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#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018

Hi, fellas, how was your Monday? I was shook when I realized that we are halfway through 2018.

Does anyone recognize the word ‘shook’ that I used on the previous sentence? Have you ever read it before?

 

@catheramirez: ‘Surprise,’ ‘I can’t believe it.’

Q: @nadirantsy: Does shook have the same meaning with shocked? Same context?
A: Yes, but I think we should limit ‘shook’ to a relaxed, playful context. We don’t use it to express our sadness when hearing a bad news, for example.

 

‘Shook’ is one of the popular internet terms that we are going to discuss tonight. As languages are ever-evolving, these internet terms are actual English words whose meanings have changed over the years.

Here are some popular internet terms that are still used as of mid-2018:

Bamboozled
From the verb ‘to bamboozle’ (informal). It means to fool or cheat someone. It also means to confuse or perplex.
E.g.: “I’m bamboozled by the amount of retweets to my Twitter post.”

Boi/boye
A cute way to spell ‘boy.’ Usually used to a male dog.
E.g.: “Oh, you’re such a good boiiiiii…”

Burn
A reaction we gave when somebody has just been talked back to.
A: “Without the ugly in this world, there would be nothing beautiful.”
B: “Thank you for your sacrifice.”
C: “Burn!!”

Canceled
‘To cancel’ used to describe that an event would not take place OR a force negated another, but nowadays, netizen use ‘canceled’ to describe a dismissed or rejected person or idea.
E.g.: “If you don’t like my doggos, you will be canceled.”

Cringe and cringey
‘To cringe’ is to experience an inward shiver upon seeing or hearing something embarrassing. ‘Cringey’ is used as an adjective to describe something that causes somebody to cringe.
E.g.: “I cringed so hard when I watched her lip-synced performance. It was so cringey.”

Deceased
It was used to politely say that someone has passed away, but now, it is used to describe that something is really cool or awesome or funny that it takes our lives away.
E.g.: “OMG, my brother bought me tickets to a Rich Brian’s concert! I’m deceased!”

Doggo
Basically, it’s a cute way to say ‘dog.’
E.g.: “I just saw a super adorable, squishy, fluffy doggo.” insert crying face emojis

adorable animal beach canine
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

Extra
Something is ‘extra’ if it is done in an exaggerated, over-the-top way.
E.g.: “Rihanna’s outfit at the 2018’s Met Gala is so extra.”

Epic comeback
It used to describe a spectacular return of an artist, most of the time musicians, after a long hiatus. Now, it also means a witty (sometimes harsh) response to an insult.
A: “You’re so fat Thanos will have to snap his fingers twice.”
B: “Yeah, I’m fat, but you’re ugly. At least I can go on a diet.

Feels
All emotions mixed up: sadness, joy, envy, love, etc.
E.g.: “TVXQ’s comeback gave me all the feels.”

HMU
Stands for ‘hit me up,’ which means ‘contact me.’
E.g.: “HMU the next time you visit the city.”

Humblebrag
The act of bragging while appearing humble; the art of false modesty.
E.g.: “Who knew that constant vacations and holidays could be this exhausting?”

Lit
It used to describe the state of being drunk, but it is now used to express that something is exceptionally good.
E.g.: “The latest Arctic Monkey’s album was so lit it set my headphones on fire.”

Noob
A noob is a person who is inexperienced in a particular sphere or activity, especially computing or the use of the Internet. It came from the word ‘newbie.’ However, ‘newbie’ has a more positive connotation while ‘noob’ is intended as an insult.
A: “Hey guys, I’m kinda new here.“
B: “LOL, noob.”

Overproud
A reaction we gave when our nation or something originated from our nation is being talked about in a positive way.
A: “Did you know that an instant noodle brand from Indonesia was marketed worldwide?”
B: “Are you being overproud right now?”

Pwned
A gaming-style spelling of ‘owned,’ meaning being defeated badly.
E.g.: “Oh, snap, I was just pwned!”

Salty
Upset, angry, or bitter, after being made fun of or embarrassed. It can also be used to say that someone is mad.
E.g.: “Gosh, stop being so salty! You broke up with him; now it’s time to move on!”

Savage
Being ‘savage’ is saying or doing something harsh without a regard to the consequences.
A: “You’re so fat Thanos will have to snap his fingers twice.”
B: “Yeah, I’m fat, but you’re ugly. At least I can go on a diet.”
C: “Oooh, that was savage!”

Shady and throwing shade
Shady = suspicious
Throwing shade = talking bad about something or someone, without naming (but the audience knows anyway).
E.g.: “I think her last Instagram post was a shade thrown to me. I don’t know why she’s so shady.”

Shook
Originally, the word has a more serious connotation, as it means ’emotionally or physically disturbed.’ Nowadays, netizen use it as a playful way to say ‘surprised.’
E.g.: “She broke up with him? I’m shook!”

Stoked
It means being excited or euphoric.
E.g.: “When they told me I was on the team, I was stoked.”

Tea
A gossip or personal information belonging to someone else. The phrase ‘spill the tea’ is used the same way as ‘spill the bean’ is used, that is ‘to reveal an information that is supposed to be a secret.
E.g.: “The tea is exceptionally good today.”

Woke
Supposedly has the same meaning as ‘awaken,’ which is being enlightened, always in the know of everything that is happening in the world, more than anyone else.
E.g.: “I never consume any products coming from animals anymore. I guess I can say I’m woke.”

 

As what we always suggest, avoid using slang or internet terms in a formal interaction. If you befriend your employer or boss on social media, for example, both of you are still expected to converse formally. Any school assignments, essays, job applications, letter of recommendations, or business emails should be free from these terms either.

@kaonashily: instantly I feel ‘gaul’ knowing these ‘nowadays’ words.

@babygraace: I think salty isn’t just used when someone is being made fun or embarrassed.  E.g.: omg some people that watch my car vlogs literally get salty at me because I don’t put both my hands on the wheel!

Q: @sakurayujin: What about ‘shooketh?’
A: Even more surprised than ‘shook.’

 

Compiled and written by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 11 June, 2018.


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#EngTips: Effective Internet searching

We use the internet to search for something quite frequently. I bet some of you found this website from search engines too. It’s important to know the effective way to perform a search so that you don’t waste too much time sorting the results to find what you’re really looking for. So, I hope these tips would be useful for you.

  1. When possible use unique, specific terms. Carefully choose three or more keywords to retrieve more specific result. For example, English dictionary windows 8 can return more specific result than dictionary software as the search query.
  2. Use quotation marks for exact phrases. For example, searching for lunar eclipse using quotation marks (“lunar eclipse”) will return only the phrase in the exact order, thus excluding pages that contain only “lunar” or “eclipse” that aren’t exactly about lunar eclipse.
  3. Exclude articles (a, the), pronouns (it, they), conjunctions (and, or) or prepositions (to, from) when they aren’t important.
  4. Avoid redundant terms.Examples of artificial intelligence we are using in daily life” can be reduced to “example artificial intelligence daily life.” Another example: “wish vs hope” can return more relevant results than “the difference between wish and hope.”
  5. Use more than one search engines when necessary, like when you need to find as many resources as possible. For instance, I used library directories, Google scholar as well as Google search to find research papers for my thesis topic.
  6. If you can’t find what you’re looking for in the first 20 result, go no further. Reformulate your search using different keyword, or…
  7. Use advanced search to refine your search results. Advanced search tools are really useful and usually not that hard to get used to.
  8. Check the help page of the search engine. They usually have unique tips on how to perform effective search using their search tools.

 

Compiled and written by @Fafafin for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, October 6, 2016

 

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^MQ

#EngVocab: Internet Slang

Here are 7 terms you might have noticed popping up a lot on social media these days.
1) Lit (adj.)

It’s used to describe an exciting event, a cool person, or general awesomeness.

Example:

  • Last night’s party was lit, buddy!

2) Fam (n.)

It’s used to refer to those close to you. These people can be your actual family, but most times it is used for close friends that you trust who are like family.

Example:

  • You always have my back, fam.

3) Sis (n.)

It is a shorter version of sister. Sis is known as the new bro. However you’d use bro, just replace it with sis and you’re good to go.

Example:

  • Sorry, but you can’t sit with us, sis.

4) Snatched (adj.)

It’s used to describe anything that looks really good or on point. It is a newer version of “fleek.”

Example:

  • Omg, I love your eyebrows. They’re snatched!

5) High-key / Low-Key (adj.)

High-key is used to describe something needing to be said out loud. But todays, it also used to alter word “very,” “a lot,” “intensely,” or “much.”

Example:

  • High-key don’t wanna move from the couch today. Or ever.

Low-key is clearly the opposite of “high-key”. It means to keep things as secret. But, nowadays, it also refers to “not really,” “not a lot,” “minimally.”

Example:

  • “I’m just low-key in love with him, OK?”

Here are both used in the same sentence:

  • “When you high-key want someone but you’re trying to be low-key.”

6) Ship (v./n.)

As a verb, it means to support a romantic pairing (usually of fictional characters).

As a noun, a ship is when a romantic pairing occurs between two characters.

Example:

  • I ship Andrew and Emma so much. They’re the cutest couple ever!

7) Savage (adj.)

It’s used to describe someone who doesn’t care about the consequences of his or her actions; bad-ass or hardcore.

Example:

  • Did you see the way he beat that snatcher? That was savage!

 

Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, August 6, 2016

 

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^MQ

#EngTrivia: Is there such thing as Internet Dialect? Feat. @PBSIdeaChannel

Here’s a question for our #EngTrivia session today,

Do you believe there is an internet dialect?

Today’s session is based on “Are There Internet Dialects?” By @PBSIdeaChannel presented by @mikerugnetta

According to them, accents can’t exist on the internet as it is written (non verbal even though you are literally saying it (verbally) inside your head

So, in internet’s case, how we talk is a dialect which includes how we use the language, where English is the Lingua Franca – the common language for all natives – Smiley, hashtags, abbreviations, acronyms, “semi unconscious the use of selfie” are part of it

General English in the internet would be an e-mail from your colleague about certain events

Such animated GIFs (animated pictures) and Tumblr are powerfully expressive

Yet the use of (English) language in Tumblr could be lowercase and no punctuation

e.g., “tbh I literally say ‘literally and tbh’ literally all the time tbh”

“tbh” in itself can be talked thoroughly why and how it is used so this comes to how words and its usage

Mike said, it might be the “community value” that causes it like that

i.e., Tumblr seems more vulnerable, there is sensitivity

So…. does that mean it is not an internet dialect? It is just feelings revealed? How do we actually know it is a dialect?

Community is people who do things together – doing it in a cultural and social context

There are practices which are social practices with untold rules of thumbs existing

e.g., well tuned sensitivity, shared world views; might be coming from the way a community is educated, its interest, professions

Penelope Eckhert stated that speakers develop their linguistic view in the community they participate in – forms of participation and community practice are mutually constructed

So the way you communicate seems to influence and be influenced by the surroundings, in this case the internet itself

Facebookish, Twitterish, Tumblrish could just be the few internet dialects

as we would or could use different ways of speaking in certain social media or platforms that we use or we are in

So, as @mikerugnetta would say it, “what do you guys think?” It seems that this is an interesting phenomenon..

Internet language has existed for a while now and there are different kinds, even might be in development

So internet could be a hometown where you get your English dialect, as it is a (global) region, a community, it has people in it

And of course to most, it will be considered informal to the formal usage of English as it is a dialect from a region

That’s it for today’s #EngTrivia, I hope you have enjoyed it :)

For more about it, click – http://youtu.be/SDPasRas5u0  “Are There Internet Dialects?” By @PBSIdeaChannel presented by @mikerugnetta

 

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4u on October 4, 2014

 

Source: http://youtu.be/SDPasRas5u0  “Are There Internet Dialects?” By @PBSIdeaChannel presented by @mikerugnetta

#EngTrivia: David Crystal’s Internet and SMS English language

Does anyone here know David Crystal by any chance?

Yes.. “@Revalyani: He is a Linguist.”

And yes one of the things he researched on is this “@vviinnkkaa: the theorist of internet language feature”

Yes he is British :) “@fitriaaelfs: I’ve heard once.. Is he british linguist isn’t he?”

As a Linguist, Crystal have explored many aspects of English indeed, from the past and present. Based on a talk of his book launch Spell It Out, he mentioned a lot of things.

But I was strucked with two things he mentioned:

1. The internet English language has gone back to its roots

Sometimes if you are blogging, instant messaging, tweeting, of course not always a person over your shoulder would say, “Oh…you spelt that wrong!”

To Crystal, this action of typing as you think it is spelt is like what happened before English is as it is. So in a sense, funnily, we are going back to how simple English would be in the past in the advance technology era

2. That English texting or SMS language is not all bad English

It seemed SMS language has been seen as something bad due to its abbreviations created by younger generations. Leaving out alphabets in words randomly apparently is a bad thing. But after analysing it:

First, the abbreviated words were only 10 % of the whole SMS sent so not all of them are abbreviations

Secondly, SMS abbreviation has been invented someway along the line years ago, there were poems and games that sort of used it in a sense. Such as old acronyms during the 60s like YYURYYUBICURYY4ME.

Third, the younger generations did mot leave alphabets randomly in a word when they are abbreviatin. For example you are writing, “I’ll see you tonight” then the sms would be

“ll s y tnt”

you would understand it rather than

“I e o u i”.

This won’t make sense would it? So in SMS we keep the consonants rather than the vowels. And of course, in order to know that, you should be able to spell well in English. So the best SMS texter would be the best spellers.

Well what do fellas think? Is it true? Is it weird? Is it false?

@trianarakanita: It is really really true!!! :))

@Anindyasd: i do agree, but i think the most important in order us to understand is to keep the word’s first or last letter.

@rissastellar: I think ‘c u 2nite’ is easier to be understood than ‘ill s y tnt’ :D

@misspuputt: I’d prefer to write full text while texting than make it short.. Confusing, I think..

@bellzart: not sure :/ we use slang lang when we text thou..

Well, I hope I have cheered you up and hope you have a lovely Saturday evening wherever you are! Hope it has been useful :)

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4U on November 16, 2013

Source:

David Crystal, Spell it Out  – Christ Church,Bath, Monday 26th November 2012.

Jeanette Weston © 2013 Magus Studio – http://youtu.be/Gco5whWZWkI