Category Archives: trivia

#EngTrivia: Idioms and Expressions with the Same or Similar Meanings in English and Indonesian

What are you doing for the Saturday night? I hope that you are staying safe at home but if you must go outside for essential purposes that cannot be delayed, please exercise safety precautions.

Several years ago, we posted an article about common expressions in English and its Indonesian counterparts. You can check it here: Expressions in English and Their Indonesian Counterparts Part 1 and Part 2. 

The background of these articles was that there are expressions in English that we cannot quite translate into Indonesian; we just know what they mean, thus we were trying to find similar expressions in Indonesian to help understand the English version better.

For this article, we are going to do something similar: we’ll start a series of idioms and expressions that have similar or even the same meanings in English and Indonesian. An example submitted by one of our followers on Twitter:

@fatfukuro: Don’t judge a book by its cover (Eng) and jangan menilai buku dari sampulnya (Ina).

pexels-photo-267669.jpeg
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

So here is the list of what we compiled so far:

  1. Backbone (Eng) = Tulang punggung (Ina)
    Meaning: the chief support of a system or an organisation.

  2. Backstab (Eng) = Menusuk dari belakang (Ina)
    Meaning: the action or practice of harming someone’s reputation whilst feigning friendship.

  3. Big-headed (Eng) = Besar kepala (Ina)
    Meaning: conceited or arrogant.

  4. Big-hearted (Eng) = Besar hati (Ina)
    Meaning: kind and generous.

  5. Big mouth (Eng) = Besar mulut (Ina)
    Meaning: a boastful person.

  6. Blue blood (Eng) = Darah biru (Ina)
    Meaning: a person of noble or royal birth.

  7. Bookworm (Eng) = Kutu buku (Ina)
    Meaning: someone who loves reading.

  8. Brainwash (Eng) = Cuci otak (Ina)
    Meaning: force someone to adopt a radically different belief.

  9. Brokenhearted (Eng) = Patah hati (Ina)
    Meaning: overwhelmed by grief or disappointment.

  10. Cold-blooded (Eng) = Berdarah dingin (Ina)
    Meaning: deliberately cruel or violent.

  11. Cool-headed (Eng) = Kepala dingin (Ina)
    Meaning: calm.

  12. Empty-handed (Eng) = Tangan hampa (Ina)
    Meaning: unsuccessful, fruitless effort.

  13. Fall in love (Eng) = Jatuh hati (Ina)
    Meaning: develop romantic feelings towards someone or deep liking for something.

  14. Flesh and blood (Eng) = Darah daging (Ina)
    Meaning: someone related to us by blood.

  15. Get some fresh air (Eng) = Cari angin (Ina)
    Meaning: go outside to take a break from a possibly stressful situation.

  16. Go in one ear, out of the other (Eng) = Masuk kuping kiri, keluar kuping kanan (Ina)
    Meaning: of a piece of information that is quickly forgotten.

  17. Golden child (Eng) = Anak emas (Ina)
    Meaning: a favoured child amongst a group of children.

  18. Half-heartedly (Eng) = Setengah hati (Ina)
    Meaning: not feeling fully committed or engaged to an activity.

  19. Head of the family (Eng) = Kepala keluarga (Ina)
    Meaning: someone who leads a family.

  20. Heavy heart (Eng) = Berat hati (Ina)
    Meaning: with much sadness and regret.

  21. Hot seat (Eng) = Kursi panas (Ina)
    Meaning: being in a position of heavy duty and responsibility.

  22. Iron fist (Eng) = Tangan besi (Ina)
    Meaning: of a government or someone exercising power in a ruthless or oppressive manner.

  23. Law of the jungle (Eng) = Hukum rimba (Ina)
    Meaning: of a world where those who are strong and apply ruthless self-interest will be most successful.

  24. Lift one’s hat to… (Eng) = Angkat topi (Ina)
    Meaning: praise, salute, congratulate, or pay tribute to someone.

  25. Open arms (Eng) = Tangan terbuka (Ina)
    Meaning: a warm welcome.

  26. Open secret (Eng) = Rahasia umum (Ina)
    Meaning: of a secret who is known to many people.

  27. Out of control (Eng) = Hilang kendali (Ina)
    Meaning: of something that’s no longer possible to manage.

  28. Pen pal (Eng) = Sahabat pena (Ina)
    Meaning: someone with whom we develop friendship by sending letters to one another, particularly if we live in different countries.

  29. Put one’s hands up (Eng) = Angkat tangan (Ina)
    Meaning: raise one’s hands to surrender.

  30. Quick on one’s feet (Eng) = Cepat kaki (Ina)
    Meaning: able to think and take quick action.

  31. Right hand (Eng) = Tangan kanan (Ina)
    Meaning: an assistant, the most important position next to someone.

  32. Scapegoat (Eng) = Kambing hitam (Ina)
    Meaning: someone who is blamed for the wrongdoings, mistakes, or faults of others.

  33. Silent witness (Eng) = Saksi bisu (Ina)
    Meaning: an object that displays traces of evidences of a crime.

  34. Stage fright (Eng) = Demam panggung (Ina)
    Meaning: nervousness before or during an appearance before an audience.

  35. Stepping stone (Eng) = Batu loncatan (Ina)
    Meaning: an action or event that helps someone to make progress towards a specified goal.

  36. Take something to one’s heart (Eng) = Memasukan ke dalam hati (Ina)
    Meaning: take criticism seriously and be affected or upset by it.

  37. Tangled web (Eng) = Benang kusut (Ina)
    Meaning: of a situation or a problem that is confusing or difficult to solve.

  38. Throw a towel (Eng) = Lempar handuk (Ina)
    Meaning: stop trying or doing something because lacking of determination or conviction that one can win or be successful.

  39. Turn a blind eye (Eng) = Tutup mata (Ina)
    Meaning: pretend not to notice something is happening, usually something bad.

  40. Two-faced (Eng) = Bermuka dua (Ina)
    Meaning: of someone being insincere or acting one way in certain situations and then in a contrary manner in others.

  41. Walk away (Eng) = Ambil langkah seribu (Ina)
    Meaning: easily, casually, or irresponsibly abandon a situation in which one is involved or for which one is responsible.

  42. Wash one’s hands of… (Eng) = Cuci tangan (Ina)
    Meaning: not wanting to be involved with someone or something, not taking responsibility of someone or something.

  43. Watch one’s mouth (Eng) = Jaga lidah/mulut (Ina)
    Meaning: being careful of what one says.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 11 July 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngQAs 6 July 2020: ‘in the bed’ or ‘on the bed,’ How to Improve English for Children, and Is Grammar Important?

On our special #EngQAs, our followers on Twitter are invited to send their questions related to English learning and we will try to answer it within the session. Here are some questions that were sent to us on 6 July.

pexels-photo-208494.jpeg
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

  1. By @lvlcnrn: Which one is correct: in the bed or on the bed?
  2. By @SDN2_PanSi: How to improve English skills for elementary students?
  3. By @Adith_Thyo: Grammar dalam bahasa Inggris perlu/pentingkah?

 

Answers:

  1. I personally prefer using ‘on the bed’, as in my understanding, the preposition ‘on’ means physically in contact with or supported by a surface. The phrase ‘in the bed’ might refer to being inside the bed, as in the bedroom. More on preposition: #GrammarTrivia: “in” vs. “at” (Prepositions of Place)
  2. It’s important to constantly repeat the parts of speech (word types) and improve the children’s vocabulary. Here are some tips that you can also try: #EngTips: Learning at Different Ages
  3. Sangat penting, karena grammar adalah tata bahasa yang membantu kita berkomunikasi dengan lebih efektif. Akan tetapi, jangan khawatir berbahasa Inggris karena takut salah grammar. Dipelajari saja sambil jalan. More on whether grammar is important: #EngClass: Understanding the Basics of English Grammar

 

Remember that our DM on Twitter and our mention tab are open for you to discuss any topics that are related to English learning. Mention us or send us a DM.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 6 July 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngTrivia: Extended Family Members

When it comes to family members, we have our immediate family members consisting of our parents, siblings, spouses, and children. This group might also include our half-siblings (siblings we have from different parents).

And then there are our close relatives, such as grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, and cousins.

What we also count as our relatives are the extended family members, who are still related to us by blood but not as close as our immediate family members or our close relatives. Who are they and how do we address them?

pexels-photo-1835926.jpeg
Photo by Craig Adderley on Pexels.com

Say, my grandfather has a younger brother. In Indonesian, I will simply call him ‘Kakek’ or grandfather, just as how I call my grandfather. But in English, I will refer to him as my great uncle. The same applies to great aunt.

And then I have a cousin, who is a child of my parent’s sibling. I will refer to this cousin as my first cousin. If my parent’s cousin has a child, that person is my second cousin. My child will also refer to the child of my cousin’s as the second cousin.

What about my parent’s cousins? In Indonesian, I will call them uncles and aunts. In English, they are still called cousins only with ‘removal’, that implies different generation. For example, my father’s first cousin is my first cousin once removed. The term applies both ways. My father’s first cousin will also refer to me as his/her/their first cousin once removed. My children will refer to them as the first cousin twice removed and vice versa.

The last but not least, we have the in-laws, who are related to us by marriage. Our spouse’s parents are our parents in law and our spouse’s siblings are our siblings in law.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 20 June 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#UKSlang: Slang in Harry Potter Books

Who here is a Harry Potter fan? Even though the books and movies were all released, except for the Fantastic Beasts, I’m feeling a little flashback to Hogwarts. We are sharing some slang used on Harry Potter books.

JK Rowling

 

“Bloody hell!”
We know this one to be used a lot by Ron. It is a common expression in Britain, Australia, and New Zealand. It could express a lot, from surprise to disgust to anger, etc.

Bloody hell

 

“Blimey.”
A popular British word to express surprise. Similar to ‘wow.’

“Bollocks!”
This is a word we should not use carelessly, as it means male genitalia parts. However, it’s used in the same way as ‘nonsense.’

“Codswallop!”
Also means ‘nonsense.’

“Git.”
Somewhat derogatory, git is used to describe a foolish person. Hagrid used it once to refer to Mr Filch.

Mr Filch

 

“Mental.”
Meaning crazy or insane.

Mental

 

“Peckish.”
The feeling of small hunger, wanting to eat but not quite hungry yet.

“Snog.”
To kiss passionately, to make out.

 

Feel free to add more on the comment section below!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 5 March 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngKnowledge: Word of the Year

Hi, fellas, did you know that Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year 2019 is ‘climate emergency?’

We face more and more weather and climate-related crisis every year, so it is natural that people all around the world are getting more curious about the term ‘climate emergency’ and decided to look it up on the dictionaries.

As defined by Oxford Dictionaries, climate emergency is “a situation in which urgent action is required to reduce or halt climate change and avoid potentially irreversible environmental damage resulting from it.”

But what is ‘Word of the Year’ and how did this tradition start?

words text scrabble blocks
Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

 

Word(s) of the Year refers to any of various assessments as to the most important word(s) or expression(s) during a specific year.

The first known version of this tradition is the German one, Wort des Jahres, which was started in 1971. The American Dialect Society is the oldest English version, started in 1991. By early 2000s, a lot of organisations began to announce their versions of Word(s) of the Year for various purposes and with various criteria for the assessment.

Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year for the last five years are:

2015: Face with tears of joy emoji or laughing-crying emoji, the first emoji to have ever been selected.
2016: Post-truth.
2017: Youthquake.
2018: Toxic.
2019: Climate emergency.

The American Dialect Society also chose the Word of the Decade, which is ‘web’ for 1990s, ‘to google’ for 2000s, and singular ‘they’ for 2010s. According to the Society, the Word of the 20th century is jazz and the Word of the Past Millennium is ‘she.’

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 20 February 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

 

#EngTalk: Adverbs without -ly

Hi, fellas! Most of us know that an adverb is a part of speech which is usually (not always) formed by adding the suffix -ly to an adjective.

Example:
Usual –> usually
Regular –> regularly
Beautiful –> beautifully
Angry –> angrily
Actual –> actually
Bad –> badly
Kind –> kindly

ask blackboard chalk board chalkboard
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

In recent years, more people using adverbs without -ly.
Example:
“He spoke loud and clear.”

The sentence still makes sense, too, because we understand that ‘he’ who spoke did so in a loud and clear way.

Naturally, it became a hot topic; should we omit -ly from an adverb? What do you think, fellas?

@pepe_2604: Hello there. I’m an English teacher in Mexico. I’ve found lots of changes in the language, not only a foreign but mine as well, due to media content, among other factors. So, I think it’s not a big issue to avoid -ly in an adverb since we face different problems for spoken production, and if we manage to make our students confident about producing a spoken language, I see no big deal with it. It is not that I don’t care but I can deal with it in further lessons.

 

I personally am used to putting -ly on an adverb. However, languages were developed to help humans understand each other. As long as we could understand what the sentence means, especially on spoken interaction, I think it’s fine.

The case could be different on written materials, where using proper grammar will help us understand the context better. But that’s just my personal opinion. What do you think, fellas?

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 6 February 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngTrivia: ‘to dedicate to’ or ‘to dedicate for?’

Hi, fellas! How are you today? Did you get to see the Grammy award ceremony? Did your favourites win?

During an award acceptance speech/winning speech, often the winner says something that goes, “I dedicate this award ____ everyone who has supported me.”

What is the correct preposition to fill the blank, fellas? We have 2 options, ‘to’ and ‘for.’

Grammy_Award_2002
The Grammy (picture by Wikipedia).

Yes, the answer is ‘to.’

‘to dedicate something to something/someone’ is a phrase that means to reserve something for a particular purpose regarding something else or someone.
E.g.:
“Mom, I dedicated this song to you.”
“She dedicated her life to being a nurse.”

I understand that this can be confusing to us Indonesian, because the direct translation for both ‘to’ and ‘for’ is ‘untuk.’ Sometimes, we might use ‘for’ instead of the correct word, ‘to.’

However, as it is a phrase, we should always try to remember the correct form, ‘to dedicate ____ to.’

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 28 January 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngKnowledge: 2020 Fun Facts

#Page364of365 Today is the last Monday this year and only less than 48 hours before we change the calendar. How excited are you for 2020, fellas?

pexels-photo-3401900.jpeg
Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

I myself am looking into personal growth, doing more voluntary works or charitable activities, and learning some new skills, like sewing. What about you?

While making a list of things we are planning to do in 2020, let’s share some facts about the new year.

  1. The year 2020 will start on a Wednesday and as it is a leap year, will have 366 days.
  2. People all over the world mostly believe that 2019 is the last year of this decade (2010-2019), which means 2020 is the first year of the new decade. However, there are some who believe that the new decade starts in 2021. How is that? Because there are two ways to decide from when to when a decade lasts. The first way is by the same digit. For example, the 1990s started from 1990 and lasted until 1999. The second way is by starting a decade with the last digit ‘1.’ As there is no year ‘zero/0,’ we start counting the years from year 1. By this definition, the 2020 is the last year of the decade and the new decade will begin on 1 January 2021.
  1. The Roman number of 2020 is MMXX.
  2. The Gregorian year 1992 had the exact same calendar as the year 2020.
  3. The Chinese year of Metal Rat will last from 25 January 2020 until 11 February 2021. Rat is the first animal on the Chinese zodiac list so the year of rat is believed to be a new beginning when people from all zodiac signs can prosper.

If you think 2019 was not up to your expectation and 2020 is not going to be any different, plan to try out new things or rediscover your love for old hobbies and idle skills. Who knows what will happen, right? Let’s welcome 2020 with a bang!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 30 December 2019.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngKnowledge: The Twelve Days of Christmas

Have you ever heard of the phrase ‘The Twelve Days of Christmas,’ fellas? Have you ever wondered what it is and what it means?

‘The Twelve Days of Christmas’ is a Christmas carol that dated back to 1780 when it was first used in England as a chant or a rhyme. It is believe to have a French origin.

It tells a story of accumulating gifts for twelve days since Christmas Day; each day the amount of gift increases from the day before.

assorted color gift boxes
Photo by Giftpundits.com on Pexels.com

The song goes like this (source: Google):

On the first day of Christmas my true love sent to me
A partridge in a pear tree
On the second day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the third day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the fourth day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the fifth day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Five gold rings, four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the sixth day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Six geese a laying, five gold rings, four calling birds
Three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the seventh day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Seven swans a swimming, six geese a laying, five gold rings
Four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the eighth day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Eight maids a milking, seven swans a swimming, six geese a laying
Five gold rings, four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the ninth day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Nine drummers drumming, eight maids a milking, seven swans a swimming, six geese a laying, five gold rings, four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the tenth day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Ten pipers piping
Nine drummers drumming, ten pipers piping
Drumming, piping, drumming, piping
Eight maids a milking, seven swans a swimming, six geese a laying
Five gold rings, four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the eleventh day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Eleven ladies dancing, ten pipers piping, nine drummers drumming
Eight maids a milking, seven swans a swimming, six geese a laying
Five gold rings, four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the twelfth day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Twelve Lords a leaping, eleven ladies dancing, ten pipers piping
Nine, drummers drumming, eight maids a milking
Seven swans a swimming, six geese a laying
And five gold rings, four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree, and a partridge in a pear tree

 

There are several variations and versions to this song but all tells a story of cumulative wealth or gifts. There are also similar verses in Scotland, Faroe Islands, and France. The exact origins and the meaning of the song are unknown, although many believe that it came from children’s memory and forfeit game. Each child in succession repeats the gifts of the day and forfeits or is given penalty for each mistake.

Do you want to try to memorise it, fellas?

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 26 December 2019.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#GrammarTrivia: Parallelism Structure

Hello fellas, how are you doing? Today we will discuss #GrammarTrivia Do you know what is “Parallelism” in English?

Parallelism or Parallel structure is important, especially in Academic circles or in the Business Corp. So whether you speaking or whether your writing this principle of Parallelism will help you to communicate more effectively.

Parallelism is speaking or writing technique in which you can communicate more powerfully by balancing different part of your sentence.

Let’s check some examples of Parallelism sentences:

1. Verb + Verb

E.g :Janet sings and dances.”

We see verb (sings) and verb (dances), so that sentence is Parallelism.

2. Gerund + Gerund

E.g: “We enjoy reading and cooking.”

We see gerund (reading) and (cooking), so that sentence is Parallelism.

3. Infinitive noun + Infinitive noun

E.g: “I like to watch movies and to travel abroad.”

We see that infinitive and noon (to watch movie) and infinitives and noun (to travel abroad).

4. Adverb + Adverb

E.g: “The Police acted quickly and carefully.”

We see that (quickly) and adverb (carefully), so that sentence is Parallelism.

5. Noun + Noun ( for long sentences)

E.g: “The Job demands professional qualifications, the ability to manage others and experience working around the globe.”

The parallelism structure of that sentence is become:

“The Job demands professional qualifications, managerial ability and global experience.”

Sometimes, it is very normal to write sentences there are not Parallel in the beginning, but after you correct them to become parallel structure, your writing or speaking are becoming more powerfully.

Fellas, you can learn more completely about parallelism structure from this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8pIidfrSG4&t=353s

That’s all for today and See you tomorrow!

Compiled and written by @2013happyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, October 23, 2019

#EngTrivia : How to Use “Today”, “Present day” and “Nowadays”

Hello fellas, how are you today?

Today’s session  #EngTrivia we will discuss how to use  “Today”, “Present day” and “Nowadays” in the sentences, also know what are the difference between Today, Present day and Nowadays.

1. Today is a noun and usually refers to the current calendar day, or this day.

E.g: “Today is Wednesday”

    “ It will be cloudy all day today”

     “Today is September 28th.”

2. Present day is also a noun and usually refers to the current era or period of time, a time that exists and sometimes a period of years or decades or even centuries.

E.g: “ The music of the present day is very different from the music of the Baroque period.”

Sometimes, present day also used as an adjective.

E.g : “ If you look back at what computers used to look like, present-day models are very sophisticated

Fellas, do you have any others example?

Nowadays in an adverb that mean “at the present time” and it can be used to mean the period of current, decades and centuries.  

E.g: “Kids nowadays have much more freedom than they did in my day”.

3. Nowadays you can find just about anything you want to know on the Internet.”

Fellas, Sometimes today is used as an adverb to mean the same thing as nowadays.

E.g: “ Schools today/ nowadays are struggling to get funding for the arts.”

That’s all for today fellas, See you tomorrow!

Compiled and written by @2013happyy for @Englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, August28, 2019

#EngTrivia: January’s trivia

Hey, Fellas! How do you do? How is your first week in this new year? This evening I am going to share some fun facts about January, as an opening month of the year.

  1. Do you know that January was named after a Roman God, Janus? Janus is pictured as a person who has two heads. It is said that he is an animistic spirit of doorway and archway. Scholar believe that Janus is a symbol all new beginnings. And maybe, this is why his name had been using as the name of the first month of the year.
  2. In America January is regarded as a National Soup Month. Unfortunately, I still can’t find the history behind this event. The source I read also showed that this event is  unofficial in America. Perhaps, Americans initiated this event due to winter season in the country.
  3. In Russia, Christmas will be celebrated on 7th January this year. The reason why Russian celebrate their Christmas differently is Russians are mostly Orthodox Christians. And Orthodox church use Julian calendar, which was made by Julius Caesar in 45 BC.
  4. January is also an important month for Haitians because Haiti Independence Day was proclaimed on 1 January 1804.
  5. If you were born in January, then you are lucky enough to have garnets as your birthstone. It is a red colored gemstone and it shapes like pomegranate.
  6. January is also well known as a National Blood Donor in America. This event was firstly initiated in 1970 by Richard Nixon, the 37th President of USA.

Anyway, that’s all I can share in this session. If you know anything else that is related to January, you are free to share it.

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, January 4, 2018

#EngTrivia: Commonly misspelled and missused vocabulary (2)

Hi, Fellas! Good evening and happy Friday! How’s your week so far? Well, in this evening I would to continue our session about  some vocabulary that are usually confusing due to similar letter arrangement. For you who missed the topic two weeks ago, you can read the article by following this link 

“Stationery” vs. “stationary”

Before I start explaining them, is there anyone know the difference of those words?

“Stationary means stability there is no change. While stationery means writing paper and everything related with write process.” – @al3ajalabead

“Stationery” is known as a noun, which means something that is used for writing, such as papers, pens, pencils, etc. Meanwhile, “stationary” is an adjective to refer something that is not moving. There are some similar words of “stationary” to make it clear, such as

  • “immobile,”
  • “static,” and
  • “motionless.”

Example:

  • “I am going to stationery shop to get some pencils.”
  • “Wall is a simple example of stationary material.”

“Principle” vs. “principal.”

“Principle” acts as a noun that means basic/fundamental belief or concept. On the other hand, “principal” can be either a noun or an adjective. As a noun, “principal” means an important person in an organisation, but as an adjective, this word means the most important.

EaEmple:

  • “I have a principle to not intervene my personal life with work.”
  • “Mr. Heidi is our school principal.”

“Affect” vs. “effect.”

“Affect” is a verb that means to give an impact to someone or something, while “effect” is the impact itself (noun).

Example:

  • “Deforestation affects the increase of global temperature.”
  • “Extinction of some species is one of the effects of global warming.”

source:

  • Merriam Webster

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, November 2, 2018

#EngTrivia: Commonly missused and misspelled vocabulary

Hi, Fellas! Good evening and happy Friday! How’s your week so far? I hope you experienced something great! Well, in this evening I would share some vocabulary that are usually confusing because most of them have almost similar letter arrangement or typography if I’m not mistaken.

“A lot” vs. “alot.”

Before I start explaining them, is there anyone know the the meaning of each of them and how we should use it?

“Not so good at explaining, but here’s my shot. “A lot” is for a particular ‘bunch’ of items. Eg: There’s a lot of books for A there, a lot of pencils for B here.” – @educareer_jp 

It is generally known that “a lot” can act as a pronoun or an adverb, which means many/pleunty.  Meanwhile, “allot” is verb, which means to distribute or to assign. There are some words that are related to “allot,” they are “allocate,” “administer,” “hand out,” etc.

Example:

  • “We have a lot of problem to deal with.”
  • “You are alloted 20 minutes to present your research findings.”

“Awhile” vs. “a while.”

Both “a while” and “awhile” means “a short period of time.” However, each of them have a different role in a sentence. “Awhile” acts as an adverb that explain something happens in a short time. On the other hand, “a while” is a noun phrase.

Example:

  • “I think I’m going to stay here awhile.”
  • “Pasta will be ready in a while.”

“Desert” vs. “dessert.”

“Desert” means to abandon/to leave something (verb), while “dessert” is food that usually served after meal and generally it’s sweet (noun).

Example:

  • “This town is very quiet it’s looked like deserted place.”
  • “I want cheese cake as my dessert.”

source:

  • Merriam Webster
  • Grammarly

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, October 19, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Double Comparatives

Hello, fellas. How do we say “Semakin cepat, semakin baik” in English? Yes. We say it through double comparatives “The sooner, the better”. But, wait. Is it correct to use article the with comparative comparison (-er, more)? Let’s check it out.

Comparisons are used to assess the value of one thing and another. They are equal comparison (as…as), comparative comparison and superlative comparison (-est, the most).

(More on comparisons: https://englishtips4u.com/2012/01/20/engclass-degrees-of-comparison/comment-page-1/)

Double comparatives comprise of two parts, each of which begins with the. The second part is the result of the first one. In double comparatives, both parts have parallel structures.

There are three structures of double comparatives:

1) the + comparative, the + comparative
e.g. The fresher, the tastier.

2) the + comparative + the noun, the + comparative + the noun
e.g. The greater the experience, the higher the salary.

3) the + comparative + subject + verb , the + comparative + subject + verb
e.g. The harder you work, the more you accomplish.

Sources:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition
Deborah Phillips, Longman Complete Course for the TOEFL Test
Michael A Pyle and Mary Ellen Munoz Page, Cliffs TOEFL Preparation Guide

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @englishtipsforyou on Thursday, July 19, 2018

 

#GrammarTrivia: Due to vs. Because of (REVISIT)

This topic might be one of the most frequently asked questions that we have ever received. What is the difference between ‘due to’ and ‘because of?’

@ridhoansyori: KINDLY. SOMEONE. EXPLAIN. PLS

Take a look at these two sentences
– Her headache was due to the noise coming from upstairs.
– She had a headache because of the noise coming from upstairs.

person people woman hand
Photo by Public Domain Pictures on Pexels.com

On sentence 1, there is the noun ‘her headache’ and the linking verb ‘was.’ To make sentence 1 a complete sentence, we need a complement. The phrase ‘due to the noise coming from upstairs’ is this complement.

“Her headache                  was                                        due to the noise coming from upstairs.”
Subject                               linking verb                         complement

 

On sentence 2, the subject is ‘she.’ The predicate is ‘had a headache.’

If we write it only as ‘she had a headache,’ the sentence will still be complete. We want to introduce the reason WHY she had a headache. So, we add ‘because of the noise coming from upstairs.’

Although sentence 1 & 2 are similar, sentence 1 was actually meant to say that there was a noise from upstairs and her headache came as a RESULT to this noise.

Meanwhile, sentence 2 explained that THE REASON she had a headache was that noise coming from upstairs.

 

Are you still unsure, fellas? Let’s take the following exercise.

a. My brother’s success is ______ his hard work.
b. My brother is a successful person ______ his hard work.
c. She failed ______ not studying.
d. Her failure was ______ not studying.

@dindaaark: a. Due to. b. Because of. c. Because of. d. Due to.
@notevennurul: A. Due to. B. Because of. C. Because of. D. Due to.
@cynthiatika: a, d : due to. b, c : because of.

 

Answers:
a & d: due to
‘My brother’s success’ came as a result of ‘his hard work.’
‘Her failure’ came as a result of ‘not studying.’

b & c: because of
‘His hard work’ is the reason why ‘my brother is a successful person.’
‘Not studying’ is the reason why ‘she failed.’

 

A couple of tips to decide when to use ‘due to’ and ‘because of’:

‘Due to’ is an adjectival phrase. It gives more detail to the noun. It identifies the result of an event. It always comes after linking verb ‘be’ (is, am, are, was, were, will be, etc.).

‘Because of’ is an adverbial phrase. It gives more detail to the verb. It identifies the reason why something happens. It always comes after subject + verb.

 

Q: @magnifician: Di kamus cambridge online, “due to” bisa menggantikan “because of”, min (contoh kedua)

due to

A: Benar. Namun, contoh kedua lebih tepat jika menggunakan ‘because of.’ Ini versi admin:
A lot of her unhappiness is due to boredom. She is unhappy because of boredom.
The bus’ delay was due to heavy snow. The bus was delayed because of heavy snow.

Q: @magnifician: Ini contoh lainnya…

due to 2

A: Seperti penjelasan admin sebelumnya, ‘due to’ memberi keterangan pada subjek, sehingga jika sudah menggunakan ‘due to,’ frasa yang mengandung verba bisa tidak dicantumkan.
The game’s cancellation was due to adverse weather conditions.
Her five days of work was due to illness.
The captain’s withdrawal from the match was due to injury.
Kalimat 2 & 3 sudah tepat menggunakan ‘due to.’

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, 13 June, 2018.


RELATED POST(S):

#GrammarTrivia: Possessives with Gerunds

adolescent blur child close up
“I love you singing” or “I love your singing?” Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

We all have that one friend who sings beautifully, albeit never considering singing as a professional career. What should we say to compliment him/her? Do we say, “I love you singing,” or do we say, “I love your singing?” Which one is correct, fellas?

@ghaniginanjar: The second one. I love your singing.

@KushalRJoshi: Second one?

@endang_yl: I love your singing.

@XxKit_kat: The 2nd one ‘I love your singing’ = ‘I love the sound of your voice when you sing’.

 

On one fine afternoon, you and a friend are out for a walk. You pass a bus stop where a woman seems to be crying. Do you say to your friend, “Did you see that woman crying?” or do you say, “Did you see that woman’s crying?”

@Goyoomin: Did you see that woman crying?

 

So, what is the difference between these two situations? Why do we use the possessive form ‘your singing’ in the first example, but then we use ‘see that woman crying’ in the second example?

Let’s go back to what gerund is. Gerund is a verb that has transformed into and functions as a noun. Therefore, the way we use gerund should always be in line with the way we use a noun, including combining it with a possessive form.

If we see a sentence like the one in the first example, “I love your singing,” it’s very likely that the thing we love is ‘the singing that belong to you.’ ‘Singing‘ here is something owned by ‘you,’ or in other words, ‘your singing.’

What about the second example? Does it make sense if I modify the sentence into, “Did you see that crying woman?” Does the sentence still have the same meaning?

Crying‘ in the second example is not a gerund. It is in fact an adjective, modifying ‘that woman.’ Therefore, we do not need to use a possessive form like we did with the first example.

Two tips to determine whether a verb -ing should come with a possessive form or not:

  1. Check the object of our action. In the first example, is it the ‘you’ that you love or is it the ‘singing that belongs to you?’
  2. Try switching the sentence’s structure. Modifying the first sentence into ‘I love singing you’ does not quite make the same sense as modifying the second sentence into ‘Did you see that crying woman?’

 

Exercise:

  1. Do you mind (me/my) asking questions?
  2. No, not at all. I appreciate (you/your) coming to me.
  3. I heard about the (project/project’s) being cancelled.
  4. In fact, we anticipate the possibility of (it/its) succeeding.

 

Answer:

  1. “Do you mind my asking questions?”
    Checklist:
    – What will the other person mind about?
    The action ‘asking questions’ that belongs to the speaker. ‘Asking questions’ here is a gerund.
    – How could we modify the sentence into?
    The sentence could be modified into, “Do you mind asking me questions?” or “Do you mind asking my questions?” which does not have the same meaning as the primary sentence.
  2. “No, not at all. I appreciate your coming to me.”
    Checklist:
    – What does the speaker appreciate?
    The action ‘coming to me’ that belongs to the interlocutor. ‘Coming to me’ here is a gerund.
    – How could we modify the sentence into?
    The sentence could be modified into, “I appreciate coming you to me,” which does not have any clear meaning.
  3. “I heard about the project being almost cancelled.”
    Checklist:
    – What did the speaker hear about?
    The project is being almost cancelled. ‘Being almost cancelled’ here is an adjective.
    – How could we modify the sentence into?
    The sentence could be modified into, “I heard about the almost-cancelled project,” which has the exact same meaning as the primary sentence.
  4. “In fact, we anticipate the possibility of its succeeding.”
    Checklist:
    – What does the speaker anticipate?
    The success of the project. ‘Succeeding’ here is a gerund.
    – How could we modify the sentence into?
    The sentence could be modified into, “In fact, we anticipate the possibility of succeeding it,” which creates double meanings. It can mean that the project is being successful or it can mean that the project is being followed by another project. The phrase ‘its succeeding’ will remove the ambiguity.

 

Special shout-out to one of our fellas who sent us a question about how to use possessives with gerunds during our LINE chat session. If you would like a one-one-one consultation as well, add us on LINE .

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, 16 May, 2018.


RELATED POST(S):

#EngTrivia: Choice of words

Hi, Fellas.  How are you today? We meet again in #EngTrivia session.

This evening I will share some words which can be the alternative of daily casual words. You can use these selections in your IELTS test essay performance.

  1. ‘Accelerate.’ Meaning: ‘speed up.’
    • Example:
      • “My friend had join a special class in his high school, so he can accelerate his grade.”
  2. ‘Additionally.’ Meaning: ‘there is more.’
    • Example:
      • “Additionally, we have to prepare the gift for this holiday session.”
  3. ‘Allow.’ Meaning: ‘let.’
    • Example:
      • “My parents allowed me to drive to school.”
  4. ‘Anecdote.’ Meaning: ‘joke.’
    • Example:
      • “There are plenty of silly anecdote in social media nowadays.”
  5. ‘Anticipate.’ Meaning: ‘expect.’
    • Example:
      • “The movie was as good as I have anticipated.”
  6.  ‘Beneficial.’ Meaning: ‘good for (something).’
    • Example:
      • “Do you think this purchasing system would be beneficial for our company?”
  7. ‘Utilize.’ Meaning: ‘use.’
    • Example:
      • “This manual has a detail description of utilizing the incubator.”
  8.  ‘Sufficient.’ Meaning: ‘enough.’
    • Example:
      • “Our country still have a sufficient rice stock and it will last approximately until next year.”
  9. ‘Pleased.’ Meaning: ‘happy.’
    • Example:
      • “Pleased to meet you.”
  10. ‘Perhaps.’ Meaning: ‘maybe.’
    • Example:
      • “I am not sure I would able to attend the meeting on time. Perhaps, my assistant could cover me for several minutes.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, December 7, 2017