Tag Archives: English

#EngVocab: ‘Live’ vs. ‘alive’

Someone asked us on LINE about the difference between ‘live’ and ‘alive’ on LINE. So, instead of keeping the answer between the two of us, I’ll talk about it in this article and share with all of you. Let’s start, shall we?

Meaning of ‘live’ and ‘alive’

First off, let’s talk about the meaning of ‘live’ and ‘alive.’ In a glance, both have something to do with life.

  • ‘Life’ (noun), dibaca laif, is the period between birth and death, during which something is active and functioning.
  • ‘Life’ (noun), dibaca laif, also refers to the living person or being.

‘Live’ is both a verb and an adjective.

As a verb, ‘live,’ yang dibaca liv, means to exist, to be alive, to reside, to conduct a life. Example:

  • “I live in Jakarta.”
  • “They lived happily ever after.”

As an adjective, ‘live,’ yang dibaca laiv, means living, actual, present. Example:

  • ‘live show,’
  • ‘live animal,’
  • ‘live broadcast.’

‘Alive’, dibaca əlaiv, is an adjective.

‘Alive’ describes the condition of living, active, and not dead. Example:

  • “The happiest woman alive.”
  • “Grandpa is still alive.”

Now we’ve talked about the meaning of ‘live’ and ‘alive.’ Let’s look at more examples:

RIGHT

WRONG

Live show

Alive show

Live bait

Alive bait

I am alive.

I am live.

Keep your hope alive.

Keep your hope live.

Look at the examples again. Did you notice the difference? Clue: position. Did you notice how ‘live’ is placed directly before a noun and ‘alive’ is placed after a verb?

Live‘ is an attributive adjective. Attributive adjectives are positioned before the noun they describe.

Alive‘ is a predicative adjective. Predicative adjectives are positioned after verbs such as be, become, grow, look or seem.

And there you have it! That’s the end of today’s talk on how to differentiate when to use ‘live’ and ‘alive.’ If you have other questions regarding this topic, or any other topic at all, feel free to hit us up on Twitter or drop a comment in the comment box below.

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @Englishtips4U on Wednesday, March 8, 2017

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#WOTD: Whilst

‘Whilst’ is a conjunction (kata sambung), a word used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause.

As a conjunction, ‘whilst’ means the same as ‘while‘. Both mean ‘during the time that something else happens.’

Example:

  • She reads a novel whilst waiting for her boyfriend.
  • She reads a novel while waiting for her boyfriend.

‘Whilst’ and ‘while’ indicate that two events are happening at the same time.

On going events:

  • reading a novel
  • waiting for boyfriend

Not just that, both ‘whilst’ and ‘while’ can also mean ‘in contrast with something else.’

Example:

  • Her top is white, whilst her pants are black.
  • Her top is white, while her pants are black.

Here’s another example of using ‘whilst’ in showing contrast.

Example:

  • Whilst ‘of’ refers to possession, ‘from’ refers to origins.

 

So, you may now ask:

When should we use ‘whilst’? Or should we use ‘while’ instead?

Actually, the real question is not ‘when’ to use them; but ‘where‘ you should use ‘whilst.’

For Americans, the word ‘whilst’ tends to have an archaic ring. ‘Whilst’ is rarely used in American English. The use of ‘whilst’ gives the impression that the writer is British. ‘Whilst’ is fairly common in British publications.

So that sums up our discussion on the word ‘whilst.’ I hope the explanation was clear enough and not too boring. However, if you still have any question on how to use ‘whilst’ (or any other topic), feel free to hit us up.

 

Compiled and written by @Miss_Qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, February 24, 2017

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#EngProverb: Rain

Hello hey ho, fellas! It has been raining a lot lately and there’s this one song my nephew sings every time it rains. 

Do you know this song? The song goes like this:

 

Speaking of rain, I’ll share proverbs about rain from various countries. Check them out.

  1. English proverb – “If it rains before seven, ’twill cease before eleven.”
  2. Thai proverb – “Rainbow after the rain.”
  3. Chinese proverb – “When it rains about the break of day, the traveller’s sorrows pass away.”
  4. Welsh proverb – “A flood in the river means fine weather.” 
  5. Spanish proverb – “A river flood, fishes good.”
  6. Greek proverb – “If there is much rain in winter, the spring is generally dry.”
  7. Latin proverb – “After clouds a clear sun.”
  8. German proverb – “Rain in September is good for the farmer, but poison to the vine growers.”
  9. English proverb – “A foul morn may turn to a fine day.”
  10. Cornish proverb – “More rain, more rest.”

There goes all 10 proverbs on rain. Feel free to mention us if you know other proverbs on rain from your country.

Compiled and written by @Miss_Qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, February 15, 2017

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#IOTW: Idioms related to education and school

  1. Easy as ABC. Meaning: very easy.
    • Example:
      • “Learning mathematics is easy as ABC.”
  1. Bookworm. Meaning: someone who reads a lot
    • Example:
      • “No wonder she is genius. She is a bookworm.”
  1. Brainstorm. Meaning: try to develop idea or think of a new idea.
    • Example:
      • “In this group discussion, we need to brainstorm for our environment campaign.”
  1. Call the roll. Meaning: call students’ names on a roll and expect them to answer if they are there.
    • Example:
      • “Every morning when the class starts, the teacher calls the roll.”
  1. Cap and gown. Meaning: a special cap called a mortarboard and a special robe which is worn in academic ceremony.
    • Example:
      • “The students wore cap and gown on their graduation day.”
  1. Count noses. Meaning: to count the number of people.
    • Example:
      • “The teacher stopped to count the nose several times during the field trip.”
  1. Cover a lot of ground. Meaning: to complete a lot of material in a class or course.
    • Example:
      • “I covered a lot of ground in Physics class last semester.”
  1. Cow college. Meaning: a school where farming or agriculture is studied.
    • Example:
      • “He graduated from cow college in America.”
  1. Crack a book. Meaning: to open a book to study (usually used in the negative)
    • Example:
      • “It shocked me when I got my test result. It was good although I didn’t crack a book that much.”
  1. Crank out a paper. Meaning: to write a paper or essay in mechanical way.
    • Example:
      • “I have to crank out a paper to pass this subject.”

 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Tuesday, February 21, 2017

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#EngClass: Modal verb – Can

We’ve talked about “may” and “must” in previous posts. If you happen to miss them, check these out:

“Can” is commonly used to express:

  • Ability
  • Possibility
  • Permission

“Can” is only used in the present tense. In the past tense, we use “could”. We will talk about “could” in another instance.

 

When to use “can”?

We use the modal “can” to make statements about:

slide9

  1. In statements about ability.
    • Example:
      • I can sing.
  2. In statements about possibility.
    • Example:
      • It can get very crowded on holidays.
  3. In statements about offer.
    • Example:
      • Can I help you?
  4. In statements about permission.
    • Example:
      • Can I ask you a question?
  5. In statements about instruction and request.
    • Example:
      • Can you listen to me please?
  6. In statements about prohibition.
    • Example:
      • You can’t smoke in the building.
  7. In statements about impossibility.
    • Example:
      • It can’t be true. I just met her yesterday.

 

How to use “can”?

slide11

Next, we’ll talk about how to use “can” in a sentence.

  • Like every other modal verb, “can” is followed by a bare infinitive verb.
  • To form a negative sentence, “not” is slipped in between “can” and the bare infinitive verb. The negative sentence expresses prohibition and impossibility.

 

  1. “Can” in statements about ability.
    • Example:
      • (+) I can sing.
      • (-) I can’t sing.
      • (?) Can you sing?
  2. “Can” in statements about possibility.
    • Example:
      • (+) It can get very crowded on holidays.
      • (-) It can’t get crowded even on holidays.
      • (?) Can it get crowded on holidays?
  3. “Can” in statements about offer.
    • Example:
      • (+) I can help you.
      • (-) I can’t help you.
      • (?) Can I help you?
  4. “Can” in statements about permission.
    • Example:
      • (+) You can ask me anything.
      • (-) You can’t ask me.
      • (?) Can I ask you a question?
  5. “Can” in statements about instruction and request.
    • Example:
      • (+) Can you stay still!
      • (?) Can you listen to me please?
  6. “Can” in statements about prohibition.
    • Example:
      • (-) You can’t smoke in the building.
      • (-) We can’t park at the entrance.
  7. “Can” in statements about impossibility.
    • Example:
      • (-) It can’t be true. I just met her yesterday.

 

Prohibition

Prohibition is a negative permission. It is stated with a negative statement. To state a prohibition, we use “can’t” or “cannot”.

Subject + can + not + verb

Example:

  • You cannot meet her.
    • Meaning: You are not allowed to meet her.

Stating impossibility

To state the impossible, we use a negative statement.  When stating the impossible, we add “not” after “can”.

Subject + can + not + verb

Example:

  • You can’t be serious. I don’t believe you.
    • Meaning: What you’re saying is impossible.

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, February 1, 2017


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#EngTrivia: ‘Staring’ vs. ‘gazing’

Have you ever heard or read lines like these ones below?

 Why are you staring at me?

I’m not staring. I’m gazing.

I heard those lines when I watched The Vampire Diaries. What immediately came to my mind was, “Gazing? What is that?” because all I saw was Elena was staring, but she said ‘gazing.’ So, in this article, we will have a discussion about the two words. What is the difference between ‘staring’ and ‘gazing?’

If you checked the dictionary, ‘stare‘ is defined as to look fixedly or vacantly, while ‘gaze‘ is defined as to look steadily and intently, at something or someone for a long time. They are similar. The difference is we use ‘stare to indicate senses and feelings, such as curiosity, anger, boldness, admiration, bored, stupidity, etc; while ‘gaze to indicate sense of pleasure, like awe, admiration, fascination, and love.

Here are some examples to point them out:

  1. She gazes/stares admiringly at Warren.
  2. She stares at me blankly. (You can’t use ‘gaze’ in this sentence.)
  3. I stare at him with anger. (You also can’t use ‘gaze’ in this sentence)
  4. Yudith gazes/stares at the beautiful view of the sea.
  5. He stares/gazes at his sleeping child

From the example we can say that ‘gaze’ is used to show positive feelings, while ‘stare’ is used to show both positive and negative feelings (neutral).

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Tuesday, January 31, 2017

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#EngVocab: Obsolete words – a trip to the past

As language advances, lots and lots of words are invented. Unfortunately, some words went obsolete because of this. But today we will take a look to some of the obsolete words.

  1. Fudgel. Meaning: pretending to do work while actually do nothing.
    • Example:
      • I got fired because my boss caught me fudgeling.
  2. Brabble. Meaning: to argue loudly about something unimportant.
    • Example:
      • I’m not going to brabble with you. Let’s just go home for now.
  3. Snoutfair. Meaning: it is what you say to a good looking person.
    • Example:
      • Despite of his age, Keanu Reeves is still a snoutfair.
  4. Slugabed. Meaning: a lazy person that stays in bed for too long.
    • Example:
      • Wake up, slugabed! It’s already 11 am!
  5. Hoddypeak. Meaning: ‘fool’ or ‘simpleton.’
    • Example:
      • He’s not very bright; he’s a hoddypeak with a very kind heart.
  6. Jollux. Meaning: a sophisticated way of saying ‘fat.’
    • Example:
      • A: “Honey, do I look fat?”
      • B: “Baby, you’re just a little bit jollux.”
  7. Kench. Meaning: to laugh loudly (LOL).
    • Example:
      • I’m trying so hard not to kench in class while reading your text yesterday!
  8. Gorgonize: Meaning: to have paralyzing or mesmerizing effect on someone.
    • Example:
      • Zooey Deschanel’s eyes gorgonize me. I’m petrified just by looking at her eyes.
  9. Groak. Meaning: to silently watch someone while they are eating, hoping to be invited.
    • Example:
      • Don’t groak! I’ll buy you a doughnut if you stop staring at me like that.
  10. Crapulous. Meaning: to feel ill after eating or drinking (way) too much.
    • Example:
      • I always feel crapulous on holidays, mostly because my mom’s homemade food is too good.

Compiled and written by @bintilvice for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, 8 January 2016

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#EngQuote: Courage against terrorism

We are going to show the world that we are not afraid!

  1. “Fighting terrorism is like being a goalkeeper. You can make a hundred brilliant saves but the only shot that people remember is the one that gets past you.” – Paul Wilkinson.
  2. “Everybody’s worried about stopping terrorism. Well, there’s a really easy way: stop participating in it.” – Noah Chomsky.
  3. “If we destroy human rights and rule of law in the response to terrorism, they have won.” – Joichi Ito.
  4. “How do you defeat terrorism? Don’t be terrorized. Don’t let fear rule your life, even if you are scared.” – Salman Rushdie.
  5. “What separates us from the animals, what separates us from the chaos, is our ability to mourn people we’ve never met.” – David Levithan.
  6. “The war against terrorism is terrorism.” – Woody Harrelson.
  7. “Terrorism has no nationality or religion.” – Vladimir Putin.
  8. “In a sense, terrorism blossomed in the advent of television. Television promotes terrorism in religion and in politics.” – Marilyn Manson.
  9. “Our values and way of life will prevail – terrorism will not.” – John Linder.

 

Compiled and written by @bintilvice for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, 22 January 2016

 

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#EngKnowledge: Seven honorary knights of British empire

This article will talk about the seven honorary knights of British empire. Sir Ian McKellen, Sir Patrick Stewart, Sir Alex Ferguson are all British so you won’t find their names in this list. Let’s just get to the list now, shall we?

  1. Bill and Melinda Gates. Yes, because of Microsoft and their notable charity work. Bill was knighted as Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of British Empire in 2005.

    bill_melinda_gates
    (Source: CNN Turk)
  2. John Edgar Hoover. The first FBI director. Hoover was knighted as Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of British Empire in 1950.

    john-edgar-hoover
    (Source: memoriambook.com)
  3. Angelina Jolie. Not because of her acting, but because she was involved in preventing sexual violence. Jolie received the title Dame Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of St Michael and St George in 2014.
    angelina-jolie
    (Source: celebsbios.com)

     

  4. Bono from U2. His concern to end hunger in Africa made him anointed as a knight in British Order. Bono was knighted as Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of British Empire in 2007.

    bono
    (Source: Annie Liebovitz)
  5. Steven Spielberg, because he was able to double the cinema admission in UK since 1980s. Spielberg earned the title Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of British Empire in 2001.
    steven-spielberg-04.jpg
    Best Director nominee Steven Spielberg arrives on the red carpet for the 85th Annual Academy Awards on February 24, 2013 in Hollywood, California. AFP PHOTO/FREDERIC J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images) (source:emaze.com)

     

  6. Mother Teresa, because of her charitable and missionary works in India. Mother Teresa was granted a membership of Order of Merits in 1983, an exclusive order that has limited members.

    mother-teresa
    (Source: anguerde.com)
  7. Benito Mussolini attained the title years prior to World War II. Of course, it was annulled several years later. Mussolini was knighted as Knight Grand Cross of the Most Honourable Order of The Bath in 1923 and annulled in 1940.

    benito-mussolini
    (Source: adsa.ro)
  8. Here’s a bonus! The late President Soeharto was also given honorary knighthood in 1974. He earned the title Knight Grand Cross of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath.

    suharto2
    (Source: brainly.co.id)

Compiled and written by @bintilvice for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, February 5, 2016

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#EngVocab: Other ways to say ‘Love’

Valentine’s Day is coming! It is very closely related to love. Unfortunately, sometimes, the word love is banal, overused, and mainstream.

Well, today is special session for those of you who want to profess your love in a different way: I will give you some other ways to say “Love”! Before I start, I want you to know some things about the words I will share to you.

  1. This word is probably the most similar to love because it means “love or respect someone deeply.”
  2. It means “a gentle feeling of fondness or liking.”
  3. An intense but temporary and short-lived feeling for someone.
  4. A love, loyalty, or enthusiasm for something or someone.
  5. Respect and warm approval to someone or something.
  6. This one is for you, poets. It means the state of being under a spell. A love spell, for this occasion.

So instead of using the very overused “I love you,” you could switch to:

  • “I adore you,”
  • “I feel affection for you,”
  • “I’m devoted to you,”
  • “I’m infatuated by you,”
  • “I admire you or,”
  • “I’m enchanted by you.”

Of course, there are so many ways to say I love you to someone. But words mean nothing without actions.

Compiled and written by @bintilvice for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, February 12, 2016

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#WOTD: Woebegone

Although my day went great, my friend’s wasn’t so much since he looked woebegone. I asked, of course, as a good friend. He said he was fine, but that sad look hinted that he wasn’t telling the truth.

From the illustration above, you should have guessed which word we will discuss in this session.

Woebegone is an adjective. It means strongly affected by woe or exhibiting a great sorrow. It could also mean being in a sorry state.

Woebegone originated in the 13th century, derived from a phrase “me is wo begon woe has beset me.” There are some synonyms of ‘woebegone,’ namely:

  • suffering,
  • troubled,
  • forlorn, and
  • gloomy.

Let’s see how we use it in sentences, shall we?

  • “He looked woebegone (sad looking) after his date left him for another man.”
  • “Wow, you look woebegone (being in a sorry state)! Get some shower or I’ll have you kicked out of your room!” I said.

Compiled and written by @bintilvice for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, 19 February 2016

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#IOTW: Idioms in Taylor Swift’s songs (2)

Idioms are important and very useful to give variation in conversation. They help you sound like native speakers and are useful to enrich your vocabulary.

So, what is an idiom? Idiom or idiomatic expression is a group of words in a fixed order that have a particular meaning that is different from their literal meanings. So, it won’t make sense if you change the words because they are fixed expressions. For example if you say ‘the math test was a piece of macaroon’ instead of ‘the math test was a piece of cake,’ you’ll just confuse the hearer.

In this instance, we are going to talk about idioms found in Taylor Swift’s songs. We have previously shared some here: #IOTW: Idioms in Taylor Swift’s songs.

Here are some more idioms from Taylor Swift’s songs:

1. In your wildest dream. If you say something will happen ‘in your wildest dreams’, it means: it isn’t likely to happen or you think it is impossible to happen.

“Staring at the sunset, babe. Red lips and rosy cheeks. Say you’ll see me again. Even if it’s just in your wildest dream.”

– Wildest Dreams

Example:

  • I want Taylor Swift to come to my graduation day and sing for me, but I think it probably won’t happen, even in my wildest dreams.

2. Last straw. Meaning: the final thing; the thing or action that is too much and goes too far

“You don’t have to call anymore, I won’t pick up the phone, This is the last straw, Don’t wanna hurt anymore.”

– You’re Not Sorry

Example:

  • My boyfriend told me he would be late for dinner, but the last straw was seeing with a girl. I told him our relationship was over.

3. Sweep (someone) off (someone’s) feet. This expression describes a feeling when you fall in love instantly with someone.

“I’m not a princess, This ain’t a fairy tale, I’m not the one you’ll sweep off her feet, Lead her up the stairwell”

– White Horse

Example:

  • She hopes a gorgeous man will sweep her off her feet on Valentine’s Day.

4. To know something like the back of your hand. This expression is used when talking about things/places/persons you know really well.

“And we know it’s never simple. Never easy. Never a clean break. No one here to save me. You’re the only thing I know like the back of my hand”

– Breathe

Example:

  • Don knows Sherlock Holmes TV series like the back of his hand. He has watched them many times.

5.Touch and go. It means precarious or uncertain; with a risk of not succeeding.

“I’m walking past through the traffic lights. Busy streets and busy lives. And all we know. Is touch and go.”

– State Of Grace

Example:

  • It’s touch and go if I will ever go out.It’s still raining cats and dogs.

6. To take someone/ something for granted. It means to expect someone or something will be always available to serve you without thanks or recognition.

“You’re the kind of man who makes me sad, While she waits up,You chase down the newest thing, And take for granted what you have”

– Girl At Home

Example:

  • He left you because you took him for granted all this time.

7. To wear your heart on your sleeve. It means that you show your feelings obviously.

“Got the radio on, my old blue jeans. And I’m wearing my heart on my sleeve. Feeling lucky today, got the sunshine. Could you tell me what more do I need.”

– A Place In This World

Example:

  • I wear my heart on my sleeve. I can’t hide my feelings when I’m feeling down.

8. An open book. If someone is an open book, s/he is fairly predictable. You know what s/he is thinking or feeling.

“But here I am an open book. Turn the page it’s all the rage. Get a look on the inside. Oh what you get is what you see.”

– The Diary Of Me

Example:

  • Harry is an open book. You’ll know right away if he’s sad.

9. Safe and sound. If you are safe and sound, it means you are unharmed and healthy.

“You’ll be alright. No one can hurt you now. Come morning light. You and I’ll be safe and sound.”

– Safe And Sound

Example:

  • It was a rough trip, but we arrived safe and sound.

There are more idioms in Taylor Swift’s songs. Leave us a comment below if you find more idioms in her songs.

 

Compiled and written by @kusumawicitraa for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, January 27, 2017

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#EngClass: Modal verb – Must

To continue our discussion on modal verb, this time, we’ll talk about “must”. “Must” is commonly used to express:

  • personal obligation,
  • necessity,
  • strong recommendation,
  • certainty.

Instead of “must”, native speakers from America usually prefer the more flexible form “have to”.

 

When to use “must”?

People generally use “must” to express personal obligation, something that the speaker thinks is necessary. Other than that, “must” is also used for the following purposes:

slide7

  1. To express obligation or duty.
    • Example:
      • You must wear a seat belt at all times.
  2. To emphasize the necessity of something.
    • Example:
      • You must give up smoking. It’s bad for you.
  3. To say that you’re sure that something is true.
    • Example:
      • It must be cold outside. It’s raining hard.
  4. To express positive logical assumptions.
    • Example:
      • She must have been at home. Her lights were on.
  5. To make a strong recommendation.
    • Example:
      • The ice cream here is delicious. You must try some.

 

How to use “must”?

slide8

  • Like every other modal verbs, “must” is followed by a main verb.
  • And to form a negative sentence, “not” is placed after the word “must”, before the main verb. It expresses prohibition.
  • “Must” is generally not used in interrogative sentences. For questions, it is more common to use “have to”.

 

  1. “Must” in expressing obligation or duty.
    • Example:
      • You must wear a seat belt at all times.
      • She must cook dinner every evening.
  2. “Must” in emphasizing the necessity of something.
    • Example:
      • You must give up smoking. It’s bad for you.
      • You must study the last two chapters before the test.
  3. “Must” in saying that you’re sure that something is true.
    • Example:
      • It must be cold outside. It’s raining hard.
      • She must be home. The lights are on.
  4. “Must” in expressing positive logical assumptions.
    • Example:
      • She must have been at home. Her lights were on.
      • There’s a missed call on my phone. He must have called last night.
  5. “Must” in making a strong recommendation.
    • Example:
      • The ice cream here is delicious. You must try some.
      • We really must get together for dinner sometime.

 

Present certainty and deduction

“Must” can also be used when you’re certain that something is true, based on evidence. In order to express present certainty, “must” is followed by “be” and a noun or an adjective.

S + must be + noun/adjective/v-ing/prepositional phrase.

Example:

  • She must be a teacher. She’s so wise. (noun: a teacher)
  • She must be cold. She’s shivering. (adjective: cold)
  • She must be singing. I can hear her voice. (present participle: singing)
  • She must be at her friend’s. Nobody is answering the door. (prepositional phrase: at her friend’s)

 

Logical assumptions and past certainty

“Must” is also used in expressing logical assumptions. To express logical assumptions, “must” is followed by “have” and “past participle”.

S + must have + V3

Example:

  • This must have been the book she was talking about. There is no other book with a red cover.
  • She must have won the lottery. She suddenly got a brand new car.

 

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, January 25, 2017


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#EngTalk: Your learning method

Today I want to open a small talk session about learning English. I used to hate English. Why? Because it’s complicated. It has too many grammars, difficult pronounce, and it stressed me out. But then I saw my friends who were expert in English. They looked really cool because they can communicate with foreigners. I want to be like them who are able to be friends with people from another country.

Since that day, I realized that I should not be enslaved by my negative thoughts towards English. If I want to be excellent like them, I should change the way I think about English. I should start to love it in order to enjoy learning English. And in my case, I also modified the way I studied.

You might have read our article in Kumparan about improving English vocabulary and reading skill (https://kumparan.com/english-tips-for-you/tips-menambah-vocabulary-dan-kemampuan-membaca-dalam-bahasa-inggris). I have a similar method to improve my English skill. Do you have your own method? How do you learn English?

I love reading and I started to read English books more often. It was hard for me at first because there were a lot of words which I have never seen before. It was troublesome because whenever I caught unfamiliar words, I would open my dictionary.

“I started reading news articles…” – @patibenitez7

“I use game on my phone to improve my English skill.” – @Ursula_Meta

“Exactly, I learn english by reading fanfiction, watching movies, dramas, interviews, variety shows, ryan higa’s vids.” – @iyegati

People always say that the beginning is always the hardest. The more I read, the more vocabularies I picked up and I started to open the dictionary less frequently. I also started to write my daily journal in English. It successfully ‘forced’ me to memorize the meaning of vocabularies and how to use them in sentences.

Lastly, I also varied my reading genre. I started to read news articles to get to know more scientific vocabularies. You can also read any genre according to you interest. Language is a habit. You also can’t understand it while you are under pressure . To improve, you have to study and implement what you picked up in your daily life activities.

 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4U on Tuesday, January 24, 2017

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#IOTW: Idioms to express tiredness

Here are some idioms to express tiredness. Shall I start now or just get some sleep a little more? LOL, just kidding. Check these out, fellas!

1. Dead tired. Meaning: Totally exhausted or fatigued.

Example:

  • I was dead tired after running my first 5000 marathon.

2. Dead on one’s feet. Meaning: to be extremely tired.

Example:

  • My sister was doing her room all day and was dead on her feet.

3. Dog-tired. Meaning: to be extremely tired.

Example:

  • He usually got home around midnight, dog-tired after a long day at work.

4. Ready to drop. Meaning: to be so tired and nearly too exhausted to stay standing.

Example:

  • I’ve been shopping all day with Mom. I’m ready to drop!

5. Out like a light. Meaning: to be so tired that you fall asleep very quickly.

Example:

  • As soon as his head touched the pillow, he was out like a light.

Trivia:
@fikaa328: In Korean language, you can say gae phigon, which means dog-tired too.

 

Compiled and written by @AnienditaR for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, November 12, 2016

 

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#WOTD: Cloudburst

Have you ever heard of ‘Cloudburst’? Do you know what the word means? Here are some fellas’ guesses about the word.

Awan badai –

Cloud means awan, and burst means ledakan. So cloudburst means awan puting beliung? – 
Yes, all the answers above are correct.
According to Merriam-Webster, ‘cloudburst’ is a noun which means a sudden and very heavy downpour.
The word ‘cloudburst’ was first used in the early 1800s. It may be the translation of a German noun, Wolkenbruch. Here are some synonyms of it: deluge, downpour, storm, and torrent.
Here are some examples of cloudburst in a sentence:
  1. “The weatherman warned of possible cloudbursts in the afternoon.”
  2. “On September 6, 2014, there was a cloudburst in Kashmir valley killing more than 200 people.”
Here are some other examples from our fellas:
  1. “The cloudburst on Korea two weeks ago was very terrifying.” – 
  2. “I am not able to go somewhere due to cloudburst comes at the moment.” – 
Source: dictionary.com; Merriam-webster.com
Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, November 20, 2016

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#EngClass: Modal verb – May

In this particular session/post, we’ll talk about “may”. It is one of many modal verbs which modify main verbs. Modal verbs are often used to express an opinion or attitude about a possible fact or to control a possible action.

Modal verbs either show:

  • a decision on how certain something is (a speculation or prediction about a fact, talk about degrees of certainty, possibility, likelihood)
  • the desire to control an action (give or refuse permission, talk about obligation and necessity)

When to use “may”?

“May” is most commonly used to express possibility. Other than that, “may” is also used for the following purposes:

slide9

  1. To express future possibility.
    • Example:
      • She is very smart. I think she may get the scholarship.
  2. To give permission.
    • Example:
      • You may go out now that your homework is done.(Present)
      • You may go out after your homework is done. (Future)
  3. To ask for permission.
    • Example:
      • May I stay overnight?
  4. To talk about typical occurrences.
    • Example:
      • You may find it difficult if you drink coffee in the evening.
  5. To speculate about past actions. 
    • Example:
      • She is late. I think she may have overslept.
  6. To express wishes.
    • Example:
      • May all your wishes come true.

How to use “may”?

slide10

  • In an interrogative sentence, “may” is placed up front and followed by subject and verb.
  • To form a negative sentence, “not” is placed after the word “may”.
  • In a sentence, “may” is placed after subject and before verb.
  1. To express future possibility.
    • Example:
      •  (+) She is very smart. I think she may get the scholarship.
      • (-) I think she may not get the scholarship.
  2. To give permission.
    • Example:
      • (+) You may go out now that your homework is done.(Present)
      • (-) You may not go out. Your homework is not done.
    • Example:
      • (+) You may go out after your homework is done. (Future)
      • (-) You may not go out even after your homework is done.
  3. To ask for permission.
    • Example:
      • (?) May I stay overnight?
  4. To talk about typical occurrences.
    • Example:
      • (+) You may find it difficult to sleep if you drink coffee in the evening.
      • (-) You may not find it difficult to sleep if you drink milk.
  5. To speculate about past actions.
    • Example:
      • (+) She is late. I think she may have overslept.
      • (-) She arrived looking tired. I think she may not have overslept.

Speculating past action

slide17

“May” can also be used to form a past tense sentence to express past possibility.

  • To express past possibility, “may” is followed by “have” and past participle (verb3).
    • Example:
      • She may have been waiting in the rain. She was feverish.
  • To form a negative sentence when talking about past possibility, “not” is placed right after “may”.
    • Example:
      • She may not have been waiting in the rain. Her clothes were dry.

Giving permission in the past

slide20

To express giving permission in the past, we do not use “may”. Instead, we use “be allowed to“. Both are synonymous, except “be allowed to” can be used to give permission in the present, past and future.

  • When we talk about giving permission in the past, “be allowed to” is positioned after subject and followed by an infinitive verb. And since we’re talking a past event, we use “was” or “were”.
    • Example:
      • He was allowed to go on a holiday.
  • To form a negative sentence when talking about giving permission in the past, “not” is slipped in right after “was/were”.
    • Example:
      • He was not allowed to go on a holiday.
  • To form an interrogative sentence when talking about giving permission in the past, “was/were” is placed up front followed by the subject, “allowed to” and the infinitive verb.
    • Example:
      • Was he allowed to go on a holiday?

Feel free to ask if you have any question in relation to “may”. Simply drop a comment down below or contact us on Twitter.

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, January 18, 2017


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#EngTrivia: Restrictive and Non-restrictive clause

In this article, we will talk about restrictive and non-restrictive clause; also known as defining and non-defining clause. What exactly are they?

They are types of relative clause which define a noun. They usually contain relative pronouns such as who, which, that, where, and when. For examples:

  1. “The cake which I bought from Breadtalk was delicious.”
  2. “This is the dress which I wore last week.”
  3. “I will go to the beach with Rina, who was my school mate, this weekend.”

From the examples, I would say sentences number 1 and 2 contain restrictive clauses while sentence number 3 contains a non-restrictive clause . Why?

Let’s start from number 1. What if ‘which I bought from Breadtalk’ is removed from the sentence? It will be ‘The cake was delicious.’ Then try to remove ‘which I wore last week,’ the sentence will turn to ‘This is the dress.’ The meaning of the sentence changed, didn’t it?

which I bought from Breadtalk’ and ‘which I wore last week’ are restrictive clauses because they add an important information. They explain and define the cake and the clothes we talk about. That is why it is also called defining clause.

How about sentence number 3? Read the sentence and avoid ‘who was my school mate.’ It will be ‘I will go to the beach with Rina this weekend.’

The sentence still have the same meaning because the clause we removed is just an additional explanation of the object, Rina. And that is why ‘who was my school mate’ is called non-restrictive clause.

Practice

Now I will give you some samples and you should determine it whether the sentences below contain restrictive or non-restrictive clause.

  1. My eldest son, who is 27, is studying in Australia.
  2. Her aunt who lives in Sulawesi visited her last week.
  3. I found your book on the bench which is in the park you visited yesterday.
  4. He wrote the review of Up, the movie which I have just watched, and posted it in his blog.

Answer

  1. It contains non-restrictive clause: who is 27
  2. It contains restrictive clause: who lives in Sulawesi
  3. It contains restrictive clause: where in the park you visited yesterday
  4. It contains non-restrictive clause: the movie which I have just watched

In a simpler way, non-restrictive clauses are always separated by commas while restrictive clauses are not.

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4U on Tuesday, January 17, 2017

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