#IOTW: Idioms Related to Transportation and Travel

Hello, fellas! How’s your weekend?
Let’s discuss idioms related to transportation and travel! Here we go! #IOTW
On the same boat: sharing a particular experience or circumstance with someone else. 

E.g.: “You’re not the only one who failed to get the concert ticket. We’re on the same boat!” 

Jump on the bandwagon: to join or follow something once it is successful or popular. 

E.g.: “I heard Black Panther movie is phenomenal, but I’m not going to jump on the bandwagon and watch it. Superhero movie isn’t my cup of tea.”

Paddle one’s own canoe: to be able to act independently. 

E.g.: “Since I turned 25 this year, mom expected me to paddle my own canoe.”

Backseat driver: someone who tells the others how to do things. 

E.g.: “I don’t need a backseat driver on this project. Stop pestering me with all your advice.”

Hit the road: to leave, especially on a road trip.

E.g.: “Let’s hit the road before dawn.”
Itchy feet: the need to leave or to travel. 

E.g.: “Seeing the picture of a beach really gives me the itchy feet.”

Sail through (something): to complete something quickly and with ease. 

E.g.: “My thesis sailed through the professor with no debate.”

A third/fifth wheel: An unwanted or unnecessary person. 

E.g.: “Ann invited me to go to the movies, but if she also invited her boyfriend, I wouldn’t be joining. I would feel like a third wheel there.”
That wraps up our session, fellas! See you on another session.

Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, March 24, 2018.

Advertisements

#GrammarTrivia: Brackets

Hello, fellas! How’s your day? Today we will talk about “brackets.” Here we go!

Brackets are symbols mainly used as separator for additional information to a sentence or a main content. If we remove the brackets, the sentence would still make good sense. There are two main types of brackets, they are round () and square [].

British English (BrE) and American English (AmE) define them differently.

  • (  ), BrE: round brackets or brackets, AmE: parentheses
  • [  ], BrE: square brackets, AmE: brackets

Round brackets or parentheses are used to:

  1. add extra information to a sentence.
    • Example:
      • “Lake Toba (Indonesia: Danau Toba) is the largest volcanic lake in Sumatera as well as the world.”
  2. indicate plural or singular nouns.
    •  Example:
      • “My new shelf need book(s).”
  3. add a personal comment.
    • Example:
      • “Kuta Beach is the most beautiful beach in Bali (I prefer Sanur Beach  to Kuta Beach).
  4.  define abbreviations.
    • Example:
      • “The link above will take you to a PDF (Portable Document Format) version.”

Square brackets are used to

  1. modify another person’s words, especially when we want to make it clear that the modification has been made by us, not by the original writer.
    • Example:
      • The witness said: “He [the policeman] hit me.”
  2. add information.
    • Example:
      • “The two teams in the finals of the first FIFA Football World Cup were both from South America [Uruguay and Argentina].”
  3. add missing words.
    • Example:
      • “It is [a] good question.”
  4. modify a direct quotation.
    • Example:
      • He “love[s] driving.” (The original words were “I love driving.”)

That’s all for today, fellas! I hope it’ll be useful for you. Good night!
Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U. Saturday, March 10, 2018.


RELAATED POST(S):

^MD

#EngTips: Capitalization (2)

Hey, Fellas! We meet again. How was your day? Last week session, we have discussed some rules of capitalization. Today, we will continue to discuss the others. Here we go!

  1. Do not capitalize compass directions (south, etc.) that aren’t being used as a name.
    • Example:
      • “We’re leaving West Java and heading north this month.”
  2. Do not capitalize earth’s landscape (e.g.: river, hill, sea) that aren’t being used as a name, especially when the term is used descriptively.
    • Example:
      • Semeru mountain
      • Toba lake
  3. However, if the earth’s landscape is being used as a name and being an actual part of a proper noun, it needs to be capitalized.
    • Example:
      • Mount Krakatau
      • Sahara Desert
      • Jimbaran Beach
  4. Do not capitalize occupation before full names. However, titles replacing one’s first name are capitalized.
    • Example:
      • “The soccer team was trained by coach James.”
      • “Here comes Doctor Smith.”
  5. Do not capitalize the first item in a list followed by a colon.
    • Example:
      • “You need to buy: apples, grapes, and mangos.”
  6. Do not capitalize coordinating conjunction (and, but, yet, or, nor, for, so) unless it is first or last word in a title.
    • Example:
      • “So Quiet on the Canine Front is a 1930 comedy short film.”
      • “There are ten movies in Abbot and Costello series.”
  7. Do not capitalize an article (a, an, the) unless it is first or last word in a title.
    • Example:
      • “The Atlantis Interceptors was influenced by Mad Max.”

That’s all I can share for today, fellas. I hope it could be useful for you.
Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U. Saturday, 27 January, 2018.


RELATED POST(S):

^MD

#EngVocab: Phrasal Verbs with ‘Get’

Hey, fellas! How do you do?

It’s time for us to get along  more and discuss phrasal verbs together!
The previous tweet contains a phrasal verb. Phrasal verb is a phrase that consists of a verb with a preposition or adverb or both. The meaning of phrasal verb is different from the original verb.
Below is the list of the phrasal verb with ‘get’ to enrich your vocabulary.

  1. Get along (with something/someone): be friendly.

E.g.: “My classmates and I get along very well. We eat together in lunch time.”


  1. Get out: to leave; used for telling someone to leave. 

E.g.: “I’m studying here! Please get out of my room!” 

  1. Get over (something): to deal with or gain control of something.

E.g.: “She can’t get over her happy feeling.”

  1. Get through to (something): to go forward to the next step of a process.

E.g.: “He got through to the final round of audition.”

  1. Get by: to survive by using the money, knowledge, etc. that you have.

E.g.: “How are you getting by these days?”

  1. Get away: to leave from a person or place.

E.g.: “We’ve decided to visit countryside to get away from this city.”

  1. Get up: to get out of bed after sleeping. 

E.g.: “My sister gets up at 4:30 every morning.”

  1. Get rid of (something): to remove or throw away something. 

E.g.: “Mr. Jo got rid of their old sofa and bought a new one.”

  1. Get off: to escape a punishment; to stop an action from someone or something.

E.g.: “The suspect will get off with a caution.”

“Would you please get your feet off the table?”
10. Get in: to arrive at home or at work.

E.g.: “She never gets in before 6:50 in the morning.”

That’s all for today, fellas! It’s time for #EngVocab session to get away and let another session take over tomorrow.
Written and compiled by @anhtiss on @EnglishTips4U. Saturday, December 16, 2017

#IOTW: Fear

Hello, fellas! Did you enjoy the Halloween event few days ago? In the theme of Halloween, we will talk about the idioms related to fear, nervousness, and anxiety. Here we go!

 

  1. Shake like a leaf

Meaning: to tremble violently with fear and nervousness

E.g.: “Before I went into the exam room, I was shaking like a leaf.”

 

  1. Scared stiff

Meaning: utterly terrified that one cannot move

E.g.: “He was scared stiff when the dog barked at him.”

 

  1. Send shivers down (one’s) spine

Meaning: to cause an intense feeling of fear, nervousness, exhilaration, or excitement in someone.

E.g.: “This creepy old house is sending shivers down my spine! Let’s get out from here.”

 

  1. Bated breath

Meaning: if you wait for something with bated breath, you wait in an anxious or excited way to see what’s happen next.

E.g.: “We waited with bated breath for the winner to be announced.”

 

  1. Bundle of nerves

Meaning: someone who is very nervous, anxious, or uneasy.

E.g.: “Ann is doing her college entrance exam today. She’s a bundle of nerves!”

 

  1. Break out in a cold sweat

Meaning: to begin sweating because one is nervous or frightened.

E.g.: “I get nervous at the dentist and usually break out in a cold sweat.”

 

  1. Make one’s blood run cold

Meaning: to shock or horrify someone.

E.g.: “I could tell you a horror story that would make your blood run cold.”

 

 

Source:

  • Cambridge Idioms Dictionary.

  • Farlex Dictionary of Idioms

 

 

Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, November 3, 2017.