Tag Archives: language

#EngTrivia: English Language Philosophical Books

Hey fellas, I hope your Saturday is well :) I noticed that our nature has been to the extreme lately, let’s pray that it will pass soon…

So today I will share an #EngTrivia on philosophical books written in English, do you know what they are?

Philosophy is a set of ideas or the study about how to do something or how to live; also about knowledge, truth, nature of life.

Don’t worry, I won’t be discussing anything serious tonight :)

Lately I have been reading those and here I want to share my experience.

As I have mentioned during the 3rd Anniversary tweets, some, even most philosophical books were not originally written in English.

You can find the 3rd Anniversary tips on Reading here: http://ow.ly/tEAXI 

So automatically it is a translated book hence it was translated to the nearest meanings.

Most non-native speakers would have difficulties reading it, yet it turns out even native speakers also have difficulties.

Reading a philosophical book or even its extract is like reading a literature.

It’s like reading a poetry, or a Shakespeare text, even though it is using modern English language

Most of the time you won’t get what it’s written straight away, you have to break it down in order to understand it.

And from that, you would find out these thoughts/knowledge that you can apply towards your methodology of working, thinking, etc.

Or you could disagree with it completely.

Those who are planning to pursue studies abroad on theoretical, historical, philosophical studies, it seems this is one thing to expect of and you should be ready of :)

I am not discouraging instead I am encouraging you to do your best and be ready for what is ahead :)

Expect those long sentences, metaphors, the many comas and long paragraph. Remember, it was written in a different language.

Even in Indonesian language we tend to write longer, so when translated it tends to be longer than an English language sentence.

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4U on February 15, 2014

#EngTrivia: David Crystal’s Internet and SMS English language

Does anyone here know David Crystal by any chance?

Yes.. “@Revalyani: He is a Linguist.”

And yes one of the things he researched on is this “@vviinnkkaa: the theorist of internet language feature”

Yes he is British :) “@fitriaaelfs: I’ve heard once.. Is he british linguist isn’t he?”

As a Linguist, Crystal have explored many aspects of English indeed, from the past and present. Based on a talk of his book launch Spell It Out, he mentioned a lot of things.

But I was strucked with two things he mentioned:

1. The internet English language has gone back to its roots

Sometimes if you are blogging, instant messaging, tweeting, of course not always a person over your shoulder would say, “Oh…you spelt that wrong!”

To Crystal, this action of typing as you think it is spelt is like what happened before English is as it is. So in a sense, funnily, we are going back to how simple English would be in the past in the advance technology era

2. That English texting or SMS language is not all bad English

It seemed SMS language has been seen as something bad due to its abbreviations created by younger generations. Leaving out alphabets in words randomly apparently is a bad thing. But after analysing it:

First, the abbreviated words were only 10 % of the whole SMS sent so not all of them are abbreviations

Secondly, SMS abbreviation has been invented someway along the line years ago, there were poems and games that sort of used it in a sense. Such as old acronyms during the 60s like YYURYYUBICURYY4ME.

Third, the younger generations did mot leave alphabets randomly in a word when they are abbreviatin. For example you are writing, “I’ll see you tonight” then the sms would be

“ll s y tnt”

you would understand it rather than

“I e o u i”.

This won’t make sense would it? So in SMS we keep the consonants rather than the vowels. And of course, in order to know that, you should be able to spell well in English. So the best SMS texter would be the best spellers.

Well what do fellas think? Is it true? Is it weird? Is it false?

@trianarakanita: It is really really true!!! :))

@Anindyasd: i do agree, but i think the most important in order us to understand is to keep the word’s first or last letter.

@rissastellar: I think ‘c u 2nite’ is easier to be understood than ‘ill s y tnt’ :D

@misspuputt: I’d prefer to write full text while texting than make it short.. Confusing, I think..

@bellzart: not sure :/ we use slang lang when we text thou..

Well, I hope I have cheered you up and hope you have a lovely Saturday evening wherever you are! Hope it has been useful :)

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4U on November 16, 2013

Source:

David Crystal, Spell it Out  – Christ Church,Bath, Monday 26th November 2012.

Jeanette Weston © 2013 Magus Studio – http://youtu.be/Gco5whWZWkI

#EngTips: The Importance of a Proper Accent

Hi, fellas! Some people learn a foreign language, English in this case, because they just want to speak it fluently. However, some people learn it to speak it fluently and with a non-foreign accent almost like a native speaker.

Sometimes we feel tired when people asking us to repeat because they don’t understand us. And sometimes people laugh because of our funny accent, right?

Also, how many of you think that British accent sounds sexy? I do. Hehe…

So, today I’m going to give you some tips on how to get rid of a foreign accent!

  1. Learn to pronounce the sounds the way they are originally pronounced in the native language. This is the most important step. Realize that the same letter can be pronounced differently in many languages. Practise very hard to memorize the new and native pronunciation.
  2. Listen to the language spoken with its native accent and try to imitate the pronunciation. At this step, you don’t have to focus on the meaning of the words. Repeat the pronunciation again and again.
  3. This way, your brain will start to replace your old foreign accent with the new one.
  4. If you’re a language freak, why don’t you learn the linguistics behind your target language. It helps you break up the accent you want to learn and know how it is made.
  5. Practise with a native speaker. Have a discussion with them and let them correct your accent.
  6. Stay consistent. If you want to learn British accent, then pronounce all words with the accent. On the other side, if you want to learn American accent, don’t pronounce a few words using British accent.

That’s my tips for you, fellas. Do you have your own tips? Share it to other fellas!

 

Compiled by @Patipatigulipat at @EnglishTips4U on April 19, 2013