Category Archives: speaking

#EngTalk: Accents

Hi, hello, everyone. How are you today? I hope you are safe and healthy.

Who here is a fan of British accent? I know I am. It just sounds strong, distinct, and unique, although sometimes it takes me a while to understand what the speaker is saying. I often find myself trying to imitate the accent. Most people that I speak with say that I have American or Australian accent, though, so I’m not sure what happened. What do you think of the many, many accents from English speaking people?

@NeNi961111: OH MY!! MEEEEE. I like British accent so much, want to speak, but end up with American accent.

@RAKemal: I used to have (mimic?) standard British accent. Then I went to a week-long Indonesian-American joint-conference and there went my accent.

@sfn520: I don’t know what accent I’m using, I just speak English.

@mrivaldi__: I am! i feel mesem2 sendiri, if i’m watching british got talent. Their voices was quite sexy.

@fatimatulKN: I am a big fan of harry potter movies, jolly (british-korean youtuber), sorted food (british cooking youtube channel). British accent itu kedengeran classy, sophisticated, well educated, kayak yg pinter gt orangnya yg ngomong.

Photo by Ian Panelo on Pexels.com

English came from the UK but even in its home country, there are several areas where people speak with different accents and dialects. Cockney, Geordie, Scottish, and Estuary English are some of them.

@NeNi961111: I only know Scottish, and that’s quite difficult but never the other 3 before.

@Keystone_Eng: Yes, its one of the things I love about England, there are loads of different accents. There are many different accents in the UK. For example, my native accent is a Yorkshire accent. It’s very different to the other accents.

One of my friends has a strong Cockney accent despite being born and growing up in Indonesia. If you are looking for an example of Cockney accent, watch the movie My Fair Lady (1964). The leading lady, Eliza Doolittle (Audrey Hepburn), speaks in a strong Cockney accent and is then transformed into an upper class lady by a phonetics professor, Henry Higgins.

“The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plain…”

The trailer of My Fair Lady (1964).

Personally, I consider correct pronunciation is more important than trying to acquire an accent. After all, the purpose of language is to help two people communicate, so as long as both have the same understanding on the topic, it is fine.

Of course the case would be different if you are taking a test to measure your English proficiency in relations to scholarship or work opportunities, for example TOEFL or IELTS. The institution that requires the test might apply a certain standard.

Do you agree that paying attention to correct pronunciation is more important than accents?

@gluon0x: We are on the same page.

@sfn520: Yes, I agree. I don’t pay much attention to my accent, as long as my pronunciation is understandable. And I learn English so that I can read some English movies, comics, etc.

@fernandoqc6: Yeah, totally agree. Additionally, there are some other strong accents. These kind of accent (such as French, Indian) should be tough to “change” it.

@NeNi961111: Agreee

Compiled and written by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 10 September 2020.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngKnowledge: Common Misconceptions in English Learning

#EngKnowledge: The Birth of British and American Accents

#EngTips: How to Improve Your English Listening Skills

#EngTips: The Importance of a Proper Accent

#EngTrivia: Rupert Grint’s Accents

#ENgvocab: Sick, ill, pain, Aiche, hurt and injury

Hello fellas, How was your day?

Let’s imagine, if you are a Doctor, what would you ask for your patience when they coming to check up?

Yes, you can ask: “What do you have”? or “What’s wrong”?

According to that situation, Today we will discuss #EngVocab Sick, Ill, Pain, Ache, Hurt and Injury in the sentences. Let’s get started!

  1. Sick and ill are adjectival. These words are similar in meaning.

E.g:

I feel ill.

I feel sick.

We also can use Sick in this sentence:

E.g: ” I’m so sick of this song. Can you turn it off“?

2. Pain and Ache are nouns.

E.g:

I have pain in my arm“.

My whole body feels painful“.

We only use Ache, when the words are connected.

E.g:

I have a headache and a stomach ache and a backache“.

3. Hurt is a verb. It is used to show your sick feeling

E.g: ” Aw, that hurts! Don’t touch me there“.

4. The injury usually uses when you got pain and that give effect for your life.

E.g:

I am Injured

She survived the accident without injury“.

Fellas, now you can use these words in the right sentences and situation. Thank you for attention, See you tomorrow!

Compiled by @2013happyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, 12 February 2020

#GrammarTrivia: Parallelism Structure

Hello fellas, how are you doing? Today we will discuss #GrammarTrivia Do you know what is “Parallelism” in English?

Parallelism or Parallel structure is important, especially in Academic circles or in the Business Corp. So whether you speaking or whether your writing this principle of Parallelism will help you to communicate more effectively.

Parallelism is speaking or writing technique in which you can communicate more powerfully by balancing different part of your sentence.

Let’s check some examples of Parallelism sentences:

1. Verb + Verb

E.g :Janet sings and dances.”

We see verb (sings) and verb (dances), so that sentence is Parallelism.

2. Gerund + Gerund

E.g: “We enjoy reading and cooking.”

We see gerund (reading) and (cooking), so that sentence is Parallelism.

3. Infinitive noun + Infinitive noun

E.g: “I like to watch movies and to travel abroad.”

We see that infinitive and noon (to watch movie) and infinitives and noun (to travel abroad).

4. Adverb + Adverb

E.g: “The Police acted quickly and carefully.”

We see that (quickly) and adverb (carefully), so that sentence is Parallelism.

5. Noun + Noun ( for long sentences)

E.g: “The Job demands professional qualifications, the ability to manage others and experience working around the globe.”

The parallelism structure of that sentence is become:

“The Job demands professional qualifications, managerial ability and global experience.”

Sometimes, it is very normal to write sentences there are not Parallel in the beginning, but after you correct them to become parallel structure, your writing or speaking are becoming more powerfully.

Fellas, you can learn more completely about parallelism structure from this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8pIidfrSG4&t=353s

That’s all for today and See you tomorrow!

Compiled and written by @2013happyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, October 23, 2019

#EngTalk: How to Start a Conversation

pexels-photo-515169.jpeg
Image by WordPress

 

Sometimes, we could feel nervous when we are about to start a conversation in English. The feeling of awkwardness of saying something in a foreign language, coupled with the concern about saying something wrong or grammatically incorrect, could be overwhelming.

However, the more you familiarise yourself with speaking in English, the more confident you could be. Therefore, always practice when you have a chance. You can start with everyday conversation with a friend or a colleague.

When passing a friend on a hallway at school or meeting somewhere else, we can say:
– How are you?
– Hey, what’s up?
– Hi, how is it going?

If it’s a colleague at work, a more formal interaction is expected. We can start with:
– How are you today?
– What have you been up to lately?
– How was your weekend? (if weekend has just passed) OR Have you got plans for the weekend? (if weekend is about to come).
– Have you heard of that news?

But what if we are in a situation when there is no one we are familiar with?
When you are in a party or a gathering, and there is no one there whom you know, you can always start a conversation and turn a stranger into an acquaintance.

Here are some sentences you could use to start a conversation with a stranger:
–  I don’t believe we have met. I’m Katie.
– What is it that you do for a living?
– Do you go to school near here?
– Do you live around here?
– This is such a great event. What do you think?

You can also start with complimenting a person’s appearance or performance. For example:
– I like your outfit. Where did you buy it?
– I couldn’t help but staring at your necklace. It’s beautiful.
– You gave an interesting speech. I’d like to know your thoughts about…

Making comments about someone’s physical appearance is fine if we are already good friends with him/her, but never point out what a stranger’s lacking as it is considered impolite. For example:
– You look uncomfortable in that clothes ×
– It seems like you have gained some weight ×

 

If you feel that you might require some helps getting into a conversation with strangers, bring a friend. After a while, you should be confident to do it on your own.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 26 February 2018.


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#EngTalk: Polite Small Talks

Some of us might prefer a deep, meaningful conversation over a small talk. However, upon meeting a new person, we are rarely in a situation where we could jump into a serious discussion. That is when need small talk.

If it is done correctly, small talk can be comfortable. The key is keeping the small talk casual, not bringing any discomfort, but is still good enough to connect two people. For example, we should go with topics that both persons like rather than dislike.

There are also several things to avoid when trying to connect to our interlocutor. We should avoid making fun of or commenting on our interlocutor’s physical appearance, as we cannot be sure if the interlocutor is comfortable to discuss about that.

Here is what we recommend to make our small talk more enjoyable but still courteous.

  1. Start with a friendly greeting and a smile.
    Smile is a universal language and it almost always earns us a positive feedback from our interlocutor.
  2. Use an approachable body language.
    We should keep our phone away for a while and look at the interlocutor. By doing so, we are giving signal to our interlocutor that we are paying attention.
  3. Avoid pointing out somebody’s lacking in something.
    Physical appearance, except for the good things, is rarely a pleasant topic. Try not to mention about somebody’s weight or age or mismatched clothes. Instead, compliment the person on something. Tell him that his hair looks great or his face is radiant.
  4. Find a common ground.
    Find a topic that both we and our interlocutor can relate to and that can possibly be extended to a longer conversation. For example, favourite sports, favourite TV shows, favourite teachers, etc. Who knows by the end of the conversation, we already recommend new TV shows to watch to each other?
  5. Tell something about ourselves, but not too much.
    We can start with something we like but we should also ask our interlocutor’s opinion. Remember, if the interlocutor feels like we never give him a chance to speak, he can easily get bored.
  6. Listen well.
    Not only will our interlocutor feel appreciated, listening well and paying attention can also help us find more common grounds, which means more topics to talk about.
  7. Mention about hanging out again.
    If you really enjoy talking to each other, express your interest to meet again. We can try saying, “We should talk more about this over coffee,” or something similar.
  8. Say goodbye nicely.
    Although small talk is often a pastime during a certain event, we should make our interlocutor feel important. Therefore, when we bid adieu, we should also express that we hope to hear from our interlocutor.

We can say:
“I’ll see you around.”
“I hope we can meet again soon.”
“It’s been a pleasure talking to you.”

All in all, our eloquence can always be improved by practicing more. As the saying goes, “Practice makes perfect.”

So never get tired of practicing, fellas. Try making small talks with your friends and teacher every day in English.

 

Compiled and written by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 3 April 2017.

 

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#EngTrivia: Expressions in English and Their Indonesian Counterparts (2)

Hello, dear fellas! How are you?

Last week, we talked about expressions and their possible translations to Indonesian. If you missed it, check it out here: https://englishtips4u.com/2016/10/10/engtrivia-expressions-in-english-and-their-indonesian-counterparts/

Now, we’re going to continue with part 2. Are you ready?

  1. ‘It’s a fair cop!’, something we say if somebody caught us doing something wrong.
    Indonesian: ‘Yah, ketahuan, deh!’
    Example:
    “You said you were on a diet! Why are you eating ice cream?” | “It’s a fair cop!” #EngTrivia
  2. ‘Way to go!’, expressing approval, pleasure, or excitement.
    Indonesian: ‘Selamat! Kamu hebat!’
    Example:
    “Congratulations on your acting debut! Way to go!” #EngTrivia
  1. ‘I get the picture’, meaning we understand the situation.
    Indonesian: ‘Oh, aku ngerti maksudnya.’
    Example:
    “You could not meet me, but you were going out with your friends? Oh, I get the picture!” #EngTrivia
  2. ‘Not on good/speaking terms’, meaning two parties are not on friendly situation or not speaking.
    Indonesian: ‘Lagi musuhan’.
    Example:
    “You wouldn’t want to put Janet and John in the same team. They are currently not on speaking terms.” #EngTrivia
  3. ‘To come of age’. It means to reach adulthood.
    Indonesian: ‘Sudah cukup umur’.
    Example:
    “You’ll get my permission to bring the car when you’ve come of age and had a license.” #EngTrivia
  4. ‘As it happens/just so happens’ is another way of saying ‘as a matter of fact’.
    Indonesian: ‘Sebenarnya…’
    Example:
    “As it happens, I’ve booked the flight earlier. Just in case.” #EngTrivia
  5. ‘Come to think of it’, used when an idea or point occurs to someone while he’s speaking.
    Indonesian: ‘Kalau dipikir-pikir…’
    Example:
    “We’ll need to work overtime. Come to think of it, we’ve taken overtime four days in a week now.” #EngTrivia
  1. ‘Oh, what a giveaway!’, said when we revealed something we should have not.
    Indonesian: ‘Aduh, keceplosan.’
    Example:
    “I didn’t eat all the cakes, only four of five!” | “What? But you’re on a diet!” | “Oh, what a giveway!” #EngTrivia

 

There you go, fellas! Should you have any questions, comments, or ideas, let us know via mention or write them at www.englishtips4u.com. Don’t forget to check the recap of this session later, as it will also be complete with examples. Thank you for being with me, fellas!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 10 October, 2016.

#EngTrivia: Expressions in English and Their Indonesian Counterparts

Hello, everyone! Good evening! How was your day so far?

On learning language, I feel like I have to understand what a word or phrase means before being able to use it. Do you also feel the same?

When watching a movie or listening to a song, sometimes there are English word that we cannot just completely translate to our mother language.

For example, I had to Google what ‘Kudos’ means to explain it to my cousin when she heard in a movie and she thought it was ‘kiddos’.

So, tonight’s session will be on certain phrases or expressions in English and what they mean, as well as their Indonesian counterparts.

  1. Let’s start with ‘kudos’ that I mentioned earlier. It’s another way of saying ‘You’re great!’
    In Indonesian, it’s ‘Wah, hebat!’
    Example:
    “Mom, I just won the spelling bee!” | “Kudos, kiddo!” #EngTrivia
  2. ‘Ditto’, meaning ‘I agree with you’.
    Indonesian: ‘Baru mau bilang gitu’.
    Example:
    “I think we need more people in our studying group.” | “Ditto.” #EngTrivia
  3. ‘Not so/too fast’, used to stop what somebody’s doing, to slow down somebody when speaking or making a move, or to tell somebody not to be too eager to do something.
    Indonesian: ‘Eh, entar dulu!’
    Example:
    “Dad, I’m hanging out with my friends.” | “Not so fast. Did you finish your homework?” #EngTrivia
  4. ‘I’m a sucker for…’ means ‘I really like…’
    Indonesian: ‘Aku suka banget…’
    Example:
    “I’m a sucker for sci-fi movies, the likes of Star Wars, Avatar, Interstellar, and so on.” #EngTrivia
  5. ‘That’s putting me off’ is another way to say ‘That makes me lose my interest.’
    Indonesian: ‘Jadi ilfeel’.
    Example:
    “The way this candidate talks about war really puts me off.” #EngTrivia
  6. ‘Doing something for sports’ means doing it only for amusement.
    Indonesian: ‘Ya, seneng aja gitu’.
    Example:
    “Be careful with that teacher. He likes giving impromptu tests for sports.” #EngTrivia
  7. ‘Touché!’, meaning ‘You’ve got a point!’
    Indonesian: ‘Nah, itu!’
    Example:
    “Just because he stutters, doesn’t mean we should not listen to what he has to say.” | “Touché!” #EngTrivia
  8. ‘Send one’s regards’, meaning ‘send someone’s greetings to somebody else’.
    Indonesian: ‘Titip salam.’
    Example:
    “The Lannisters send their regards.” #EngTrivia

 

Alright, fellas, those are some English expressions with their Indonesian counterparts. Any questions or comments, just tweet us.

Please remember, fellas, using the expressions I just tweeted doesn’t mean what you’ve been using is incorrect. The expressions help to add some ‘spices’ to your daily conversations.

Thank you for being with me, fellas! Today’s #EngTrivia is a wrap! Check out our site http://www.englishtips4u.com for other interesting topics.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 3 October, 2016. 

#EngClass: Word Stress

Hi, fellas! Was today a good day? Or perhaps you just went through a stressful day? I hope not, but if you happen to have had a stressful day, how about putting those stressful events behind and learn to put a stress in a word instead? Yes, today we’re going to learn about word stress.

In English, we don’t pronounce every syllable (suku kata) in a word with the same strength. When saying a word, we put a stress (emphasis) in one syllable, and pronounce the other syllable(s) more quietly. Stressing a syllable means we say it a little longer or louder or with a higher pitch than the other syllables.

Every English word has one stressed syllable, and it’s important to stress the right syllable when we speak. Word stress helps the listeners tell one word apart from another. For instance, if you hear two stressed syllables, you hear two words. It helps us understand a speaker who speaks very fast.

Stressing the wrong syllable in a word can make the word difficult to hear, and therefore the listener can’t understand us. Stressing different syllable can even change the meaning of some words. For example, if you stress the first syllable in the word present, it’s a noun that means gift. But if you stress the second syllable (present), it becomes a verb that means to offer.

So how do we know which syllable to stress? Here are some general rules that you can follow:

  1. Stress the first syllable of most two-syllable nouns and adjectives, e.g., table, happy
  2. Stress the last syllable of most two-syllable verbs, e.g., decide, begin
  3. Stress the second-to-last syllable of words that end in –ic, –sion, and –tion, e.g., geographic, expansion, attention
  4. Stress the third-from-last syllable of words that end in –cy, –ty, –phy, –gy, and –al, e.g., democracy, uncertainty, geography, biology, critical

But there are some exceptions and many types of words that are not covered by those rules, so you should check the dictionary to be sure. Different dictionaries have different ways to mark the stressed syllable. Now, take a look at the pronunciation guide below the defined word in your dictionary.

  • Oxford Dictionary and Collins Dictionary: an apostrophe (‘) shows that the following syllable is stressed. Example: prəˈnaʊns means we stress the nounce in pronounce.
  • Dictionary.com: the stressed syllable is marked bold. Example: pruh-nouns

If you think, “I can’t possibly memorize the stressed syllable for every word in the dictionary!” You’re right. Perhaps the best way is to learn by practice. If you practice listening until you’re familiar enough with spoken English, I’m sure you’ve also learned the word stress. You just don’t realize it. Fluent English speakers use word stress all the time without thinking about it. It’s kind of the same way we use intonation in our sentences in Bahasa Indonesia.

So, now that we know that word stress is the key to understanding spoken English, we know why it’s important to learn English by listening. Listening can help you learn to speak English properly so that people understand you better. We actually have some #EngTips for you on that very topic: How to improve your English listening skill.

I hope this post has been useful for you, fellas. Have a good day!

(Source: teachingenglish.org.uk, englishclub.com, dictionary.com, oxforddictionaries.com)

Compiled and written by @fafafin for @EnglishTips4U on September 8, 2016

#EngTrivia: Commonly mispronounced words

Sometimes while we’re reading, we find a new word which we don’t know how to pronounce, at least until we check the dictionary or consult our teachers. In this article, we are going to discuss several commonly mispronounced words.

  1. Buffet.
    • We, in Indonesia, often mispronounce this word as ‘boo-fet,’ while the correct pronunciation is ‘bəˈfā’ (buh-fé).
  2. Ibiza.
    • It’s pronounced ‘ee-bee-tha’ instead of ‘ee-bee-tza.’
  3. Determine.
    • I often mispronounce this word, too. I say ‘dee-ter-mine’ while the correct pronunciation is ‘dee-ter-meen.’
  4. Doubt and debt.
    • The letter ‘b’ in both words is silent, so the words are pronounced ‘dout’ and ‘det.’
  5. Bear.
    • It’s pronounced ‘be(ə)r’ instead of ‘beer’ (drink).
  6. Duty.
    • The correct pronunciation is ‘d(y)o͞otē,’ not ‘duh-tee.’
  7. Sword.
    • The word has silent ‘w’, and it’s pronounced ‘sôrd.’
  8. Angle.
    • The word is pronounced ‘aNGgəl’ not to be confused with ‘angel (ānjəl).
  9. Would, should, could.
    • Again, the ‘l’ is silent, so the words are pronounced ‘wood’, ‘shood’, and ‘kood.
  10. Castle.
    • Instead of ‘kastel’, the word is pronounced ‘kasəl.’

There you go, fellas! Albeit being a short one, I hope this #EngTrivia article is useful for you. Whenever you learn a new word, learn also how to pronounce it correctly so your interlocutor can understand you perfectly. Thank you very much for reading this article!

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, May 23, 2016

Related post(s):

^MQ

#EngTips: How to be a great public speaker

Hi, fellas! Here are some tips for better public speaking skill. Check them out!

1. Define the purpose of your speaking, whether you want to inform, inspire, or persuade your audience. Knowing your ultimate purpose will help you stay focused through the preparation process.

2. Start to prepare your material by doing a deep research from A-Z of things you wanna talk about. Then pick a few powerful ideas that your audience will remember. Make it as simple as possible.

3. Memorize your concept instead of all the content. Do this by creating bullet points of the content, stories, and data.

4. If you use slides, make sure that eyes are on you, not the slides.

5. Here are some tips for your slide presentation.

6. Meet and chat up with your audience in advance to warm you up and make more engagement.

7.Try to connect with your audience by being self-effacing, humorous and real.

8. Tell your own stories to make your messages more memorable.

9. Keep the audience involved by asking question. Ask them to give some examples or tell their stories.

10. Last but not least, master your speaking by practicing regularly. Because we all know that practice make perfect.

Good luck with your public speaking, fellas! :)

Source:

 

Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, April 30, 2016

 

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^MQ

#EngTrivia: Important phrases in an airport

Bali-Airport-Lounge-50.jpg
(Source: onemileatatime.boardingarea.com)

This time, we are going to discuss some important phrases you might find in an airport.

You might find these phrases/questions important when you are planning to go abroad. Thus, mark them somewhere in case you need it someday so that you may prepare what to answer when asked.

Phrases when you check-in

  1. ‘Your passport and ticket, please.”
    Meaning: Toling perlihatkan tiket dan paspormu.
  2. “Are you checking-in any bags?”
    Meaning: Ada tas yang mau disimpan di bagasi pesawat?
  3. “Would you like a window or an aisle seat?”
    Meaning: Mau duduk di samping jendela atau di samping lorong?
  4. “There’s an excess baggage charge of $XX.”
    Meaning: Ada biaya kelebihan bagasi sebesar $XX.
  5. “Did you pack your bags yourself?”
    Meaning: Anda mengepak tas Anda sendiri?
  6. “Has anyone had access to your bags in the meantime?”
    Meaning: Ada yang membuka tas kamu beberapa saat lalu?
  7. “Do you have any liquids or sharp objects in your hand baggage?”
    Meaning: Ada cairan atau benda tajam di tas jinjing/backpackmu?

Phrases in security check area.

  1. “Could you put any metallic objects into the tray, please?”
    Meaning: Tolong letakkan semua barang berbahan metal di nampan/baki.
  2. “Please empty your pockets and put the contents in the tray.”
    Meaning: Kosongkan kantong Anda dan letakkan isinya di baki.
  3. Please take your laptop out of its case.”
    Meaning: Keluarkan laptop Anda dari tempat/tas/sarungnya.

That’s all. Hope they help you prepare your travel better. Bon voyage!

Source: https://www.speaklanguages.com/english/phrases/travelling-by-air

 

Compiled and written by @wisznu at @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, February 18, 2016

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^MD

#UKSlang: UK slang (9)

Good evening, fellas! How has your day been? I hope it’s been fun. I spent mine in campus, it was fun yet leave my cream crackered right now.  :D

In tonight session, I’d like to share some #UKSlang. Are you guys interested? Check them out, fellas!

  1. Absobloodylootely. Meaning: to agree with someone highly in a rather enthusiastic fashion.
    • Example:
      • Q: Are you going to do?
      • A: Absobloodylootely!
  1. Bob’s your uncle. Meaning: “there you have it!” or “everything is alright.”
    • Example:
      • “You just have to take the first left, and Bob’s your uncle –There’s the restaurant!”
  1. Cream crackered. Meaning: to be really tired and exhausted.
    • Example:
      • “Sorry, I can’t come to your party. I’m cream crackered.”
  1. Chock-a-block. Meaning: closely packed together; extremely full; crowded.
    • Example:
      • “Books piled chock-a-block on the narrow shelf.”
  1. Tickety-boo. Meaning: as it should be; going smoothly; fine.
    • Example:
      • “You don’t have to worry, everything is Tickety-boo.”
  1. Twee. Meaning: overly dainty, delicate, cute, or quaint.
    • Example:
      • “Her bunny-themed tea set is so utterly twee.”
  1. Queer street. Meaning: a difficult situation, such as debt or bankruptcy
    • Example:
      • “Stop buying unnecessary things, that’ll land you in Queer Street!”

It’s a wrap for now. Thank you for joining me. I hope it has been useful for you and…. Have a great day, fellas!


Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, November 7 , 2015

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#EngKnowledge: The birth of British and American Accents

All this time, we have been learning about the difference between British and American accent. You know it when you hear it. But have you ever wondered how these two accents came to be? Online magazine Mental Floss tried to answer the big question in the article “When did Americans lose their British accent?” As you may have known, the history of these two countries are strongly related.

The first English colony in the land that would be America arrived in Jamestown, Virginia, in 1667. They certainly carried the language and accent that they used in their homeland, England. So how did their accent change? Now here comes the most interesting part … It wasn’t the American accent that went through changes, it was the British accent! The current American accent is actually much closer to the ‘original’ British accent.

We must first remember that British and American accents are very diverse. There are various accents used in the UK, such as Geordie, cockney, or Yorkshire. American accents also varied. There are Southern accent, and even black people have their own accent.

What we call “British accent” is actually a standardised Received Pronounciation (RP). Also known as Public School English or BBC English. What we call “American accent” is actually ‘general American accent’ or ‘newscaster accent’ or ‘Network English.’

Back to the story about the English colony in America. Remember, we first had the technology to record human voice in 1860. 300 years after the colony arrived, the difference between the British and American accents was already apparent. Since recording technology wasn’t available in those 300 years, we can’t say for sure when the change happened. But changes in British society might provide us the clue to the answer.
To explain that, first we need to know the major difference between British and American accent: Rhotacism.

Rhotacism is the excessive use of the letter ‘R’ in pronunciation. American accent is rhotic and speakers pronounce the ‘R’ in words such as ‘hard’. Meanwhile, British accent is non-rhotic, making the way they pronounce ‘hard’ sounds more like ‘hahd’.

In the 19th century, there was a hot trend among the upper and upper middle class in southern England to become non-rhotic. The trend was to not pronounce the ‘R’. It became the signifier of class and status. This posh accent was later standardised as Received Pronunciation, and being taught widely by tutors to social climbers.

Slowly but sure, the accent spread across England and is being used by people across levels and professions. Across the pond, there were also societal changes that further strengthen the use of American accent. Big cities like New York, Chicago, and Detroit became the new centers of economic power in the region. The cities are populated by Scots-Irish and North English migrants. Southern English elites have no significance in there. The Received Pronunciation then lost its influence among people in the cities.

Source: Mental Floss

#EngVocab Extra

  1. Came to be. Arti: asal mulanya.
  2. Strongly related. Arti: berhubungan erat.
  3. Apparent. Arti: nyata, terlihat, tampak.
  4. Signifier. Arti: penanda.
  5. Posh. Arti: mewah.
  6. Social climber. Arti: orang yg ingin meningkatkan status sosial (dengan memakai barang mewah, mengubah cara bicara).
  7. Across the pond. Arti: di seberang Lautan Atlantik, cara orang Inggris menyebut Amerika.
  8. Societal change. Arti: perubahan masyarakat.
  9. Further strengthen. Arti: semakin memperkuat.

 

Compiled by @animenur for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, May 17, 2015

 

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#EngTalk: Spelling noises? (1)

We are back with David Crystal’s ‘Spell It Out’ today and this time is about…

Spelling noises… is there such a thing? What do you think?

So according to Crystal: “We also need to spell the emotional noises that form a part of conversation. A phonetic spelling turns out not to be so easy to achieve.”

Hmmm…. (That’s one)

So, “spoken language is more than words and sentences”, it “contains quite a few isolated noises” to express emotions called interjections

For example – When we want to “convey throat-clearing” we would use

Ahem

Eham”, “Mhumh”, won’t work

Yet its earlier version, in the 18th century, it would be only

Hem!”

Interjections can be either:

  1. we use sounds at the back of our mouth such as expressing disgust e.g. yuk, ugh, blech
  2. using both lips such as to to express relief e.g. phew, whew
  3. produce a click noise with our tongue such as to express disapproval or irritation e.g. tut – from the 16th century or tck – as Rudyard Kipling would write it, or tsk – popular in the 1940s

Some of these noises spelling are actually “breaking the rules” as they become words with no vowels

Other example would be brr (expressing feeling cold), grr (expressing irritation), shh (be quiet!), pst (calling someone silently) and hmmmm (expressing the person is thinking)

just like what I did in the beginning :)

Hope this #EngTalk has been useful for you! Still curious of this whole noises spelling?

Stay tuned for more next time :)

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4u on December 27, 2015

Source: David Crystal’s “Spell it Out”

 

 

#USSlang: American slang (18)

  1. At sea. Meaning: bingung.
    • Example:
      • “Mary is at sea now. She couldn’t answer the test. We should leave her alone.”
  2. Badical. Meaning: sangat bagus.
    • Example:
      • “Ryan’s performance was badical last night. He got so many compliments.”
  3. Hit the books. Meaning: belajar.
    • Example:
      • “Luke, you’ve to stop playing. It’s time to hit the books or you won’t pass the final exams.”
  4. King size. Meaning: sangat besar.
    • Example:
      • “The burger is king size. I can’t eat it alone, let’s eat it together.”
  5. Make tracks. Meaning: pergi.
    • Example:
      • “What are you doing? It’s time for us to make tracks. Hurry!”
  6. Nook. Meaning: masalah.
    • Example:
      • “Who’s gonna solve the nook? You’re the one who made it, Jim.”
  7. Zeen. Meaning: mengerti.
    • Example:
      • “I’m so tired, please leave me alone, zeen?”
  8. Vege out. Meaning: tidak melakukan apa-apa.
    • Example:
      • “I want to vege out in my room this weekend. So don’t call me, kay.”
  9. Scrilla. meaning: uang.
    • Example:
      • “Don’t even ask him to buy you dinner. He doesn’t have scrilla. He just lost his job last week.”

 

Compiled and written by @iisumarni at @EnglishTips4U  on Thursday, April 4, 2013

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#UKSlang: “Bloody hell!”

Before we begin this #UKSlang session, I’d like you to check out the above video.

It’s a TV commercial by Tourism Australia (Badan Pariwisata Australia), meant to attract international travellers to visit. Released in 2007, the commercial created a huge controversy.

The commercial shows a group of Australian preparing themselves to greet tourists. It ended with the slogan. This is where the controversy is!

2015/01/img_5934.jpg

In this article, we will be discussing “Bloody hell” – its history, how it’s used, and the controversy!

“Bloody hell” is a curse word commonly used in United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries.

There are 2 ways to use it:

  1. As an exclamation (seruan).
    • Example:
      • Bloody Hell! Did you just posted a pic of me sleeping on Instagram?”
    • We use it like we use “Damn it!” in American slang.
  2. Another way is to include them in a sentence the way we use “Fuck” in American slang.
    • Example:
      • “Why the bloody hell didn’t you send the letters?”
    • “Bloody hell” is considered rude, but different country has different view on how rude it is.

In the UK, the media are not even allowed to print the words. It has to be censored into “b___y“. But in Australia, they are more relaxed about it. That’s why the words appeared in the TV commercial!

When it was first released in the UK, the Tourism Australia caused a stir and ended up being banned because of the words. For the British, the TV commercial was too rude, whilst Australians have no problem with it at all. It’s interesting how even for these English-speaking countries, cultural clash can still happen. Even the Australian Minister of Tourism Fran Bailey had to visit UK to lobby for the commercial to be shown.

But why does “bloody hell” considered rude? There different stories on its origin.

Many sources claim that it is rude because it is ‘blasphemous’ (menghina agama). Some say the words sounds violent because it reminds people of wars.

Others say the words were borrowed from German word “blode” which means “silly, stupid.”

Imagine how it was like when Ron Weasley said “bloody hell” many times in Harry Potter movies, which aimed for kids :D

Either way, “bloody hell” had become a curse word that feels distinctively British.

Here’s a funny video of all the “bloody hell” Ron Weasley said in Harry Potter movies:

“but, i don’t think ‘bloody hell’ is as rude as ‘fuck’, imo :/” – @purwamel

Yup! But apparently the British government thought it was too rude for a TV commercial.

“Is it same with another curse such as “shit” ?” – @ChristinaJeje

Yes. It is quite similar.

“huh? But once I watched Tp Ger on BB*, where one of the presenters said the words, uncensored.” – @afrizalfp

I think there might be a different regulation for commercials, print media, and movies/series.

“If it can make it into such movies (and maybe books, but I don’t quite remember), why so much fuss about it in commercials?” – @RAKemal

Hmmm… we’re not quite sure. Anyone knows why? Please leave a comment down below.

“That’s what I thought. Just that, I’m not sure. Either way, “bloody hell” sounds cooler than “fuck”, though not always.” – @afrizalfp

Image source: adweek.com

Compiled and written by @animenur for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 18, 2015

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#USSlang: American slang (17)

  1. Babbage. Meaning: fake.
    • Example:
      • “I know for sure that Alicia’s LV bag is babbage.”
  2. Close call. Meaning: a very dangerous situation.
    • Example:
      • “Drew had a close call with her teacher when she opened her notes during the test yesterday.”
  3. Dead presidents. Meaning: money.
    • Example:
      • “Ray, lend me some dead presidents. My Mom won’t give me.”
  4. Fuzz. Meaning: police.
    • Example:
      • “Damien was picked by the fuzz last year after he stole some CDs.”
  5. Gasser. Meaning: something hillarious.
    • Example:
      • “You shouldn’t miss Jackie Chan’s new film. It’s a real gasser!”
  6. Hecka. Meaning: very.
    • Example:
      • “I really like your dress. It’s a hecka adorable.”
  7. Mutt. Meaning: dog.
    • Example:
      • “Heath, what’s your mutt’s name? It’s so cute.”
  8. Nada. Meaning: nothing.
    • Example:
      • “I asked my father to give me some money and he gave me nada.”
  9. Radioactive. Meaning: very popular.
    • Example:
      • “It’s not possible for you to be her friend. She’s radioactive. You’re a geek.”

Compiled and written by @iisumarni at @EnglishTips4U  on Thursday, March 7, 2013

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#EngTips: Polite vs. not polite

In this opportunity, I want to share to you about “polite and not polite”. I think this is important, so pay attention, please. :)

What does being polite mean?

  1. Being polite means showing consideration for the feelings or wishes of others.
  2. Sometimes we have to be more polite than at other times.
  3. In general, the people we wish to be more polite to are ‘important’ people or strangers.
  4. The usual rule is: ‘The more words you use, the more polite you are!’

isn’t that definition refer to “being considerate” –

Yes, being polite also means being considerate & respectful. – @EnglishTips4U

Let’s see these examples:

  • Not polite: ‘Min, reply my DM!’
  • Polite: ‘Hi, min. Could you please reply my DM? Thanks a bunch.’

Which of the two sentences is more likely to get a response from our admin? Can you see the difference, fellas?

The more words you use, the more polite the sentence gets. Take a look at the picture for examples.

It’s not necessary to be so very polite to friends, equals, or members of our family, unless they are old. To make a sentence a little more polite, you can add ‘please.’ Also, you can offer an explanation for your request.

Let’s see this example:

“My campus is going to hold an event and we need your help. Could you please check your DM? Thank you.”

Usually you will be more polite to people such as your boss, teacher, and also to people you don’t know well, old people, etc.

If you want to be very polite, like talking to a stranger, you can say:

  1. ‘Would you mind + V-ing ?’
  2. ‘Could you possibly + V1 ?’

In requests, it is generally polite to use a question form, and a tentative form like ‘would.’

Another way to be polite is to give a hint, so that the other person can guess what you want.

Let’s see this example:

  • A: ‘Hi, B. We can’t seem to find your email.’
  • B: ‘Oh, do you want me to resend my email?’
  • A: ‘Yes, please.’

In English, it is polite to:

  1. Greet people when you see them.
  2. Talk about them first.
  3. Use ‘please’ and ‘thank you.’
  4. Say ‘sorry’ if you do anything wrong, however small.
  5. Say ‘excuse me’ if you ask someone in the street.

Well, that’s all this lesson on ‘polite & not polite’. Hope it’s useful. Don’t forget to practice what you have learned. :)

Source: An A – Z of English Grammar & Usage by Geoffrey Leech et al.

Compiled and written by @NenoNeno at @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, June 19, 2014

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