Tag Archives: christmas

#EngVocab #EngKnowledge: Various Christmas Greetings

Photo by Dana Tentis on Pexels.com

Most English-speaking people use ‘merry Christmas’ in their Christmas greetings. There are many options to choose from, as follows:

  1. “Season’s greetings from…”
    According to Dictionary.com, the exact origin of the phrase ‘season’s greetings’ is unknown, but it is predicted to have risen in popularity during the same time as ‘merry Christmas.’
    We normally use ‘season’s greetings’ in writing like cards, texts, or emails, to people who celebrate Christmas and other holidays around the end of the year, starting from Thanksgiving, Hannukah, Kwanzaa, and New Year.
    ‘Season’s greetings’ carries a neutral, non-religious tone, and it can be used interchangeably with ‘happy holidays.’
  2. “Have a very merry Christmas!”
    This Christmas greeting is also mostly used in writing. This sentence means to wish the receiver a joyous Christmas celebration.
  3. “Happy Christmas!”
    When the first Harry Potter movie came out, I was surprised by the use of ‘happy Christmas,’ as I had been more accustomed to ‘merry Christmas.’
    Later, I found out that ‘happy Christmas’ is still widely used in England.
  4. “Merry Christmas!”
    While ‘happy’ is considered an emotional state, ‘merry’ gives a more active or playful connotation. The phrase ‘merry Christmas’ is widely popular in greetings, carols, and Christmas songs.
  5. “Happy holidays!”
    There are several other holidays around Christmas, from Kwanzaa to Hanukkah to Boxing Day and New Year, so we use ‘happy holidays’ as to commemorate all the celebrations that are being observed.

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, 24 December 2021.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):
#EngGame: Christmas Vocabulary
#EngKnowledge: The Twelve Days of Christmas
#EngVocab: Christmas Decoration
#IOTW: Christmas Idioms
#IOTW: Idioms Related to Christmas and Holiday

#IOTW: Christmas idioms

1. Be no angel. Meaning: to behave badly occasionally.

Example:

  • She‘s no angel but it’s expected of her if you treat her that way.

2. Christmas comes but once a year. Meaning: Since Christmas only happens once a year, we should treat it as a special time by being good to others or by indulging our children or ourselves.

Example:

  • Christmas comes but once a year, let’s get something for every one.

3. Cold turkey. Meaning: to withdraw from (an addictive substance or a habit)abruptly and completely.

Example:

  • People usually try to quit smoking by going cold turkey.

4. Deck the halls. Meaning: to indulge in copious amount of alcoholic drinks as a way of dealing with stress.

Example:

  • I’m so tired, I just want to deck the halls for the rest of the day.

5. Don’t get your tinsel in a tangle. Meaning: Get over it! Don’t get stressed out.

Example:

  • Don’t get your tinsel in a tangle. He’s only here for the party.

6. Trim the tree. Meaning: to decorate a (Christmas) tree.

Example:

  • Now that I’ve made my choice, let’s trim the tree and get ready for Christmas.

7. To cancel someone’s Christmas. Meaning: To kill someone; to destroy someone.

Example:

  • If he keeps bugging me, I’m gonna cancel his Christmas.

8. Christmas came early (this year). Meaning: When you receive some unexpected good news or good fortune.

Example:

  • Congratulations! I heard you’re promoted. Sounds like Christmas came early this year.

9. Like turkeys voting for Christmas. Meaning: to accept a situation which will have very bad results for them.

Example:

  • When she signed up to organize the reunion, she was like a turkey voting for Christmas.

10. Christmas tree. Meaning: A drunkard, a person who is frequently or habitually drunk.

Example:

  • A well-dressed Christmas tree sat in the corner – lit up, of course.

 

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, December 28, 2016

 

Related post(s):

 

^MQ

#IOTW: Christmas idioms

1) ‘Tis the season to be jolly.
The phrase is taken from a Christmas carol.It serves as a reminder to put on a happy face over the festive period.

2) Christmas comes but once a year.
The phrase is usually used as an excuse for overindulgence, whether on food or on gifts.

3) Deck the halls.
an old tradition of decorating the hall with branches from a holly tree. (also a name of a Christmas Carol).

4) Trim the tree.
an old expression means to decorate a pine tree with ornaments, lights, and other glittery bits.

5) Don’t get your tinsel in a tangle.
an expression means not to get stressed out trying to make Christmas perfect.

6) Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth.
an expression means to be grateful of a present even if it isn’t exactly what you wanted.

source:http://www.everywordcounts.co.uk/christmas-idioms-phrases-unwrapped/

 

Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, December 25, 2016

 

Related post(s):

 

^MQ