Category Archives: vocabulary

#ENGVOCAB: VARIOUS WAYS TO SAY ‘TO CRY’

This is such a time to be alive, fellas. Not only are we in a middle of a global pandemic and climate crisis, many people are struggling to make ends meet (to survive). Sometimes, it’s okay to take a break and sort out the emotions you are feeling.

Crying is one of some healthy ways to cope with stressful situations. However, it’s sometimes underrated because someone who cries is perceived as fragile or weak, whereas we know that expressing our emotions in a healthy way is actually a sign of strength.

Photo by burak kostak on Pexels.com

On this article are going to discuss several words we can use as an alternative of ‘to cry.’

1. To sob (terisak) = To shed tears audibly or sometimes noisily.

2. To weep/to shed tears (meneteskan air mata) = Usually used to describe someone who sheds tears quietly.

3. To wail (menangis sambil berteriak) = A cry caused by a deep pain, grief, and anger.

4. To bawl (menangis keras dan lama) = Typically more dramatic, more noisy, and lasting longer than sobbing.

5. To snivel (menangis pelan) = To cry and sniff in a feeble way.

6. To blubber (menangis tak terkendali) = To sob noisily and uncontrollably.

7. To squall (menangis keras, biasanya dilakukan bayi atau anak-anak) = Of a baby or a small child to cry noisily and continuously.

I hope you find this article useful. Having feelings or emotions is not wrong, fellas, and we could learn to handle them in a healthy way, as not to overwhelm us and the people around us. Stay safe and healthy!

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 8 October 2020.

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#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Clumsy’
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#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Tired’

#ENGVOCAB: SIMILAR WORDS, DIFFERENT MEANINGS

There are similar words that have different meanings and they are often confused with one another. Raise your hands if you’ve ever mixed up ‘dateline’ and ‘deadline.’

Photo by Jordan Benton on Pexels.com

Here are some of them:

Bully and bullish

These two words might seem similar, but they actually have different meanings.
‘Bully’ is an action of or a person who is intimidating those who seem more vulnerable.
‘Bullish’ is of someone who has personal qualities that resemble a bull: strong, assertive, and confident.

Childish and childlike

‘Childish’ means having personal qualities like a child but in an immature context.
‘Childlike’ means similar to a child in an adorable and innocent way.

Dateline and deadline

Some of us might have used ‘dateline’ to describe the latest time by which something should be completed, whilst we should have used ‘deadline’ instead.
‘Dateline’ is a line at the head of a news article that shows the time and place of when and where the article was written.
‘Deadline’ is the latest time by which something should be completed.

Exhausted and exhaustive

‘Exhausted’ means tired, drained, or spent.
‘Exhaustive’ means thorough or detailed.

Fiend and friend

Ever heard of or read the word ‘fiend,’ fellas? It looks similar to ‘friend,’ right? It actually has a completely different meaning because a ‘fiend’ is an evil spirit or a demon.
A ‘friend’ is a companion.

Handy and handful

These two words came from the root ‘hand.’
Something is ‘handy’ if it is useful.
Something is ‘handful’ if it has the quantity that fills our hands.
Someone is ‘handful’ if they are difficult to deal with.

Invisible and invincible

Something is ‘invisible’ if it cannot be seen.
Something is ‘invincible’ if it cannot be defeated.

Vile and veil

‘Vile’ is of someone who is extremely unpleasant, morally bad, or wicked. ‘Vile’ is synonymous with ‘evil.’
‘Veil’ is a piece of clothing that covers the face, usually worn by a woman.

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 24 September 2020.

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#EngTalk: The Importance of Improving Your Vocabulary

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#EngTrivia: Commonly Misused and Misspelled Vocabulary

#EngTrivia: Commonly Misused and Misspelled Vocabulary (2)

#EngTrivia: Idioms and Expressions with the Same or Similar Meanings in English and Indonesian

What are you doing for the Saturday night? I hope that you are staying safe at home but if you must go outside for essential purposes that cannot be delayed, please exercise safety precautions.

Several years ago, we posted an article about common expressions in English and its Indonesian counterparts. You can check it here: Expressions in English and Their Indonesian Counterparts Part 1 and Part 2. 

The background of these articles was that there are expressions in English that we cannot quite translate into Indonesian; we just know what they mean, thus we were trying to find similar expressions in Indonesian to help understand the English version better.

For this article, we are going to do something similar: we’ll start a series of idioms and expressions that have similar or even the same meanings in English and Indonesian. An example submitted by one of our followers on Twitter:

@fatfukuro: Don’t judge a book by its cover (Eng) and jangan menilai buku dari sampulnya (Ina).

pexels-photo-267669.jpeg
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

So here is the list of what we compiled so far:

  1. Backbone (Eng) = Tulang punggung (Ina)
    Meaning: the chief support of a system or an organisation.

  2. Backstab (Eng) = Menusuk dari belakang (Ina)
    Meaning: the action or practice of harming someone’s reputation whilst feigning friendship.

  3. Big-headed (Eng) = Besar kepala (Ina)
    Meaning: conceited or arrogant.

  4. Big-hearted (Eng) = Besar hati (Ina)
    Meaning: kind and generous.

  5. Big mouth (Eng) = Besar mulut (Ina)
    Meaning: a boastful person.

  6. Blue blood (Eng) = Darah biru (Ina)
    Meaning: a person of noble or royal birth.

  7. Bookworm (Eng) = Kutu buku (Ina)
    Meaning: someone who loves reading.

  8. Brainwash (Eng) = Cuci otak (Ina)
    Meaning: force someone to adopt a radically different belief.

  9. Brokenhearted (Eng) = Patah hati (Ina)
    Meaning: overwhelmed by grief or disappointment.

  10. Cold-blooded (Eng) = Berdarah dingin (Ina)
    Meaning: deliberately cruel or violent.

  11. Cool-headed (Eng) = Kepala dingin (Ina)
    Meaning: calm.

  12. Empty-handed (Eng) = Tangan hampa (Ina)
    Meaning: unsuccessful, fruitless effort.

  13. Fall in love (Eng) = Jatuh hati (Ina)
    Meaning: develop romantic feelings towards someone or deep liking for something.

  14. Flesh and blood (Eng) = Darah daging (Ina)
    Meaning: someone related to us by blood.

  15. Get some fresh air (Eng) = Cari angin (Ina)
    Meaning: go outside to take a break from a possibly stressful situation.

  16. Go in one ear, out of the other (Eng) = Masuk kuping kiri, keluar kuping kanan (Ina)
    Meaning: of a piece of information that is quickly forgotten.

  17. Golden child (Eng) = Anak emas (Ina)
    Meaning: a favoured child amongst a group of children.

  18. Half-heartedly (Eng) = Setengah hati (Ina)
    Meaning: not feeling fully committed or engaged to an activity.

  19. Head of the family (Eng) = Kepala keluarga (Ina)
    Meaning: someone who leads a family.

  20. Heavy heart (Eng) = Berat hati (Ina)
    Meaning: with much sadness and regret.

  21. Hot seat (Eng) = Kursi panas (Ina)
    Meaning: being in a position of heavy duty and responsibility.

  22. Iron fist (Eng) = Tangan besi (Ina)
    Meaning: of a government or someone exercising power in a ruthless or oppressive manner.

  23. Law of the jungle (Eng) = Hukum rimba (Ina)
    Meaning: of a world where those who are strong and apply ruthless self-interest will be most successful.

  24. Lift one’s hat to… (Eng) = Angkat topi (Ina)
    Meaning: praise, salute, congratulate, or pay tribute to someone.

  25. Open arms (Eng) = Tangan terbuka (Ina)
    Meaning: a warm welcome.

  26. Open secret (Eng) = Rahasia umum (Ina)
    Meaning: of a secret who is known to many people.

  27. Out of control (Eng) = Hilang kendali (Ina)
    Meaning: of something that’s no longer possible to manage.

  28. Pen pal (Eng) = Sahabat pena (Ina)
    Meaning: someone with whom we develop friendship by sending letters to one another, particularly if we live in different countries.

  29. Put one’s hands up (Eng) = Angkat tangan (Ina)
    Meaning: raise one’s hands to surrender.

  30. Quick on one’s feet (Eng) = Cepat kaki (Ina)
    Meaning: able to think and take quick action.

  31. Right hand (Eng) = Tangan kanan (Ina)
    Meaning: an assistant, the most important position next to someone.

  32. Scapegoat (Eng) = Kambing hitam (Ina)
    Meaning: someone who is blamed for the wrongdoings, mistakes, or faults of others.

  33. Silent witness (Eng) = Saksi bisu (Ina)
    Meaning: an object that displays traces of evidences of a crime.

  34. Stage fright (Eng) = Demam panggung (Ina)
    Meaning: nervousness before or during an appearance before an audience.

  35. Stepping stone (Eng) = Batu loncatan (Ina)
    Meaning: an action or event that helps someone to make progress towards a specified goal.

  36. Take something to one’s heart (Eng) = Memasukan ke dalam hati (Ina)
    Meaning: take criticism seriously and be affected or upset by it.

  37. Tangled web (Eng) = Benang kusut (Ina)
    Meaning: of a situation or a problem that is confusing or difficult to solve.

  38. Throw a towel (Eng) = Lempar handuk (Ina)
    Meaning: stop trying or doing something because lacking of determination or conviction that one can win or be successful.

  39. Turn a blind eye (Eng) = Tutup mata (Ina)
    Meaning: pretend not to notice something is happening, usually something bad.

  40. Two-faced (Eng) = Bermuka dua (Ina)
    Meaning: of someone being insincere or acting one way in certain situations and then in a contrary manner in others.

  41. Walk away (Eng) = Ambil langkah seribu (Ina)
    Meaning: easily, casually, or irresponsibly abandon a situation in which one is involved or for which one is responsible.

  42. Wash one’s hands of… (Eng) = Cuci tangan (Ina)
    Meaning: not wanting to be involved with someone or something, not taking responsibility of someone or something.

  43. Watch one’s mouth (Eng) = Jaga lidah/mulut (Ina)
    Meaning: being careful of what one says.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 11 July 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: Twitter Handles to Expand Your Vocabularies

Many of us are on self-quarantine due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Not only to keep ourselves safe and healthy, we are doing this to prevent further transmission of the virus to other people with whom we interact. We might not be showing symptoms (asymptomatic), but it does not always mean we are not carrying the virus with us. For me, it is better to be safe than sorry.

However, being on self-quarantine does come with challenging times. Eventually, I noticed my sleep pattern changes as I sleep or take frequent naps during the day and stay awake almost the whole night. Do you also experience the same?

I figured that I needed to find new interests to keep me busy and I decided to read and learn more especially about topics that I had never really touched before the pandemic.
Recently, I completed the 30-day word challenge by Merriam-Webster Dictionary.

Merriam Webster
Source: Merriam-Webster Dictionary’s Twitter handle

On this article, I’m going to share some accounts that will help you expand your vocabularies and learn grammar effectively.
1. Merriam-Webster dictionary
@MerriamWebster provides you with Word of the Day, the background story behind words and phrases, and trending words.

  1. Dictionary.com
    @Dictionarycom also provides word of the day and trending words, with quite a sassy and hilarious manner.
  2. The Oxford English Dictionary
    My most favourite feature of @OED is its Word of the Year, which doesn’t only cover the most searched word of the year as it might also introduce a new word that is widely used but not registered on any dictionaries yet.
  3. The Yuniversity
    @The_YUNiversity posts daily vocabulary and grammar lessons in just a few tweets and helpful infographics. Its explanation is also really easy to comprehend. Bonus: KPop fans will relate so much to this handle.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 11 June 2020.


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#EngVocab: Healthcare Professionals

Hi, everyone! I hope you are doing well. It’s an awful time for all of us around the world, but I think we have to give special credits to our healthcare professionals who might be working tirelessly during this pandemic.

pexels-photo-3825586.jpeg
Photo by Retha Ferguson on Pexels.com

On this article, we are sharing some occupations that can be called healthcare professionals. Healthcare professionals are defined as people who may provide health care treatment and advice based on formal training and experience.

  1. Physician/doctor/medical practitioner: a person qualified to practice medicine.
  2. Surgeon: a medical practitioner qualified to practice surgery.
  3. Physician’s assistant: someone qualified to assist a physician and carry out routine clinical procedures under the supervision of a physician.
  4. Nurse: a person trained to care for the sick or infirm, especially in a hospital.
  5. Dentist: a person qualified to treat the diseases and conditions that affect the teeth and gums.
  6. Midwife: a person (typically a woman) trained to assist in childbirth.
  7. Physiotherapist/physical therapist: a person qualified to treat disease, injury, or deformity by physical methods such as massage, heat treatment, and exercise.
  8. Psychiatrist: a medical practitioner specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of mental illnesses.
  9. Psychologist: an expert in the scientific study of the human mind and its functions, especially those affecting behavior in a given context.
  10. Pharmacist: a person who is professionally qualified to prepare and dispense medicinal drugs.

Aside of those mentioned above, let’s not forget to thank all the support workers that help run a health facility. Donate if you can, fellas, and follow the government’s instruction of staying home and keeping our personal hygiene and health to help ease the work of healthcare professionals.

Stay safe, everywhere you are.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 14 May 2020.


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#UKSlang: Slang in Harry Potter Books

Who here is a Harry Potter fan? Even though the books and movies were all released, except for the Fantastic Beasts, I’m feeling a little flashback to Hogwarts. We are sharing some slang used on Harry Potter books.

JK Rowling

 

“Bloody hell!”
We know this one to be used a lot by Ron. It is a common expression in Britain, Australia, and New Zealand. It could express a lot, from surprise to disgust to anger, etc.

Bloody hell

 

“Blimey.”
A popular British word to express surprise. Similar to ‘wow.’

“Bollocks!”
This is a word we should not use carelessly, as it means male genitalia parts. However, it’s used in the same way as ‘nonsense.’

“Codswallop!”
Also means ‘nonsense.’

“Git.”
Somewhat derogatory, git is used to describe a foolish person. Hagrid used it once to refer to Mr Filch.

Mr Filch

 

“Mental.”
Meaning crazy or insane.

Mental

 

“Peckish.”
The feeling of small hunger, wanting to eat but not quite hungry yet.

“Snog.”
To kiss passionately, to make out.

 

Feel free to add more on the comment section below!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 5 March 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: Word of the Year

Hi, fellas, did you know that Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year 2019 is ‘climate emergency?’

We face more and more weather and climate-related crisis every year, so it is natural that people all around the world are getting more curious about the term ‘climate emergency’ and decided to look it up on the dictionaries.

As defined by Oxford Dictionaries, climate emergency is “a situation in which urgent action is required to reduce or halt climate change and avoid potentially irreversible environmental damage resulting from it.”

But what is ‘Word of the Year’ and how did this tradition start?

words text scrabble blocks
Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

 

Word(s) of the Year refers to any of various assessments as to the most important word(s) or expression(s) during a specific year.

The first known version of this tradition is the German one, Wort des Jahres, which was started in 1971. The American Dialect Society is the oldest English version, started in 1991. By early 2000s, a lot of organisations began to announce their versions of Word(s) of the Year for various purposes and with various criteria for the assessment.

Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year for the last five years are:

2015: Face with tears of joy emoji or laughing-crying emoji, the first emoji to have ever been selected.
2016: Post-truth.
2017: Youthquake.
2018: Toxic.
2019: Climate emergency.

The American Dialect Society also chose the Word of the Decade, which is ‘web’ for 1990s, ‘to google’ for 2000s, and singular ‘they’ for 2010s. According to the Society, the Word of the 20th century is jazz and the Word of the Past Millennium is ‘she.’

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 20 February 2020.


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#ENGVOCAB: SICK, ILL, PAIN, ACHE, HURT, AND INJURY

Hello fellas, how was your day?

Let’s imagine you are a doctor. What would you ask your patience when they come for a check-up?

You can ask, “What do you have?” or “What’s wrong?”

We will discuss different ways to answer that question. We will use sick, ill, pain, ache, hurt, and injury in the sentences. Let’s get started!

  1. Sick and ill are adjectives. These words are similar in meaning.

E.g:

I feel ill.”

I feel sick.”

However, sick is more often used as a way to express nuisance or annoyance.

E.g: “I’m so sick of this song. Can you turn it off?”

2. Pain and ache are nouns.

E.g:

I feel pain in my arm.”

“I feel pain in my whole body.”

If the pain is on a specific, known area, use ache.

E.g:

I have a headache and a stomachache and a backache.”

3. Hurt is a verb. It is used to show that you feel pain.

E.g: ” Aw, that hurts! Don’t touch me there.”

4. Injury is a noun, usually used after an accident that affects you for a while.

E.g.:

I have leg injury after falling from the bicycle. I don’t think I can play football.

She survived the accident without injury.”

Fellas, now you can use these words in the right sentences and situation. See you next time!

Compiled by @2013happyy for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, 12 February 2020.

#EngVocab: Words Related to Mobile Phone

Nowadays, a mobile phone has become a permanent part to our hands. We check our phones constantly even if there is no notification of incoming messages or calls or anything important on social medias. Do you also experience the same, fellas?

person taking photos of food
Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

This article will discuss words related to mobile phones.

1. Credit
This is a common term for prepaid mobile phone service, where we purchase some amount to use the provider’s service. In Indonesian, the term ‘phone credit’ has the same meaning as ‘pulsa.’

2. Data
(Mobile) data is what connects the phone to the internet when it is not connected to a Wi-Fi network.

3. Plans
Plans mean a package that might include a number of SMS, several minutes of phone calls, and some gigabits of mobile data that we purchase from the provider on a one-off occasion or on a regular basis.

Made Wirautama (@wirautama): In Indonesian we call it “paket data”.

4. 4G and 4.5G
4G means the fourth generation of mobile phone connection. It allows a mobile phone to connect to the internet with a relatively high download speed, which is 7-12 Mbps (megabits per second), and converts the phone to a mobile multimedia. 4.5G is an improved version of 4G with faster connection that could reach 14-21 Mbps. At the moment, we’re all excited for 5G, of course.

5. 4K
What is a 4K video? A video with 4K on it means that it was shoot with a lens with 3840 x 2160 pixels. It provides clearer, less fuzzy motions.

6. 720p
720p is currently the most common number to describe screen resolution. ‘P’ means progressive-scan and ‘720’ is the number of horizontal lines on the display. Higher screen resolutions are 1080p, 2160p (4K), and 8K.

7. HD
HD stands for high definition, which is also another name for a video with 720p resolution. 1080p is full HD (FHD). 1440p is Quad HD (QHD). 2160p or 4K is Ultra HD (UHD).

8. Lite
A lite version is a ‘lighter’ version of an application. It typically takes smaller space of the phone memory, displays media with lower resolutions, and has limited features compared to the full version.

9. Beta version
A beta version generally refers to a version of a piece of software that is made available for testing, typically by a limited number of users outside the company that is developing it, before its general release.

10. International roaming
The term refers to a feature that allows us to use the service of the provider in a foreign country where the service is not available. It usually costs more than the regular service.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 10 February 2020.


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#EngTips: How to Improve Vocabulary

woman in front of her computer
Photo by Ree on Pexels.com

It is not easy to learn a new language, fellas. Especially with the structure, grammar, and all the tenses. We could also find difficulties adding new words to our vocabulary. We have to know the meaning of the word, how to pronounce it correctly, and in what context it is used.

However, we can always try by learn and learn more. Here are some tips to help you improve your vocabulary:

Read and listen
It might sound simple, fellas, but it is about building a habit. The more we try to find new words by reading English texts, watching the news, or listening to podcast, the more familiar we are with them.

Keep a journal
Writing a word down in a journal could help us memorise it better. You can also use any notes on your mobile phone if you feel more comfortable doing so.

Dictionary and thesaurus are handy
If you are still unsure about the difference between a dictionary and a thesaurus, you can simply think of a dictionary as a list of words in alphabetical order with their meanings and the pronunciation, while a thesaurus shows what words are synonymous or antonymous.
With technology nowadays, install a dictionary and a thesaurus app on your mobile phone to quickly help you when you find a new word.

Use the new words
Never be hesitant to practice by using the words in a written form or in a conversation. You can also ask your studying partner to correct you.

Group words that surround the same theme
Instead of listing the words one by one, try grouping them into the same theme. For example, if you love dining out, then collect words that are related to food and restaurant and cooking. So every time you learn a new word from this theme, it will be easier to remember.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 9 January 2020.


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#WOTD: Cast

Hi, fellas, how are you today? I hope your Monday went well.

Today, we are going to discuss the word ‘cast’ on #WOTD. What do you have in mind every time you read or hear this word, fellas?

For me, the word ‘cast’ is always associated with an actor or actress being chosen to play a specific role in a movie.

E.g.: “When I heard that Joaquin Phoenix was cast as the Joker, I really couldn’t wait to see the movie.”

Clapper

 

However, aside of that meaning, there are also other meaning of the word ‘cast.’ Let’s start on how it functions as a verb.

The verb ‘to cast’ means to set or throw something aside, especially with force.
E.g.: “He cast the newspaper aside when he found a misleading article written about him.”

It can also mean to cause a light or a shadow to appear on a certain surface.
E.g.: “The morning sun cast an orange shade over the empty field.”

‘To cast’ can also mean to shape or to mould something (usually of metal) in its molten form and let it cool until it becomes solid.
E.g.: “The ring was cast in Mordor.”

Gif.gif

 

If we ‘cast a look/glance/smile, etc.’ towards something, it means that we throw a look, a glance, a smile, etc. to a specific direction.
E.g.: “As she wasn’t prepared, she couldn’t help casting nervous glances towards her classmates during the quiz.”

There are also ‘to cast a vote,’ which means to vote, and ‘to cast a spell/curse,’ which means to put a spell or a curse on someone.

In past tense and participle tense, the word ‘cast’ retains its form. So, the past form, the participle form, and the passive form of ‘cast’ are still ‘cast.’

As a noun, ‘cast’ generally refers to an object made in a mould. For example, an accident just happened to someone causing his ankle to sprain, so he needs to wear a cast.

 

Written and compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 9 September 2019.


 

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#Engvocab: Election

Hello fellas, how are you today? Fellas, on April 17, 2019, we in Indonesia hold a general election to determine the future members of House of Representative and the future president and vice president. Therefore, today, we are going to discuss vocabularies related to election.

An election is a formal group decision-making process by which a population chooses an individual to hold public office. There are several vocabularies that we often hear or read in regards to election terms. Here they are:

1. Campaign
Means the things a candidate does to get elected (shaking hands, giving oration, etc.).
E.g.: “He took a campaign tour of West Java last week.”

2. Debate
Means to argue for or against something.
E.g.: “The topic of tonight’s presidential debate is national defense and security.”

3. Candidate
Means the person who is running in an election.
E.g.: “The Indonesia presidential election in 2019 has two pair of candidates.”

4. Politics
Means the activities associated with the governance of a country or other area.
E.g.: “I told her I was going into politics.”

5. Voter
Means the individual who is voting in an election.
E.g.: “Now the voters will decide.”

6. Ballot paper
Means a piece of paper or a small ball used in a secret voting.
E.g.: “Each person will get a ballot which should be kept confidential.”

7. Supporter
Means the individual who supports a candidate during an election.
E.g.: “All supporters in this campaign are so excited to meet the candidate.”

8. Political party
Means a group of people with similar political goals and opinions whose main purpose is to get candidates elected to public office.
E.g.: “Most of political parties in this election are optimistic about their candidates being elected.”

9. Democracy
Means a system of government by the whole population or all the eligible members of a state, typically through elected representatives.

E.g.: “Indonesia is one of the countries that adapts democracy as its system of government.”

10. Government
Means the governing body of a nation, state, or community.
E.g.: “The first MRT in our city was planned by the previous government.”

Thank you and see you tomorrow!

Compiled and written by @2013happyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, April 10, 2019

#ENGVOCAB: VOCABULARIES RELATED TO INTERNET AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Hello fellas, how are you? how often do you surf the internet and social media? I am sure that most of you like spending time to check social media and surfing the internet. Today, we are discussing some words and phrases related to internet and social media. Here they are.


http://lime20.com/internet.php

1. To unplug
It means to disconnect and to relax by disengaging ourselves from activities that use internet connection.

E.g.: “Sometimes you need to learn to unplug and just enjoy the peace and quiet at home.”

2. Hot-spot
It refers to a place in public area where there is a computer system with an access point or an internet connection.

E.g.: “The airport was bright and spacious, with large shopping area and Wi-Fi hot-spot lounge.”

3. To multitask
To multitask means to do many things at the same time. 

E.g.: “An interpreter needs a quick, agile mind to multitask, because she or he needs to simultaneously listen to a concept or idea in one language, understand and process it, and translate it to another language.”

4. Down-time
It refers to the time when a computer is not working properly and cannot be used. This could also mean the time somebody needs to relax and recuperate after a hard work.

E.g.: “Once we are done with all the renovation, I am ready for some major down-time.”

5. Pulled to the internet
It means working hard using the internet or being dependent to the internet.

E.g.: “I wish I could do that but I am so pulled to the internet. I manage my own business and I can hardly spend a day without sending emails or checking my website.”

6. To pull the plug
When you pull the plug of something, it means that it no longer has a power source and will switch off.

E.g.: “I am considering just pulling the plug on the whole thing. I have been so busy with my work and I have not had time to be creative or even relax.”

7. Be on the same wavelength
It refers to the same things that have the same origins but can also be used for casual acquaintances. It has the same meaning as being in tune with somebody.

E.g.: “What makes the problem worse is that Howard and Tina are not on the same wavelength about how to deal with it.”

8. No filter
It is usually used to refer to a picture, which is of original quality and has not been edited or modified. The term is also used to refer to an uncensored conversation, usually between friends.

E.g.: “Miranda is my best friend. Sometimes when we are chatting, we can talk with no filter and we laugh at each other.”

9. On fleek
Something is on fleek if it looks perfect and on point.

E.g.: “Did you see what Jason was wearing today? His look is on fleek!”

10. To win the internet
The phrase is usually used as a reaction given by someone who either really likes or really dislikes your post.

E.g.: “This picture wins the internet today. Everything else is dummy.”

That’s all for today, fellas. Hopefully today’s session is useful for you. See you tomorrow!

Compiled and written by @2013happyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, March 27, 2019

#EngVocab: British vs. American vocabulary (2)

Hi, Fellas! Good evening. How are you today? In this session I would like to continue the topic of some differences between British and American vocabulary. 

  1. BrE: ‘flashlight’ vs. AmE; ‘torch.’
    • Example,
      • “Do you have a torch?”
      • “Do you have a flashlight?”
  2. BrE: ‘underground. vs. AmE: ‘subway.’
    • Example:
      • “Do you know which underground I should take to go to city’s library?”
      • “Do you know which subway I should take to go to city’s library?”
  3. BrE: ‘post’ vs. AmE: ‘mail.’
    • Example:
      • “You got a post from your mother.”
      • “You got a mail from your mother.”
  4. BrE: ‘trainers’ vs. AmE: ‘sneakers.’
    • Example:
      • “Where did you put my trainers?”
      • “Where did you put my sneakers?”
  5. BrE: ‘windscreen.’ vs. AmE: ‘windshield.’ 
    • Example:
      • “I think the windscreens are broken.”
      • “I think the windshields are broken.”
  6. BrE: ‘rubber’ vs. AmE: ‘eraser.’
    • Example:
      • “May I borrow your rubber?”
      • “May I borrow your eraser?”
  7. BrE: ‘courgette’ vs. AmE: ‘zucchini.’
    • Example:
      • “I think I’ll have baked courgette as side dish.”
      • “I think I’ll have baked zucchini as side dish.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, October 5, 2018


RELATED POST(S):

^MD

#EngVocab: ‘The Same’, ‘Similar’, ‘Like’, and ‘Alike’

Hello, Fellas. Our session today is about some vocabularies with similar meaning – “the same,” “similar,” “like,” and “alike” – and how to use them in a sentence.

The same and similar are adjectives. However, same is always preceded by the.

  • Examples:
    • “Jane and Mary have the same personalities.”
    • “Jane and Mary have similar personalities.”
    • “Their personalities are the same.”
    • “Their personalities are similar.”

The other difference between “the same and “similar” lies in the prepositions following them. “As” comes after “the same,” while “to” follows “similar.”

  • Examples:
    • “Your smartphone is the same as mine.”
    • “Your smartphone is similar to mine.”

There may be a noun between “the same” and “as.”

  • Example:
    • “Jane is the same age as Mary.”

There is a slight difference between “like” and “alike.” “Like” precedes a noun, but “alike” never comes before a noun.

  • Examples:
    • The house looks like a palace.
    • The two sisters are alike.

Sources:

  • Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition
  • Deborah Phillips, Longman Complete Course for the TOEFL Test

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, September 28, 2018


RELATED POST(S):

^MD

#EngVocab: British vs American vocabulary

Hi, Fellas! Good evening. How are your days? In this session I would like to share some differences on British and American vocabulary. #

  1. BrE: ‘flat’ vs. AmE: ‘apartment.’
    • Example:
      • “I love your new flat.”
      • “I love your new apartment.”
  2. BrE: ‘ground floor’ vs. AmE: ‘first floor.’ 
    • Example:
      • “We will meet at Starbuck on the ground floor.”
      • “We will meet at Starbuck on the first floor.”
  3. BrE: ‘mobile phone’ vs. AmE: ‘cell phone.’
    • Example:
      • “I lost my mobile phone.”
      • “I lost my cell phone.”
  4. BrE: ‘chemist’s’ vs. AmE: ‘drugstore’ or ‘pharmacy.’
    • Example:
      • “I work at the chemist’s in Fifth Avenue.”
      • “I work at the drugstore in Fifth Avenue.”
  5. BrE: ‘timetable’ vs. AmE: ‘schedule.’
    • Example:
      • “Our class timetable is packed for the next two days.”
      • “Our class schedule is packed for the next two days.”
  6. BrE: ‘nappy’ vs. AmE: ‘diaper.’
    • Example:
      • “We need extra nappies for the baby.”
      • “We need extra diapers for the baby.”
  7. BrE: ‘loo,’ vs. AmE: ‘restroom/bathroom.’
    • example:
      • “I need to use the loo.”
      • “I need to use the restroom.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, September 21, 2018

 

#EngClass: Blending Words (4)

Today we will learn more about ‘blending words’.

You can review the first lesson here.
You can review the second lesson here.
You can review the third lesson here.

Here are some examples of blending words:

  1. Globish (global + English).
    Meaning: a simplified version of English used by non-native speakers, consisting of the most common words and phrases only.
  2. Medicare (medical + care).
    Meaning: maintenance and restoration of health by the treatment and prevention of disease especially by trained and licensed professionals (as in medicine, dentistry, clinical psychology, and public health).
  3. Urinalysis: (urine + analysis).
    Meaning: analysis of urine by physical, chemical, and microscopical means to test for the presence of disease, drugs, etc.
  4. Hi-tech (high + technology).
    Meaning: resembling or making use of highly advanced technology or devices.
  5. Transistor (transfer + resistor).
    Meaning: a small electrical device containing a semiconductor, used in televisions, radios, etc.
  6. Vash (volcanic + ash).
    Meaning: very small solid particles ejected from a volcano during an eruption which have intermediate axes measuring 2 mm or less.
  7. Workfare: (work + welfare).
    Meaning: a welfare system that requires those receiving benefits to perform some work or to participate in job training.
  8. Mediclaim (medical + claim).
    Meaning: medical bill submitted to health insurance carriers and other insurance providers for services rendered to patients by providers of care. When you go to the doctor, hospital or other provider, your service generates a bill.
  9. Skylab (sky + laboratory).
    Meaning: a space station used for scientific, research and development, medical and/or dental testing, experimentation and/or research.
  10. Vegeburger (vegetable + burger).
    Meaning: a patty resembling a hamburger but made with vegetable protein, soybeans, etc., instead of meat.
  11. Lecdem (lecture + demonstration).
    Meaning: presentation of an example of what the lecturer is discoursing about.
  12. Infotech (information + technology).
    Meaning: The hardware, software, and associated technology and businesses that are composed or related to the practice and business of information technology.

References:
http://www.collinsdictionary.com
http://www.merriam-webster.com
Google dictionary
http://www.vocabulary.com
dictionary.cambridge.org
http://www.skybrary.aero
classroom.synonym.com
http://www.dictionary.com

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, July 29, 2018.

#EngVocab: What to say instead of using ‘very’ (2)

Hi, Fellas! Happy Friday night! How’s your work/school? This evening I am going to share some words that is used to substitute a strong expression, such as ‘very beautiful,’ ‘very smart,’ etc. 

  1. Exhausted.’ Meaning: ‘very tired.’ 
    • Example:
      • ‘I have many classes today and I still need to attend reading club meeting. I’m exhausted.’
  2. Gorgeous.’ Meaning: ‘very pretty’.
    • Example:
      • ‘You look gorgeous in that dress.’
  3. Hysterical.’ Meaning: ‘very funny.’
    • Example:
      • ‘Look at his hysterical act. I can barely laughing.’ 
  4. Exact.’ Meaning: ‘very accurate.’
    • Example:
      • ‘That was the exact answer I want to hear!’
  5. Obvious.’ Meaning: ‘very clear.’
    • Example:
      • ‘I know Jess likes Andrew. It is obvious.’’ 
  6. Captivating.’ Meaning: ‘very interesting.’ 
    • Example;
      • ‘She is the most captivating girl I have ever met.’ 
  7. Compelling.’ Meaning: ‘very powerful’ (effect).
    • Example:
      • ‘I have no doubt he would win the competition, his arguments are compelling’’ 
  8. Essential.’ Meaning: ‘very necessary.’
    • Example:
      • ‘Vitamin C is one of essential nutrients for our body.’ 
  9. Exceptional.’ Meaning: ‘very special.’ 
    • Example:
      • ‘You can have my dresses, even my jewelries, but not my books. They are exceptional!’ 
  10. Innovative.’ Meaning: ‘very creative.’
    • Example:
      • ‘I think her idea is innovative.’’ 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, August 10, 2018