Tag Archives: Grammar Trivia

#GrammarTrivia: The Difference between Present Perfect Continous and Present Perfect Simple Tense

Today we are going to discuss a question that is often raised by students – online and offline. 

“How to tell the difference between Present Perfect Simple and Present Perfect Continuous Tenses?” 

Here is a sample of Present Perfect Simple Tense: I have known John since high school. 

While this is a Present Perfect Continuous Tense: I have been studying here for two years. 

Both are being used for finished and unfinished actions. 

Sometimes there is really no difference between the two, esp. if we are using verbs like ‘live’, ‘work’, ‘study’. 

Here are the ways that they can be different: 

 Present Perfect Continuous (PPC) is used to emphasize (menekankan) the time passed. 

They have been queueing for hours! <– Emphasize is on time 

They have queued for hours. <— The emphasize is not on the hours. 

Present Perfect Simple is often used to talk about ‘how much’ or ‘how many’. 

Example: He has drunk three glasses of beer today. 

And this is the most important difference: PPC focuses on the action, while PPS on the fact that the action is completed. 

This difference is often used to talk about different kinds of results in the present. 

PPS is used when the action is finished, and the result comes from the action being finished, example: 

“I have done my homework, so let’s go!” 

 “I have made a cake. Would you like to try it?” 

 PPC is used when the result comes from the action itself. It doesn’t matter if the whole action is finished or not. 

“I’ve been eating dinner, so there are plates all over the table.” 

 “I’ve been making a cake, that’s why the kitchen is such a mess.” 

PPC also emphasize that something happens temporarily. 

She’s been running a lot recently. <— it means she doesn’t usually do this. 

Source: Perfect English Grammar

Compiled by @animenur for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, 21 June 2015.

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#GRAMMARTRIVIA: The Use of ‘As If’ (Part 1)

Hi, fellas. How’s everything going today? I hope it’s going great!

In this session, I’d like to talk about a bit of grammar, which is about the use of ‘As if’. Let’s get started then. #GrammarTrivia

We can use AS IF to say how somebody or something LOOKS/SOUNDS/FEELS, etc. Take a look at the following examples. #GrammarTrivia

“That house looks AS IF it’s going to fall down.”  #GrammarTrivia

“Ann sounded AS IF she had a cold, didn’t she?” #GrammarTrivia

“I’ve just come back from holiday but I feel depressed. I don’t feel AS IF I’ve just had a holiday.” #GrammarTrivia

We can also say “It looks/sounds/smells AS IF (or AS THOUGH)”. See the following examples. #GrammarTrivia

“Sandra is very late, isn’t she? It looks AS IF she isn’t coming.” #GrammarTrivia

“We took an umbrella with us because it looked AS IF it was going to rain.” #GrammarTrivia

“Do you hear that music next door? It sounds AS IF they are having a party.” #GrammarTrivia

However, some people use LIKE after “It looks/sounds/smells..” instead of AS IF. #GrammarTrivia

Therefore, that is all about how we use AS IF in a sentence. I hope you do get the point. #GrammarTrivia

All in all, remember to visit http://englishtips4u.com and http://facebook.com/englishtips4u, fellas! See you! :)

Source: English Grammar in Use (Raymond Murphy, Cambridge University Press).

Compiled by @aditriasmara at @EnglishTips4U on Februari 23, 2015.

#GRAMMARTRIVIA: ‘By’ and ‘Until’

Howdy, fellas! How’s your Monday going? I hope it’s going awesome :)

Well, today, I’d like to talk about a bit of grammar, which is about the use of ‘by’ and ‘until’ in a sentence. Here we go! #GrammarTrivia

BY (+ a time) means ‘not later than’. Study the following examples. #GrammarTrivia

“I posted the letter today, so they should receive it BY Monday.” (= NOT LATER than Monday). #GrammarTrivia

“We’d better hurry. We have to be at home BY 5 o’clock.” (= AT or BEFORE 5 o’clock). #GrammarTrivia

“Where’s Sue? She should be here BY now.” (= so she should have arrived already) #GrammarTrivia

You cannot use UNTIL with the following meaning: #GrammarTrivia

“Tell me BY Friday whether or not you can come to the party.” (NOT ‘Tell me until Friday’) #GrammarTrivia

We use UNTIL (or TILL) to say ‘how long’ a situation continues. Study the following examples. #GrammarTrivia

“Shall we go now?” “No, let’s wait UNTIL (or TILL) it stops raining.” #GrammarTrivia

“I couldn’t get up this morning. I stayed in bed UNTIL half past ten.” #GrammarTrivia

Please compare the following example to see the difference between the use of BY and UNTIL. #GrammarTrivia

“I’ll be working UNTIL 11:30.” and “I’ll have finished my work BY 11:30. ” #GrammarTrivia

You can clearly see the difference, can’t you? :) #GrammarTrivia

Therefore, that’s how we use ‘BY and UNTIL’ in a sentence. I hope this discussion helps you. #GrammarTrivia

All in all, remember to visit http://englishtips4u.com and http://facebook.com/englishtips4u, fellas! See you! :)

Source: English Grammar in Use (Raymond Murphy, Cambridge University Press).

Compiled by @aditriasmara at @EnglishTips4U on January 12, 2014.