Tag Archives: crystal

#EngTalk: Spelling noises? (1)

We are back with David Crystal’s ‘Spell It Out’ today and this time is about…

Spelling noises… is there such a thing? What do you think?

So according to Crystal: “We also need to spell the emotional noises that form a part of conversation. A phonetic spelling turns out not to be so easy to achieve.”

Hmmm…. (That’s one)

So, “spoken language is more than words and sentences”, it “contains quite a few isolated noises” to express emotions called interjections

For example – When we want to “convey throat-clearing” we would use

Ahem

Eham”, “Mhumh”, won’t work

Yet its earlier version, in the 18th century, it would be only

Hem!”

Interjections can be either:

  1. we use sounds at the back of our mouth such as expressing disgust e.g. yuk, ugh, blech
  2. using both lips such as to to express relief e.g. phew, whew
  3. produce a click noise with our tongue such as to express disapproval or irritation e.g. tut – from the 16th century or tck – as Rudyard Kipling would write it, or tsk – popular in the 1940s

Some of these noises spelling are actually “breaking the rules” as they become words with no vowels

Other example would be brr (expressing feeling cold), grr (expressing irritation), shh (be quiet!), pst (calling someone silently) and hmmmm (expressing the person is thinking)

just like what I did in the beginning :)

Hope this #EngTalk has been useful for you! Still curious of this whole noises spelling?

Stay tuned for more next time :)

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4u on December 27, 2015

Source: David Crystal’s “Spell it Out”

 

 

Advertisements

#EngPic: “The Pronouns”

Greetings fellas :D Saturday is here and I hope it has not been a bad day for you all :)

Look at this #EngPic. Now tell me, what is it? What do you see? Is it a poem? Game? I am sorry, it’s abit blurry

pronouns2pronouns1

Is it from a book? What kind of book would it be? Who is it for? When was it made?

Share your thoughts, comments, reponses with the hashtag

Yes it’s “@AubreyPlaysBass: a story”, any other guesses?

Yes it is something to do with it “@ncitraaaaaa: the pronoun’s?”

Sadly, no… “@Ernieee1203: idk, shakespeare?”

How so? “@daraamentari: seems like tarot book?”

You can say it like that.. “@AubreyPlaysBass: a folk story? Legend?”

Yes they do :) “@outer_space24: seems they bold some pronouns like I and they. Its not really clear tho”

So the book is a…

A fun grammar book for children called The Infant’s Grammar made in 1824

As this is taken from one of David Crystal’s book, I am going to quote several things he said

He stated colourful guides such as this one were popular when formal teaching of English has been established in the end

Of 18th century. Those guidance books which have rhymes, poetry, games, puns, “playful methods of exposition” seemed to be sought after. Dictionaries, spelling guides and other grammar books are selling well too at the time

So this kind of book would be used to help children understand it better and has no intention to replace any school learning books

This book seems to make the grammar groups as group of people coming to a certain gathering

Moreover the subtitle of the book is “or a Pic-nic Party of the Parts of Speech”

So what do fellas think? Are there such books existing nowadays?

It seems they were formed in such way indeed “@OKTindriani: it’s like a pieces of story i think :o”

Well of course the modern English is not as complicated as then, but such grammar books might be useful to anyone

Well I hope you enjoy the #EngPic session today :)

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4U on November 23, 2013

Source:

Evolving English by David Crystal

#EngTrivia: David Crystal’s Internet and SMS English language

Does anyone here know David Crystal by any chance?

Yes.. “@Revalyani: He is a Linguist.”

And yes one of the things he researched on is this “@vviinnkkaa: the theorist of internet language feature”

Yes he is British :) “@fitriaaelfs: I’ve heard once.. Is he british linguist isn’t he?”

As a Linguist, Crystal have explored many aspects of English indeed, from the past and present. Based on a talk of his book launch Spell It Out, he mentioned a lot of things.

But I was strucked with two things he mentioned:

1. The internet English language has gone back to its roots

Sometimes if you are blogging, instant messaging, tweeting, of course not always a person over your shoulder would say, “Oh…you spelt that wrong!”

To Crystal, this action of typing as you think it is spelt is like what happened before English is as it is. So in a sense, funnily, we are going back to how simple English would be in the past in the advance technology era

2. That English texting or SMS language is not all bad English

It seemed SMS language has been seen as something bad due to its abbreviations created by younger generations. Leaving out alphabets in words randomly apparently is a bad thing. But after analysing it:

First, the abbreviated words were only 10 % of the whole SMS sent so not all of them are abbreviations

Secondly, SMS abbreviation has been invented someway along the line years ago, there were poems and games that sort of used it in a sense. Such as old acronyms during the 60s like YYURYYUBICURYY4ME.

Third, the younger generations did mot leave alphabets randomly in a word when they are abbreviatin. For example you are writing, “I’ll see you tonight” then the sms would be

“ll s y tnt”

you would understand it rather than

“I e o u i”.

This won’t make sense would it? So in SMS we keep the consonants rather than the vowels. And of course, in order to know that, you should be able to spell well in English. So the best SMS texter would be the best spellers.

Well what do fellas think? Is it true? Is it weird? Is it false?

@trianarakanita: It is really really true!!! :))

@Anindyasd: i do agree, but i think the most important in order us to understand is to keep the word’s first or last letter.

@rissastellar: I think ‘c u 2nite’ is easier to be understood than ‘ill s y tnt’ :D

@misspuputt: I’d prefer to write full text while texting than make it short.. Confusing, I think..

@bellzart: not sure :/ we use slang lang when we text thou..

Well, I hope I have cheered you up and hope you have a lovely Saturday evening wherever you are! Hope it has been useful :)

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4U on November 16, 2013

Source:

David Crystal, Spell it Out  – Christ Church,Bath, Monday 26th November 2012.

Jeanette Weston © 2013 Magus Studio – http://youtu.be/Gco5whWZWkI