Tag Archives: internet

#ENGVOCAB: POPULAR INTERNET TERMS AS OF JANUARY 2021 T-Z

Hello, everyone! This article is to the last one of our series on popular internet terms as of January 2021. Here are the previous articles on the series in case you missed it: PART 1PART 2PART 3, PART 4

REMINDER: Most of these terms are slang and SHOULD ONLY be used in an informal interaction.

  1. That’s a you problem (phrase)
    Meaning: an informal way of saying ‘that’s your problem.’
    Example:
    “I’m telling the truth and I have witnesses. If you don’t believe me, I think that’s a you problem.”
  2. That’s just me (phrase)
    Meaning: an informal way of saying ‘that’s just my opinion.’
    Example:
    “I don’t think it’s right to meet up and hang out now, but that’s just me.”
  3. Thicc (adjective)
    Meaning: curvy, slightly overweight.
    Example:
    “I feel like I’d rather be thicc than being underweight.”
  4. This could have been an email (phrase)
    Meaning: of a professional gathering that seems to be a waste of time.
    Example:
    “This whole meeting could have been an email.”
  5. This isn’t even my final form (phrase)
    Meaning: ‘I can improve or do better than this.’ Originated from Songoku’s or any Saiyan’s transformation to a Super Saiyan in the Dragon Ball franchise.
    Example:
    “Wait, wait, wait, this isn’t even my final form. You will be shocked.”
Credit: Meme Generator

  1. Three much (adjective, adverb)
    Meaning: more exaggerated than ‘too much.’
    Example:
    “Girl, you are really three much! Stop making a fuss.”
  2. Throw someone under the bus (phrase)
    Meaning: to betray someone.
    It gained popularity because of the movie Mean Girls (2004) despite not being actually said on the movie and despite having been coined a long time before the movie was released.
    Example:
    “How do you expect to have loyal friends if you constantly throw them under the bus?”
  3. Tiny (adjective)
    Meaning: someone or something being small and cute.
    Example:
    “She’s adorable when she speaks in tiny voice.”
  4. Toxic (adjective)
    Meaning: of an environment or a person’s behaviour that could be detrimental to someone’s mental health.
    Example:
    A: “Why did you deactivate your Instagram account?”
    B: “No specific reason; I just think it’s become toxic.”
  5. Trigger (noun)
    Meaning: something that could potentially upset someone, especially someone with mental health issues.
    Triggering (adjective)
    Meaning: upsetting.
    Triggered (adjective)
    Meaning: getting upset or worked up by something.
    Example:
    “Don’t show her this; it could trigger her.”
  6. Unbothered (adjective)
    Meaning: of someone not being affected by something negative said about them.
    Example:
    “Despite the rumours, she remains unbothered.”
  7. Unpopular opinion (noun)
    Meaning: an opinion that is different to the opinion of the general public, sometimes controversial.
    Example:
    “Unpopular opinion: working overtime is not something we should glorify.”
  8. Uwu (expression)
    Meaning: a written version of this smiley (◡ ω ◡). Nowadays, it’s also said as a response to something adorable.
    Example:
    “I just found out that Benedict Cumberbatch didn’t know how to pronounce ‘penguin.’ I’m uwu-ing so hard right now.”
  9. We stan (phrase)
    Meaning: we support.
    Example:
    “Michelle Obama is so inspirational. We stan an intelligent woman.”
Credit: Pinterest.

  1. Weird flex, but ok (expression)
    Meaning: a reaction we give to other people who act over the top or outlandishly.
    Example:
    A: “Yes, I won 500 Candy Crush levels, all with three stars!”
    B: “Weird flex, but ok.”
  2. Whipped (adjective)
    Meaning: being obsessed or controlled, often used on someone dominated by their significant other.
    Example:
    “Getting home right after work instead of out drinking with your friends is not being whipped. It means you prioritise your family and health.”
  3. Who hurt you? (expression)
    Meaning: a question we ask to someone who seems to be unreasonably upset.
    Example:
    “Did you really fight with a shop assistant just because they ask you to wear a mask? Really, who hurt you?”
  4. Wholesome (adjective)
    Meaning: heartwarming or feel-good.
    Example:
    “During my lunch break, I often look at some wholesome memes. They always cheer me up.”
  5. Wifey (noun)
    Meaning: an affectionate term for a husband to refer to his wife.
    Example:
    “Wifey got mad at me for leaving the front door unlocked.”
  6. Wild (adjective)
    Meaning: exaggerated, extreme, over-the-top, unusual.
    Example:
    “This mukbang with living animals is so wild. I can’t watch it.”
  7. Yeah, right (expression)
    Meaning: a double positive words that somehow carries a negative, sarcastic tone.
    Example:
    “You said you didn’t study but you still got an A on the math quiz. Yeah, right.”
  8. Yee to one’s haw (noun)
    Meaning: something or someone that makes us feel complete.
    Example:
    “Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture is the yee to my haw. It’s a piece that can cheer me up anytime.”
  9. Yeet (expression, verb)
    Meaning: an expression that was initially used to show excitement, approval, or surprise, but is now also used as an informal version of ‘to throw something away.”
    Example:
    “He accidentally yeeted his phone out of the window on the second floor.”
  10. Zen (adjective)
    Meaning: a peaceful and relaxed feeling.
    Example:
    “My zen side was tested during the entire 2020.”

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 16 January 2021.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 A-C
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 C-I
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 I-P
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 P-T

#ENGVOCAB: POPULAR INTERNET TERMS AS OF JANUARY 2021 P-T

Hello, everyone! This article is to continue our series on popular internet terms as of January 2021. Here are the previous articles on the series in case you missed it: PART 1PART 2, PART 3

REMINDER: Most of these terms are slang and SHOULD ONLY be used in an informal interaction.

  1. Protec, attac… (phrase)
    Meaning: the intentionally misspelled version of ‘he protects, but he also attacks,’ accompanied with the third phrase that rhymes with both words.
    Example:
    He protec, he attac, but most importantly, he wants some snac.
  2. Pumped (adjective)
    Meaning: excited.
    Example:
    “I’m so pumped to get 1,000 subscribers.”
  3. Reality check (phrase)
    Meaning: a phrase to use to bring someone back to reality.
    Example:
    “Yes, some of us do make less than Rp 20,000 a day that we can’t barely afford decent clothes and housing. I bet it’s a reality check for you.”
  4. Receipt (noun)
    Meaning: a proof of a scandal, a claim, or an accusation.
    Example:
    “Do you want me to dig up some receipts? I’m sure there’ll be plenty on the internet.”
  5. Relatable (adjective)
    Meaning: a state of something that we can relate to, something we can understand, or something that can make us say, “It’s so me.”
    Example:
    “This quote is so relatable.”
Credit: @tinybuddha on Twitter

  1. Rn (adverb)
    Meaning: short of ‘right now.’
    Example:
    “This song is so beautiful. I’m dying rn.”
  2. Sadboi/sadgirl (noun)
    Meaning: someone who is being very open about their emotions that are usually related to a complicated love life.
    Example:
    “He’s just being a sadboi right now, always emotional.”
  3. Sassy (adjective)
    Meaning: of someone, usually a woman or a girl or those identify as such, to be unapologetically bold.
    Example:
    “Sassy remarks are to be expected from her. Be prepared.”
  4. Screen-capture (verb, noun)
    Meaning: to capture a screen where a piece of important information is shown.
    Example:
    “I have screen-captured this conversation. Just in case.”
  5. Serving (verb)
    Meaning: providing a good look, good internet posts/contents, or good artistic material.
    Example:
    “He’s been serving us a lot of behind-the-scene from his latest movie.”
  6. Shaking/quaking (verb)
    Meaning: someone or something is possibly intimidated by someone’s hidden ability or talent.
    Example:
    A: “Your acting skill is top notch. Hollywood is shaking.”
    B: “You’re being sarcastic.”
  7. Shameless plug (noun)
    Meaning: an improperly placed promotion or advertisement.
    Example:
    “His promoting his YouTube channel on a natural-disaster-related Instagram post feels like a shameless plug to me.”
  8. Share one braincell (phrase)
    Meaning: two or more people doing something silly or ridiculous together.
    Example:
    “My classmates and I shared one braincell during the exam. We literally had no idea what we were doing.”
  9. S**t hits the fan (phrase)
    Meaning: something bad happens.
    Example:
    “She always does controversial things, but when s**t hits the fan, she momentarily disappears from social media.”
  10. Sike (expression)
    Meaning: an incorrect spelling of the slang ‘psych’ that was popular in 1990s. It’s similar to adding ‘not’ or ‘no’ at the end of a sentence to imply sarcasm or a joke.
    Example:
    “You look good with that platinum blonde hair… Sike.”
  11. Simp (noun, verb)
    Meaning: an insult for a male follower who is obsessed with and desperate to get the attention of a female social media celebrity.
    Example:
    “You bought her bath water? D**n, I didn’t know you were such a simp.”
  12. Sketchy (adjective)
    Meaning: untrustworthy, disreputable, suspicious.
    Example:
    “This website seems sketchy to me. Are you sure it’s not a scam?”
  13. Slay (verb)
    Meaning: to greatly impress.
    Example:
    “Mariah Carey slays with her ‘All I Want for Christmas Is You.'”
  14. Sleep with one eye open (phrase)
    Meaning: to live in fear.
    Example:
    “I sleep with one eye open thanks to my overbearing boss.”
  15. Smol (adjective)
    Meaning: a cute way to say ‘small.’
    Example:
    “Look at this smol puppy.”
A smol puppy. Credit: @smoldogpics on Twitter.

  1. Snap (verb)
    Meaning: to do something agressively or to do something greatly.
    Example:
    “Ariana Grande snapped with her ‘Thank You, Next.'”
  2. Snatch/steal someone’s wig (phrase)
    Meaning: to steal the show or to humiliate someone publicly, giving the same embarrassment to the target as literally taking off their wig.
    Example:
    “I sincerely apologise for snatching your wig, but this is what happens when you badmouth me.”
  3. So done (adjective)
    Meaning: tired, bored.
    Example:
    “I’m so done with your antics. Can you go disturb someone else?”
  4. Soft (adjective)
    Meaning: moved, touched.
    Example:
    “The interaction between Keanu Reeves and his fans makes me soft.”
  5. Sploot (verb, noun)
    Meaning: for a pet to lie flat on a surface and stretch their back legs. A wordplay of ‘split.’
    Example:
    “As soon as we got back from the walk, my dog sploot and smiled widely.”
  6. Sure, Jan (expression)
    Meaning: something we say when we know someone is lying right to our face. Taken from the movie A Very Brady Sequel (1996).
    Example:
    “So you left me on read because your phone died? Sure, Jan.”
  7. (Kinda) sus (adjective)
    Meaning: (kind of) suspicious.
    Example:
    “Do you trust her story? It seems kinda sus.”
  8. Take the heat (phrase)
    Meaning: to withstand disapproval or controversies.
    Example:
    “She always causes drama, but when she gets confronted, she’s unable to take the heat herself.”
  9. Thank you, next (expression)
    Meaning: the title of Ariana Grande’s 2018 hit single. Nowadays, it’s used to express that someone wants to move on from a hurtful experience.
    Example:
    “The last thing I want is to have my ex back into my life. Thank you, next!”
  10. That didn’t age well (phrase)
    Meaning: of someone or something that has a negative ending despite a promising start.
    Example:
    “That actor was selected as one of the first people to get vaccinated, but he went straight into a party afterwards. That surely didn’t age well.”

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 16 January 2021.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):
#EngVocab: New Words on Internet
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 A-C
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 C-I
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 I-P

#ENGVOCAB: POPULAR INTERNET TERMS AS OF JANUARY 2021 I-P

Hello, everyone! This article is to continue our series on popular internet terms as of January 2021. Here are the previous articles on the series in case you missed it: PART 1, PART 2

REMINDER: Most of these terms are slang and SHOULD ONLY be used in an informal interaction.

  1. I- (expression)
    Meaning: an expression that represent speechlessness. Often comes in its variation ‘I cannot,’ ‘I can’t’ or ‘I can’t even.’
    Example:
    “I just got a notification that I won a giveaway. I-“
  2. In Spain, but without ‘s’ (expression).
    Meaning: being in pain.
    Example:
    “Her crush didn’t want to go out with her. She is in Spain, but without ‘s’ right now.”
  3. In this economy? (phrase)
    Meaning: we cannot carry out something because it’s a financial burden.
    Example:
    “Buying the latest phone? In this economy?”
  4. Influencer (noun)
    Meaning: an internet celebrity who can possibly influence other people’s opinion or decision. Nowadays, it generally refers to someone who was relatively unknown but gradually became famous as they gained huge following on social media.
    Example:
    “Yet another influencer throwing a party in the middle of a worldwide pandemic. Are they for real?”
  5. Instant regret (phrase)
    Meaning: a regretful feeling that comes instantly after saying something, making a wrong decision, or doing something wrong.
    Example:
    “I bought this phone on a flash sale, but I didn’t know that it didn’t support dual SIM cards. Talk about an instant regret.”
  6. Irl (phrase)
    Meaning: the abbreviation of ‘in real life,’ distinguishing our life on and off the internet.
    Example:
    “I imagine she’s not as sassy irl, but that’s just me.”
  7. Issa (phrase)
    Meaning: a slang for ‘is a’ or ‘it is a.’
    Example:
    “The football match issa fire.”
  8. Karen (noun)
    Meaning: a pejorative term for women seeming to be entitled or demanding beyond the scope of what is normal.
    Example:
    “I just saw a Karen arguing with a shop assistant who advised her to wear a mask.”

  1. Leave one on read (phrase)
    Meaning: to leave a message on read and not send any responses.
    Example:
    “She leaves you on read all the time, man. I think it’s time you take the hint.”
  2. …lives in one’s head rent free (phrase)
    Meaning: of someone not being able to forget or move on from someone else or something.
    Example:
    “His remarks live in your head rent free, but you should know he said that as a joke.”
  3. Lost it (phrase)
    Meaning: losing one’s temper or not being able to control oneself.
    Example:
    “When he started raising his voice, I lost it.”
  4. Love that for you (phrase)
    Meaning: ‘I’m happy for you,’ sometimes used in a sarcastic tone.
    Example:
    A: “I got this LV knockoff for $200.”
    B: “Love that for you.”
  5. Lowkey (adverb)
    Meaning: secretly.
    Example:
    “I lowkey want to travel but I don’t want to spread the virus.”
  6. Make it make sense (phrase)
    Meaning: make something clear, transparent, or comprehensible.
    Example:
    “So, you want to travel in the middle of a pandemic? Make it make sense.”
  7. Make no mistake (phrase)
    Meaning: ‘do not be mistaken.’
    Example:
    “Make no mistake, she’ll also be 10 minutes late to this meeting.”
  8. Mess (noun)
    Meaning: a problem, a complicated situation.
    Example:
    “That mess is gonna be hard to clean up, especially since a lot of netizen have apparently screen-captured their Instagram stories.”
  9. Miss me with that (nonsense) (phrase)
    Meaning: another way of saying ‘I don’t believe you’ or ‘I don’t buy your excuses.’
    Example:
    “You were being honest? Miss me with that nonsense. I knew you’ve been texting other girls.”
  10. Mom, come pick me up, I’m scared (phrase)
    Meaning: an expression to use when we see something scary on the internet. Originated from a scene in the movie Mean Girls (2004).
    Example:
    “Aaarrgghh, I can’t watch this horror movie trailer. Mom, come pick me up, I’m scared!”
  11. Mood (noun)
    Meaning: a representation of our current state or feelings.
    Example:
    “This lazy cat is such a mood.”
Picture credit: Pinterest

  1. Mukbang (noun)
    Meaning: an eating broadcast originated from South Korea to accompany those who live and eat alone. A currently popular theme for a YouTube content.
    Example:
    “How do people do mukbang and stay healthy? I’m honestly curious.”
  2. …never gets old (phrase)
    Meaning: something is never boring.
    Example:
    “This joke never gets old.”
  3. No one, literally no one (expression)
    Meaning: a reaction we give to something unexpected.
    Example:
    No one: …
    Literally no one: …
    Disney: ruining Mulan’s live action.
  4. No s**t, Sherlock (expression)
    Meaning: a reaction to someone explaining something that’s a common fact or blatantly obvious. Example: “You eat junk food every day and now you’re complaining that you gained weight? No s**t, Sherlock.”
  5. Nothing to write home about (phrase)
    Meaning: not special or distinguished enough.
    Example:
    “Yeah, my YouTube channel is monetised, but it’s nothing to write home about, yet.”
  6. Nvm (expression)
    Meaning: a contraction of ‘never mind.’
    Example:
    “Nvm, I’ll just order pizza.”
  7. Ok, boomer (expression)
    Meaning: an expression commonly used by millennials and Gen-Z to mock baby-boomers and Gen-X for their outdated thinking.
    Example:
    “A woman’s place is in the kitchen. Yeah, right. Ok, boomer.”
  8. On fleek (adjective)
    Meaning: looking good, perfectly done, or just about right.
    Example:
    “My eyebrows are on fleek today.”
  9. People are sleeping on it (phrase)
    Meaning: people are ignoring a good content or a talented person.
    Example:
    “This song is moving, but people are sleeping on it. Wake up, people!”
  10. Period (expression)
    Meaning: a simplified way of saying ‘end of a discussion.’
    Example:
    “i was right, you were wrong. Period.”
  11. Petition to/for… (phrase)
    Meaning: a phrase to demand something to be done or someone to be treated in a certain way.
    Example:
    “Petition to Netflix to have all Lord of the Rings movies on its catalogue.”

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 16 January 2021.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):
#EngVocab: Internet Slang
#EngVocab: New Words on Internet
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 A-C
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 C-I

#ENGVOCAB: POPULAR INTERNET TERMS AS OF JANUARY 2021 C-I

Hello, everyone! This article is to continue our series on popular internet terms as of January 2021. Here is the first article on the series in case you missed it: PART 1

REMINDER: Most of these terms are slang and SHOULD ONLY be used in an informal interaction.

  1. Cuteness overload (phrase)
    Meaning: an overwhelming cuteness.
    Example:
    “Keanu Reeves playing with puppy is the definition of cuteness overload.”
  2. Cyber-bully (verb, noun)
    Meaning: to bully someone on the internet or someone who bullies another person on the internet.
    Example:
    “Jesy Nelson, a former member of Little Mix, was a victim of cyber-bullying.”
  3. Darn, dang (expression)
    Meaning: somewhat more polite versions of d*mn.
    Example:
    “Dang it, I lost the Wi-Fi connection.”
  4. Deplatform (verb)
    Meaning: to take away someone’s privilege of using a certain social media platform, usually after a series of dangerous, misleading, provocative, abusive, or life-threatening posts.
    Example:
    “I think Twitter did the right thing by deplatforming the president.”
  5. Did I stutter? (phrase)
    Meaning: ‘Do I need to repeat myself?’ or ‘Do I look like I’m kidding?’
    Example:
    A: “I want everything to be done by 5 PM today.”
    B: “But…”
    A: “Did I stutter?”
  6. Doomscrolling/doomsurfing (verb)
    Meaning: the act of consuming a large quantity of negative online news at once.
    Example:
    “Stop doomscrolling. It’s not good for your health.”
  7. Don’t @ me (phrase)
    Meaning: ‘Don’t tag me’ or ‘I don’t want to argue with you on this matter.’
    Example:
    “I like pineapple on my pizza. Don’t @ me.”
  8. Drama (noun)
    Meaning: any scandal or controversial event, sometimes steeming from a trivial argument.
    Example:
    “This influencers drama is giving me a headache. I think I’ll just unfollow them.”
  9. Drama queen (noun)
    Meaning: a gender-neutral term to refer to someone who is overly dramatic.
    Example:
    “Don’t be such a drama queen. You only lost a dozen of followers. So what?”
  10. Eboi/egirl (noun)
    Meaning: a popular internet boy or girl.
    Example:
    A: “Does playing online games a lot automatically make me an egirl?”
    B: “No, unless there is a horde of simps following all of your online activities.”
  11. Edgy (adjective)
    Meaning: daring, bold, and sometimes controversial.
    Example:
    “How to be edgy on social media 101: have an unpopular opinion.”
  12. Everybody gangsta until… (phrase)
    Meaning: everybody is emotionally strong and stable before they see something that could shake them.
    Example:
    “Everybody gangsta until they check their bank account.”
  13. Fake (adjective)
    Meaning: someone acting not as what they preach or advertise to be.
    Example:
    “Be careful of fake friends. They could always throw you under the bus.”
  14. Flex (verb, noun)
    Meaning: to show off or something that we can show off.
    Example:
    “I got an A on the math quiz. I’m gonna flex it on social media.”
  15. Flipping, freaking (adverb)
    Meaning: alternatives to f**king.
    Example:
    “She’s so freaking smart!”
  16. Flying wig/snatched wig (expression)
    Meaning: expressing surprise or shock.
    Example:
    “Things that fly: birds, planes, and our wigs.”
  17. Fr (adverb)
    Meaning: short of ‘for real,’ meaning ‘seriously.’
    Example:
    “You scared me just now, fr.”
  18. Get a life (phrase)
    Meaning: to start doing something meaningful in life.
    Example:
    “Bruh, stop scrolling through your ex’ Instagram posts and go get a life.”
  19. …gets me every time (phrase)
    Meaning: something gives us a strong feeling or emotion, no matter how old it is or how often we see or hear it.
    Example:
    “Queen’s Love of My Life gets me every time. It reminds me of my mother, who loved the song.”
  20. …gives me everything/gives me life (phrase)
    Meaning: something makes me happy.
    Example:
    “Stray Kids’ Hyunjin’s blonde hair gives me everything.”
Stray Kids’ Hwang Hyunjin with blonde hair. Picture credit: Koreaboo.

  1. Go off, sis (phrase)
    Meaning: a gender-neutral phrase to tell someone to express their feelings or emotions through ranting.
    Example:
    “I don’t think I did anything wrong, but yeah, go off, sis!”
  2. Gurl (noun)
    Meaning: an informal version of ‘girl,’ often used in an admonishing tone.
    Example:
    “Gurl, what is you doing?” (Yes, the grammatical error is often intentional).
  3. Happiness noise/happy … noises (phrase)
    Meaning: a phrase originated from a mid-sneeze husky meme. Used to describe joy.
    Example:
    “She squealed with happy girlie noises when she got a text back from her crush.”
  4. …has left the chat (phrase)
    Meaning: someone or something has disappeared.
    Example:
    “I just saw a gif of Stray Kids’ Felix. Now my soul has left the chat.”
  5. …has seen things (phrase)
    Meaning: someone or something has witnessed bad things happen, usually to the extent of getting traumatised.
    Example:
    “This cat has seen things.”
  6. Hecc (expression)
    Meaning: a somewhat more polite alternative to hck or hll.
    Example:
    “What the hecc is happening?”
  7. Henlo (expression)
    Meaning: a pet’s owner way of saying ‘hello.’
    Example:
    “Henlo, this is Coconut Rice Bear (a Samoyed that is popular on the internet).”
  8. Highkey (adverb)
    Meaning: obviously.
    Example:
    “In this day and age, I highkey want to stay at home as much as possible.”
  9. Hubby (noun)
    Meaning: an affectionate way for a wife to call her husband.
    Example:
    “Oh, my hubby calls. I’m sorry, can I get this? This must be important.”
  10. I’ll give you that/I’ll give it to you (phrase)
    Meaning: another way of saying ‘I’ll give you credits for it’ or ‘I applaud you for it.’
    Example:
    “You did finish your task on time, I’ll give it to you, but I think you can do better than this.”

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 22 January 2021.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):
#EngVocab: Internet
#EngVocab: Internet Slang
#EngVocab: New Words on Internet
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of January 2021 A-C

#ENGVOCAB: POPULAR INTERNET TERMS AS OF JANUARY 2021 A-C

Every now and again, we take a deep look into words that are commonly used by netizen (internet users) and compile them, because most of them are slang or have different meanings with their official meanings on the dictionary. You can have a look at our mid-2018 compilation HERE.

Here is our January 2021 compilation. Some of these terms may have been trendy before 2021 and some of them may have become less popular by now.

REMINDER: Most of these terms are slang and SHOULD ONLY be used in an informal interaction.

  1. 10 out of 10 would recommend (phrase)
    Meaning: something is so good and we would recommend it to other people.
    Example:
    “This sandwich is perfect. 10 out of 10 would recommend.”
  2. Adulting (verb, noun)
    Meaning: doing things that grown up people do.
    Example:
    “I want to go back to my youth and not worry about rent and stuff. Adulting sucks.”
  3. Aesthetic (adjective)
    Meaning: concerning beauty or the appreciation of beauty. Often typed as ‘a e s t h e t i c’ to give a dramatic effect.
    Example:
    A: “Why did you delete so many of your Instagram posts?”
    B: “I like to keep my feed aesthetic.”
  4. And I oop-/anna oop-/oof (phrase)
    Meaning: a phrase popularised by Jasmine Masters. Used in the same sense as ‘oops’, especially when reacting to other people’s mistakes or blunders. It’s also sometimes written ‘anna oop-‘ or ‘oof.’
    Example:
    A: “That celebrity went to a party right in the middle of a pandemic.”
    B: “And I oop-“
  5. …and stuff (phrase)
    Meaning: an informal way of saying ‘and everything (else)’ or ‘and so on.’
    Example:
    “With you getting upset and stuff, it’s so hard for me to tell the truth.”
  6. Angy (adjective)
    Meaning: a cute way to say ‘angry.’ Often goes as, “No talk me I’m angy.”
    Example:
    “He scares me when he angy.”

  1. Atm (adverb)
    Meaning: ‘at the moment.’ Not ‘authorised teller machine’ (ATM).
    Example:
    “I’m busy atm. Can I call you back later?”
  2. Badmouth (verb)
    Meaning: to speak ill about someone behind their back.
    Example:
    “I’m done with those who badmouthed me. Thank you, next!”
  3. Bebe (noun)
    Meaning: baby. From the French word ‘bébé’ with the same meaning.
    Example:
    “A bebe Samoyed (dog breed) looks like a stuffed bear.”
  4. Beef (noun, verb)
    Meaning: a problem, an argument, or a fight, or to argue or to fight, especially via the internet or social media platforms.
    Example:
    “Nicki Minaj and Cardi B were constantly beefing.”
  5. Be like (phrase)
    Meaning: an informal form of ‘to say’ or ‘to give a certain reaction.’
    Example:
    “I was like, ‘Why are you so obsessed with me?'” – Mariah Carey.
  6. Begpacker (noun)
    Meaning: a portmanteau of ‘beg’ and ‘backpacker,’ used to refer to a backpacker who travels without sufficient fund to what’s considered as a third world country, mostly in Southeast Asia, and then begs their way to fund the trip or the flight home.
    Example:
    “Read this The Guardian’s article on begpackers. It’s quite interesting.”
  7. Big … energy (phrase)
    Meaning: of someone or something radiating or exuding confidence or of someone or something having remarkable similarity to someone or something else.
    Example:
    “I feel like having big 90s boy band energy with my new haircut.”
  8. Bish (noun)
    Meaning: another version of the b-word.
    Example:
    “That’s right, bish, don’t mess with me.”
  9. Boop (verb, noun)
    Meaning: affectionately touching a dog’s nose.
    Example:
    “Who’s a good boi? Here’s a boop for you!”

  1. Bop (noun)
    Meaning: a good song.
    Example:
    “God’s Menu by Stray Kids is such a bop!”
  2. Brb dying (phrase)
    Meaning: ‘Be right back, I’m dying.’ Used in a joking manner to react to something of top quality or adorable.
    Example:
    “This Joker scene compilation from The Dark Knight (2008) is everything. Brb dying.”
  3. Bruh (noun, expression)
    Meaning: a new version of ‘bro,’ but used in a tone of surprise, shock, or disapproval.
    Example:
    A: “Bro, I’m so sorry, I accidentally stepped on your cat’s tail.”
    B: “Bruh, WTF. Is the cat okay?”
  4. Bye, Felicia (expression)
    Meaning: an expression from the movie Friday (1995), that means ‘to bid farewell to someone whom we dislike.’
    Example:
    “Alright, I gotta go now. Bye, Felicia!”
  5. Byelingual (adjective)
    Meaning: of a person who is bilingual but struggling with both languages.
    Example:
    “That moment when you mix up English and French… Byelingual!”
  6. Cancel culture (noun)
    Meaning: a situation when we stop supporting a company or a famous person due to their objectionable or offensive act.
    Example:
    “Cancel culture doesn’t work for her as she has a lot of fans who condone everything she says or does.”
  7. Cash grab (noun)
    Meaning: a product released by big corporations, often in a collaboration with celebrities or influencers, that is often overpriced but of average quality, underwhelming, or unnecessary.
    Example:
    “This lipstick is a cash grab; you can buy similar products from any brand with much cheaper price.”
  8. Catfish (noun, verb)
    Meaning: social media pictures or personas that do not match one’s real life, usually with the intention of deceiving or luring someone else into a relationship.
    Example:
    “I got catfished by that girl I met online. Our first meeting irl was so awkward because she looked nothing like her Instagram pictures.”
  9. Chef’s kiss (phrase)
    Meaning: referring to a chef who kisses their fingers after tasting a special cuisine. Nowadays, it is used to describe something that is perfectly done.
    Example:
    “A Star Is Born (2018) was excellent. Lady Gaga’s voice is just chef’s kiss.”
  10. Chile (expression)
    Meaning: chill, relax.
    Example:
    A: “I can’t believe that influencer stole your artwork and credited it as hers.”
    B: “Chile, I’ll ask her about it.”
  11. Choose your fighter (phrase)
    Meaning: to pick between two or more equally strong contenders, which can be people, pictures, memes, or anything else.
    Example:
    “Pineapple on pizza or fried chicken with chocolate sauce. Choose your fighter.”
  12. Clickbait (noun, verb)
    Meaning: a misleading or exaggerated title of an internet post, usually created to gain traffic or engagement.
    Example:
    “Some of his YouTube video titles are pure clickbait. They don’t represent the contents of the videos at all.”
  13. Content warning/trigger warning (noun)
    Meaning: a warning at the beginning of an internet content to inform the audience that the content could put someone in a distress. Often abbreviated as CW/TW.
    Example:
    “Content warning/trigger warning: containing domestic violence.”
  14. Covidiot (noun)
    Meaning: a person who ignores health protocols like refusing to wear a mask during COVID-19 pandemic.
    Example:
    “Don’t be such a Covidiot and put other people at risk. Wear your mask.”
  15. (Content) creator (noun)
    Meaning: someone who creates an internet content.
    Example:
    “When I asked my niece what her dream was, she said she wanted to be a YouTube content creator. I was shook.”

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 16 January 2021.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):
#EngVocab: Internet
#EngVocab: Internet Slang
#EngVocab: New Words on Internet
#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018
#USSlang: Internet Slang (2)

#EngVocab: Words Related to Mobile Phone

Nowadays, a mobile phone has become a permanent part to our hands. We check our phones constantly even if there is no notification of incoming messages or calls or anything important on social medias. Do you also experience the same, fellas?

person taking photos of food
Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

This article will discuss words related to mobile phones.

1. Credit
This is a common term for prepaid mobile phone service, where we purchase some amount to use the provider’s service. In Indonesian, the term ‘phone credit’ has the same meaning as ‘pulsa.’

2. Data
(Mobile) data is what connects the phone to the internet when it is not connected to a Wi-Fi network.

3. Plans
Plans mean a package that might include a number of SMS, several minutes of phone calls, and some gigabits of mobile data that we purchase from the provider on a one-off occasion or on a regular basis.

Made Wirautama (@wirautama): In Indonesian we call it “paket data”.

4. 4G and 4.5G
4G means the fourth generation of mobile phone connection. It allows a mobile phone to connect to the internet with a relatively high download speed, which is 7-12 Mbps (megabits per second), and converts the phone to a mobile multimedia. 4.5G is an improved version of 4G with faster connection that could reach 14-21 Mbps. At the moment, we’re all excited for 5G, of course.

5. 4K
What is a 4K video? A video with 4K on it means that it was shoot with a lens with 3840 x 2160 pixels. It provides clearer, less fuzzy motions.

6. 720p
720p is currently the most common number to describe screen resolution. ‘P’ means progressive-scan and ‘720’ is the number of horizontal lines on the display. Higher screen resolutions are 1080p, 2160p (4K), and 8K.

7. HD
HD stands for high definition, which is also another name for a video with 720p resolution. 1080p is full HD (FHD). 1440p is Quad HD (QHD). 2160p or 4K is Ultra HD (UHD).

8. Lite
A lite version is a ‘lighter’ version of an application. It typically takes smaller space of the phone memory, displays media with lower resolutions, and has limited features compared to the full version.

9. Beta version
A beta version generally refers to a version of a piece of software that is made available for testing, typically by a limited number of users outside the company that is developing it, before its general release.

10. International roaming
The term refers to a feature that allows us to use the service of the provider in a foreign country where the service is not available. It usually costs more than the regular service.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 10 February 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018

Hi, fellas, how was your Monday? I was shook when I realized that we are halfway through 2018.

Does anyone recognize the word ‘shook’ that I used on the previous sentence? Have you ever read it before?

 

@catheramirez: ‘Surprise,’ ‘I can’t believe it.’

Q: @nadirantsy: Does shook have the same meaning with shocked? Same context?
A: Yes, but I think we should limit ‘shook’ to a relaxed, playful context. We don’t use it to express our sadness when hearing a bad news, for example.

 

‘Shook’ is one of the popular internet terms that we are going to discuss tonight. As languages are ever-evolving, these internet terms are actual English words whose meanings have changed over the years.

Here are some popular internet terms that are still used as of mid-2018:

Bamboozled
From the verb ‘to bamboozle’ (informal). It means to fool or cheat someone. It also means to confuse or perplex.
E.g.: “I’m bamboozled by the amount of retweets to my Twitter post.”

Boi/boye
A cute way to spell ‘boy.’ Usually used to a male dog.
E.g.: “Oh, you’re such a good boiiiiii…”

Burn
A reaction we gave when somebody has just been talked back to.
A: “Without the ugly in this world, there would be nothing beautiful.”
B: “Thank you for your sacrifice.”
C: “Burn!!”

Canceled
‘To cancel’ used to describe that an event would not take place OR a force negated another, but nowadays, netizen use ‘canceled’ to describe a dismissed or rejected person or idea.
E.g.: “If you don’t like my doggos, you will be canceled.”

Cringe and cringey
‘To cringe’ is to experience an inward shiver upon seeing or hearing something embarrassing. ‘Cringey’ is used as an adjective to describe something that causes somebody to cringe.
E.g.: “I cringed so hard when I watched her lip-synced performance. It was so cringey.”

Deceased
It was used to politely say that someone has passed away, but now, it is used to describe that something is really cool or awesome or funny that it takes our lives away.
E.g.: “OMG, my brother bought me tickets to a Rich Brian’s concert! I’m deceased!”

Doggo
Basically, it’s a cute way to say ‘dog.’
E.g.: “I just saw a super adorable, squishy, fluffy doggo.” insert crying face emojis

adorable animal beach canine
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

Extra
Something is ‘extra’ if it is done in an exaggerated, over-the-top way.
E.g.: “Rihanna’s outfit at the 2018’s Met Gala is so extra.”

Epic comeback
It used to describe a spectacular return of an artist, most of the time musicians, after a long hiatus. Now, it also means a witty (sometimes harsh) response to an insult.
A: “You’re so fat Thanos will have to snap his fingers twice.”
B: “Yeah, I’m fat, but you’re ugly. At least I can go on a diet.

Feels
All emotions mixed up: sadness, joy, envy, love, etc.
E.g.: “TVXQ’s comeback gave me all the feels.”

HMU
Stands for ‘hit me up,’ which means ‘contact me.’
E.g.: “HMU the next time you visit the city.”

Humblebrag
The act of bragging while appearing humble; the art of false modesty.
E.g.: “Who knew that constant vacations and holidays could be this exhausting?”

Lit
It used to describe the state of being drunk, but it is now used to express that something is exceptionally good.
E.g.: “The latest Arctic Monkey’s album was so lit it set my headphones on fire.”

Noob
A noob is a person who is inexperienced in a particular sphere or activity, especially computing or the use of the Internet. It came from the word ‘newbie.’ However, ‘newbie’ has a more positive connotation while ‘noob’ is intended as an insult.
A: “Hey guys, I’m kinda new here.“
B: “LOL, noob.”

Overproud
A reaction we gave when our nation or something originated from our nation is being talked about in a positive way.
A: “Did you know that an instant noodle brand from Indonesia was marketed worldwide?”
B: “Are you being overproud right now?”

Pwned
A gaming-style spelling of ‘owned,’ meaning being defeated badly.
E.g.: “Oh, snap, I was just pwned!”

Salty
Upset, angry, or bitter, after being made fun of or embarrassed. It can also be used to say that someone is mad.
E.g.: “Gosh, stop being so salty! You broke up with him; now it’s time to move on!”

Savage
Being ‘savage’ is saying or doing something harsh without a regard to the consequences.
A: “You’re so fat Thanos will have to snap his fingers twice.”
B: “Yeah, I’m fat, but you’re ugly. At least I can go on a diet.”
C: “Oooh, that was savage!”

Shady and throwing shade
Shady = suspicious
Throwing shade = talking bad about something or someone, without naming (but the audience knows anyway).
E.g.: “I think her last Instagram post was a shade thrown to me. I don’t know why she’s so shady.”

Shook
Originally, the word has a more serious connotation, as it means ’emotionally or physically disturbed.’ Nowadays, netizen use it as a playful way to say ‘surprised.’
E.g.: “She broke up with him? I’m shook!”

Stoked
It means being excited or euphoric.
E.g.: “When they told me I was on the team, I was stoked.”

Tea
A gossip or personal information belonging to someone else. The phrase ‘spill the tea’ is used the same way as ‘spill the bean’ is used, that is ‘to reveal an information that is supposed to be a secret.
E.g.: “The tea is exceptionally good today.”

Woke
Supposedly has the same meaning as ‘awaken,’ which is being enlightened, always in the know of everything that is happening in the world, more than anyone else.
E.g.: “I never consume any products coming from animals anymore. I guess I can say I’m woke.”

 

As what we always suggest, avoid using slang or internet terms in a formal interaction. If you befriend your employer or boss on social media, for example, both of you are still expected to converse formally. Any school assignments, essays, job applications, letter of recommendations, or business emails should be free from these terms either.

@kaonashily: instantly I feel ‘gaul’ knowing these ‘nowadays’ words.

@babygraace: I think salty isn’t just used when someone is being made fun or embarrassed.  E.g.: omg some people that watch my car vlogs literally get salty at me because I don’t put both my hands on the wheel!

Q: @sakurayujin: What about ‘shooketh?’
A: Even more surprised than ‘shook.’

 

Compiled and written by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 11 June, 2018.


RELATED POST(S): 

#EngTips: Effective Internet searching

We use the internet to search for something quite frequently. I bet some of you found this website from search engines too. It’s important to know the effective way to perform a search so that you don’t waste too much time sorting the results to find what you’re really looking for. So, I hope these tips would be useful for you.

  1. When possible use unique, specific terms. Carefully choose three or more keywords to retrieve more specific result. For example, English dictionary windows 8 can return more specific result than dictionary software as the search query.
  2. Use quotation marks for exact phrases. For example, searching for lunar eclipse using quotation marks (“lunar eclipse”) will return only the phrase in the exact order, thus excluding pages that contain only “lunar” or “eclipse” that aren’t exactly about lunar eclipse.
  3. Exclude articles (a, the), pronouns (it, they), conjunctions (and, or) or prepositions (to, from) when they aren’t important.
  4. Avoid redundant terms.Examples of artificial intelligence we are using in daily life” can be reduced to “example artificial intelligence daily life.” Another example: “wish vs hope” can return more relevant results than “the difference between wish and hope.”
  5. Use more than one search engines when necessary, like when you need to find as many resources as possible. For instance, I used library directories, Google scholar as well as Google search to find research papers for my thesis topic.
  6. If you can’t find what you’re looking for in the first 20 result, go no further. Reformulate your search using different keyword, or…
  7. Use advanced search to refine your search results. Advanced search tools are really useful and usually not that hard to get used to.
  8. Check the help page of the search engine. They usually have unique tips on how to perform effective search using their search tools.

 

Compiled and written by @Fafafin for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, October 6, 2016

 

Related post(s):

 

^MQ

#EngVocab: Internet Slang

Here are 7 terms you might have noticed popping up a lot on social media these days.
1) Lit (adj.)

It’s used to describe an exciting event, a cool person, or general awesomeness.

Example:

  • Last night’s party was lit, buddy!

2) Fam (n.)

It’s used to refer to those close to you. These people can be your actual family, but most times it is used for close friends that you trust who are like family.

Example:

  • You always have my back, fam.

3) Sis (n.)

It is a shorter version of sister. Sis is known as the new bro. However you’d use bro, just replace it with sis and you’re good to go.

Example:

  • Sorry, but you can’t sit with us, sis.

4) Snatched (adj.)

It’s used to describe anything that looks really good or on point. It is a newer version of “fleek.”

Example:

  • Omg, I love your eyebrows. They’re snatched!

5) High-key / Low-Key (adj.)

High-key is used to describe something needing to be said out loud. But todays, it also used to alter word “very,” “a lot,” “intensely,” or “much.”

Example:

  • High-key don’t wanna move from the couch today. Or ever.

Low-key is clearly the opposite of “high-key”. It means to keep things as secret. But, nowadays, it also refers to “not really,” “not a lot,” “minimally.”

Example:

  • “I’m just low-key in love with him, OK?”

Here are both used in the same sentence:

  • “When you high-key want someone but you’re trying to be low-key.”

6) Ship (v./n.)

As a verb, it means to support a romantic pairing (usually of fictional characters).

As a noun, a ship is when a romantic pairing occurs between two characters.

Example:

  • I ship Andrew and Emma so much. They’re the cutest couple ever!

7) Savage (adj.)

It’s used to describe someone who doesn’t care about the consequences of his or her actions; bad-ass or hardcore.

Example:

  • Did you see the way he beat that snatcher? That was savage!

 

Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, August 6, 2016

 

Related post(s):

 

^MQ

#EngTrivia: Is there such thing as Internet Dialect? Feat. @PBSIdeaChannel

Here’s a question for our #EngTrivia session today,

Do you believe there is an internet dialect?

Today’s session is based on “Are There Internet Dialects?” By @PBSIdeaChannel presented by @mikerugnetta

According to them, accents can’t exist on the internet as it is written (non verbal even though you are literally saying it (verbally) inside your head

So, in internet’s case, how we talk is a dialect which includes how we use the language, where English is the Lingua Franca – the common language for all natives – Smiley, hashtags, abbreviations, acronyms, “semi unconscious the use of selfie” are part of it

General English in the internet would be an e-mail from your colleague about certain events

Such animated GIFs (animated pictures) and Tumblr are powerfully expressive

Yet the use of (English) language in Tumblr could be lowercase and no punctuation

e.g., “tbh I literally say ‘literally and tbh’ literally all the time tbh”

“tbh” in itself can be talked thoroughly why and how it is used so this comes to how words and its usage

Mike said, it might be the “community value” that causes it like that

i.e., Tumblr seems more vulnerable, there is sensitivity

So…. does that mean it is not an internet dialect? It is just feelings revealed? How do we actually know it is a dialect?

Community is people who do things together – doing it in a cultural and social context

There are practices which are social practices with untold rules of thumbs existing

e.g., well tuned sensitivity, shared world views; might be coming from the way a community is educated, its interest, professions

Penelope Eckhert stated that speakers develop their linguistic view in the community they participate in – forms of participation and community practice are mutually constructed

So the way you communicate seems to influence and be influenced by the surroundings, in this case the internet itself

Facebookish, Twitterish, Tumblrish could just be the few internet dialects

as we would or could use different ways of speaking in certain social media or platforms that we use or we are in

So, as @mikerugnetta would say it, “what do you guys think?” It seems that this is an interesting phenomenon..

Internet language has existed for a while now and there are different kinds, even might be in development

So internet could be a hometown where you get your English dialect, as it is a (global) region, a community, it has people in it

And of course to most, it will be considered informal to the formal usage of English as it is a dialect from a region

That’s it for today’s #EngTrivia, I hope you have enjoyed it :)

For more about it, click – http://youtu.be/SDPasRas5u0  “Are There Internet Dialects?” By @PBSIdeaChannel presented by @mikerugnetta

 

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4u on October 4, 2014

 

Source: http://youtu.be/SDPasRas5u0  “Are There Internet Dialects?” By @PBSIdeaChannel presented by @mikerugnetta

#EngTrivia: David Crystal’s Internet and SMS English language

Does anyone here know David Crystal by any chance?

Yes.. “@Revalyani: He is a Linguist.”

And yes one of the things he researched on is this “@vviinnkkaa: the theorist of internet language feature”

Yes he is British :) “@fitriaaelfs: I’ve heard once.. Is he british linguist isn’t he?”

As a Linguist, Crystal have explored many aspects of English indeed, from the past and present. Based on a talk of his book launch Spell It Out, he mentioned a lot of things.

But I was strucked with two things he mentioned:

1. The internet English language has gone back to its roots

Sometimes if you are blogging, instant messaging, tweeting, of course not always a person over your shoulder would say, “Oh…you spelt that wrong!”

To Crystal, this action of typing as you think it is spelt is like what happened before English is as it is. So in a sense, funnily, we are going back to how simple English would be in the past in the advance technology era

2. That English texting or SMS language is not all bad English

It seemed SMS language has been seen as something bad due to its abbreviations created by younger generations. Leaving out alphabets in words randomly apparently is a bad thing. But after analysing it:

First, the abbreviated words were only 10 % of the whole SMS sent so not all of them are abbreviations

Secondly, SMS abbreviation has been invented someway along the line years ago, there were poems and games that sort of used it in a sense. Such as old acronyms during the 60s like YYURYYUBICURYY4ME.

Third, the younger generations did mot leave alphabets randomly in a word when they are abbreviatin. For example you are writing, “I’ll see you tonight” then the sms would be

“ll s y tnt”

you would understand it rather than

“I e o u i”.

This won’t make sense would it? So in SMS we keep the consonants rather than the vowels. And of course, in order to know that, you should be able to spell well in English. So the best SMS texter would be the best spellers.

Well what do fellas think? Is it true? Is it weird? Is it false?

@trianarakanita: It is really really true!!! :))

@Anindyasd: i do agree, but i think the most important in order us to understand is to keep the word’s first or last letter.

@rissastellar: I think ‘c u 2nite’ is easier to be understood than ‘ill s y tnt’ :D

@misspuputt: I’d prefer to write full text while texting than make it short.. Confusing, I think..

@bellzart: not sure :/ we use slang lang when we text thou..

Well, I hope I have cheered you up and hope you have a lovely Saturday evening wherever you are! Hope it has been useful :)

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4U on November 16, 2013

Source:

David Crystal, Spell it Out  – Christ Church,Bath, Monday 26th November 2012.

Jeanette Weston © 2013 Magus Studio – http://youtu.be/Gco5whWZWkI