Category Archives: WOTD

#EngVocab: Adjectives That Describe Personalities (3)

Hi, fellas! How are you?

We meet again in another series of adjectives that could describe someone’s personality. For the first and second installment of this topic, please visit: https://englishtips4u.com/2012/07/13/engvocab-adjectives-that-describes-personality/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2018/03/12/engvocab-adjectives-that-describe-personalities-2/

Daft = silly, foolish (informal use).
“There is nothing daft about my fondness for Daft Punk. Their music suits my taste.”

Daft Punk.jpg
Daft Punk (pic from grammy.com)

Deranged = mad, insane.
“Police managed to stop that deranged gunman before he could shoot anyone.”

Debonair = from old French ‘de bon aire,’ meaning stylish, charming, and confident. Usually used to describe a man.
“Many who have met Nicholas Saputra described the actor as debonair.”

Dapper = Neat, well-dressed. Also used to describe a man.
“The Academy Awards were crowded by charming ladies and dapper gentlemen.”

Eloquent = fluent and persuasive in speaking or writing.
“She is quite an eloquent young lady. She would make a good public speaker.”

Enchanting = delightfully charming or attractive.
“Unlike her casual daily appearance, she became an enchanting lady on her wedding day.”

Expressive = effectively conveying thoughts or feelings.
“Emilia is such an expressive person. We could know how she feels by looking at her face.”

Emilia clarke
Emilia Clarke (pic from pinterest).

Fair = in accordance with rules or standards.
“If you should become a leader, be a fair one.”

Faithful = loyal, devoted.
“Her late husband was a faithful person. He always spent his free time with the family.”

Fearless = bold, brave.
“Naomi Campbell is a fierce, fearless woman. No wonder she has the longest running career as a supermodel.”

Flirtatious = behaving in such a way to suggest a playful attraction.
“Who was the flirtatious guy you were talking to? He seemed to make you uncomfortable.”

Frank = open, honest, and direct in speech or writing, especially when dealing with unpalatable matters.
“Is she always so frank, even though not so many people agree with her?”

Funky = modern and stylish in an unconventional or striking way.
“Lady Gaga is funky and quirky, in an extraordinary way.”

Lady Gaga.jpg
Lady Gaga (pic from pinterest).

 

There they go, fellas! As ever, the best way to practice and memorise new vocabularies is by using them a lot. Start incorporating these new words in your daily conversation. Check your dictionaries often to understand the context better.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 9 April, 2018.


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#EngVocab: Adjectives That Describe Personalities (2)

We know that English is very rich in expressions. We can describe anyone and anything with so many ways; idioms, phrases, and words amongst many others. We will discuss one of them.

Before you continue reading, you might want to check our previous article on this subject: #EngVocab: Adjectives That Describe Personalities.

Anhedonic = unable to feel happiness.
“In the ‘Winnie the Pooh,’ Eeyore is described as a depressed, anhedonic stuffed donkey.”

Agreeable = pleasant, enjoyable.
“She’s an agreeable companion. You won’t get bored.”

Assertive = self-assured, confident (without being aggressive).
“As a team leader, you should be more assertive.”

Bold = strong, brave, willing to take a risk.
“She’s so bold. She does not wait for anyone to introduce her to the CEO.”

Brooding = showing deep unhappiness.
“He’s always brooding; I don’t know what’s wrong with him.”

Childish = immature.
“She’s so childish that she always throws tantrums over small problems.”

Childlike = innocent, having good qualities associated with a child.
“Her laughter is childlike; it’s contagious.”

Chirpy = cheerful, lively.
“Quenzino is such a chirpy little fella. I wanna pinch his cheeks.”

pexels-photo-774910.jpeg
A chirpy baby (Picture from WordPress).

 

Dark = mysterious.
“Whenever I forget to bring my driving license with me, the police always look like dark and intimidating figures.”

Dim = stupid (informal use) OR dim-witted = slow (in Bahasa Indonesia: lemot).
“Please don’t use sarcasm with him. He’s dim; he won’t get it.”

To make it easier to memorize them, try to use one of the words on the list on your daily conversations. Be careful with some words that have a negative connotation.

P.S.: The list will continue.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 12 March, 2018.


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#WOTD: Cacophony

Hi, Fellas! It’s good to see you again this evening. How’s your day?

In this session we are going to discuss “cacophony.” Is there anyone have an idea of the meaning of this word?

“Ex. Shouting wife.. Lol.” – @cris_zysier

Oxford Dictionary states that “cacophony” is an unpleasant/harsh sound. In a simpler way hand you can also define it as a noise. It is said that “cacophony” was derived from a Greek word called “kakophonia” or “kakophonos.” Kakophonos itself is the combination of “kakos,” which means “bad,” and “phone” (sound).

There are some example of cacophonies in our daily life, such as the sound of vehicles on the road followed by the shouting horns, chatter, or a mixed sound of music. According to Merriam-Webster dictionary, there are some related vocabulary to “cacophony.” They are “blast,” “uproar,” “clatter,” etc.

Lastly, here are some example of sentences that contain “cacophony”

  • “The room is full of people. I think I will stay here since their voices are cacophonies to me.”
  • “The increasing number of personal vehicles is the main cause of cacophony on the road.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, January 18, 2018

#WOTD: Youthquake

Hello, dear Fellas. I wish you a happy new year although the moment has already passed. I hope you will achieve your plans and have a better year!

Today we will have a talk about ‘youthquake.’ Maybe some of you knew that ‘youthquake’ is actually the word of the year in 2017, but this word is new for me and perhaps for one of you, too. Besides, there is no time limit in learning. Don’t you agree?

I saw ‘youthquake’ at the very first time while I was browsing some news in Jakarta Post. It stated that Oxford Dictionary named it as the word of 2017.

Is there anyone who can tell me what it means?

“A change affected by youth?” – @puputrbc

‘Youthquake’ means a significant change in some aspect, such as political, social, business, culture, etc., that was lead by young people. Could you give me some example of something as the product of the change? As a simple illustration, I think the significant raise of cafes is.

“Startup business, I guess.” – @kaonashily

Even though this word is just recently known, but it is said that ‘youthquake’ was mentioned publicly in 1960s by Vague Magazine editor. Here are some example of ‘youthquake’ in sentences:

  • “Have you noticed that youthquake had already existed along with the rapid development of social media?”
  • “Youthquake had silently changed our lifestyle.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, January 4, 2018

#WOTD: Debutante

Hello, Fellas. How are you today? This evening we are going to discuss “debutante.” Are you familiar with this word?

The very first time I found “debutante” is when I was reading historical fiction novel. It was about a selection to get a bride for crown prince of a kingdom.

If you take a look in Merriam-Webster dictionary, “debutante” is originally a French word. It means grand attendance of an upper-class young lady to parties. Since they are a high-class parties, the lady definitely wears her best gown to create a good impression.

Generally, debutantes will be presented in a royal party in order where the nobles may choose one of them as their soon-to-be bride. Here are some illustration of the “debutante” usage in a sentence:

  • “Nina is the most debutante in this season.”
  • “A debutante should have a beauty as well as a good education.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, September 14, 2017

#WOTD: Gratis

You see it right, Fellas. We will discuss the word ‘gratis’ today.

I knew ‘gratis’ as a Dutch word when I attended a short Dutch course several months ago. At that time, I thought that ‘gratis’ had originally been brought by Dutch in colonization era and then we adopted it into Indonesian vocabulary. However, It surprised me when I found the word ‘gratis’ in English written book I am currently reading.

After I did a brief research, ‘gratis’ is originally Latin. It means kindness or thankful. You might find there are other sources, such as Collins dictionary and Merriam-webster, stated ‘gratis’ is also borrowed from the word ‘gratia’ which means favour. It is known that people started to be familiar with this word in late Middle English period (15th century.)

As an English vocabulary, ‘gratis’ shares the same meaning to Dutch or Indonesian. ‘Gratis’ means free or without (money) charge. In addition, it can be an adverb or an adjective.

Example:

  • “You don’t need to pay for this hamburger. It’s gratis.”
  • “I got this bicycle gratis for winning a competition.”
  • “You can get a gratis ice cream if you show this coupon to McD staff.”

Latin is well-known as a universal language, especially in science. So, you may find it in other literature, too, e.g., German, Italian, and Portuguese.

Additional source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Tuesday, April 25, 2017.

 

#WOTD: Nitpick

Hi fellas, have you ever corrected someone’s insignificant typo or other ignorable mistake? Well, did you know there’s a word for that? It’s “nitpick“.

 

did-you-mean-16aeead7a349d1cbf62d2ddd71b37971
Did you mean: nitpick

 

Nitpick” can act as a verb or a noun. The word means criticizing small and unimportant detail. For example, when your friend type “Youre welcome” in a text message and you correct him saying he missed an apostrophe, you’re nitpicking at him. When using “nitpick” as a verb with an object, you can say “nitpick at” or “nitpick about“.

Here are some example sentences with “nitpick”:

“It’s a really well-designed house, I can’t find thing to nitpick about.”

“People can nitpick all they want but I’m still proud of my first published book that I worked very hard for.”

“We get along very well although sometimes we can’t help nitpicking at each other.”


Compiled and written by @Fafafin for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, March 2, 2017

#WOTD: Whilst

‘Whilst’ is a conjunction (kata sambung), a word used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause.

As a conjunction, ‘whilst’ means the same as ‘while‘. Both mean ‘during the time that something else happens.’

Example:

  • She reads a novel whilst waiting for her boyfriend.
  • She reads a novel while waiting for her boyfriend.

‘Whilst’ and ‘while’ indicate that two events are happening at the same time.

On going events:

  • reading a novel
  • waiting for boyfriend

Not just that, both ‘whilst’ and ‘while’ can also mean ‘in contrast with something else.’

Example:

  • Her top is white, whilst her pants are black.
  • Her top is white, while her pants are black.

Here’s another example of using ‘whilst’ in showing contrast.

Example:

  • Whilst ‘of’ refers to possession, ‘from’ refers to origins.

 

So, you may now ask:

When should we use ‘whilst’? Or should we use ‘while’ instead?

Actually, the real question is not ‘when’ to use them; but ‘where‘ you should use ‘whilst.’

For Americans, the word ‘whilst’ tends to have an archaic ring. ‘Whilst’ is rarely used in American English. The use of ‘whilst’ gives the impression that the writer is British. ‘Whilst’ is fairly common in British publications.

So that sums up our discussion on the word ‘whilst.’ I hope the explanation was clear enough and not too boring. However, if you still have any question on how to use ‘whilst’ (or any other topic), feel free to hit us up.

 

Compiled and written by @Miss_Qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, February 24, 2017

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#WOTD: Woebegone

Although my day went great, my friend’s wasn’t so much since he looked woebegone. I asked, of course, as a good friend. He said he was fine, but that sad look hinted that he wasn’t telling the truth.

From the illustration above, you should have guessed which word we will discuss in this session.

Woebegone is an adjective. It means strongly affected by woe or exhibiting a great sorrow. It could also mean being in a sorry state.

Woebegone originated in the 13th century, derived from a phrase “me is wo begon woe has beset me.” There are some synonyms of ‘woebegone,’ namely:

  • suffering,
  • troubled,
  • forlorn, and
  • gloomy.

Let’s see how we use it in sentences, shall we?

  • “He looked woebegone (sad looking) after his date left him for another man.”
  • “Wow, you look woebegone (being in a sorry state)! Get some shower or I’ll have you kicked out of your room!” I said.

Compiled and written by @bintilvice for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, 19 February 2016

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#WOTD: Cloudburst

Have you ever heard of ‘Cloudburst’? Do you know what the word means? Here are some fellas’ guesses about the word.

Awan badai –

Cloud means awan, and burst means ledakan. So cloudburst means awan puting beliung? – 
Yes, all the answers above are correct.
According to Merriam-Webster, ‘cloudburst’ is a noun which means a sudden and very heavy downpour.
The word ‘cloudburst’ was first used in the early 1800s. It may be the translation of a German noun, Wolkenbruch. Here are some synonyms of it: deluge, downpour, storm, and torrent.
Here are some examples of cloudburst in a sentence:
  1. “The weatherman warned of possible cloudbursts in the afternoon.”
  2. “On September 6, 2014, there was a cloudburst in Kashmir valley killing more than 200 people.”
Here are some other examples from our fellas:
  1. “The cloudburst on Korea two weeks ago was very terrifying.” – 
  2. “I am not able to go somewhere due to cloudburst comes at the moment.” – 
Source: dictionary.com; Merriam-webster.com
Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, November 20, 2016

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#WOTD: Eloquent

Hi, fellas! How did you spend your day?

I want to highlight that I spent my breaks from work today to watch some inspiring TED Talks. What I admire about the speakers in those talks is how eloquent they are. I think their eloquence is part of what makes their talks powerful and persuasive.

Anyway, that brings us to our #WOTD today: Eloquent.

Eloquent is an adjective. The word means having the ability to use language clearly and effectively. An eloquent person is good at speaking and persuading people. Eloquent can also mean clearly expressing feeling or meaning when the word is used to describe speech or a writing. Words synonymous to eloquent are articulate, expressive, and fluent.

In addition to the sentence that I tweeted earlier, here are more examples of how to use eloquent in a sentence:

  • Her argument was expressed so eloquently that the audience can’t help but agree with it.
  • That eloquent storyteller has published a very beautiful novel recently.

 

Compiled and written by @Fafafin for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, November 24, 2016

 

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#WOTD: Clean, clear

Have you ever wondered if you’ve been using ‘clean’ and ‘clear’ correctly, fellas? Now, it has nothing to do with facial product with the same name.

Clean, Clear.JPG

Talking about those two words will bring us to a wide and broad explanation. I would summarize it in this #WOTD post.

 

As adjectives

As an adjective, ‘clean’ means free from dirt, marks, or stains; morally uncontaminated, pure, innocent; free from unwanted substances.

On the other hand, ‘clear’ means obvious, visible, or easily understood.

Saying somebody’s face is clean means the face is spotless (no acne, no blemish, etc.). Saying it clear means the face is visible.

More examples, fellas.

  • I really love this town. The air is so clean. (The air is unpolluted in that town).
  • He keeps his place very clean. (His place is neat and spotless).
  • Am I making myself clear? (Am I understood/do you understand what I mean?)
  • It’s not clear yet who will be the head of the committee. (The head of the committee is not known/obvious yet).

 

As verbs

If the words function as verbs, ‘to clean an object’ is to remove anything that makes the object dirty.

‘To clear an object’ means to remove anything that hinders it from being obvious or visible.

Example:

  • Clean the table (Wipe off the dirt from the table).
  • Clear the table (Remove any objects on the table to create more space).

‘To cleanse’ means to clean up something by/as if by washing.

Example:

  • This purification ceremony is held to cleanse our spiritual being.
  • Don’t forget to cleanse your face before bed.

That’s what I can share for now! Hope the explanation is clear enough.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 24 October, 2016

 

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#EngVocab: Coffee

Do you like coffee, Fellas? If you do, then this is the perfect article for you to enrich your vocabulary about coffee! Please do chime in anytime! I’m not an expert in coffee-ology but I love it so much I decided to compose an article about it.

  1. Barista. Meaning: You already know this. A person who makes coffee drinks as a profession.
  2. Espresso. Meaning: not expresso. Strong dark coffee prepared by forcing near-boiling water under pressure to finely ground coffee beans.
  3. Americano. Meaning: one or two shots of espresso with additional water.
  4. Cappuccino. Meaning: 1/3 of coffee, 1/3 of milk, 1/3 of foam. Sometimes topped with chocolate powder.
  5. Crema. Meaning: reddish substance that appears on top of espresso during the brewing period.
  6. Latte. Meaning: Coffee with a lot (approx.: 8 oz.) of steamed milk. Flavoring may be added to form flavored lattes.
  7. Decaf/decaffeinated. Meaning: Coffee without its psychoactive substance aka caffeine. (But why?)
  8. Mocha/Caffè Mocha. Meaning: may refer to many kinds of coffee but basically it is chocolate caffè latte.

So that was it, Fellas! I hope now you know the difference between cappuccino and latte!

Compiled and written by @bintilvice for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, October 14, 2016

 

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#WOTD: On a par with

‘On a par with’ is often written as ‘on par with’, without ‘a.’ But, both writing styles have the same meaning: equals to or similar to someone or something.

Now, let’s see how the phrase is used in sentences. Example:

  • The hospitality of this home-stay is on a par with a hotel’s.
  • I think women should be on a par with men in having the same opportunities and gaining appreciation in one’s workplace.

Additional example from a fella on Twitter:

We are on a par with others in front of God. – @fijarhajianto

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 5 September, 2016

 

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#WOTD: Precocious

The word we’re going to talk about in this post is ‘precocious’. Have you ever heard of it?

‘Precocious’ is an adjective used to describe an early mature in development, especially mental development. ‘Precocious’ comes from Latin word ‘praecox,’ which means ‘early ripening‘ or ‘premature.’

By 1650, English speakers turned the word ‘praecox‘ into ‘precocious’. It was used to describe plants that produced blossoms before their leaves came out.

By the 1670s, ‘precocious’ was also being used to describe humans who developed skills or talents before others typically did.

Here are some examples of it in a sentence:

  • A precocious child, she went to university at the age of 15.
  • A precocious musician, he was giving concerts when he was seven.

Here is another example from one of our fellas, @micah_adrian:

  • My cousin is a precocious girl. She thinks like an adult from such a young age and yes, she’s a very serious person.

 

Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, August 21, 2016

 

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#WOTD: Salience

 

tumblr_static_axi5y8nmrio8kgkok4s0c0ccg.jpg

In this occasion, we are going to discuss a word that I just discovered when reading a research on language teaching and the word is ‘salience.’ Salience (noun) means is the state or condition of being prominent. (Salient; adjective)

Oxford dictionary defines the word ‘salience’ as most noticeable or important. Meanwhile, Cambridge defines the same word as the fact of being important to or connected with what is happening or being discussed.

The word is prominently found in linguistics and other fields of studies, such as sociology, psychology, and political studies. In psychology, for example, we have ‘social salience,’ which means a set of reasons which draw an observer’s attention toward a particular object.

‘Salience’ comes from the Latin ‘salire‘, meaning ‘to leap.’

In short, we could draw a conclusion that ‘salience’ shares the same sense to ‘importance.’

Some examples of ‘salience’ in sentences are:

  • The salience of these facts was questioned by several speakers.
  • Our birthday will always be a date that jumps out at you with a lot of salience.
  • Away from these predominantly liberal arenas, however, white identity has found a more potent form of salience. (The New Yorker)
  • The researchers saw a drop in activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, part of the salience network of the brain. (Time)
  • Crises, particularly wars, may increase the salience of national considerations. (Salon)

Those are some information on the word ‘salience’ that we have gathered for you. Hope it’s clear enough to sufficiently introduce you to the word and its usage.

Thanks for your attention today!

 

Compiled and written by @Wisznu for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, August 11, 2016

 

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#WOTD: Ambrosial

Hello hey hi, fellas! How are you all?

Have you ever heard of the word ‘ambrosial’, fellas? Today we are going to talk about it!

Ambrosial is an adjective. It means highly pleasing, especially to the sense of taste.

The word ‘ambrosial’ was first used in 1590s.

It comes from Latin ambrosius, from Greek ambrosios, which means “immortal, divine”.

Ambrosial also means ‘having a pleasant smell’.

Some synonyms of ambrosial:

fragrant, aromatic, perfumed, delicious, appetizing, dainty, flavorful, delish.

Some antonyms of ambrosial:

smelly, stinky, distasteful, flavorless, tasteless, yucky.

Example use:

As I stood wiping quietly I could smell the ambrosial odours from the kitchen.

– The Friendly Road

That is all I can share for now, fellas. I hope it could be useful for you :)

Compiled and written by @waitatiri at @EnglishTips4U on August 2, 2016.

#WOTD: Box Office

Hello hello, Fellas! Happy to be back. Are you there? :)

The Annual Academy Awards ceremony was held in March and the hype was definitely huge. Especially for @LeoDiCaprio and his fans. Following the hype of this year’s Academy Awards, this session is about Box Office.

There are several versions of the origin of the term “Box Office.” The first version says that the term “box office” originates from William Shakespeare’s Globe Theater. The room to count the amount of money the theater made in a day became known as a box office.

Another version says that the term is attested since 1786, presumably from sales of boxes (private seating areas in a theater). Now, the term is frequently used, as a synonym for the amount of business a particular production, a film or theater show, receives.

For movies released in North America, box office figures are usually divided between domestic, meaning U.S. and Canada and foreign which includes all other countries. Weekly box office figures are taken to be from Friday through Thursday to allow for the fact that most movies are released on a Friday.

Box office (n) also means a booth, as in a theater or stadium, where tickets are sold.

Box office (adj) means of or relating to the box office or to the business and commercial aspects of the theater.

Example:

  • “A box-office film, a box-office attraction.”

That’s it for today, fellas. See you tomorrow!

Compiled and written by @EnglishTips4U for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, 2 March, 2016.


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