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#ENGKNOWLEDGE: GUY FAWKES NIGHT

“Remember, remember, the fifth of November
The gunpowder treason and plot
I see of no reason why the gunpowder treason
Should ever be forgot…”

Do you remember this line, fellas? Along with this mask?

Photo by NEOSiAM 2020 on Pexels.com

Most of us heard the lines or saw the mask first on the movie ‘V for Vendetta’ (James McTeigue, 2006). The main character of the movie, V, was a victim of a biological weapon experiment. The weapon then brought England to a despotic era led by Chancellor Sutler.

V was portrayed to have taken his inspiration from Guy Fawkes. Guy Fawkes was a member of the Gunpowder Plot who was arrested on 5 November 1605. V wore a mask that was said to resemble Fawkes’ face and set a revolution on the day Fawkes was arrested, 5 November.

Due to the popularity of the movie, many people then associated the Guy Fawkes mask with a symbol of resistance against tyranny. We even have hackers that go by the name Anonymous and use the mask as their persona. However, the history of 5 November 1605 was not exactly that black and white.

If we trace the history of 5 November 1605, we could go back to the reign of Henry VIII from House of Tudor, who was the king of England from 1509 to 1547. During his reign, he declared himself as the Supreme Head of the Church of England. He adopted the Protestant faith which severed the tie between England and the Catholic Church led by the Pope and eventually resulted in excommunication of England by the Pope and other notable European kingdoms who supported the Pope.

Catholic churches and monasteries across England were forced to close their doors and had their assets confiscated. Anyone who spoke against Henry VIII found their heads rolling off of the chopping block (executed by beheading). This definitely caused a deep resentment between people of different faiths.

Upon his death, Henry passed the throne to his only legitimate son, Edward VI, who was also a devout Protestant. Unfortunately, Edward VI died young at the age of 15-16 and did not leave any heir. He chose his cousin, Lady Jane Grey, to be the new queen, despite having two half-sisters, Mary I and Elizabeth I.

The older sister, Mary I, was set on returning England to a Catholic state. With the nobility as her supporters, she overthrew Jane Grey and became the Queen of England for the next 5 years. During her reign, those of Protestant faith were deemed heretics and executed, which led to the coinage of the term ‘Bloody Mary.’ Her sister, Elizabeth I, almost met the same fate; she was accused of plotting against the Queen.

Eventually, Mary I fell ill and died of what was suspected to be ovarian cysts or uterine cancer, and as she had no heir, she reluctantly named her sister, Elizabeth I, who was a Protestant, as her successor. Elizabeth I then reigned for 45 years. She promoted religious tolerance and introduced a Religious Settlement which then became the foundation of the Church of England and Anglicanism.

But again, the succession was an issue, as Elizabeth was a woman and therefore could not pass on her family name. She was torn between marriage proposals from Spain and France, which in her view, would make England merely a vassal state of either kingdom. She was concerned that her marriage would again bring England to disharmony.

So she did something drastic: she chose not to marry. Upon her death in 1603, the throne then passed on to her closest Protestant relative, James VI of Scotland from House of Stuart, who then became James I and reigned upon England and Scotland.

The deep resentment caused by Henry VIII’s decision to declare himself the Supreme Head of the Church of England was still very much obvious more than half a century later. Even during the reign of Elizabeth I, there had been numerous attempts to overthrow the monarch and enthrone someone of Catholic faith, and this also happened during the reign of James I. One of the most notable ones was the Gunpowder Plot.

Set as an attempt to blow up the House of Lords (the parliament) and kill James I, the plot was discovered on 5 November 1605 when Guy Fawkes was arrested. To celebrate the fact that the King had survived the assassination attempt, people lit bonfires around London. An act called ‘The Observance of 5th November’ was then passed to enforce an annual thanksgiving to celebrate the plot’s failure. From then on, the 5th of November is celebrated annually in the UK. It is also known as Bonfire Night and Guy Fawkes Night.

So, I personally have mixed feelings about the fifth of November. I love the movie V for Vendetta, and many people apparently do, too. But it’s safe to say that the history behind Guy Fawkes is… a lot. Do feel free to add anything if there’s something I missed and correct me for any historical inaccuracy.

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 5 November 2020.

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#EngKnowledge: The History of Scientific English
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#EngKnowledge: 7 Facts of Buckingham Palace

In this instance, we are going to find out more about Buckingham Palace. We have compiled 7 interesting facts about Buckingham Palace just for you.

Buckingham Palace, London, UK
BXEK9B Buckingham Palace, London, UK (source: dailymail.co.uk)

  1. John Sheffield, 3rd Earl of Mulgrave and Marquess of Normanby, was created by Duke of Buckingham in 1703. He built Buckingham House for himself as a grand London home.
  2. Buckingham Palace is a symbol of love from a king to his beloved queen. George III bought Buckingham House in 1761 for his wife Queen Charlotte to be used as a comfortable family home. And 14 of 15 children of George III were born here.
  3. John Nash (a super talented architect of England) was put by George IV to enlarge the palace into the imposing U-shaped building.
  4. Buckingham Palace has 775 rooms. These include 19 State rooms, 52 Royal and guest bedrooms, 188 staff bedrooms, 92 offices and 78 bathrooms.
  5. There are 1,514 doors and 760 windows in Buckingham Palace. All windows are cleaned every six weeks to keep them clean.
  6. On the site, King James I used to plant mulberries to rear silkworms. Unfortunately, the king chose the wrong kind of mulberry. So the silk production never took off in Britain.
  7. Buckingham Palace houses largest collections of clocks and watches in the world. In total, it is home for 350 exceptional clocks and watches.

 

Compiled and written by @wisznu at @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, January 28, 2016

 

Related post(s):

 

^MD

 

#EngPic: Indonesian Events in England

Hi fellas :) I hope you had a good Saturday so far :D

Did you know that outside of Indonesia there are Indonesian cultural events going on?

And in England, it is no exception :D Here are some #EngPic that admin would like to share how our culture are shown in the English land :)

First up, guess who was in Trafalgar Square :D This square is a very iconic landmark in London, England

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Year 2014 is the first time Indonesia get to share their culture in Trafalgar Square. Many countries have done the same, even yearly!

Trafalgar Square is dedicated to the Battle of Trafalgar hence Nelson’s column is in the middle as he led the battle.

Which you can see it standing behind the stage. From here you can also see Big Ben. “Hello Indonesia” is the name of the event.

Beside performances, there were Indonesian food and crafts being sold by Indonesian representatives from Indonesia and England.

Representatives & workshops all shared our uniqueness on unity and diversity. It was a colourful day in Trafalgar Square :)

I think the highlight would be the crowd “dangdutan” in the ending in front of the famous National Gallery :D

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There are so many photos that could be shared but I think @londonfriend has the best photos for our #EngPic -> http://ow.ly/yhBme :D

Besides in Trafalgar Square, Nottingham University’s Indonesian Student Society held their yearly “Indofest” on site

While “Hello Indonesia” was by the Indonesian Embassy and Governmental institutes, “Indofest” was held by Indonesian students in UK

It has food and crafts being sold, performances, Indonesian games, sports, Batik workshop, and photo exhibition #EngPic

Surprisingly, as the #EngPic shows, not only kids get to play “balap karung”, the adults too :D

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There were a lot of stands and people, you also can see the smoke of the satay grilling from here :)

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See if you can guess what’s on the right pocket of the bag? :D I really miss it now :( it was sold for £1!

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To be honest, these kind of events are bringing home closer to those who are far and it promotes Indonesia more and more :)

Just like what this #EngPic says :) Photo by @yantiyanto

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And on that note, who wouldn’t resist a tipat cantok and cendol drink with ketan XD Photo by @yantiyanto

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So that’s it for our #EngPic today :) I really hope you enjoyed the session :D

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4u on June 21, 2014

Photo sources: @daedonghae and @yantiyanto