Tag Archives: COVID19

#ENGVOCAB: VARIOUS WAYS TO SAY ‘TO CRY’

This is such a time to be alive, fellas. Not only are we in a middle of a global pandemic and climate crisis, many people are struggling to make ends meet (to survive). Sometimes, it’s okay to take a break and sort out the emotions you are feeling.

Crying is one of some healthy ways to cope with stressful situations. However, it’s sometimes underrated because someone who cries is perceived as fragile or weak, whereas we know that expressing our emotions in a healthy way is actually a sign of strength.

Photo by burak kostak on Pexels.com

On this article are going to discuss several words we can use as an alternative of ‘to cry.’

1. To sob (terisak) = To shed tears audibly or sometimes noisily.

2. To weep/to shed tears (meneteskan air mata) = Usually used to describe someone who sheds tears quietly.

3. To wail (menangis sambil berteriak) = A cry caused by a deep pain, grief, and anger.

4. To bawl (menangis keras dan lama) = Typically more dramatic, more noisy, and lasting longer than sobbing.

5. To snivel (menangis pelan) = To cry and sniff in a feeble way.

6. To blubber (menangis tak terkendali) = To sob noisily and uncontrollably.

7. To squall (menangis keras, biasanya dilakukan bayi atau anak-anak) = Of a baby or a small child to cry noisily and continuously.

I hope you find this article useful. Having feelings or emotions is not wrong, fellas, and we could learn to handle them in a healthy way, as not to overwhelm us and the people around us. Stay safe and healthy!

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 8 October 2020.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Clumsy’
#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Dirty’
#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Rude’
#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Stink’
#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Tired’

#EngTalk: Lunch and Snacks

Some of you might have returned to work at the office and we are all aware of the risks and difficulties. Take care of yourself, fellas, and keep your surroundings clean and hygienic.

Over the past few days, Indonesian Twitter users have been engaged in quite an odd debate about packed lunch. It started when a lady uploaded ideas for lunch boxes that she’d been preparing for her husband and apparently some people thought she was being too nice to her husband. Some also questioned whether she did that because she was a woman and assumed that it was her duty to be in the kitchen.

I personally think the lunch box was sweet and commendable. Preparing food for our loved ones is an act of love. It’s just as simple as that. Bear in mind that anyone can prepare food for anyone they love, regardless of the gender. After all, cooking is one of the basic surviving skills.

Furthermore, preparing our own meal ensures that we know what goes into the meal and helps us control our portion as not to overeat.

What do you think about this matter, fellas?

agil (@IvIcnrn): well said here. just can’t understand why some people got mad about it.

pexels-photo-90893.jpeg
Photo by Keegan Evans on Pexels.com

For health reasons, I have been eating mostly plant-based food. I limit meat and poultry consumption to once a week or once in two weeks. I still eat fish and eggs and dairy products, though, so I cannot really say I am a vegetarian or pescatarian.

I have also limited my carbohydrates intake and, if possible, replacing the carbs with something that contains a lot of fibres and low glycemic index. Our metabolism rate slows as we age, so unless we are really, really physically active, all the excess carbs will turn into fat. By now you must have started guessing how old I am, LOL.

Instead of having three big meals a day, I limit my daily intake to one big meal in the morning and then settle for fruits and vegetables for the rest of the day, usually 3-4 times.

My favourite type of vegetable dish to prepare is ‘pecel’ or assorted boiled vegetables (usually spinach, water spinach, bean sprouts, and long beans) with spicy peanut sauce. I love peanut sauce and the taste it gives to the vegetables.

I feel so fortunate living in Indonesia because we have plenty of vegetables to go with our daily meals. We can simply go to a small neighbourhood stall in the morning to buy a pack of vegetables with affordable price. And we can cook them in various ways, too. We can be creative with carrots, green beans, mustard greens (sawi), bok choy, cabbages, lettuces, tomatoes, and many more.

Don’t forget tempe and tofu, which are basically Indonesian staple food. They also have good amount of protein in them. Sometimes, I simply boil them and prepare separated dipping chili sauce.

For the snack, if I feel really hungry, I go with yam, sweet potato, edamame, or a bowl of fresh fruits as watermelon, pineapple, and papaya are pretty easy to find.

What about you, fellas? What are your favourite lunch menu and snacks in between meals? Share it on the comment section below.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 2 July 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngKnowledge: Twitter Handles to Expand Your Vocabularies

Many of us are on self-quarantine due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Not only to keep ourselves safe and healthy, we are doing this to prevent further transmission of the virus to other people with whom we interact. We might not be showing symptoms (asymptomatic), but it does not always mean we are not carrying the virus with us. For me, it is better to be safe than sorry.

However, being on self-quarantine does come with challenging times. Eventually, I noticed my sleep pattern changes as I sleep or take frequent naps during the day and stay awake almost the whole night. Do you also experience the same?

I figured that I needed to find new interests to keep me busy and I decided to read and learn more especially about topics that I had never really touched before the pandemic.
Recently, I completed the 30-day word challenge by Merriam-Webster Dictionary.

Merriam Webster
Source: Merriam-Webster Dictionary’s Twitter handle

On this article, I’m going to share some accounts that will help you expand your vocabularies and learn grammar effectively.
1. Merriam-Webster dictionary
@MerriamWebster provides you with Word of the Day, the background story behind words and phrases, and trending words.

  1. Dictionary.com
    @Dictionarycom also provides word of the day and trending words, with quite a sassy and hilarious manner.
  2. The Oxford English Dictionary
    My most favourite feature of @OED is its Word of the Year, which doesn’t only cover the most searched word of the year as it might also introduce a new word that is widely used but not registered on any dictionaries yet.
  3. The Yuniversity
    @The_YUNiversity posts daily vocabulary and grammar lessons in just a few tweets and helpful infographics. Its explanation is also really easy to comprehend. Bonus: KPop fans will relate so much to this handle.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 11 June 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngKnowledge: World Environment Day 2020

Hello everyone, how are you doing? It’s been raining a lot here in Bali, Indonesia, despite we have entered dry season. By the way, did you know that 5 June is celebrated every year as World Environment Day?

pexels-photo-1072824.jpeg
Photo by Akil Mazumder on Pexels.com

World Environment Day (WED) is observed every year on 5 June to raise global awareness to take positive environmental action to protect nature and the planet Earth.

UN designates 5 June as World Environment Day in 1972 and two years later (1974), WED is celebrated for the first time under the slogan “Only One Earth.” During 1974-1983, WED was celebrated 10 times but only in three countries (USA, Canada, and Bangladesh).

World Environment Day 2020 is focusing on biodiversity and will be hosted in Colombia in partnership with Germany. The theme of World Environment Day 2020 is “Celebrate Biodiversity.” Videos highlighting the biodiversity and environmental achievements of different regions of Colombia will be featured throughout the day, including images and drone footage of strategic ecosystems. We can join the conversation online with the hashtag #ForNature.

Air pollution, overpopulation, deforestation, and climate crisis have been some of the major factors that affect our environment. By actively participating to decrease the impact of any factors above, we might have hope for a better environment. Humans are not the only species on this planet and our actions have significant impact on the existence of other species. Furthermore, studies show deforestation and loss of wildlife cause increases in infectious diseases, including the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

We have only one Earth and we live on this world together, fellas. Let’s let nature be nature and do our parts to help reduce the negative impact of climate crisis. Stay safe everywhere you are.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, 5 June 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

 

#EngKnowledge: Eid al-Fitr 2020

Hi, hello, everyone, how was your Eid holiday?

I’ll admit that to me it felt different as we have been in self-quarantine for a while that I lost count of what day it is. Do you also experience the same? Share your story!

pexels-photo-908278.jpeg
Photo by Khairul Onggon on Pexels.com

Eid al-Fitr is an important holiday for Muslims worldwide. In Indonesia, it is usually marked by 7-10 days of holiday to accommodate those who do homecoming trip. We didn’t see the hustle and bustle this year as much as the previous years due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

It is also marked with visiting the houses of our close friends and relatives to ask and give forgiveness for our wrongs, which is usually ended with dining together. The signature dishes are ketupat (rice cake wrapped in coconut leaf), opor ayam (braised chicken soup), and rendang. What about in your countries?

Aside of that, we also provide assorted cakes and cookies, such as nastar (pineapple tart), putri salju (literally snow princess), and kaasstengels (soft cheese sticks), accompanied with cold juice to the guests. Given the pandemic, most of us might skip all these traditions and some might not get the chance to meet our families.

Stay strong, fellas. Sometimes we need to make a sacrifice to keep ourselves and our loved ones safe.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 25 May 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngTips: Eid al-Fitr During COVID19 Pandemic

A big holiday is coming in less than a week for us in Indonesia, but sadly, it’s most likely that this year’s Eid al-Fitr will be very different than the previous years. Regardless, it’s a difficult situation for all of us so we need to work together to help flatten the curve.

What can we do on this year’s Eid? Here’s what we recommend.

pexels-photo-318451.jpeg
Photo by Tayeb MEZAHDIA on Pexels.com

  1. Save the funds for emergency.
    I think we can put less priority on new clothing or lavish celebrations in favour of emergency funds and donation to those who are in need.
    Do you agree, fellas?

  2. Stay in the city.
    I understand that the situation is very different from one person to another but if you still can stay in the city where you’ve been living, consider not doing the homecoming trip until we get the situation under control. This is to avoid spreading the COVID-19 virus to our family and relatives in our hometown.

  3. Minimise movement and keep physical distance.
    The Eid prayer is an important part of the Eid holiday. If the local government considers it safe to do so, still maintain your distance from other people. Keeping a safe distance between two people could reduce the risk of getting infected by the virus.

  4. Make use of the technology.
    Make use of our smartphones to contact our loved ones by, perhaps, having a virtual celebration. It is very important to stay connected as well as checking up on each other.

Those are the tips that we can share, fellas. Happy holiday and stay safe!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 18 May 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngVocab: Healthcare Professionals

Hi, everyone! I hope you are doing well. It’s an awful time for all of us around the world, but I think we have to give special credits to our healthcare professionals who might be working tirelessly during this pandemic.

pexels-photo-3825586.jpeg
Photo by Retha Ferguson on Pexels.com

On this article, we are sharing some occupations that can be called healthcare professionals. Healthcare professionals are defined as people who may provide health care treatment and advice based on formal training and experience.

  1. Physician/doctor/medical practitioner: a person qualified to practice medicine.
  2. Surgeon: a medical practitioner qualified to practice surgery.
  3. Physician’s assistant: someone qualified to assist a physician and carry out routine clinical procedures under the supervision of a physician.
  4. Nurse: a person trained to care for the sick or infirm, especially in a hospital.
  5. Dentist: a person qualified to treat the diseases and conditions that affect the teeth and gums.
  6. Midwife: a person (typically a woman) trained to assist in childbirth.
  7. Physiotherapist/physical therapist: a person qualified to treat disease, injury, or deformity by physical methods such as massage, heat treatment, and exercise.
  8. Psychiatrist: a medical practitioner specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of mental illnesses.
  9. Psychologist: an expert in the scientific study of the human mind and its functions, especially those affecting behavior in a given context.
  10. Pharmacist: a person who is professionally qualified to prepare and dispense medicinal drugs.

Aside of those mentioned above, let’s not forget to thank all the support workers that help run a health facility. Donate if you can, fellas, and follow the government’s instruction of staying home and keeping our personal hygiene and health to help ease the work of healthcare professionals.

Stay safe, everywhere you are.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 14 May 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):