Samoyed that is popular on the internet).”
  8. Highkey (adverb)
    Meaning: obviously.
    Example:
    “In this day and age, I highkey want to stay at home as much as possible.”
  9. Hubby (noun)
    Meaning: an affectionate way for a wife to call her husband.
    Example:
    “Oh, my hubby calls. I’m sorry, can I get this? This must be important.”
  10. I’ll give you that/I’ll give it to you (phrase)
    Meaning: another way of saying ‘I’ll give you credits for it’ or ‘I applaud you for it.’
    Example:
    “You did finish your task on time, I’ll give it to you, but I think you can do better than this.”

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 22 January 2021.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):
#EngVocab: Internet
#EngVocab: Internet Slang
#EngVocab: New Words on Internet
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 A-C

#ENGVOCAB: POPULAR INTERNET TERMS AS OF JANUARY 2021 A-C

Every now and again, we take a deep look into words that are commonly used by netizen (internet users) and compile them, because most of them are slang or have different meanings with their official meanings on the dictionary. You can have a look at our mid-2018 compilation HERE.

Here is our January 2021 compilation. Some of these terms may have been trendy before 2021 and some of them may have become less popular by now.

REMINDER: Most of these terms are slang and SHOULD ONLY be used in an informal interaction.

  1. 10 out of 10 would recommend (phrase)
    Meaning: something is so good and we would recommend it to other people.
    Example:
    “This sandwich is perfect. 10 out of 10 would recommend.”
  2. Adulting (verb, noun)
    Meaning: doing things that grown up people do.
    Example:
    “I want to go back to my youth and not worry about rent and stuff. Adulting sucks.”
  3. Aesthetic (adjective)
    Meaning: concerning beauty or the appreciation of beauty. Often typed as ‘a e s t h e t i c’ to give a dramatic effect.
    Example:
    A: “Why did you delete so many of your Instagram posts?”
    B: “I like to keep my feed aesthetic.”
  4. And I oop-/anna oop-/oof (phrase)
    Meaning: a phrase popularised by Jasmine Masters. Used in the same sense as ‘oops’, especially when reacting to other people’s mistakes or blunders. It’s also sometimes written ‘anna oop-‘ or ‘oof.’
    Example:
    A: “That celebrity went to a party right in the middle of a pandemic.”
    B: “And I oop-“
  5. …and stuff (phrase)
    Meaning: an informal way of saying ‘and everything (else)’ or ‘and so on.’
    Example:
    “With you getting upset and stuff, it’s so hard for me to tell the truth.”
  6. Angy (adjective)
    Meaning: a cute way to say ‘angry.’ Often goes as, “No talk me I’m angy.”
    Example:
    “He scares me when he angy.”

  1. Atm (adverb)
    Meaning: ‘at the moment.’ Not ‘authorised teller machine’ (ATM).
    Example:
    “I’m busy atm. Can I call you back later?”
  2. Badmouth (verb)
    Meaning: to speak ill about someone behind their back.
    Example:
    “I’m done with those who badmouthed me. Thank you, next!”
  3. Bebe (noun)
    Meaning: baby. From the French word ‘bébé’ with the same meaning.
    Example:
    “A bebe Samoyed (dog breed) looks like a stuffed bear.”
  4. Beef (noun, verb)
    Meaning: a problem, an argument, or a fight, or to argue or to fight, especially via the internet or social media platforms.
    Example:
    “Nicki Minaj and Cardi B were constantly beefing.”
  5. Be like (phrase)
    Meaning: an informal form of ‘to say’ or ‘to give a certain reaction.’
    Example:
    “I was like, ‘Why are you so obsessed with me?'” – Mariah Carey.
  6. Begpacker (noun)
    Meaning: a portmanteau of ‘beg’ and ‘backpacker,’ used to refer to a backpacker who travels without sufficient fund to what’s considered as a third world country, mostly in Southeast Asia, and then begs their way to fund the trip or the flight home.
    Example:
    “Read this The Guardian’s article on begpackers. It’s quite interesting.”
  7. Big … energy (phrase)
    Meaning: of someone or something radiating or exuding confidence or of someone or something having remarkable similarity to someone or something else.
    Example:
    “I feel like having big 90s boy band energy with my new haircut.”
  8. Bish (noun)
    Meaning: another version of the b-word.
    Example:
    “That’s right, bish, don’t mess with me.”
  9. Boop (verb, noun)
    Meaning: affectionately touching a dog’s nose.
    Example:
    “Who’s a good boi? Here’s a boop for you!”

  1. Bop (noun)
    Meaning: a good song.
    Example:
    “God’s Menu by Stray Kids is such a bop!”
  2. Brb dying (phrase)
    Meaning: ‘Be right back, I’m dying.’ Used in a joking manner to react to something of top quality or adorable.
    Example:
    “This Joker scene compilation from The Dark Knight (2008) is everything. Brb dying.”
  3. Bruh (noun, expression)
    Meaning: a new version of ‘bro,’ but used in a tone of surprise, shock, or disapproval.
    Example:
    A: “Bro, I’m so sorry, I accidentally stepped on your cat’s tail.”
    B: “Bruh, WTF. Is the cat okay?”
  4. Bye, Felicia (expression)
    Meaning: an expression from the movie Friday (1995), that means ‘to bid farewell to someone whom we dislike.’
    Example:
    “Alright, I gotta go now. Bye, Felicia!”
  5. Byelingual (adjective)
    Meaning: of a person who is bilingual but struggling with both languages.
    Example:
    “That moment when you mix up English and French… Byelingual!”
  6. Cancel culture (noun)
    Meaning: a situation when we stop supporting a company or a famous person due to their objectionable or offensive act.
    Example:
    “Cancel culture doesn’t work for her as she has a lot of fans who condone everything she says or does.”
  7. Cash grab (noun)
    Meaning: a product released by big corporations, often in a collaboration with celebrities or influencers, that is often overpriced but of average quality, underwhelming, or unnecessary.
    Example:
    “This lipstick is a cash grab; you can buy similar products from any brand with much cheaper price.”
  8. Catfish (noun, verb)
    Meaning: social media pictures or personas that do not match one’s real life, usually with the intention of deceiving or luring someone else into a relationship.
    Example:
    “I got catfished by that girl I met online. Our first meeting irl was so awkward because she looked nothing like her Instagram pictures.”
  9. Chef’s kiss (phrase)
    Meaning: referring to a chef who kisses their fingers after tasting a special cuisine. Nowadays, it is used to describe something that is perfectly done.
    Example:
    “A Star Is Born (2018) was excellent. Lady Gaga’s voice is just chef’s kiss.”
  10. Chile (expression)
    Meaning: chill, relax.
    Example:
    A: “I can’t believe that influencer stole your artwork and credited it as hers.”
    B: “Chile, I’ll ask her about it.”
  11. Choose your fighter (phrase)
    Meaning: to pick between two or more equally strong contenders, which can be people, pictures, memes, or anything else.
    Example:
    “Pineapple on pizza or fried chicken with chocolate sauce. Choose your fighter.”
  12. Clickbait (noun, verb)
    Meaning: a misleading or exaggerated title of an internet post, usually created to gain traffic or engagement.
    Example:
    “Some of his YouTube video titles are pure clickbait. They don’t represent the contents of the videos at all.”
  13. Content warning/trigger warning (noun)
    Meaning: a warning at the beginning of an internet content to inform the audience that the content could put someone in a distress. Often abbreviated as CW/TW.
    Example:
    “Content warning/trigger warning: containing domestic violence.”
  14. Covidiot (noun)
    Meaning: a person who ignores health protocols like refusing to wear a mask during COVID-19 pandemic.
    Example:
    “Don’t be such a Covidiot and put other people at risk. Wear your mask.”
  15. (Content) creator (noun)
    Meaning: someone who creates an internet content.
    Example:
    “When I asked my niece what her dream was, she said she wanted to be a YouTube content creator. I was shook.”

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 16 January 2021.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):
#EngVocab: Internet
#EngVocab: Internet Slang
#EngVocab: New Words on Internet
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018
#USSlang: Internet Slang (2)

#WOTD: FLEXING

“Weird flex, but okay.”

Source: Twitter gif.

Have you ever heard or read this sentence, fellas? It’s usually directed to people who have skills or styles that are a little outlandish or out-of-the-box.

‘To flex’ in the sense of bragging about personal things is an informal expression that means showing off or flaunting something (Indonesian: pamer). According to Urban Dictionary, it dates back as far as 2004.

When did ‘flexing’ start becoming popular? The word gains popularity thanks to one of Rae Sremmurd’s songs, No Flex Zone (2014). Until today, it is one of the most used internet slangs, partly thanks to flexing culture.

Now, what is flexing culture? It is an competition to show off expensive things (gadget/electronic devices, clothings, jewelleries, merchandise, etc.), lavish lifestyle, places we recently visited, or our fine dining experience to our circle of friends and family, particularly on social media, in order to seem wealthy and up-to-date and to increase our social standing.

Many articles have pointed out the psychological effects of flexing culture; some of them are the need to always compete, the replacement of self-worth and self-esteem with material things, unhealthy coping mechanism, and unnecessary spending, but I guess it all comes back to us whether we let ourselves be affected or not.

Let us know what you think about flexing and flexing culture on the comment section below.

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 23 November 2020.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):
#AusSlang: The Australian Way
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018
#UKSlang: Slang in Harry Potter Books
#USSlang: Internet Slang (2)
#USSlang: Money

#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018

Hi, fellas, how was your Monday? I was shook when I realized that we are halfway through 2018.

Does anyone recognize the word ‘shook’ that I used on the previous sentence? Have you ever read it before?

 

@catheramirez: ‘Surprise,’ ‘I can’t believe it.’

Q: @nadirantsy: Does shook have the same meaning with shocked? Same context?
A: Yes, but I think we should limit ‘shook’ to a relaxed, playful context. We don’t use it to express our sadness when hearing a bad news, for example.

 

‘Shook’ is one of the popular internet terms that we are going to discuss tonight. As languages are ever-evolving, these internet terms are actual English words whose meanings have changed over the years.

Here are some popular internet terms that are still used as of mid-2018:

Bamboozled
From the verb ‘to bamboozle’ (informal). It means to fool or cheat someone. It also means to confuse or perplex.
E.g.: “I’m bamboozled by the amount of retweets to my Twitter post.”

Boi/boye
A cute way to spell ‘boy.’ Usually used to a male dog.
E.g.: “Oh, you’re such a good boiiiiii…”

Burn
A reaction we gave when somebody has just been talked back to.
A: “Without the ugly in this world, there would be nothing beautiful.”
B: “Thank you for your sacrifice.”
C: “Burn!!”

Canceled
‘To cancel’ used to describe that an event would not take place OR a force negated another, but nowadays, netizen use ‘canceled’ to describe a dismissed or rejected person or idea.
E.g.: “If you don’t like my doggos, you will be canceled.”

Cringe and cringey
‘To cringe’ is to experience an inward shiver upon seeing or hearing something embarrassing. ‘Cringey’ is used as an adjective to describe something that causes somebody to cringe.
E.g.: “I cringed so hard when I watched her lip-synced performance. It was so cringey.”

Deceased
It was used to politely say that someone has passed away, but now, it is used to describe that something is really cool or awesome or funny that it takes our lives away.
E.g.: “OMG, my brother bought me tickets to a Rich Brian’s concert! I’m deceased!”

Doggo
Basically, it’s a cute way to say ‘dog.’
E.g.: “I just saw a super adorable, squishy, fluffy doggo.” insert crying face emojis

adorable animal beach canine
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

Extra
Something is ‘extra’ if it is done in an exaggerated, over-the-top way.
E.g.: “Rihanna’s outfit at the 2018’s Met Gala is so extra.”

Epic comeback
It used to describe a spectacular return of an artist, most of the time musicians, after a long hiatus. Now, it also means a witty (sometimes harsh) response to an insult.
A: “You’re so fat Thanos will have to snap his fingers twice.”
B: “Yeah, I’m fat, but you’re ugly. At least I can go on a diet.

Feels
All emotions mixed up: sadness, joy, envy, love, etc.
E.g.: “TVXQ’s comeback gave me all the feels.”

HMU
Stands for ‘hit me up,’ which means ‘contact me.’
E.g.: “HMU the next time you visit the city.”

Humblebrag
The act of bragging while appearing humble; the art of false modesty.
E.g.: “Who knew that constant vacations and holidays could be this exhausting?”

Lit
It used to describe the state of being drunk, but it is now used to express that something is exceptionally good.
E.g.: “The latest Arctic Monkey’s album was so lit it set my headphones on fire.”

Noob
A noob is a person who is inexperienced in a particular sphere or activity, especially computing or the use of the Internet. It came from the word ‘newbie.’ However, ‘newbie’ has a more positive connotation while ‘noob’ is intended as an insult.
A: “Hey guys, I’m kinda new here.“
B: “LOL, noob.”

Overproud
A reaction we gave when our nation or something originated from our nation is being talked about in a positive way.
A: “Did you know that an instant noodle brand from Indonesia was marketed worldwide?”
B: “Are you being overproud right now?”

Pwned
A gaming-style spelling of ‘owned,’ meaning being defeated badly.
E.g.: “Oh, snap, I was just pwned!”

Salty
Upset, angry, or bitter, after being made fun of or embarrassed. It can also be used to say that someone is mad.
E.g.: “Gosh, stop being so salty! You broke up with him; now it’s time to move on!”

Savage
Being ‘savage’ is saying or doing something harsh without a regard to the consequences.
A: “You’re so fat Thanos will have to snap his fingers twice.”
B: “Yeah, I’m fat, but you’re ugly. At least I can go on a diet.”
C: “Oooh, that was savage!”

Shady and throwing shade
Shady = suspicious
Throwing shade = talking bad about something or someone, without naming (but the audience knows anyway).
E.g.: “I think her last Instagram post was a shade thrown to me. I don’t know why she’s so shady.”

Shook
Originally, the word has a more serious connotation, as it means ’emotionally or physically disturbed.’ Nowadays, netizen use it as a playful way to say ‘surprised.’
E.g.: “She broke up with him? I’m shook!”

Stoked
It means being excited or euphoric.
E.g.: “When they told me I was on the team, I was stoked.”

Tea
A gossip or personal information belonging to someone else. The phrase ‘spill the tea’ is used the same way as ‘spill the bean’ is used, that is ‘to reveal an information that is supposed to be a secret.
E.g.: “The tea is exceptionally good today.”

Woke
Supposedly has the same meaning as ‘awaken,’ which is being enlightened, always in the know of everything that is happening in the world, more than anyone else.
E.g.: “I never consume any products coming from animals anymore. I guess I can say I’m woke.”

 

As what we always suggest, avoid using slang or internet terms in a formal interaction. If you befriend your employer or boss on social media, for example, both of you are still expected to converse formally. Any school assignments, essays, job applications, letter of recommendations, or business emails should be free from these terms either.

@kaonashily: instantly I feel ‘gaul’ knowing these ‘nowadays’ words.

@babygraace: I think salty isn’t just used when someone is being made fun or embarrassed.  E.g.: omg some people that watch my car vlogs literally get salty at me because I don’t put both my hands on the wheel!

Q: @sakurayujin: What about ‘shooketh?’
A: Even more surprised than ‘shook.’

 

Compiled and written by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 11 June, 2018.


RELATED POST(S): 

#UKSlang: UK slang (10)

Whilst preparing for a session to be delivered on Twitter, I found some slangs that are quite hilarious. I hope you find them fun, like I do. This time, we’ll talk about some slangs that are mostly used in the UK. Like all slangs, they’re suitable only in casual conversation.

Enough with the speech. Let’s start, shall we?

  1. A bunch of fives. Meaning: a punch in the face.
    • Example:
      • “I’ll give you a bunch of fives.”
      • Meaning: “I’m going to punch you in the face.”
  2. Pants. Meaning: not very good, not great.
    • Example:
      • “That’s pants.”
      • Meaning: “That’s not very good.”
  3. Nineteen to the dozen. Meaning: very fast, at a speedy rate at high speed.
    • Example:
      • “She was talking nineteen to the dozen.”
      • Meaning: “She was talking very fast.”
  4. Pear-shaped. Meaning: wrong result, deviate from expectation.
    • Example:
      • “It’s all gone pear-shaped.”
      • Meaning: “It’s all gone wrong.”
  5. A slice short of a loaf. Meaning: not very clever.
    • Example:
      • “That pretty girl is a slice short of a loaf.”
      • Meaning: “That pretty girl is not very clever.”
  6. As bright as a button. Meaning: clever.
    • Example:
      • “She’s as bright as a button.”
      • Meaning: “She’s clever.”
  7. Spend a penny. Meaning: visit the bathroom.
    • Example:
      • “Excuse me. I need to spend a penny.”
      • Meaning: “Excuse me. I need to visit the bathroom.”
  8. Parky. Meaning: cold.
    • Example:
      • “It’s parky outside.”
      • Meaning: “It’s cold outside.”
  9. Curtain twitcher. Meaning: a nosy neighbor.
    • Example:
      • “You’re such a curtain twitcher.”
      • Meaning: “You’re such a nosy neighbor.”
  10. Fluff. Meaning: fart.
    • Example:
      • “Did you just fluff?”
      • Meaning: “Did you just fart?”

That’s all for now, fellas! So, which one do you like best?

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, April 29, 2017

 

Related post(s):

 

#USSlang: Internet slang (2)

In this article, we’ll share some slang words we would most likely find on the internet. Do remember that we should avoid using slang words in formal situation.

Slang words are ideally only used in casual conversation and text. They are popular only for a certain period of time. Let’s start , shall we?

 

  1. Sus. Meaning: someone sketchy, shady.
    • Example:
      • I told you that guy over there was sus.
    • ‘Sus’ comes from the word suspect. As a slang, ‘sus’ suggests that someone is sketchy or shady.
    • Other than that, ‘sus’ can also mean ‘see you soon.’ Example:
      • I’m getting off work now. Sus.
  2. Boots. Meaning: emphasis, very much.
    • Example:
      • I had a very long day. I’m tired boots.
    • Tired boots = very tired
    • Add ‘boots’ to the end of an adjective or verb to emphasize on whatever you’re saying.
  3. Hunty. Meaning: a term of endearment for friends, usually used in the drag community.
    • Example:
      • Hey hunty, I’m home!
    • ‘Hunty’ is a combination of two words, ‘honey’ and ‘c*nt.’ It can sometimes be used in a demeaning way.
  4. Stan. Meaning: an obsessed fan (n.), admire (v.)
    • Example:
      • There’s a bunch of Stans waiting right outside the concert hall.
    • ‘Stan’ originated from Eminem song about an obsessed fan. ‘Stan’ was the main character in the song.
  5. OTP (One True Pairing) Meaning: your favorite relationship in a fandom, a couple that other people think matches the best.
    • Example:
      • My OTP is Glenn Alinskie Chelsea Olivia. They’re such a cute couple.
  6. Tea. Meaning: gossip, news or personal information belonging to someone else.
    • Example:
      • Spill the tea about what happened at the party.
  7. DR (double rainbow). Meaning: a term used to convey extreme happiness.
    • Example:
      • I got a promotion at work and have been seeing DRs all day.
  8. ICYMI (in case you missed it). Meaning: often used by people who missed things (often important) in social media or chat rooms.
    • Example:
      • ICYMI, my cat is sick and it ruined half of my wardrobe.
    • ICYMI can also be used in humorous way to point something which is already obvious.
  9. IMMD (it made my day). Meaning: a term used to show happiness, something awesome.
    • Example:
      • OMG! My boss just gave me a huge raise. #IMMD
  10. AMA (ask me anything). Meaning: a term to invite people to ask questions.
    • Example:
      • I have been studying for that exam all day. AMA.

There goes 10 internet slang words for now, fellas! Now that you have 10 more slang words in your repertoire, it’s time to put them to practice.

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, March 15, 2017


Related post(s):

^MQ

#USSlang: Money

In this post; we would like to share the most common American slang for money.

  1. Bill. Meaning: one hundred dollars, or a piece of paper money.
    • Example:
      • a fifty-dollar bill.
  2. Wad. Meaning: a considerable amount of money.
    • Example:
      • a wad of cash.
  3. Buck. Meaning: commonly means a dollar, but can also mean an amount of money in general, or a hundred dollars.
    1. Example:
      1. his bag costs only fifty bucks.
      2. You can earn more bucks as you go.
  4. Fin/fiver/five-spot. Meaning: five-dollar bill.
  5. Sawbuck/ten-spot/Hamilton. Meaning: ten-dollar bill. Alexander Hamilton is pictured on the $10 banknote.
  6. C-note or Benjamin. Meaning: 100 dollar bill.
  7. Grand. Meaning: a thousand dollars.
    • Example:
      • five grands for a one-year program.
  8. Nickel. Meaning: originally refers to a coin worth five cents, but as a slang term it means something that costs five dollars.
  9. Dime. Meaning: originally means a coin worth ten cents, but as a slang term it means ten dollars.
  10. Other general terms for money: scratch, dough, moolah, cheddar, and smacker.

Compiled and written by @Fafafin for @EnglishTips4U on December 15, 2016.

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^MQ

#AUSSlang: The Australian way

People from different part of the world have their own way to say things. Even though Australians speak English, like British & Americans, there are some words or slang which are unique to people from the country.

In this post, I’ll share some slang of the most common slang you might find in Australia. Let’s start!

  1. US: Cup of coffee | AU: Cuppa

slide1
Example: Would you like any sugar in your cuppa?

 

  1. US: Biscuit | AU: Biccie

slide2
Example: The best way to start your day is with a glass of warm milk and some biccie.

 

  1. US: Breakfast | AU: Breakkie

slide3
Example: Do you prefer chicken porridge or nasi uduk for breakkie?

 

  1. US: Afternoon | AU: Arvo

slide4
Example: It’s a very tiring day. Let’s have an arvo nap.

 

  1. US: Umbrella | AU: Brolly

slide5
Example: Always keep a brolly with you wherever you go. Especially in the raining season.

 

  1. US: Sunglasses | AU: Sunnies

slide6
Example: Oversized sunnies are trending now thanks to Syahrini.

 

  1. US: Track pants | AU: Tracky dacks

slide7
Example: Rihanna seems to like this green tracky dacks a lot.

 

  1. US: Convenience store | AU: Milk bar

slide8
Example: Let’s go to a milk bar and grab something to eat.

 

  1. US: Chocolate | AU: Choccie

slide9
Example: I really should stop eating so much choccie.

 

  1. US: Candy | AU: Lollies

slide10
Example: I don’t mind living off lollies, but my dentist wouldn’t approve.

 

  1. US: Guy | AU: Bloke

slide11
Example: Despite his attitude, he turned out to be a very nice bloke.

 

  1. US: Girl | AU: Bird

slide12
Example: She’s one of the most determined bird you might ever find on TV.

 

  1. US: Flip flops, sandals |AU: Thongs

slide13
Example: Somebody left these thongs outside. Are they yours?

 

  1. US: Lipstick | AU: Lippy

slide14
Example: I always keep at least one lippy in my purse.

 

  1. US: Gas station | AU: Servo

slide15
Example: Fortunately we found a servo in time. I almost ran out of petrol.

 

Alright! There goes 15 Australian slang you might want to know, especially if you’re planning to go to Australia.

 

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, September 28, 2016

 

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^MQ

#EngVocab: Internet Slang

Here are 7 terms you might have noticed popping up a lot on social media these days.
1) Lit (adj.)

It’s used to describe an exciting event, a cool person, or general awesomeness.

Example:

  • Last night’s party was lit, buddy!

2) Fam (n.)

It’s used to refer to those close to you. These people can be your actual family, but most times it is used for close friends that you trust who are like family.

Example:

  • You always have my back, fam.

3) Sis (n.)

It is a shorter version of sister. Sis is known as the new bro. However you’d use bro, just replace it with sis and you’re good to go.

Example:

  • Sorry, but you can’t sit with us, sis.

4) Snatched (adj.)

It’s used to describe anything that looks really good or on point. It is a newer version of “fleek.”

Example:

  • Omg, I love your eyebrows. They’re snatched!

5) High-key / Low-Key (adj.)

High-key is used to describe something needing to be said out loud. But todays, it also used to alter word “very,” “a lot,” “intensely,” or “much.”

Example:

  • High-key don’t wanna move from the couch today. Or ever.

Low-key is clearly the opposite of “high-key”. It means to keep things as secret. But, nowadays, it also refers to “not really,” “not a lot,” “minimally.”

Example:

  • “I’m just low-key in love with him, OK?”

Here are both used in the same sentence:

  • “When you high-key want someone but you’re trying to be low-key.”

6) Ship (v./n.)

As a verb, it means to support a romantic pairing (usually of fictional characters).

As a noun, a ship is when a romantic pairing occurs between two characters.

Example:

  • I ship Andrew and Emma so much. They’re the cutest couple ever!

7) Savage (adj.)

It’s used to describe someone who doesn’t care about the consequences of his or her actions; bad-ass or hardcore.

Example:

  • Did you see the way he beat that snatcher? That was savage!

 

Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, August 6, 2016

 

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^MQ

#UKSlang: UK slang (9)

Good evening, fellas! How has your day been? I hope it’s been fun. I spent mine in campus, it was fun yet leave my cream crackered right now.  :D

In tonight session, I’d like to share some #UKSlang. Are you guys interested? Check them out, fellas!

  1. Absobloodylootely. Meaning: to agree with someone highly in a rather enthusiastic fashion.
    • Example:
      • Q: Are you going to do?
      • A: Absobloodylootely!
  1. Bob’s your uncle. Meaning: “there you have it!” or “everything is alright.”
    • Example:
      • “You just have to take the first left, and Bob’s your uncle –There’s the restaurant!”
  1. Cream crackered. Meaning: to be really tired and exhausted.
    • Example:
      • “Sorry, I can’t come to your party. I’m cream crackered.”
  1. Chock-a-block. Meaning: closely packed together; extremely full; crowded.
    • Example:
      • “Books piled chock-a-block on the narrow shelf.”
  1. Tickety-boo. Meaning: as it should be; going smoothly; fine.
    • Example:
      • “You don’t have to worry, everything is Tickety-boo.”
  1. Twee. Meaning: overly dainty, delicate, cute, or quaint.
    • Example:
      • “Her bunny-themed tea set is so utterly twee.”
  1. Queer street. Meaning: a difficult situation, such as debt or bankruptcy
    • Example:
      • “Stop buying unnecessary things, that’ll land you in Queer Street!”

It’s a wrap for now. Thank you for joining me. I hope it has been useful for you and…. Have a great day, fellas!


Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, November 7 , 2015

Related post(s):

#USSlang: “Hump Day”

According to Oxford English Dictionary, “hump day” is the informal name for ‘Wednesday’.
Wednesday is seen as the midpoint (titik tengah) of a working week.
After Wednesday, we are moving closer towards the weekend. Everything feels easier and more bearable. Bearable = bisa dihadapi dengan mudah/santai.

This picture best describes the feeling of getting over a Wednesday:

 

Example: Over the hump! It’s Wednesday.

 

 

Why is it called a ‘hump’?

Surprisingly, it has something to do with camels. This is a hump (punuk unta).


Mondays and Tuesdays are seen as the hardest part of the week because we go back to work/school and get very busy on those days. Stress level usually peaked (memuncak) on Wednesday, then slows down on Thursday and Friday. Which is why Wednesdays are basically like the peak of a camel’s hump.

Here are some examples in using “hump day” in a sentence:

  • Hump day is always the hardest part of the week in this business.”
  • “Let’s look for a hump day treat and get over the stress.”
    • Treat = permen, suguhan, sesuatu yang enak.

Source: Oxford Dictionaries online, factsboard.com and keen.com for images

 

Compiled by @animenur for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, July 1, 2015

 

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Further #EngTalk: Penggunaan Bahasa Inggris di Indonesia

(Conversations along #EngTalk: English words as Bahasa Indonesia slang)

Denger-denger, Presiden ke-enam SBY suka menggunakan kata2 b. Inggris, ada yang tahu kata-kata apa saja yang beliau gunakan?

Dua trending topic Indonesia sekarang adalah #NovemberWish dan #JilbabInLove, kira-kira kenapa ya….

Kenapa bukan “Harapan November” daripada “November Wish”?

Kenapa judul sinetronnya Jilbab In Love? Apakah telalu sulit ditulis dalam bahasa Indonesia?

@riskianaaa: biar dikira orang inggris dan gak dikira kampungan..” apakah segitunya kita pakai bahasa Inggris? :/

@EdhaArora13: ya lebih keren aja gitu., hehe” hmmmmm

@umamkha: mungkin semakin bisa mencampurkan 2 bahasa jadi 1 akan terlihat semakin pintar :))” hmmmmm

@christyaneggy: thank you” re: kata-kata bahasa Inggris SBY

@RoroInggar_: biar byk yg retweet mungkin (?)” hehehe re: trending topic

Kalau menurut admin, mungkin November Wish & Jilbab In Love contoh2 pemakaian bahasa Inggris dimana dianggap lebih cepat dicerna

@christyaneggy: kalo menururku sih udah kebiasaan orang indonesia min. bahasa Indonesia sendiri juga kan sebenernya bahsa melayu”

Eits, @christyaneggy, B. Melayu banyak bedanya lho sama B. Indonesia… banyak kata-kata B. Belanda juga

@driphani: teeeeetoooottt. How come lebih cepet dicerna? Sedangkan di indonesia b.ing itu sebagai foreign language not second language.”

Okay, mungkin tepatnya “cepat ditangkap”. Kalau menurut @driphani kenapa ada judul sinetron jadi Jilbab in Love / TT NovemberWish?

@driphani: mungkin krn bnyk produk yg kita gunakan sehari2 dalam b.ing. kita pake hape juga kata2 e dalm b.ing. jd sdh jadi kebiasaan”

@anggivish: karena singkat. Atau karena orang indonesia banyak terpapar film/buku/sosmed/9gag yg berbahasa inggris? Hehe”

Karena singkat maka cepat dicerna, dan memang B Inggris adalah foreign language di Indonesia @anggivish

“film/buku/sosmed/9gag yg berbahasa inggris” yang disebut @anggivish memang menjadi bagian dari kenapa B. Inggris bisa menjadi bagian dari kata-kata keseharian atau gaul di bahasa Indonesia juga

Maka dari itu admin pingin bahas kata-kata B. Inggris yang menjadi kata-kata gaul baru di B. Indonesia

@christyaneggy:kalo menurut buku yg aku pernah baca sih min.orang Indonesia pakai bahasa Melayu gaul yang sering dipakai di daerah pesisir jadi mungkin dari situ ada perbedaannya”

Atau apakah sebenarnya sekarang kita sudah tidak membeda-bedakan lagi?

@gita_LJ: hmm.. krn b.ingg penting dan ga akan bisa2 kl ga dilatih.. jd ngomong campur2 adlh satu cara utk melatih #Engtalk kita :D”

Hmmm interesting @gita_LJ,

@Vy_za: Tapi memakai 2 bahasa juga harus liat lawan bicara ya min :)” Iya itu pasti, yang ini dalam konteks berbahasa Indonesia

 

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4u on November 8, 2014

#EngTalk: English Words as Bahasa Indonesia Slang (2)

Fellas, bagi yang sudah membaca buku kami Chapter 2 tentang English Words as Bahasa Indonesia Slang atau pernah baca post ini https://englishtips4u.com/2012/08/03/engtalk-english-words-as-bahasa-indonesia-slang/ … ..apakah menurut fellas ada yang lebih baru?

Indonesia memiliki beberapa slang dari B. Inggris, seperti yang dibahas di buku kami/bahasan sebelumnya (link di atas)

Berhubungan sesi ini dilaksanakan 2 tahun yang lalu, menurut fellas apakah ada slang/kata gaul yang lebih baru lagi?

*tidak terasa sudah 2 tahun yang lalu ternyata sesi ini :’)

So let’s start our #EngTalk shall we? Menurut fellas kata2 bahasa Inggris apa lagi yang menjadi slang/kata gaul bahasa Indonesia akhir2 ini?

Sebelumnya kita punya Happening, Artis, Selow, Woles, Pending, dsb apakah kata2 ini masih berlaku?

 

Istilah teknologi

@RoisulUmam: istilah teknologi biasanya sering dipakai, kak. contohnya install, gadget, klik, upload, download.”

@RoisulUmam: install = pasang, gadget = alat canggih (menurut KBBI), upload = unggah, download = unduh”

 

Lagu diterjemahkan?

@luhur_setiabudi: sakitnya tuh disini (hurt at here)” wow… judul lagu ini diterjemahkan juga?

@musokela: “the pain is here” Jadi beneran lagu ini suka diterjemah ke bahasa Indonesia ya? re: sakitnya tuh disini

 

Di-Indonesiakan

@R_Dhewie75: “Bhaayy” min, dari kata “Bye” yg biasanya diucapkan ketika udh kesel sama orang :)”

@adyanurs: Iya jadi “yesss” bahkan jadi “yezzz” ex: “kangen bgt yessss”

@christyaneggy: parfum? perfume = parfum = minyak wangi semprot”

@adyanurs: “Recommend bgt nih film”. Recommend = sarankan/menyarankan. Maksudnya jd gimana ya min? Haha”

Kayaknya sih lebih meng-Indonesiakan kalimat bahasa Inggris seperti “I would recommend this film” @adyanurs <- “@AshenaPuteri: Gw sih makenya recommended”

@adyanurs: Ini kynya slang baru nih min, gue baru denger dn baru tau. “A6″ = Asix = Asik…” whaaaat? haha

 

Tetap Bahasa Inggris

@Vy_za: Sring mncampuradukkan bhsa Ina sma English min. For ex. ”bjumu fashionable bgt si”

@sintaokt: btw, anyway, then, good job, good luck, happy birthday dll. Sering bangeeeet.”

@MarieAnneliese: bahasa jualan min;) kaya sold out, available, restock dsb ;)”

@umamkha: ‘meet up yuk’ gitu hehehe :))”

@Rurisyrl: “at least” sering niih, ya gak sih?” Kalau contoh “at least” kayak apa ya? “At least gue uda dateng”, gitu? @Rurisyrl

@ridwanahsa: aku sih down to earth aja ~” penggunaannya seperti itu? <- “@DimasYanuar_: Kayanya lebih ke ngejelasin sifat orang yg rendah hati min” re: “Aku sih down to earth aja”

@DimasYanuar_: which is, congratulations, dinner, stalking, badmood, etc” Hmmm.. “which is”… interesting

@Rurisyrl: itu cowok ‘macho’ banget. Gitu misalnyaa”

@devittaputri: alat rumah tangga, toaster, rice cooker, magic jar, blender, juicer, mixer, hampir gak ada yg b.indo sekarang :p”

@Rurisyrl: gurunya ‘killer’ banget! Bahasanya Anak sekolahan nih~”

@Rurisyrl: ‘ranking’? Aku dapet ranking berapa yaa~ lol”

@devittaputri: event di mall, kaya midnight sale, garage sale, discount up to.., buy 1 get.., ini eyangku aja paham maksudnya. :)” Eyangmu gaul @devittaputri hehehe

@theotheolaDPM: Ini: Ada tugas disuruh buat ‘paper’, besok ‘deadline’ tugas.”

@amaeamae: Refill (tinta printer nya di refill dong)”

@eunlindalie: toned,shape. Kyak ” biar badannya toned n lebih shape”” wow banyak banget… <- “@eunlindalie: min.. Ak ngegym aj. Instrukturny tuh instruct kita pke inggris loh. Jarang pake b.indo

Klo yg isiny ibu2 bru pke b.indo” wow…. <- “@eunlindalie: Yg bru bljar pun diajrin untuk instruxt pke inggris. Kl pk b.indo mreka ngaku it susah. Dan mlah cnderung kacau.” hmmm… wow

@Rurisyrl: ‘invite’ pin bb ku ya~” #EngTalk

@Rurisyrl: ‘happy sweet seventeen’ ya~ yg ini agak gawls :D”

@theotheolaDPM: Jadi seorang CEO itu ga gampang, harus bisa ‘manage people‘ dan perusahaan.” interesting

Hmm, contoh-contoh penggunaan almost, attitude, honestly, envy, crush, better, cheat @reggyelvira seperti apa ya?

<- “@Rurisyrl: gila! Gue envy liat dia pulang bareng. Hmmm~ :D” hahahaa kocak

<- @reggyelvira: honestly gue suka sama dia. #honestly | ihhh envy deh, dia dapet gadget baru #envy itu min contohnya :)

@krungy2121: brave? , kita harus brave dong kalo mau bisa._.” interesting <- “@krungy2121: lol saya kebanyak nonton acara korea pake engsub jd bgt lah” wah ketahuan subtitle-nya tidak benar… -.-

@dhitaadut: Sorry gue typo mulu daritadi ”

@krungy2121: how abt, cut into pieces dulu baru bisa dimakan ?” hmmm that’s new for me haha

@firazier: happy born day? Biasanya aku ucapin buat temen yang lagi ultah._.” iya padahal harusnya birthday

@devittaputri: kemasan. sachet, pouch, box, refill, packs, dozen.”

@DimasYanuar_: “a little piece of cake” min ane sering pake.” maksudnya gimana ya? <- “@DimasYanuar_: dulu kata guru SMA itu slang artinya ‘kecil’ utk nggampangin sesuatu.

Contoh Q:lo bisa salto ngga?|A: a little piece of cake.” oh i see..

@theotheolaDPM: Nanti tolong ‘handle’ diskusi nya ya, ‘just in case’ saya datang terlambat.”

@Rurisyrl: satnight sama siapa yaaa~ x)”

@dewacko: “basically” min. selebritis di tv suka bilang itu.” wah siapa tuh? hehe

@Leonitanov: gakbisa main nih, schedule padet bgt.”

@adyanurs: “at least” atau “even“. Kdg suka aneh kl didenger dn diterjemahin ke bahasa kl gak pas sm objek yg dimaksud”

@devittaputri:satu lg min. Istilah waktu pilpres kmarin. “blunder” entah media cetak, tv nasional, smp rumpian di warung burjo jg”

Maksud “blunder” apa ya @devittaputri ? <- “@sar_sep: kesalahan fatal gitu bukan? Di sepakbola juga sering dipake tuh… @devittaputri” <- “@devittaputri: di oxford sih blunder :a stupid or careless mistake….Waktu pilpres kmrn sih di media “pernyataan hatta dianggap sbg blunder” <- “@elnasihein_: blunder dari istilah yg sering dipakai didunia sepakbola, melakukan kesalahan sendiri.”

@farhanbarona: gak gerak nih, gw stuck di tol.. Ntar kalo briefingnya udah mulai misscall gw ya” Stuck dan briefing, hmmm

@farhanbarona: hari ini kita merger grupnya, trus baru kita bahas chapter 8. Btw, form saya kasih udah diisi?” Merger itu apa ya? <- “@farhanbarona: penggabungan min, dosen (saya) sering pake kata ini..”

@nanangfauzi: sudah ya telfonnya, ini lagi urgent mau sampai rumah saudara.”

@dadansuk: di berita sidang UU PILKADA ada istilah “walkout” min.”

@farhanbarona: kalo udah selesai make up, stand by dibelakang stage ya.. 20 menit lagi kita perform.” hmmmmm <- @gandiamega: Nih min RT @vidialdiano: Besok pagi akan perform di acara Bank Mandiri Semarang! See you soon kawan2 Semarang & @VidiesJateng

@dadansuk: planning liburan kita mau ngapain snorkeling or hiking?” pemakaian snorkeling dari snorkling & hiking makin banyak ya.. <- “@dadansuk:iya min. Kalo ejaan yg bner gmna ya min, snorkeling,snorkelling,snorkling? Aku bingung.” Snorkelling/snorkeling ternyata dari kata snorkel, coba ketik: define: snorkle di Google <- @dadansuk: oh ternyata di UK pake snorkelling, snorkelled. di US snorkeling, snorkeled.

@DimasYanuar: “talk to my hand” juga tuh min sering dipake

 

Wah ternyata ada beberapa yang masih dipakai dan beberapa yang baru juga ya, fellas :)

@elnasihein_: lebih baiknya tetap menggunakan bahasa Indonesia, bahasa kalo tidak digunakan akan punah, semangat sumpah pemuda”

Apa yang dikatakan @elnasihein_ benar, di dalam era globalisasi kayak sekarang, kita tidak boleh lupa Semangat Sumpah pemuda juga :)

Seperti yang selalu admin sampaikan, kami di @EnglishTips4U bukan bermaksud menghilangkan bahasa Indonesia tetapi berbagi tentang bagaimana bahasa Inggris bisa digunakan atau telah digunakan dalam kehidupan sehari-hari. Sesi seperti #EngTalk membuka peluang untuk fellas dan admin berinteraksi tentang ini. Bagi yang penasaran apa saja yang telah kita biacarakan sebelumnya tentang English Words as Bahasa Indonesia Slang Atau Indonesian English, bahkan English Indonesian,silahkan baca buku kami Things Your English Books Don’t Tell You (https://englishtips4u.com/2014/07/11/tyebdty-can-be-found-at/ …)

Atau visit http://englishtips4u.com  dan search keywords tersebut :) Terima kasih kepada semua fellas yang telah berkontribusi hari ini :D

Maaf tidak bisa di-retweet atau di-mention semuanya untuk #EngTalk kali ini

More info of our first ever book here https://englishtips4u.com/2014/07/11/tyebdty-can-be-found-at/ … :)

 

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4u on November 8, 2014

#SASlang: South African slang

Did you know that South Africa is also one of the major English speaking countries in the world? Have you heard of any South African English slang?

So, in this post, I will be introducing a few South African slang which I thought is rather interesting to us Indonesians.

South African slang seems different to any other English slangs that might have existed… or it could also be a different English as a whole. Just like Singaporean English (Singlish), which we’ve discussed in a previous posts, South Africans adapt several languages too.

“South African English has a flavor of its own, borrowing freely from Afrikaans, which is similar to Dutch and Flemish, as well as from the country’s many African languages. Some words come from colonial-era Malay and Portuguese immigrants.”

“Note: In many words derived from Afrikaans, the letter “g” is pronounced in the same way as the “ch” in the Scottish “loch” or the German “achtung”– a kind of growl at the back of the throat.”

So with that in mind, let’s see some of the words they have:

1. Shame. We might think this is a bad word, but in South Africa it is actually quite endearing in social engagements

“Seriously, when in doubt, just say “Ag shame” and your sentiment will be greatly appreciated.”

Example:

A: “My brother won a million bucks yesterday.”

B: “Shame!”

2. Babelaas. It sounded like “bablas”, eh? It means hangover. “Babelaas” is also written “Babbelas.”

3. Lekker. One Dutch word quite known to a lot of people, meaning “good.”

  1. Ag (pronounced “Agh” or “ach”) “Ag” generally used at the beginning of a sentence, to express resignation or irritation.”

Or known as another way saying “Oh man” – It “is a filler word. We South Africans love our filler words” – used positively too.

It could be “Ag no man! What did you do that for?” or “Ag, I had a great time last night.”

5. Ja, nee. Meaning: yes, no – we who speak little English would think these two words are the most helpful, but here they say both.

“These two words are often used in succession to express agreement or confirmation.”

Example:

Ja, nee I’m fine thanks.”

6. Jawelnofine. Meaning: yes-well-no-fine – A more complicated one to understand but used for resignation or accepting unpleasant situation.

Example:

A: “The school fees have increased by over 20% this year?”

B: “Jawelnofine.

Jawelnofine is also another way of saying “How about that?”

7. Bioscope. Like the Indonesian bioskop or Afrikaan’s bioskoop meaning cinema.

8. In Singlish we have a different use of the word “later”. In South African slang, the word “later” means “just now.”

“Just now” is an unknown amount of time. They mean they’ll do it in the near future – not immediately.

Example:

“I’ll do the packing just now”

9. Eish (pronounced aysh). “Eish” used to express surprise, wonder, frustration or outrage – like Indonesian’s “eits.”

 

 

Source:

 

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, February 28, 2015

 

Related post(s):

 

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#USSlang: African-American vernacular

February is special because of the celebration of Black History Month in United States and many other countries. It is an event to celebrate the heritage of African-American people. From their history, their struggle against racism, to their culture.

So, in this article, we will discuss some of the most common words used in African-American slang!

“also called african american vernacular english or AAVE, if i may add.” – @alasadulloh

You may have heard these words in hip-hop music and Hollywood movies. Like any other slang, they can’t be used in formal settings.

In fact, some can only be used among African-American people. They’d think it’s offensive if it’s used by other race. Which one? Let’s see from this list … plays something hip-hop to begin the session

1. Aight. Meaning: ‘Alright.’ Used at the end of a sentence to confirm.

  • Example:
    • Nobody gonna bring yo

    • u down, aight?

2. Bling. Meaning: accessories with diamonds, worn by rappers. Inspired by the sounds diamond makes when moved.

IMG_6057

3. Blown up. Meaning: very angry, or becoming very popular at short time.

  • Example:
    • “50 Cent has blown the fuck up!”

4. Bomb. Meaning: Something very cool.

  • Example:
    • “The new Beyonce album is the bomb, man!”

5. Boo. Meaning: Girlfriend/boyfriend; “boo = bae xD” – @nazhifa189

  • Example:
    • “You will always be my boo.”

6. Booty. Meaning: Butt.

  • Example:
    • “That guy has been staring at my booty.”

7. Candy-ass. Meaning: Weak or wimpy.

  • Example:
    • “Stop crying, you’re such a candy-ass!”

8. Crib. Meaning: House.

  • Example:
    • “Welcome to my crib, yo!”

IMG_6058

9. Folks. Meaning: People. In Australia, ‘folks’ is a slang that means “parents.”

  • Example:
    • “These guys are my folks, they’re with through happiness and sadness.”

10. Ho. Meaning: Slut, prostitute.

  • Example:
    • “That ho stole my boyfriend!”

11. Hood. Meaning: The ghetto, a community of African-American.

  • Example:
    • “I’m gonna meet my folks at the hood tonight.”

12. Holla. Meaning: A greeting OR expression of happiness.

  • Example:
    • “Holla! My boy just picked off that pass!”

13. Mo. Meaning: Short version for ‘more’.

  • Example:
    • “Remember that mo money means mo problem!”

14. Gangsta. Meaning: A gang member or something cool.

  • Example:
    • “That Nike hoodies are so gangsta.”

15. Ghetto. Meaning: Something that is not high-cultured.

  • Example:
    • “It’s ghetto when your hair is longer in the front than in the back.”
    • I think “it’s so ghetto” has the same feeling as “alay banget” in Indonesian language, no?

16. Peep. Meaning: Friends.

  • Example:
    • “Come hang with me and my peeps!”

17. Pimp. Meaning: Something good, cool, profitable or turning into something good.

  • Example:
    • “Let me pimp your car for you.”

IMG_6059

Important note about African-American slang:

The word ‘nigga’ may only be used among themselves. ‘Nigga’ is usually used as greeting or to mention a black person. But it still has a negative connotation when used by other race. So don’t use it unless you want to get into trouble!

Compiled and written by @animenur for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, January 31, 2015

Related post(s):

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