Category Archives: WOTD

#EngKnowledge: Word of the Year

Hi, fellas, did you know that Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year 2019 is ‘climate emergency?’

We face more and more weather and climate-related crisis every year, so it is natural that people all around the world are getting more curious about the term ‘climate emergency’ and decided to look it up on the dictionaries.

As defined by Oxford Dictionaries, climate emergency is “a situation in which urgent action is required to reduce or halt climate change and avoid potentially irreversible environmental damage resulting from it.”

But what is ‘Word of the Year’ and how did this tradition start?

words text scrabble blocks
Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

 

Word(s) of the Year refers to any of various assessments as to the most important word(s) or expression(s) during a specific year.

The first known version of this tradition is the German one, Wort des Jahres, which was started in 1971. The American Dialect Society is the oldest English version, started in 1991. By early 2000s, a lot of organisations began to announce their versions of Word(s) of the Year for various purposes and with various criteria for the assessment.

Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year for the last five years are:

2015: Face with tears of joy emoji or laughing-crying emoji, the first emoji to have ever been selected.
2016: Post-truth.
2017: Youthquake.
2018: Toxic.
2019: Climate emergency.

The American Dialect Society also chose the Word of the Decade, which is ‘web’ for 1990s, ‘to google’ for 2000s, and singular ‘they’ for 2010s. According to the Society, the Word of the 20th century is jazz and the Word of the Past Millennium is ‘she.’

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 20 February 2020.


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#EngVocab: Words Related to Mobile Phone

Nowadays, a mobile phone has become a permanent part to our hands. We check our phones constantly even if there is no notification of incoming messages or calls or anything important on social medias. Do you also experience the same, fellas?

person taking photos of food
Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

This article will discuss words related to mobile phones.

1. Credit
This is a common term for prepaid mobile phone service, where we purchase some amount to use the provider’s service. In Indonesian, the term ‘phone credit’ has the same meaning as ‘pulsa.’

2. Data
(Mobile) data is what connects the phone to the internet when it is not connected to a Wi-Fi network.

3. Plans
Plans mean a package that might include a number of SMS, several minutes of phone calls, and some gigabits of mobile data that we purchase from the provider on a one-off occasion or on a regular basis.

Made Wirautama (@wirautama): In Indonesian we call it “paket data”.

4. 4G and 4.5G
4G means the fourth generation of mobile phone connection. It allows a mobile phone to connect to the internet with a relatively high download speed, which is 7-12 Mbps (megabits per second), and converts the phone to a mobile multimedia. 4.5G is an improved version of 4G with faster connection that could reach 14-21 Mbps. At the moment, we’re all excited for 5G, of course.

5. 4K
What is a 4K video? A video with 4K on it means that it was shoot with a lens with 3840 x 2160 pixels. It provides clearer, less fuzzy motions.

6. 720p
720p is currently the most common number to describe screen resolution. ‘P’ means progressive-scan and ‘720’ is the number of horizontal lines on the display. Higher screen resolutions are 1080p, 2160p (4K), and 8K.

7. HD
HD stands for high definition, which is also another name for a video with 720p resolution. 1080p is full HD (FHD). 1440p is Quad HD (QHD). 2160p or 4K is Ultra HD (UHD).

8. Lite
A lite version is a ‘lighter’ version of an application. It typically takes smaller space of the phone memory, displays media with lower resolutions, and has limited features compared to the full version.

9. Beta version
A beta version generally refers to a version of a piece of software that is made available for testing, typically by a limited number of users outside the company that is developing it, before its general release.

10. International roaming
The term refers to a feature that allows us to use the service of the provider in a foreign country where the service is not available. It usually costs more than the regular service.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 10 February 2020.


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#WOTD: Cast

Hi, fellas, how are you today? I hope your Monday went well.

Today, we are going to discuss the word ‘cast’ on #WOTD. What do you have in mind every time you read or hear this word, fellas?

For me, the word ‘cast’ is always associated with an actor or actress being chosen to play a specific role in a movie.

E.g.: “When I heard that Joaquin Phoenix was cast as the Joker, I really couldn’t wait to see the movie.”

Clapper

 

However, aside of that meaning, there are also other meaning of the word ‘cast.’ Let’s start on how it functions as a verb.

The verb ‘to cast’ means to set or throw something aside, especially with force.
E.g.: “He cast the newspaper aside when he found a misleading article written about him.”

It can also mean to cause a light or a shadow to appear on a certain surface.
E.g.: “The morning sun cast an orange shade over the empty field.”

‘To cast’ can also mean to shape or to mould something (usually of metal) in its molten form and let it cool until it becomes solid.
E.g.: “The ring was cast in Mordor.”

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If we ‘cast a look/glance/smile, etc.’ towards something, it means that we throw a look, a glance, a smile, etc. to a specific direction.
E.g.: “As she wasn’t prepared, she couldn’t help casting nervous glances towards her classmates during the quiz.”

There are also ‘to cast a vote,’ which means to vote, and ‘to cast a spell/curse,’ which means to put a spell or a curse on someone.

In past tense and participle tense, the word ‘cast’ retains its form. So, the past form, the participle form, and the passive form of ‘cast’ are still ‘cast.’

As a noun, ‘cast’ generally refers to an object made in a mould. For example, an accident just happened to someone causing his ankle to sprain, so he needs to wear a cast.

 

Written and compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 9 September 2019.


 

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#WOTD: Embezzle

Hi, Fellas! How do you do along this week?

In this session, I would like to share some information about “embezzle.” Have you heard about this word?

“Embezzle” is adopted from the word “embesiller” Anglo-French, which means “to make a way with.” According to Merriam Webster Dictionary, this word acts as a verb with a meaning “to steal money you’ve been trusted with.”

In my view, this word refers the ones who work in finance division that steal the company’s or organizations’s fund.

There are some related words to “embezzle,” such as “misappropriate,” “misuse,” “preempt,” “peculate,” etc. Lastly, here are some examples of sentences that contains embezzle:
1. “She was arrested from emblezzing his company’s.”
2. “He’s aware that his boss embezzle the company’s money, but he pretends to not know about it.”

 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, July 19, 2019

#WOTD: Hoodwink

Hi, Fellas! How are you doing? How are your days so far? This evening we meet again in word of the day session. This time I am going to share ‘hoodwink’ as the topic. Have you ever heard about this word?

Hoodwink is the combination of ‘hood’ and ‘wink,’ which means to trick or deceiving someone. According to the meaning,it is obvious that ‘hoodwink’ acts as an verb if we use it in a sentence. There are some words that are related to ‘hoodwink,’ such as ‘delute’ ‘fake out,’ and ‘hoax.’

Lastly,here are some example of ‘hoodwink’ in a sentence
1. “Don’t be hoodwinked by some news without verification.’
2. “They hoodwinked George by telling him lies.’

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, April 12, 2019

#WOTD: Impetus

Hi, Fellas! How are you doing? How are your days so far? This evening we meet again in word of the day session. This time I am going to share ‘impetus’ as the topic. Have you ever heard about this word?

Impetus is adopted from Latin, ‘impetere,’ which means to attack. In a sentence, ‘impetus’ acts as a noun with a meaning a force to activate a process or to increase its activity. In addition, this word could mean a force in order to make something moving.

There are some synonyms of ‘impetus,’ such as

  • ‘boost,’
  • ‘stimulant,’
  • ‘encouragement,’
  • ‘motivation,’ etc.

 

To complete this discussion, I would like to give some sentences with ‘impetus.’

  • “The picture of a large sum of money is the impetus of corruption.”
  • “The permission to study abroad could be the impetus, so he’s been study harder lately.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, March 1, 2019

#WOTD: Foray

Hi, Fellas! How are you doing? In this evening we are going to have word of the day session. Anyway, have you heard about ‘foray’?

‘Foray’ originally comes from Middle English ‘forrayen,’ which means ‘forager.’

We can use ‘foray’ either as a noun or a verb in a sentence. If you regard it as a noun, ‘foray’ means a sudden invasion/attack. On the other hand, it also means an attempt to try a new activity. In addition, ‘foray’ always refers a new territory/scope or a new occupation. 

There are some synonyms of ‘foray,’ such as ‘irruption,’ ‘invasion,’ and ‘raid.’

Lastly, here are some example of sentences with ‘foray,’

  • “I heard that last night the police forayed that abandoned building. So, it’s true that there had been a suspicious activity there.”
  • “The author forayed into romance.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, February 1, 2019

#WOTD: Valorous

Hello, Fellas! How are you today? Isn’t today a lovely day since it’s weekend! Anyway, how’s your week so far? Mine is great because I finally got something I need in order to pursue my desired plan, or maybe you can say it my future.

Well, back to Englishtips4u session, this evening we are going to talk about a word called ‘valorous.’ Is there someone familiar with this word?

According to Merriam-webster dictionary, ‘valorous’ is an adjective with “brave” as a meaning. It is said that ‘valorous’ was originally derived from French ‘valeureux,’ but there is another statement that this word came from Latin ‘valorosus.’ In addition, there are some synonyms of ‘valorous,’ such as:

  • ‘bold,’
  • ‘dauntless,’
  • ‘valiant’ and
  • ‘courageous.’

Here are some example of the usage of ‘valorous’ in a sentence:

  • “I think someone who have courage to criticise our government is such valorous person.”
  • “He tackled the thief who was going to attack me with a knife. What a valorous act!”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, November 16, 2018

#WOTD: Wanderlust

Hi, Fellas! Good evening. How’s your days? I hope you experienced something great! In this session I would like to talk about ‘wanderlust.’ Have you heard about it?

“I’ve heard about it. But i never know what it means,” – @angelccxo 

“Wanderlust = a desire to travel,” – @Aldo_Bandan 

I saw ‘wanderlust’ as a novel title in Wattpad beforehand. This word sounds nice, doesn’t it? ‘Wanderlust’ is a noun that has a meaning as a strong feeling to wander/travel.  Merriam-Webster Dictionary states that this word was form from a German, “wandern,” and “lust.”

Unfortunately, there is no any related word or synonym of “wanderlust” right now. #WOTD Finally, here are some example on using ‘wanderlust’ in a sentence:

  • “Wanderlust has led her to Paris.”
  • ‘I sometimes get annoyed by Ana because of her uncontrollable wanderlust.’

source:

Merriam Webster Dictionary

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, September 14, 2018

#WOTD: Paroxysm

Hi, Fellas! Good evening. How’s your days? I hope you experienced something great! In this session I would like to talk about ‘paroxysm.’ Have you heard about it?  

Well, the first time I saw ‘paroxysm’ was when I seeing through my Pinterest timeline. It caught my eyes because I felt like there was something behind this word. ‘Paroxysm’ is a noun that has a meaning as a sudden burst of emotion. it has to be a strong feeling and you cannot control it. As a simple illustration, jealousy!

On the other hand, according to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, you could also say that ‘paroxysm’ can also refers to an action.  There are some words that are similar to ‘paroxysm,’ they are ‘explosion,’ ‘eruption,’ ‘outburst,’ ‘convulsion,’ etc.

Here are some example on using ‘paroxysm’ in a sentence:

  1. “Paroxysm of laughter erupted when she was telling her funny experience.”
  2. ‘i was overwhelmed by paroxysm of jealousy when I saw him with another girl.’

source:

  • Cambridge Dictionary
  • Merriam Webster Dictionary

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, August 24, 2018

#WOTD: Roseate

Hi, Fellas!! Happy Eid al-Fitr for those who celebrate it. Happy holiday for those who in a vacation. How was your day anyway?

This evening I would like to talk about the word “roseate.” This word came from Latin, “roseus,” and it was adapted and known as an English word in 15th century. “Roseate” acts an adjective, which means pink or a color that resembles a rose.

  • Example
    • “I love the roseate cardigan.”

On the other hand, “roseate” also mean optimistic. In this matter, there are some words that are related to “roseate,” such as “confident,” “doubtless,” “assuring,” etc.

  • Example:
    • “Where’s my roseate Emma? I am sure you will pass the test.”

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, June 16, 2018

#EngVocab: Eid al-Fitr Tradition

Hi, hello, fellas! How was your Eid al-Fitr holiday? Eid Mubarak for all of you who celebrated it.

While we are still in the festivities, I’d like to share some words related to Eid al-Fitr tradition in Indonesia.

architecture building city dawn
Photo by Indra Gunawan on Pexels.com

Mudik (Ina) = Homecoming trip (Eng)
A trip to our hometown that we usually do at the end of Ramadan.

Bermaaf-maafan (Ina) = forgiving one another (Eng)
It is believed that we should celebrate Eid al-Fitr with a clean mind, body, and soul, and forgiving one another is one way to achieve it.

Kemacetan panjang (Ina) = traffic congestion (Eng)
It is not exactly a tradition, but traffic congestion happens almost every year during homecoming. Luckily, the traffic and road condition have improved a lot this year.

Silaturahmi (Ina) = amity, tight friendship (Eng)
Refers to a close bond between two human beings who might or might not be related by blood.

Halalbihalal (Ina) = Gathering to ask for forgiveness (Eng)
An occasion when family or close friends gather to catch up with each other and ask/give forgiveness.

Ketupat (Ina) = Steamed rice cake wrapped in diamond-shaped palm leaves (Eng)
Similarly, we also have lontong (Ina) = steamed rice cake wrapped in banana leaves (Eng). Phew, quite a mouthful, isn’t it?

Opor ayam (Ina) = chicken braised in coconut milk (Eng)
One of the most popular dishes served during Eid al-Fitr celebration.

Rendang (Ina) = rendang (Eng)
This widely popular dish has been recognized by its own name, even when we are speaking English. We can also refer to it as meat simmered in spices and coconut milk.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 18 June 2018.


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#EngClass: Portmanteau

Cronut.jpg
A cronut (croissant + donut). Pic from Wikipedia.

Have you ever heard or used the word ‘portmanteau?’

A portmanteau (/pɔːrtˈmæntoʊ/) or portmanteau word is a blend of words, in which parts of multiple words or their sounds are combined into a new word. A portmanteau is also called blending word. For initial information of blending words, check out https://englishtips4u.com/2012/06/27/engclass-blending-words/

There are many portmanteau words that have been widely used, such as ‘smog’ (from ‘smoke’ + ‘fog’), ‘netizen’ (from ‘internet’ + ‘citizen’), or ‘workaholic’ (from ‘work’ + ‘alcoholic’).

If we categorize them, we will find that there are portmanteau words for:

  1. Animals.
    A new breed is usually named with a portmanteau word.
    E.g.:
    A ‘liger’ is the offspring of a male lion and a female tiger.
  2. Popular culture.
    E.g.:
    – ‘Brangelina’ is a portmanteau of Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie’s name.
    – ‘Bromance’ is a portmanteau of ‘brother’ and ‘romance,’ usually used to describe a tight friendship between two men.
  3. Vehicle.
    E.g.:
    – ‘Motorcycle,’ from ‘motorized’ + ‘bicycle.’
    – ‘Taxicab,’ from ‘taxi’ + ‘cabriolet’ (a type of horse carriage). Now, taxicab is more commonly known as simply ‘taxi’ or ‘cab.’
  4. Cuisine.
    E.g.:
    – ‘Brunch,’ from ‘breakfast’ + ‘lunch.’
    – ‘Cronut,’ from ‘croissant’ + ‘doughnut.
  5. General use.
    E.g.:
    – ‘Brexit,’ from ‘Britain’ + ‘exit.’
    – ‘Hangry,’ from ‘hungry’ + ‘angry.’
  6. Internet and computing.
    E.g.:
    – ‘Email,’ from ‘electronic’ + ‘mail.’
    – ‘Internet,’ from ‘international’ + ‘network.’
    – ‘Skype,’ from ‘sky’ + ‘peer-to-peer.’
  7. Organizations/companies.
    E.g.:
    – ‘Pinterest,’ from ‘pin’ + ‘interest.’
    – ‘Microsoft,’ from ‘microcomputer’ + ‘software.’

 

@Rnfadillaa: I just knewwww netizen means internet citizen. Thanksss @EnglishTips4U.
@laptamy: How about Frienemy? Is it a portmanteau too?
Yes, ‘frenemy’ comes from ‘friend’ + ‘enemy,’ used to describe someone with whom we have a love-hate relationship.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, 18 April, 2018.


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#EngVocab: Adjectives That Describe Personalities (2)

We know that English is very rich in expressions. We can describe anyone and anything with so many ways; idioms, phrases, and words amongst many others. We will discuss one of them.

Before you continue reading, you might want to check our previous article on this subject: #EngVocab: Adjectives That Describe Personalities.

Anhedonic = unable to feel happiness.
“In the ‘Winnie the Pooh,’ Eeyore is described as a depressed, anhedonic stuffed donkey.”

Agreeable = pleasant, enjoyable.
“She’s an agreeable companion. You won’t get bored.”

Assertive = self-assured, confident (without being aggressive).
“As a team leader, you should be more assertive.”

Bold = strong, brave, willing to take a risk.
“She’s so bold. She does not wait for anyone to introduce her to the CEO.”

Brooding = showing deep unhappiness.
“He’s always brooding; I don’t know what’s wrong with him.”

Childish = immature.
“She’s so childish that she always throws tantrums over small problems.”

Childlike = innocent, having good qualities associated with a child.
“Her laughter is childlike; it’s contagious.”

Chirpy = cheerful, lively.
“Quenzino is such a chirpy little fella. I wanna pinch his cheeks.”

pexels-photo-774910.jpeg
A chirpy baby (Picture from WordPress).

 

Dark = mysterious.
“Whenever I forget to bring my driving license with me, the police always look like dark and intimidating figures.”

Dim = stupid (informal use) OR dim-witted = slow (in Bahasa Indonesia: lemot).
“Please don’t use sarcasm with him. He’s dim; he won’t get it.”

To make it easier to memorize them, try to use one of the words on the list on your daily conversations. Be careful with some words that have a negative connotation.

P.S.: The list will continue.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 12 March, 2018.


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#WOTD: Cacophony

Hi, Fellas! It’s good to see you again this evening. How’s your day?

In this session we are going to discuss “cacophony.” Is there anyone have an idea of the meaning of this word?

“Ex. Shouting wife.. Lol.” – @cris_zysier

Oxford Dictionary states that “cacophony” is an unpleasant/harsh sound. In a simpler way hand you can also define it as a noise. It is said that “cacophony” was derived from a Greek word called “kakophonia” or “kakophonos.” Kakophonos itself is the combination of “kakos,” which means “bad,” and “phone” (sound).

There are some example of cacophonies in our daily life, such as the sound of vehicles on the road followed by the shouting horns, chatter, or a mixed sound of music. According to Merriam-Webster dictionary, there are some related vocabulary to “cacophony.” They are “blast,” “uproar,” “clatter,” etc.

Lastly, here are some example of sentences that contain “cacophony”

  • “The room is full of people. I think I will stay here since their voices are cacophonies to me.”
  • “The increasing number of personal vehicles is the main cause of cacophony on the road.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, January 18, 2018

#WOTD: Youthquake

Hello, dear Fellas. I wish you a happy new year although the moment has already passed. I hope you will achieve your plans and have a better year!

Today we will have a talk about ‘youthquake.’ Maybe some of you knew that ‘youthquake’ is actually the word of the year in 2017, but this word is new for me and perhaps for one of you, too. Besides, there is no time limit in learning. Don’t you agree?

I saw ‘youthquake’ at the very first time while I was browsing some news in Jakarta Post. It stated that Oxford Dictionary named it as the word of 2017.

Is there anyone who can tell me what it means?

“A change affected by youth?” – @puputrbc

‘Youthquake’ means a significant change in some aspect, such as political, social, business, culture, etc., that was lead by young people. Could you give me some example of something as the product of the change? As a simple illustration, I think the significant raise of cafes is.

“Startup business, I guess.” – @kaonashily

Even though this word is just recently known, but it is said that ‘youthquake’ was mentioned publicly in 1960s by Vague Magazine editor. Here are some example of ‘youthquake’ in sentences:

  • “Have you noticed that youthquake had already existed along with the rapid development of social media?”
  • “Youthquake had silently changed our lifestyle.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, January 4, 2018

#WOTD: Debutante

Hello, Fellas. How are you today? This evening we are going to discuss “debutante.” Are you familiar with this word?

The very first time I found “debutante” is when I was reading historical fiction novel. It was about a selection to get a bride for crown prince of a kingdom.

If you take a look in Merriam-Webster dictionary, “debutante” is originally a French word. It means grand attendance of an upper-class young lady to parties. Since they are a high-class parties, the lady definitely wears her best gown to create a good impression.

Generally, debutantes will be presented in a royal party in order where the nobles may choose one of them as their soon-to-be bride. Here are some illustration of the “debutante” usage in a sentence:

  • “Nina is the most debutante in this season.”
  • “A debutante should have a beauty as well as a good education.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, September 14, 2017

#WOTD: Gratis

You see it right, Fellas. We will discuss the word ‘gratis’ today.

I knew ‘gratis’ as a Dutch word when I attended a short Dutch course several months ago. At that time, I thought that ‘gratis’ had originally been brought by Dutch in colonization era and then we adopted it into Indonesian vocabulary. However, It surprised me when I found the word ‘gratis’ in English written book I am currently reading.

After I did a brief research, ‘gratis’ is originally Latin. It means kindness or thankful. You might find there are other sources, such as Collins dictionary and Merriam-webster, stated ‘gratis’ is also borrowed from the word ‘gratia’ which means favour. It is known that people started to be familiar with this word in late Middle English period (15th century.)

As an English vocabulary, ‘gratis’ shares the same meaning to Dutch or Indonesian. ‘Gratis’ means free or without (money) charge. In addition, it can be an adverb or an adjective.

Example:

  • “You don’t need to pay for this hamburger. It’s gratis.”
  • “I got this bicycle gratis for winning a competition.”
  • “You can get a gratis ice cream if you show this coupon to McD staff.”

Latin is well-known as a universal language, especially in science. So, you may find it in other literature, too, e.g., German, Italian, and Portuguese.

Additional source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Tuesday, April 25, 2017.