Tag Archives: participial

#EngClass: Participial adjective – Comparative and superlative

Hello hey ho, fellas! Still following our previous discussion on ‘participial adjective’, we will talk about stating degrees of comparison.

Degrees of comparison are used when we compare one thing/person with another. There are three degrees of comparison:

  • positive,
  • comparative, and
  • superlative.

Comparative degree of comparison

Let’s start with the comparative degree. The comparative degree is used to compare
two persons or things having the same quality.

To form the comparative degree of adjectives, we usually add -er to adjective with two or less syllables. Example:

  • Taller
  • Lighter
  • Nicer

However, when forming the comparative degree of participial adjectives, we use the
word ‘more.’ Example:

Participial adjective

Comparative

Boring

More boring

Bored

More bored

Tiring

More tiring

Tired

More tired

Alarming

More alarming

Alarmed

More alarmed

 

More example:

Participial adjective

WRONG

Comparative

Relaxing

relaxinger

more relaxing

Relaxed

relaxeder

more relaxed

Interesting

interestinger

more interesting

Interested

interesteder

more interested

Confusing

confusinger

more confusing

Confused

confuseder

more confused

Superlative degree of comparison

Moving on to the superlative degree of adjective. Superlative degree denotes the existence of the highest degree of the quality. The superlative degree of adjective is used to single out one person or thing from all the rest.

To form the superlative degree of adjectives, we usually add ‘-est’ to adjective with
two or less syllables. Example:

  • Tallest
  • Lightest
  • Nicest

However, when forming the superlative degree of participial adjectives, we use the
word ‘most.
Example:

Participial adjective

Superlative

Boring

Most boring

Bored

Most bored

Tiring

Most tiring

Tired

Most tired

Alarming

Most alarming

Alarmed

Most alarmed

More example:

Participial adjective

WRONG

Comparative

Relaxing

relaxingest

Most relaxing

Relaxed

relaxedest

Most relaxed

Interesting

interestingest

Most interesting

Interested

interestedest

Most interested

Confusing

confusingest

Most confusing

Confused

confusedest

Most confused

 

That’s a wrap, fellas! I hope the explanation was clear enough. However, if you have any question on the topic, feel free to leave a message in the comment box.

 

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, April 8, 2017

 

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#EngQuiz: Participial adjective

In short, participial adjectives are present and past participles which are used as adjectives. Present and past participles adjectives are used in slightly different ways. One talks about something that causes of the feeling , and the other talks about how someone feels.

Find a recap on that session here: #EngClass: Participial adjective (3)

Moving on, this time around, we’re having a quiz on present and past participle adjectives. Let’s start, shall we?

1. He was (terpesona) to hear his little son singing in the bath.
amuzed
amusing
amuse
amused
Correct! ‘Amused’ means ‘terpesona.’ Therefore, “He was amused.” means “Dia merasa terpesona.”
2. I find these instructions very (membingungkan)! Could you come and help me?
Confusing Correct! ‘Confusing’ means ‘membuat bingung.’ Therefore, “It is confusing.” means “Ini membingungkan.”[/explanation][/answer]
Confused
Confuse
Confuzed
3. I was feeling (tertekan), so I stayed at home with hot chocolate and a good book.
(Pic)
Depressed
Correct! ‘Depressed’ means ‘merasa tertekan.’ Therefore, “I am feeling depressed.” means “Saya merasa tertekan.”
Depressing
Impressed
Impression
4. That is the most (memalukan) photo! I look terrible!
embarrassing
Correct! ‘Embarassing’ means ‘membuat malu.’ Therefore, ’embarassing photo.’ means ‘foto yang membuat malu.’
embarrassed
embarassment
embarassingly
5. Julie was so (kelelahan) after her exams, she spent the next three days sleeping.
exhausted
Correct! ‘Exhausted’ means ‘merasa lelah.’
Therefore, “I was exhausted.” means “Saya kelelahan (merasa lelah).”
exhausting
exhaust
exhaustion
6. I tried all morning to send an email, but it wouldn’t work. I was so (frustrasi)!
frustrated
Correct! ‘Frustrated’ means ‘merasa frustrasi.’ Therefore, “I was frustrated.” means “Saya merasa frustrasi.”
frustrating
frustrate
frustration
7. A nice hot bath is so (melegakan) after a long day.
Relaxing
Correct! ‘Relaxing’ means ‘membuat lega.’ Therefore, “It is relaxing.” means “Itu melegakan (membuat lega).”
Relaxation
Relaxes
Relaxed
8. I’m very (puas) that I managed to order the meal in French.
Satisfied
Correct! ‘Satisfied’ means ‘merasa puas.’ Therefore, “I am satisfied.” means “Saya (merasa) puas.”
Satisfication
Satisfying
Satisfy
9. It’s (mengejutkan) how many people don’t want to travel to another country.
Surprising
Correct! ‘Surprising’ means ‘mengejutkan.’ Therefore, “It is surprising.” means “Itu mengejutkan (membuat terkejut).”
Surprises
Surprised
Surprise
10. My job is really (melelahkan). I don’t get home until 10pm sometimes.
Tiring
Correct! ‘Tiring’ means ‘melelahkan, membuat lelah.’ Therefore “It is tiring.” means “Itu melelahkan (membuat lelah).”
Tires
Tire
Tired

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, April 1, 2017

 

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^MQ

#EngClass: Participial adjective (3)

One of our followers asked the question above on Twitter. Do you have a similar question? Do you get confused as to when you should use present or past participle adjective? Kalau kamu masih tulis/bilang: “I’m interesting” saat mau menyatakan “Saya tertarik,” yuk baca lagi artikel ini sampai selesai.

Participle adjectives are verbs, often ends in -ing and -ed, which are used as adjectives.  There are two types of participles: present participles (v-ing) and past participles (v2). Example:

Present participle

Past participle

Boring

Bored

Relaxing

Relaxed

Tiring

Tired

Confusing

Confused

Exciting

Excited

We use present particular adjectives (v-ing) to talk about person, thing, or situation which caused the feeling. Example:

  • “I am boring.”
    • “Aku membosankan, aku menimbulkan rasa bosan.”
  • “They are confusing.”
    • “Mereka membingungkan, mereka menimbulkan kebingungan.”
  • “The book is exciting.”
    • “Bukunya menarik. Bukunya membuat orang tertarik.”

We use past participle adjectives (v2) to talk about how someone feels. Example:

  • “I am bored.”
    • “Aku merasa bosan. Yang kurasakan adalah bosan.”
  • “They are confused.”
    • “Mereka kebingungan. Yang mereka rasakan adalah bingung.”
  • “She is very excited.”
    • “Dia sangat bersemangat. Yang dia rasakan adalah semangat.”

If we were to compare the two side by side:

Present participle

Past participle

Penyebab perasaan

Perasaan yang dirasa

[Me- -kan]

[ter-], [ke- -an]

Entertaining

Entertained

Menghibur

Merasa terhibur

More examples:

Present participle

Past participle

Boring

(Membosankan)

Bored

(Merasa bosan)

Relaxing

(Membuat santai)

Relaxed

(Merasa santai)

Tiring

(Melelahkan)

Tired

(Merasa lelah)

Confusing

(Membingungkan)

Confused

(Merasa bingung)

Exciting

(Menarik)

Excited

(Merasa tertarik)

So, what do you think? I hope the explanation was clear enough. If you still have any question, feel free to leave a comment down below, or you can also mention us on twitter.

How about having a short quiz to see how well you understand the explanation given above? Look at these sentences and choose the correct answer.

  1. I was really (boring/bored) during the lecture. It was really (boring/bored).
  2. I bought a really (interesting/interested) book last night. If you’re (interesting/interested), I can lend it to you.
  3. I heard an (alarming/alarmed) noise last night, and it kept me (alarming/alarmed) all night.

Answer:

  1. bored; boring.
  2. interesting; interested.
  3. alarming; alarmed.

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, March 22, 2017

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^MQ