Tag Archives: English

#UKSlang: UK slang (10)

Whilst preparing for a session to be delivered on Twitter, I found some slangs that are quite hilarious. I hope you find them fun, like I do. This time, we’ll talk about some slangs that are mostly used in the UK. Like all slangs, they’re suitable only in casual conversation.

Enough with the speech. Let’s start, shall we?

  1. A bunch of fives. Meaning: a punch in the face.
    • Example:
      • “I’ll give you a bunch of fives.”
      • Meaning: “I’m going to punch you in the face.”
  2. Pants. Meaning: not very good, not great.
    • Example:
      • “That’s pants.”
      • Meaning: “That’s not very good.”
  3. Nineteen to the dozen. Meaning: very fast, at a speedy rate at high speed.
    • Example:
      • “She was talking nineteen to the dozen.”
      • Meaning: “She was talking very fast.”
  4. Pear-shaped. Meaning: wrong result, deviate from expectation.
    • Example:
      • “It’s all gone pear-shaped.”
      • Meaning: “It’s all gone wrong.”
  5. A slice short of a loaf. Meaning: not very clever.
    • Example:
      • “That pretty girl is a slice short of a loaf.”
      • Meaning: “That pretty girl is not very clever.”
  6. As bright as a button. Meaning: clever.
    • Example:
      • “She’s as bright as a button.”
      • Meaning: “She’s clever.”
  7. Spend a penny. Meaning: visit the bathroom.
    • Example:
      • “Excuse me. I need to spend a penny.”
      • Meaning: “Excuse me. I need to visit the bathroom.”
  8. Parky. Meaning: cold.
    • Example:
      • “It’s parky outside.”
      • Meaning: “It’s cold outside.”
  9. Curtain twitcher. Meaning: a nosy neighbor.
    • Example:
      • “You’re such a curtain twitcher.”
      • Meaning: “You’re such a nosy neighbor.”
  10. Fluff. Meaning: fart.
    • Example:
      • “Did you just fluff?”
      • Meaning: “Did you just fart?”

That’s all for now, fellas! So, which one do you like best?

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, April 29, 2017

 

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#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘very’ (2)

How often do you use the word ‘very’? How many times have you used it today alone?

To intensify or emphasis on an adjective, we often use the word ‘very‘ in front of the adjective. For example:

  • very good,
  • very bad,
  • very funny,
  • very slow,
  • etc.

However, do you know that there are some words to substitutes ‘very’? We’ll share a few this evening. Check them out!

  1. Very afraid – terrified.
    • Example:
      • I have no idea why anyone would be terrified of snakes. They’re so cuddly.
      • I have no idea why anyone would be very afraid of snakes. They’re so cuddly.
  2. Very boring – dull.
    • Example:
      • My life’s dull without you.
      • My life’s very boring without you.
  3. Very clear – obvious.
    • Example:
      • She made it obvious that she won’t be staying.
      • She made it very clear that she won’t be staying.
  4. Very dear – cherished.
    • Example:
      • A cherished friend of mine is getting married this Sunday.
      • A very dear friend of mine is getting married this Sunday.
  5. Very eager – keen.
    • Example:
      • The kids were keen to go swimming.
      • The kids were very eager to go swimming.
  6. Very frightening – terrifying.
    • Example:
      • There was a terrifying accident at the airport toll just last week.
      • There was a very frightening accident at the airport toll just last week.
  7. Very hungry – starving.
    • Example:
      • I never have time for dinner and always come home starving.
      • I never have time for dinner and always come home (feeling) very hungry.
  8. Very mean – cruel.
    • Example:
      • Even a lioness would never be cruel to her cubs.
      • Even a lioness would never be very mean to her cubs.
  9. Very old – ancient.
    • Example:
      • The book looked ancient, so he handled it carefully.
      • The book looked very old, so he handled it carefully.
  10. Very short – brief.
    • Example:
      • It’s getting late. Let’s keep the meeting brief.
      • It’s getting late. Let’s keep the meeting very short.

There go all 10 substitutes of ‘very’ for now, fellas! I hope the examples are clear enough. Otherwise, mention us to ask.

There are many more to come and I promise to share more in future sessions and articles. Meanwhile, also check out the first installment: #EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘very’

 

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, April 22, 2017

 

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#EngVocab: Phrasal verbs with ‘get’

Phrasal verb is a combination of verb and preposition or adverb or both. The combination usually gives a different meaning from the original verb. Do you know any phrasal verb with the word  ‘get’?

  1. Get up. Meaning: to get out of bed.
    • Example:
      • “I get up at 06.00 am in the morning.”
  2. Get through. Meaning: to succeed in finishing a task, or to manage to talk to someone on the phone.
    • Example:
      • “All these trials will get you through life.”
  3. Get over. Meaning: to overcome a problem, to recover from an illness.
    • Example:
      • “Don’t be sad, you will get over it.”
  4. Get out/get off. Meaning:  to leave.
    • Example:
      • “It’s dangerous, get out of there!”
  5. Get across. Meaning: to cause to be understood.
    • Example:
      • “The idea will get across on mind after the presentation.”
  6. Get along. Meaning: to have a friendly relationship.
    • Example:
      • “My cousin gets along well with his classmates.”
  7. Get away. Meaning: to leave or escape from a person or place.
    • Example:
      • “I need to get away from everything and everyone.”
  8. Get on with. Meaning: to start doing or continue doing activity.
    • Example:
      • “Let’s get on with the party!”
  9. Get in. Meaning: to go inside, to arrive.
    • Example:
      • “Hurry up, get in the car!”
  10. Get down (to). Meaning: to get serious.
    • Example:
      • “If you get down to something, you have to give full concentration.”
  11. Get by. Meaning: to manage to survive.
    • Example:
      • “I finally got by the problem after struggling for a while.”
  12. Get back. Meaning: to return from a place.
    • Example:
      • “I got back from Paris yesterday.”

 

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 16, 2017

 

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#EngQuote: Cristiano Ronaldo

Hi, fellas! How was your day? I’m so excited because I’m going to talk a little about one of my favorite football players. Can you guess who he is? A few hints will help, I believe.

He is a Portuguese. He signed to MU in 2003 and played for the club until 2009. Now he plays for Real Madrid. He has won the Ballon d’Or four times.

Got the name?

Yes, he is Cristiano Ronaldo dos Santos Aveiro, also well-known as CR7. He is an inspiration. He loves to win not only on the pitch but also in every aspect of his life.  He proves that he is a true winner even though he said that he doesn’t need to prove anything to anyone. And his success is evident.

These are some beautiful quotes from Cristiano Ronaldo, a professional footballer who rises from zero to hero.

CR7 QUOTE ABOUT HIS FATHER AND DREAMS
Lived in poor financial condition, his father said that dreams are only for the rich. This is quote particularly talks about his father and his dream. 
LIVE HIS DREAMS
Live your dreams.
TAKE AND GIVE
Take and give. He is well-known for his philanthropy. He donated money to rebuild Aceh after tsunami in 2004 and donated €15 Million to Palestinian children in Gaza.
KEEP IMPROVING
Keep on improving.

KEEP IMPROVINGG

 

MENTAL STRENGTH
Mental strength. Rivals can’t provoke him on and off pitch.
WHAT DOESN'T KILL YOU MAKES YOUR STRONGER
What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.

WHAT DOESN'T KILL YOU MAKES YOUR STRONGER2

KEEP TRYING
Keep on trying, but know your limit.
NEVER STOP LEARNING
Never stop learning.
TALENT
Talent minus hard work equals nothing.
TO REST
And don’t forget to rest.

 

Those are 10 beautiful quotes that reflect @Cristiano‘s life and his success. I hope you find them inspiring.

 

Compiled and written by @kusumawicitra for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, April 14, 2017

 

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#EngTrivia: Telling time (2)

How was your day? Did you use your time wisely? In this particular article, we’ll talk about time… or rather, the different ways to tell the time.

Slide1

So, how do you usually tell the time? What time is this clock showing? There is more than one way to tell the time. Let’s look into it in more detail. Ready?

1. ‘a.m.’ & ‘p.m.’

‘a.m.’ and ‘p.m.’ are used in the 12 hours clock system. They are more often used in writing.

  • ‘a.m.’ stands for ante meridiem, before noon. It indicates the time period from midnight to midday.
    slide3
  • ‘p.m.’ stands for post meridiem, after noon. It indicates the time period from midday to midnight. Slide4

2. ‘to’ and ‘past’

The most common way to tell the time is to use ‘to’ and ‘past.’ This method is acceptable in verbal and written communication.

  • ‘to’ is used to show the number of minutes towards a particular hour.
    • Example:
      • If it is going to be 8 o’clock in 15 minutes, we say “It’s fifteen to eight.” Slide6
  • ‘past’ is used to show the number of minutes after a particular hour.
    • Example:
      • If the time is 15 minutes after 8 o’clock, we say “It’s fifteen past eight.” Slide7

3. Hour and minute

Another way to tell the time would be by simply saying the hour and minutes. Example:

  • If the clock shows 8:05 p.m. You can simply say, “It’s eight zero five” or “It’s eight oh five.”Slide9

With this method, you don’t need to worry whether it’s morning, afternoon, evening or night. However, do keep in mind to only use this in casual conversation. You are highly discouraged to use this method in writing, especially in formal writing.

4. ’till’ and ‘after’

Especially in American English, some people use ’till’ (until) instead of ‘to,’ and ‘after’ instead of ‘past.’

  • ’till’ is used to show the number of minutes towards a particular hour.
    • Example:
      • If it is going to be 9 o’clock in 25 minutes, we say “It’s twenty-five till nine.”Slide11
  • ‘after’ is used to show the number of minutes after a particular hour.
    • Example:
      • If the time is 15 minutes after 9 o’clock, we say “It’s fifteen after nine.”Slide12

As mentioned above, ’till’ and ‘after’ are only used in American English. And even so, they’re only used in speech; not in writing.

And that’s a wrap, fellas! I hope the explanation was clear enough. However, if you do have any question, feel free to leave a comment in the comment box.

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, April 13, 2017

 

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#EngTrivia: ‘On one’s mind’ vs. ‘in one’s mind’

What do you have in mind, fellas? You’ve been on my mind lately and I hope you all are doing well. There are two different phrases in the previous sentence. Can you spot the difference? Yup! It’s ‘on one’s mind’ and ‘in one’s mind.’

On one’s mind

This phrase indicates worry or preoccupation. It may imply: thinking a lot.

Example:

  • “You’ve been on my mind lately.”
    • Meaning: I’ve been thinking about you.
  • “You look worried. What’s on your mind?
    • Meaning: What is bothering you?

In one’s mind

This phrase is used to mean: in your imagination.

  • Example:
    • A: Dad! I just saw an UFO passing by on the sky.
    • B: Oh, boy. It’s just in your mind.

The meaning of ‘in your imagination’ doesn’t apply in all cases. ‘In one’s mind’ can be used to convey our thoughts.

  • Example:
    • In my mind, Civil War is better than Age of Ultron.”

In mind

There is another phrase: ‘in mind.’

We can use ‘in mind’ when asking for someone’s opinion or what they’re thinking of doing.

  • Example:
    • A: Want to go out and watching movie?
    • B: Sure. Do you have anything in mind?
    • A: Let’s watch Split.

Now, let’s take a look at this following sentence:

  • Example:
    • “Bear in mind that I don’t eat meat because I’m a vegetarian.”

In the previous sentence, ‘in mind’ or precisely ‘bear in mind’ means: to remember an information.

Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, April 12, 2017

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#EngClass: Participial adjective – Comparative and superlative

Hello hey ho, fellas! Still following our previous discussion on ‘participial adjective’, we will talk about stating degrees of comparison.

Degrees of comparison are used when we compare one thing/person with another. There are three degrees of comparison:

  • positive,
  • comparative, and
  • superlative.

Comparative degree of comparison

Let’s start with the comparative degree. The comparative degree is used to compare
two persons or things having the same quality.

To form the comparative degree of adjectives, we usually add -er to adjective with two or less syllables. Example:

  • Taller
  • Lighter
  • Nicer

However, when forming the comparative degree of participial adjectives, we use the
word ‘more.’ Example:

Participial adjective

Comparative

Boring

More boring

Bored

More bored

Tiring

More tiring

Tired

More tired

Alarming

More alarming

Alarmed

More alarmed

 

More example:

Participial adjective

WRONG

Comparative

Relaxing

relaxinger

more relaxing

Relaxed

relaxeder

more relaxed

Interesting

interestinger

more interesting

Interested

interesteder

more interested

Confusing

confusinger

more confusing

Confused

confuseder

more confused

Superlative degree of comparison

Moving on to the superlative degree of adjective. Superlative degree denotes the existence of the highest degree of the quality. The superlative degree of adjective is used to single out one person or thing from all the rest.

To form the superlative degree of adjectives, we usually add ‘-est’ to adjective with
two or less syllables. Example:

  • Tallest
  • Lightest
  • Nicest

However, when forming the superlative degree of participial adjectives, we use the
word ‘most.
Example:

Participial adjective

Superlative

Boring

Most boring

Bored

Most bored

Tiring

Most tiring

Tired

Most tired

Alarming

Most alarming

Alarmed

Most alarmed

More example:

Participial adjective

WRONG

Comparative

Relaxing

relaxingest

Most relaxing

Relaxed

relaxedest

Most relaxed

Interesting

interestingest

Most interesting

Interested

interestedest

Most interested

Confusing

confusingest

Most confusing

Confused

confusedest

Most confused

 

That’s a wrap, fellas! I hope the explanation was clear enough. However, if you have any question on the topic, feel free to leave a message in the comment box.

 

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, April 8, 2017

 

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#IOTW: Idioms with ‘books’

“How could I be such an open book to him when, half the time, I had no idea what was milling around in his head?” -Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner

Hi, fellas! Do you know what it means to be an open book? Open book is surely one of those idioms with word ‘book.’ It means sb or sth that is easily understood.

Just so you know, we have covered many idioms: from parts of the body, name of places, Ancient Times, and many more.

Today, we’re going to share idioms with word ‘book.’ Here are 7 idioms with word ‘book.’

  • hit the books (mainly US and Australian informal): to study
    Ann isn’t coming. She’s got to hit the books.
  • throw the book at somebody: to severely punish someone 

    My lecturer said that she would throw the book at me if I kept procrastinating over my assignments.

  • crack a book: to open up one’s books, especially in order to study 

     

    You had better crack the books if you want to pass the exams.

  • read sb. like a book: understand someone’s thoughts and motives easily 

    You don’t like this gift, right? I can read you like a book.

  • blot one’s copybook: to damage one’s own reputation through bad behavior 

    She really blotted her copybook by coming late to the meeting.

  •  

    turn-up for the book(s): a surprising or unexpected event 

    So among all candidates, I am the one getting the job. That’s a turn-up for the books.

  • sing from the same hymnbook: to make the same or similar statements, especially to express the same opinions in public asa result of a prior agreement. 

    Before we release any statements, make sure that everyone from the campaign sings from the same hymnbook.  #IOTW

 

Compiled and written by @nkusumawicitra for @Englishtips4u on Friday, April 7, 2017

 

 

 

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#IOTW: Idioms in Taylor Swift’s songs (2)

#IOTW: Idioms on human body

#IOTW: 5 Idioms from Ancient Times

#EngQuiz: Participial adjective

In short, participial adjectives are present and past participles which are used as adjectives. Present and past participles adjectives are used in slightly different ways. One talks about something that causes of the feeling , and the other talks about how someone feels.

Find a recap on that session here: #EngClass: Participial adjective (3)

Moving on, this time around, we’re having a quiz on present and past participle adjectives. Let’s start, shall we?

1. He was (terpesona) to hear his little son singing in the bath.
amuzed
amusing
amuse
amused
Correct! ‘Amused’ means ‘terpesona.’ Therefore, “He was amused.” means “Dia merasa terpesona.”
2. I find these instructions very (membingungkan)! Could you come and help me?
Confusing Correct! ‘Confusing’ means ‘membuat bingung.’ Therefore, “It is confusing.” means “Ini membingungkan.”[/explanation][/answer]
Confused
Confuse
Confuzed
3. I was feeling (tertekan), so I stayed at home with hot chocolate and a good book.
(Pic)
Depressed
Correct! ‘Depressed’ means ‘merasa tertekan.’ Therefore, “I am feeling depressed.” means “Saya merasa tertekan.”
Depressing
Impressed
Impression
4. That is the most (memalukan) photo! I look terrible!
embarrassing
Correct! ‘Embarassing’ means ‘membuat malu.’ Therefore, ’embarassing photo.’ means ‘foto yang membuat malu.’
embarrassed
embarassment
embarassingly
5. Julie was so (kelelahan) after her exams, she spent the next three days sleeping.
exhausted
Correct! ‘Exhausted’ means ‘merasa lelah.’
Therefore, “I was exhausted.” means “Saya kelelahan (merasa lelah).”
exhausting
exhaust
exhaustion
6. I tried all morning to send an email, but it wouldn’t work. I was so (frustrasi)!
frustrated
Correct! ‘Frustrated’ means ‘merasa frustrasi.’ Therefore, “I was frustrated.” means “Saya merasa frustrasi.”
frustrating
frustrate
frustration
7. A nice hot bath is so (melegakan) after a long day.
Relaxing
Correct! ‘Relaxing’ means ‘membuat lega.’ Therefore, “It is relaxing.” means “Itu melegakan (membuat lega).”
Relaxation
Relaxes
Relaxed
8. I’m very (puas) that I managed to order the meal in French.
Satisfied
Correct! ‘Satisfied’ means ‘merasa puas.’ Therefore, “I am satisfied.” means “Saya (merasa) puas.”
Satisfication
Satisfying
Satisfy
9. It’s (mengejutkan) how many people don’t want to travel to another country.
Surprising
Correct! ‘Surprising’ means ‘mengejutkan.’ Therefore, “It is surprising.” means “Itu mengejutkan (membuat terkejut).”
Surprises
Surprised
Surprise
10. My job is really (melelahkan). I don’t get home until 10pm sometimes.
Tiring
Correct! ‘Tiring’ means ‘melelahkan, membuat lelah.’ Therefore “It is tiring.” means “Itu melelahkan (membuat lelah).”
Tires
Tire
Tired

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, April 1, 2017

 

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#EngTrivia: ‘Be careful’ vs. ‘take care’

Hi, fellas, I’m sure you are familiar with these phrases: ‘be careful’ and ‘take care.’ Generally, both phrases mean to pay attention to something or a condition.

If we check in the dictionary, ‘be careful’ means telling someone to pay attention in order to avoid dangers. Normally, we use this phrase to give a warning to somebody.

Example:

  • “It is raining, be careful while driving.”
  • “Be careful, you might fall from the tree.”

There are some phrases which share the same meaning to ‘be careful,’ i.e. ‘be alert,’ ‘beware,’ and ‘be on guard.’

Meanwhile, ‘take care’ is generally used to tell someone to treat someone/something carefully.

Example:

  • “Please take care of this document.”
  • “Please take care of my child while I’m shopping.”

Sometimes, we can say either ‘be careful’ or ‘take care’ when parting with someone after a meeting. They are used to wish someone her/his safety during the trip.

Take care’ is more common in use when parting with somebody. Meanwhile ‘be careful’ is usually used when we realize that the trip might come with negative consequence to somebody.

Other than ‘take care,’ ‘so long’ may be opted to somebody who will be away for a long time.

Source:

 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Tuesday, April 6, 2017

 

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#EngTrivia: Ellipsis (linguistics) & ellipsis (dot-dot-dot)

Err … what is it called again? It’s a … an ellipsis.

 

Ellipsis (  )

The three dots ( … ) is known as ellipsis. It is used to quote materials and to indicate hesitation or a pause in writer’s thought.

When used to quote materials, ellipsis is to show you’ve omitted words from the original sentence, but do not change the meanings.

Police said that two people had been killed by rebels … .

(The Nation, Bangkok, Wednesday 4 December 1991)

 

When used to indicate a pause:

“Dear boy you’re so tall … look behind and see if there’s anything coming…”

F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

 

Ellipsis (linguistics)

Ann: Would you like a cup of tea?

Dan: Yes, I would.

Omitting part of sentences and referring to the earlier sentence/ context to make the meaning clear is also called ellipsis. We do not need to provide substitute words or phrases which have already been said. In the previous dialogue, instead of saying, “Yes, I would like a cup of tea.” we can just say “Yes, I would.” We omit some words because “Yes, I would.” will be understood.

According to Nunan (1993), as cohesive devices there are three types of ellipsis: nominal, verbal, and clausal. Following are examples of each type. The material that has been omitted is indicated with (0).

  • Nominal ellipsis:

    Don and Dan like football. Both (0) are great football players.

  • Verbal ellipsis

    A: Are you a student?

    B: Yes, I am (0).

  • Clausal ellipsis

    A: Why don’t you bring a camera? Dan said that we are going to shoot a film, didn’t he?

    B: Did he? He didn’t tell me(0).

 

Many experts, however, agree that there are nine types of ellipsis: gapping, stripping, VP- ellipsis, pseudogapping, answer fragments, sluicing, N-ellipsis, comparative deletion, and null complement.

Yes … it is quite confusing when it comes to linguistics. But if you need further explanation about the ellipsis (linguistics), you can find out in any books with words ‘discourse analysis.’

I hope this #EngTrivia will develop your background knowledge that is available when you later will be studying linguistics in university.

 

Reference: Nunan, D. 1993. Introducing Discourse Analysis. London: Penguin Books Ltd.

 

Compiled and written by @kusumawicitraa for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, March 31, 2017

 

 

RELATED POST(S):

#EngTrivia: Nym words 

#EngTrivia: ‘That’ vs. ‘Which’ 

#EngTrivia: How to use ‘Albeit’? 

#EngTrivia: See, look, watch 

#EngTrivia: Adjectival Phrase

#EngClass: Participial adjective (3)

One of our followers asked the question above on Twitter. Do you have a similar question? Do you get confused as to when you should use present or past participle adjective? Kalau kamu masih tulis/bilang: “I’m interesting” saat mau menyatakan “Saya tertarik,” yuk baca lagi artikel ini sampai selesai.

Participle adjectives are verbs, often ends in -ing and -ed, which are used as adjectives.  There are two types of participles: present participles (v-ing) and past participles (v2). Example:

Present participle

Past participle

Boring

Bored

Relaxing

Relaxed

Tiring

Tired

Confusing

Confused

Exciting

Excited

We use present particular adjectives (v-ing) to talk about person, thing, or situation which caused the feeling. Example:

  • “I am boring.”
    • “Aku membosankan, aku menimbulkan rasa bosan.”
  • “They are confusing.”
    • “Mereka membingungkan, mereka menimbulkan kebingungan.”
  • “The book is exciting.”
    • “Bukunya menarik. Bukunya membuat orang tertarik.”

We use past participle adjectives (v2) to talk about how someone feels. Example:

  • “I am bored.”
    • “Aku merasa bosan. Yang kurasakan adalah bosan.”
  • “They are confused.”
    • “Mereka kebingungan. Yang mereka rasakan adalah bingung.”
  • “She is very excited.”
    • “Dia sangat bersemangat. Yang dia rasakan adalah semangat.”

If we were to compare the two side by side:

Present participle

Past participle

Penyebab perasaan

Perasaan yang dirasa

[Me- -kan]

[ter-], [ke- -an]

Entertaining

Entertained

Menghibur

Merasa terhibur

More examples:

Present participle

Past participle

Boring

(Membosankan)

Bored

(Merasa bosan)

Relaxing

(Membuat santai)

Relaxed

(Merasa santai)

Tiring

(Melelahkan)

Tired

(Merasa lelah)

Confusing

(Membingungkan)

Confused

(Merasa bingung)

Exciting

(Menarik)

Excited

(Merasa tertarik)

So, what do you think? I hope the explanation was clear enough. If you still have any question, feel free to leave a comment down below, or you can also mention us on twitter.

How about having a short quiz to see how well you understand the explanation given above? Look at these sentences and choose the correct answer.

  1. I was really (boring/bored) during the lecture. It was really (boring/bored).
  2. I bought a really (interesting/interested) book last night. If you’re (interesting/interested), I can lend it to you.
  3. I heard an (alarming/alarmed) noise last night, and it kept me (alarming/alarmed) all night.

Answer:

  1. bored; boring.
  2. interesting; interested.
  3. alarming; alarmed.

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, March 22, 2017

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#USSlang: Internet slang (2)

In this article, we’ll share some slang words we would most likely find on the internet. Do remember that we should avoid using slang words in formal situation.

Slang words are ideally only used in casual conversation and text. They are popular only for a certain period of time. Let’s start , shall we?

 

  1. Sus. Meaning: someone sketchy, shady.
    • Example:
      • I told you that guy over there was sus.
    • ‘Sus’ comes from the word suspect. As a slang, ‘sus’ suggests that someone is sketchy or shady.
    • Other than that, ‘sus’ can also mean ‘see you soon.’ Example:
      • I’m getting off work now. Sus.
  2. Boots. Meaning: emphasis, very much.
    • Example:
      • I had a very long day. I’m tired boots.
    • Tired boots = very tired
    • Add ‘boots’ to the end of an adjective or verb to emphasize on whatever you’re saying.
  3. Hunty. Meaning: a term of endearment for friends, usually used in the drag community.
    • Example:
      • Hey hunty, I’m home!
    • ‘Hunty’ is a combination of two words, ‘honey’ and ‘c*nt.’ It can sometimes be used in a demeaning way.
  4. Stan. Meaning: an obsessed fan (n.), admire (v.)
    • Example:
      • There’s a bunch of Stans waiting right outside the concert hall.
    • ‘Stan’ originated from Eminem song about an obsessed fan. ‘Stan’ was the main character in the song.
  5. OTP (One True Pairing) Meaning: your favorite relationship in a fandom, a couple that other people think matches the best.
    • Example:
      • My OTP is Glenn Alinskie Chelsea Olivia. They’re such a cute couple.
  6. Tea. Meaning: gossip, news or personal information belonging to someone else.
    • Example:
      • Spill the tea about what happened at the party.
  7. DR (double rainbow). Meaning: a term used to convey extreme happiness.
    • Example:
      • I got a promotion at work and have been seeing DRs all day.
  8. ICYMI (in case you missed it). Meaning: often used by people who missed things (often important) in social media or chat rooms.
    • Example:
      • ICYMI, my cat is sick and it ruined half of my wardrobe.
    • ICYMI can also be used in humorous way to point something which is already obvious.
  9. IMMD (it made my day). Meaning: a term used to show happiness, something awesome.
    • Example:
      • OMG! My boss just gave me a huge raise. #IMMD
  10. AMA (ask me anything). Meaning: a term to invite people to ask questions.
    • Example:
      • I have been studying for that exam all day. AMA.

There goes 10 internet slang words for now, fellas! Now that you have 10 more slang words in your repertoire, it’s time to put them to practice.

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, March 15, 2017


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#EngKnowledge: English poems

Hi, fellas! Are you a fan of poems?

I love discussing and analysing poems together with my friends and also debating what the authors meant. Here we have compiled 6 poems which you might enjoy reading. You may share your thought about the poems and leave your comments on the comment box below.

1. Kid

Kid was nominated by UN as the best poem of 2006. It was written by an African child called Oglala Lakota.

When I born, I black
When I grow up, I black
When I go in Sun, I black
When I scared, I black
When I sick, I black
And when I die, I still black
And you white fellow
When you born, you pink
When you grow up, you white
When you go in sun, you red
When you cold, you blue
When you scared, you yellow
When you sick, you green
And when you die, you grey
And you calling me colored??

2. Oranges

This poem was written by Gary Soto. If you have a hard time wondering what these poems are talking about, this poem is not one of those. You need no background knowledge to understand this poem. This one is clear and cute.

The first time I walked
With a girl, I was twelve,
Cold, and weighted down
With two oranges in my jacket.
December. Frost cracking
Beneath my steps, my breath
Before me, then gone,
As I walked toward
Her house, the one whose
Porch light burned yellow
Night and day, in any weather.
A dog barked at me, until
She came out pulling
At her gloves, face bright
With rouge. I smiled,
Touched her shoulder, and led
Her down the street, across
A used car lot and a line
Of newly planted trees,
Until we were breathing
Before a drugstore. We
Entered, the tiny bell
Bringing a saleslady
Down a narrow aisle of goods.
I turned to the candies
Tiered like bleachers,
And asked what she wanted –
Light in her eyes, a smile
Starting at the corners
Of her mouth. I fingered
A nickle in my pocket,
And when she lifted a chocolate
That cost a dime,
I didn’t say anything.
I took the nickle from
My pocket, then an orange,
And set them quietly on
The counter. When I looked up,
The lady’s eyes met mine,
And held them, knowing
Very well what it was all
About.

Outside,
A few cars hissing past,
Fog hanging like old
Coats between the trees.
I took my girl’s hand
In mine for two blocks,
Then released it to let
Her unwrap the chocolate.
I peeled my orange
That was so bright against
The gray of December
That, from some distance,
Someone might have thought
I was making a fire in my hands.

3. I, Too, Sing America

This poem was written by Langston Hughes. This poem talks about hope for black Americans.

I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I’ll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody’ll dare
Say to me,
“Eat in the kitchen,”
Then.

Besides,
They’ll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed—

I, too, am America.

4. The Man He Killed

This poem was written by Thomas Hardy. This poem has a unique shape.

Had he and I but met
By some old ancient inn,
We should have sat us down to wet
Right many a nipperkin!

But ranged as infantry,
And staring face to face,
I shot at him as he at me,
And killed him in his place.

I shot him dead because —
Because he was my foe,
Just so: my foe of course he was;
That’s clear enough; although

He thought he’d ‘list, perhaps,
Off-hand like — just as I —
Was out of work — had sold his traps —
No other reason why.

Yes; quaint and curious war is!
You shoot a fellow down
You’d treat if met where any bar is,
Or help to half-a-crown.

5. I Stop Writing the Poem

This poem was written by Tess Gallagher.

to fold the clothes. No matter who lives
or who dies, I’m still a woman.
I’ll always have plenty to do.
I bring the arms of his shirt
together. Nothing can stop
our tenderness. I’ll get back
to the poem. I’ll get back to being
a woman. But for now
there’s a shirt, a giant shirt
in my hands, and somewhere a small girl
standing next to her mother
watching to see how it’s done.

6. The Send-Off

This poem was written by Wilfred Owen.

Down the close, darkening lanes they sang their way
To the siding-shed,
And lined the train with faces grimly gay.

Their breasts were stuck all white with wreath and spray
As men’s are, dead.

Dull porters watched them, and a casual tramp
Stood staring hard,
Sorry to miss them from the upland camp.
Then, unmoved, signals nodded, and a lamp
Winked to the guard.

So secretly, like wrongs hushed-up, they went.
They were not ours:
We never heard to which front these were sent.

Nor there if they yet mock what women meant
Who gave them flowers.

Shall they return to beatings of great bells
In wild trainloads?
A few, a few, too few for drums and yells,
May creep back, silent, to still village wells
Up half-known roads.

source: poetryfoundation.org

Compiled and written by @kusumawicitraa for @Englishtips4U on Friday, March 10, 2017

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#EngQuiz: ‘Live’ vs. ‘alive’

In this occasion, we’ll test how well you understand when to use the words ‘live’ and ‘alive.’ We’ve actually talked about this in a previous article. If you missed the discussion, feel free to head over to #EngVocab: ‘Live’ vs. ‘alive’.

Without further ado, let’s start, shall we?

Read the questions carefully. Click the word of your choice.

1. Where do you [live/alive]?
live
Correct! Here, ‘live’ is a verb which means to reside.
alive
2. I [live/alive] in Jakarta.
live
Correct! Here, ‘live’ is a verb which means to reside.
alive
3. This music makes me feel [live/alive].
live
alive
Correct! Here, ‘alive’ is an adjective which means active, not dead.
4. I’ve always wanted to [live/alive] in Bali.
live
Correct! Here, ‘live’ is a verb which means to reside.
alive
5. Some people feel most [live/alive] when they are busy with work.
live
alive
Correct! Here, ‘alive’ is an adjective which means active, not dead.
6. I wish Michael Jackson was still [live/alive].
live
alive
Correct! Here, ‘alive’ is an adjective which means active, not dead.
7. Some people [live/alive] every day like there is no tomorrow.
live
Correct! Here, ‘live’ is a verb which means to conduct a life.
alive
8. We went to watch the match [live/alive] at the stadium.
live
Correct! Here, ‘live’ is an adjective which means actual, present.
alive
9. These are [live/alive] animals.
live
Correct! Here, ‘live’ is an adjective which means living.
alive
10. A man was hit by a car this morning. Is he [live/alive]?
live
alive
Correct! Here, ‘alive’ is an adjective which means active, not dead.

There goes all 10 questions for today. How did you do? How many correct answers did you score?

 

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @Englishtips4U on Thursday, March 9, 2017

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#EngTips: IELTS vs. TOEFL (2)

If we are not an English native speaker but we are planning to study or work abroad, in some stage of the application, we will need to also attach our IELTS or TOEFL score to our application. Both tests aim to assess our English proficiency and make sure that we are able to communicate well in English.

What are IELTS and TOEFL?

International English Language Test System (IELTS) is an English language test that is used for educational, immigration and occupational purposes, and is accepted by over 9,000 institutions across 130 countries worldwide. Jointly administered by the British Council, University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations and IDP Education Australia, IELTS uses British English, and is more likely to be favoured by UK and institutions in Commonwealth nations such as New Zealand and Australia. Depending on the entry requirements of the program, we might need to take either the Academic or General Training IELTS exam.

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) tests our ability to communicate in English in specifically academic, university and classroom-based settings. It is accepted by over 8,500 institutions across 130 countries, including the UK, USA and Australia, as well as all of the world’s top 100 universities. TOEFL is administered by US-based organization, the Education Testing Service, and so is conducted in American English. This test is more likely to be favoured by American institutions.

Similarities between IELTS and TOEFL

Both test our four main language skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. IELTSn Indonesia is similar to other countries, and so is TOEFL, that is why the scoring system is consistent all over the world.

Both tests also cost within the same price range, USD 150 – USD 250 per test per person.

Differences between IELTS and TOEFL

1. Scoring system

IELTS band score ranges from 1 to 9. The score report is valid for two years. We will generally aim to 6.5 to 7 to be considered as a ‘competent’ to ‘good’ user of English language.

TOEFL scores come in two versions. TOEFL Internet Based Test (TOEFL iBT) is more progressive, but test administration in some countries still uses the Paper Based Test (PBT). iBT score ranges from 0 to 120, while PBT ranges from 310 to 677.

The following spreadsheet shows the link between IELTS and TOEFL iBT score.

IELTS & TOEFL scoring system

2. Reading module

The IELTS test has a wide range of question types, while TOEFL test is multiple choices only. IELTS reading test lasts 60 minutes. Reading in TOEFL takes approximately 60 to 80 minutes.

3. Listening module

The IELTS listening test is 30 minutes, while TOEFL is 60 minutes. IELTS has a range of different questions including sentence completion, matching headings, and True, False or Not Given. The TOEFL test is multiple choices only.

We will also hear a range of different accents from English speaking countries such as Ireland, Wales, Scotland, the USA, Canada and Australia on the IELTS test whereas the TOEFL test will always be standard American English.

4. Speaking module

IELTS speaking test consists of 3 sections and its total duration is 15 minutes. In the test, we will have a face-to-face conversation with native English speaker.

In TOEFL speaking test, based on more recently used iBT, we will be talking to the computer. For those who don’t really have time to conduct IELTS, because it’s usually conducted during office hours, taking TOEFL iBT might be more suitable. The test will last for 20 minutes.

5. Writing module

IELTS has two different types of writing test: writing for Academic Training and General Training. Academic is suitable for those hoping to attend university, while General Training is mostly used for immigration purposes.

Both types have total duration 1 hour. In the Academic paper, we will be required to write a short essay based on a given graph, chart, map or cycle diagram. In the General Training paper, we will be asked to write a letter and a short essay on a particular topic.

TOEFL writing test consists of two tasks. The total duration is 50 minutes. In the first task, we need to read a text and then listen to a 2-minute lecture on the same topic. We must then write a short response to a specific question on that topic. The second task is a longer discursive essay on a particular issue, similar to a university style academic essay.

Which test to take?

Normally, the institutions we are applying to would specify which test to take. If they can accept either, the following table can be your consideration.

IELTS TOEFL
I like talking to people one-on-one. I prefer talking to a computer.
I like to write by hand. I am better at typing than handwriting.
I can understand a variety of English-speaking accents. I find American accents easy to listen to.
I find it difficult to concentrate for long periods of time. I can concentrate for long periods of time.
I prefer shorter tests. I can easily follow a lecture and take notes.
I prefer different types of questions. I like multiple choice questions.

Source:
Wikipedia
www.hotcoursesabroad.com
www.ieltsadvantage.com
 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, March 6, 2017

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#EngVocab: ‘Live’ vs. ‘alive’

Someone asked us on LINE about the difference between ‘live’ and ‘alive’ on LINE. So, instead of keeping the answer between the two of us, I’ll talk about it in this article and share with all of you. Let’s start, shall we?

Meaning of ‘live’ and ‘alive’

First off, let’s talk about the meaning of ‘live’ and ‘alive.’ In a glance, both have something to do with life.

  • ‘Life’ (noun), dibaca laif, is the period between birth and death, during which something is active and functioning.
  • ‘Life’ (noun), dibaca laif, also refers to the living person or being.

‘Live’ is both a verb and an adjective.

As a verb, ‘live,’ yang dibaca liv, means to exist, to be alive, to reside, to conduct a life. Example:

  • “I live in Jakarta.”
  • “They lived happily ever after.”

As an adjective, ‘live,’ yang dibaca laiv, means living, actual, present. Example:

  • ‘live show,’
  • ‘live animal,’
  • ‘live broadcast.’

‘Alive’, dibaca əlaiv, is an adjective.

‘Alive’ describes the condition of living, active, and not dead. Example:

  • “The happiest woman alive.”
  • “Grandpa is still alive.”

Now we’ve talked about the meaning of ‘live’ and ‘alive.’ Let’s look at more examples:

RIGHT

WRONG

Live show

Alive show

Live bait

Alive bait

I am alive.

I am live.

Keep your hope alive.

Keep your hope live.

Look at the examples again. Did you notice the difference? Clue: position. Did you notice how ‘live’ is placed directly before a noun and ‘alive’ is placed after a verb?

Live‘ is an attributive adjective. Attributive adjectives are positioned before the noun they describe.

Alive‘ is a predicative adjective. Predicative adjectives are positioned after verbs such as be, become, grow, look or seem.

And there you have it! That’s the end of today’s talk on how to differentiate when to use ‘live’ and ‘alive.’ If you have other questions regarding this topic, or any other topic at all, feel free to hit us up on Twitter or drop a comment in the comment box below.

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @Englishtips4U on Wednesday, March 8, 2017

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#WOTD: Whilst

‘Whilst’ is a conjunction (kata sambung), a word used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause.

As a conjunction, ‘whilst’ means the same as ‘while‘. Both mean ‘during the time that something else happens.’

Example:

  • She reads a novel whilst waiting for her boyfriend.
  • She reads a novel while waiting for her boyfriend.

‘Whilst’ and ‘while’ indicate that two events are happening at the same time.

On going events:

  • reading a novel
  • waiting for boyfriend

Not just that, both ‘whilst’ and ‘while’ can also mean ‘in contrast with something else.’

Example:

  • Her top is white, whilst her pants are black.
  • Her top is white, while her pants are black.

Here’s another example of using ‘whilst’ in showing contrast.

Example:

  • Whilst ‘of’ refers to possession, ‘from’ refers to origins.

 

So, you may now ask:

When should we use ‘whilst’? Or should we use ‘while’ instead?

Actually, the real question is not ‘when’ to use them; but ‘where‘ you should use ‘whilst.’

For Americans, the word ‘whilst’ tends to have an archaic ring. ‘Whilst’ is rarely used in American English. The use of ‘whilst’ gives the impression that the writer is British. ‘Whilst’ is fairly common in British publications.

So that sums up our discussion on the word ‘whilst.’ I hope the explanation was clear enough and not too boring. However, if you still have any question on how to use ‘whilst’ (or any other topic), feel free to hit us up.

 

Compiled and written by @Miss_Qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, February 24, 2017

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