Tag Archives: etiquette

#EngTalk: Smartphone Etiquette

Has any of you ever wondered of how smartphone has changed our way of living?

“Even when you don’t have a call you hold your phone.” ~ @manalh016 

“Why we enjoy read chat conversation on the phone than books.”~ @pohpho

“Smartphone changes my habit to read a book to read online pages.” ~ @widieandriyani 

“We use phones when we want to make a call or check mail, facebook, twitter, but not for a log time..health is important.” ~ @manalh016 

Rarely do we see people without smartphones these days. Even a 2-year old knows how to use it, at least to play games. Taking pictures, listening to the music, playing games, working, all can be done with one device. Pretty amazing, isn’t it?

Although smartphones have infiltrated almost all aspects of our lives, still, in my opinion, there are times when we should refrain using it. When do you think we should just keep the phone in our pockets?

“When spending our time with our family (parents, spouse and children)” ~ @nagisanoir

Indeed. Or if I may put it: when we are having actual interaction with people in real life.

Talking about interaction with people in real life, I once went to karaoke place with my friends. While we were singing our hearts out, there was a friend of mine who stayed in the corner and played with his phone all the time. He refused to sing or dance and he had us wondering what was so important in his phone. Perhaps you had similar experience?

Using smartphones while watching a concert (to take pictures or record videos) was also frowned upon. However, it becomes more and more common that nowadays, people don’t make much fuss about it.

“When we’re in the class obviously, just stop ignoring your teacher & put back your phone bcs it hurts so much to be ignored.” ~ ‏@thisisrisaf 

There are also times when you’re in a meeting and then a phone rings and the owner picks it up without any sense of guilt. Another bad timing to play with your phone is in a funeral. With the sadness, mourning, and solemnity, we can consider putting away our phones for a while.

At the end, we still need smartphones and we might still depend on it a lot, but it would be wiser not to put it as priority when there are people around us deserving more attention.

“Tks for this topic for today, I always talked to my friends about this problem.”. ~ @duyen0626

Compiled and written by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 2 November, 2015

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#EngTips: Basic etiquette in writing letters and emails

Imagine the following situation and tell us what you think.

There’s a new email in my inbox from some unknown address, with a blank subject? Do you think it’s worth reading?

Okay. So, curiosity got the better of me and I read it anyway. Nothing was written in it, save for 1 file in the attachment. What would you do?

@DaLonGxxi: it looks suspicious .. it might be a link some hacker has created to hack the account ..

@AwesomeChaser: A big no. I will just delete it even without opening the email.

People used to hand-write their letters and send them by post. However, to save cost and to cut on the use of papers, more prefer to correspond by emails nowadays. Letters and emails alike are tools of communication. Think of them as written communication.

Letter writing is an important life skill, especially in the digital era. It has the potential to affect your reputation and credibility. So, check out these basic e-mail etiquette.

 

1. State the purpose or main issue of your email in the Subject box.

Subject is the first thing people see, they would either read your email or ignore it altogether. It gives a brief idea of what your email is about.

 

2. Always start with a salutation.

In verbal communication, “salutation” is the part where we greet someone. This simple point can help build a good first impression. The most common salutation used is “Dear…,”.

  • If you only know the gender of the recipient, not the name, you can start with “Dear Madam/Sir/Miss,” Do pick one of the three.
  • If you know the name of the recipient, you can write his/her name with a title. Example: “Dear Mr. Jones,”
  • If you aren’t writing to a specific contact person, or if you have no idea whom you’re writing to,  you can start with “To whom it may concern,”
  • If you’re writing a semi-formal letter you may use “Hello,” or “Hi,” or even “Hey,” for informal greetings.

 

3. Depending on whom you’re writing to, you might start by asking after his/her well-being.

Or if you’re writing a more formal email, you might want to skip the small talk and get straight to the point.

 

4. Organize your thoughts and put them into writing.

If you can help it, divide the content into paragraphs, grouped by topics/ideas. That would definitely help keep the reader’s attention.

 

5. Thank the recipient.

For the time and effort to read your email, it wouldn’t hurt to add a “thank you” on the last paragraph of your email.

 

6. Be polite and use a complimentary close.

To end your letter on a good note, use a complimentary close. Of course, followed by your name.

  • For formal letters, stick to “Sincerely yours,” “Kindest regards,” or “Best wishes,”
  • For semi-formal letters, you can end them with “Sincerely,” or “Regards,”.
  • It’s not unheard of to end letters with “Love,” “Affectionately,” or “Fondly,” especially in ones for loved ones or close friends.

 

All these points might either sound a lot or even trivial for some people, but believe me, these basic etiquette not only shows how well-mannered and civilized you are, but also how much you respect, care about and appreciate the recipient. Yes… Even if you’re only writing to friends or relatives.

 

Do you have any other pet peeves when it comes to emails? Or do you have other tips on how to write a ‘good’ email? Feel free to mention us on Twitter or leave a comment in the box below.

 

Compiled and written by @Miss_Qiak at @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, August 14, 2014

 


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