Tag Archives: phrasal verb

#EngVocab: Phrasal verbs with ‘get’

Phrasal verb is a combination of verb and preposition or adverb or both. The combination usually gives a different meaning from the original verb. Do you know any phrasal verb with the word  ‘get’?

  1. Get up. Meaning: to get out of bed.
    • Example:
      • “I get up at 06.00 am in the morning.”
  2. Get through. Meaning: to succeed in finishing a task, or to manage to talk to someone on the phone.
    • Example:
      • “All these trials will get you through life.”
  3. Get over. Meaning: to overcome a problem, to recover from an illness.
    • Example:
      • “Don’t be sad, you will get over it.”
  4. Get out/get off. Meaning:  to leave.
    • Example:
      • “It’s dangerous, get out of there!”
  5. Get across. Meaning: to cause to be understood.
    • Example:
      • “The idea will get across on mind after the presentation.”
  6. Get along. Meaning: to have a friendly relationship.
    • Example:
      • “My cousin gets along well with his classmates.”
  7. Get away. Meaning: to leave or escape from a person or place.
    • Example:
      • “I need to get away from everything and everyone.”
  8. Get on with. Meaning: to start doing or continue doing activity.
    • Example:
      • “Let’s get on with the party!”
  9. Get in. Meaning: to go inside, to arrive.
    • Example:
      • “Hurry up, get in the car!”
  10. Get down (to). Meaning: to get serious.
    • Example:
      • “If you get down to something, you have to give full concentration.”
  11. Get by. Meaning: to manage to survive.
    • Example:
      • “I finally got by the problem after struggling for a while.”
  12. Get back. Meaning: to return from a place.
    • Example:
      • “I got back from Paris yesterday.”

 

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 16, 2017

 

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#EngTrivia: Various Meanings of ‘go off’

Good evening, fellas! Today I want to talk about a phrasal verb that often confuses me. It’s “go off”. If you want to know what a phrasal verb is, you can click here to read more about it. “Go off” confuses me a lot because it has a lot of meanings that are very different depending on its context in a sentence. Let’s walk through the meanings of “go off” one by one.

  1. If you say someone goes off, that means he/she leaves a place and go somewhere elseExample: After finishing her writing goal today, she went off to her favorite cafe to have a nice drink as a form of small celebration.
  2. If you say how an event went off, you explain how it happened in a specific way. Example: The seminar went off really well and we learn a lot from the brilliant speakers.
  3. If a machine or light goes off, that means it stops working or dies. Example: The printer went off right before it started printing the last page.
  4. If a warning device such as an alarm or a siren goes off, that means it starts making a sound/noise. Example: My phone suddenly went off with my embarrassing ringtone during class because I forgot to turn on the silent mode. See, fellas? I always thought that a cellphone going off means it turns off. We tend to think “off” indicates that something stops working. Turns out, our phone “going off” means it is making a noise (alarm or ringtone) instead of shutting down.
  5. If an explosive thing or a gun goes off, that means it explodes or it fires. Example: It was pretty fun for me to just sit on the rooftop in New Year’s Eve and watch the fireworks go off from every direction.
  6. (British English) If you go off something, that means you stop liking it. Example: I start going off fantasy novels. I’m into sci-fi now.
  7. (British English) If food or beverages go off, that means it’s not fresh and starts going bad. Example: This milk tastes funny. I think it goes off.

So, now you see how the meaning of “go off” varies. If you read something that you think doesn’t make sense, it could be that one of the words have another meaning that you don’t know. You can always check the dictionary to be sure that you really know what a word or phrase means in a particular sentence.

Compiled and written by @Fafafin for @Englishtips4U on January 5, 2016.

#GrammarTrivia: the word ‘to’

I bet you know what ‘to’ means.. Or do you? If you check the dictionary, you would notice the two letter word have tons of meaning. We’re not going to talk about all of them. But we’ll have a look at 4 of its functions.

1. as preposition of movement

To’ indicates the place you reach as a result of moving. The phrase that contains ‘to’ is called ‘to-phrase‘. ‘to-phrase’ follows:

  1. a verb.
    • Example:
      • walk to school. Walk =verb
  2. a noun.
    • Example:
      • the bus to Malang. The bus = noun

In the examples above, the ‘to-phrases’ are: ‘to school‘ and ‘to Malang‘. Here’s the structure:

  1. “walk to school” = verb + to-phrase
  2. “the bus to Malang” = noun + to-phrase

Example sentence using:

  1. ‘verb + to-phrase’ structure: “I walk to school every day.”
  2. ‘noun + to-phrase’ structure: “She’s been waiting for the bus to Malang for half an hour.”

‘from’ and ‘to’

‘to’ can also be used with ‘from’.

Structure:

from + noun phrase + to + noun phrase.

Example:

  • from Jogja to Semarang”.

In a sentence:

  • “They usually travel from Jogja to Semarang by train.”

A. ‘from .. to’ to indicate distance

The ‘from .. to’ structure can also be used to indicate distance.

Example:

  • “How far is it from Bandar Lampung to Palembang?”

B. ‘from .. to’ to express change of state

Besides distance, ‘from .. to’ can also be used to express change of state.

Example:

  • “The light changes from red to green.”

2. to show time

To’ indicates the end-point of a time period. There are 2 ways of using it:

  • with ‘from’

‘from .. to’ to indicate the end-point of a time period.

Example:

“We will be having our final test from Monday to Friday.”

  • without ‘from’

Without ‘from’, ‘to’ cannot be used alone. We use ‘until’ or ‘up to’ instead.

Example:

“We will have our test until Friday.”

However, American English prefers the use of ‘through’ to ‘to’.

Example:

“We will have our test from Monday through Friday.”

3. to indicate receiver

To’ to indicate ‘receiver’ is usually followed by a person.

Example:

  • “I’m giving this present to you.” The receiver = you.

The receiver in “I’m giving this present to you.” is what we call as ‘indirect object’. The direct object: this present.

‘to + receiver’ is usually used this way (as indirect object). Other verbs used this way are: offer, hand, lend, owe.

Structure:

Subject

Verb

Direct object

to

Indirect object

I

am giving

this present

to

you

A. ‘to’ as the receiver of a message

‘to’ also points to the ‘receiver’ of a message.

Example:

  • “I just sent an email to a friend.”
  • “Do you have something to say to me?”

4. the use in idioms

‘To’ is also used to form many ‘prepositional verbs’ and ‘phrasal-prepositional verbs’.

Examples of prepositional verbs:

  • belong to,
  • listen to,
  • believe in,
  • talk about,
  • wait for.
  • Read: Phrasal Verbs 1.

Examples of phrasal-prepositional verbs:

 

‘to’ also follows some adjectives. Examples:

  • close to,
  • due to,
  • similar to,
  • used to (used with ‘be’ = ‘I’m used to..’).

Prepositional verbs, phrasal-prepositional verbs, and ‘adjective + to’ structure form ‘idioms’. Ring a bell?

Well, that’s it. A little #GrammarTrivia on the use and function of ‘to’. I hope it is useful for you.

 

Compiled and written by @NenoNeno at @EnglishTips4U on Monday, April 29, 2013

 

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