Category Archives: slang

#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018

Hi, fellas, how was your Monday? I was shook when I realized that we are halfway through 2018.

Does anyone recognize the word ‘shook’ that I used on the previous sentence? Have you ever read it before?

 

@catheramirez: ‘Surprise,’ ‘I can’t believe it.’

Q: @nadirantsy: Does shook have the same meaning with shocked? Same context?
A: Yes, but I think we should limit ‘shook’ to a relaxed, playful context. We don’t use it to express our sadness when hearing a bad news, for example.

 

‘Shook’ is one of the popular internet terms that we are going to discuss tonight. As languages are ever-evolving, these internet terms are actual English words whose meanings have changed over the years.

Here are some popular internet terms that are still used as of mid-2018:

Bamboozled
From the verb ‘to bamboozle’ (informal). It means to fool or cheat someone. It also means to confuse or perplex.
E.g.: “I’m bamboozled by the amount of retweets to my Twitter post.”

Boi/boye
A cute way to spell ‘boy.’ Usually used to a male dog.
E.g.: “Oh, you’re such a good boiiiiii…”

Burn
A reaction we gave when somebody has just been talked back to.
A: “Without the ugly in this world, there would be nothing beautiful.”
B: “Thank you for your sacrifice.”
C: “Burn!!”

Canceled
‘To cancel’ used to describe that an event would not take place OR a force negated another, but nowadays, netizen use ‘canceled’ to describe a dismissed or rejected person or idea.
E.g.: “If you don’t like my doggos, you will be canceled.”

Cringe and cringey
‘To cringe’ is to experience an inward shiver upon seeing or hearing something embarrassing. ‘Cringey’ is used as an adjective to describe something that causes somebody to cringe.
E.g.: “I cringed so hard when I watched her lip-synced performance. It was so cringey.”

Deceased
It was used to politely say that someone has passed away, but now, it is used to describe that something is really cool or awesome or funny that it takes our lives away.
E.g.: “OMG, my brother bought me tickets to a Rich Brian’s concert! I’m deceased!”

Doggo
Basically, it’s a cute way to say ‘dog.’
E.g.: “I just saw a super adorable, squishy, fluffy doggo.” insert crying face emojis

adorable animal beach canine
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

Extra
Something is ‘extra’ if it is done in an exaggerated, over-the-top way.
E.g.: “Rihanna’s outfit at the 2018’s Met Gala is so extra.”

Epic comeback
It used to describe a spectacular return of an artist, most of the time musicians, after a long hiatus. Now, it also means a witty (sometimes harsh) response to an insult.
A: “You’re so fat Thanos will have to snap his fingers twice.”
B: “Yeah, I’m fat, but you’re ugly. At least I can go on a diet.

Feels
All emotions mixed up: sadness, joy, envy, love, etc.
E.g.: “TVXQ’s comeback gave me all the feels.”

HMU
Stands for ‘hit me up,’ which means ‘contact me.’
E.g.: “HMU the next time you visit the city.”

Humblebrag
The act of bragging while appearing humble; the art of false modesty.
E.g.: “Who knew that constant vacations and holidays could be this exhausting?”

Lit
It used to describe the state of being drunk, but it is now used to express that something is exceptionally good.
E.g.: “The latest Arctic Monkey’s album was so lit it set my headphones on fire.”

Noob
A noob is a person who is inexperienced in a particular sphere or activity, especially computing or the use of the Internet. It came from the word ‘newbie.’ However, ‘newbie’ has a more positive connotation while ‘noob’ is intended as an insult.
A: “Hey guys, I’m kinda new here.“
B: “LOL, noob.”

Overproud
A reaction we gave when our nation or something originated from our nation is being talked about in a positive way.
A: “Did you know that an instant noodle brand from Indonesia was marketed worldwide?”
B: “Are you being overproud right now?”

Pwned
A gaming-style spelling of ‘owned,’ meaning being defeated badly.
E.g.: “Oh, snap, I was just pwned!”

Salty
Upset, angry, or bitter, after being made fun of or embarrassed. It can also be used to say that someone is mad.
E.g.: “Gosh, stop being so salty! You broke up with him; now it’s time to move on!”

Savage
Being ‘savage’ is saying or doing something harsh without a regard to the consequences.
A: “You’re so fat Thanos will have to snap his fingers twice.”
B: “Yeah, I’m fat, but you’re ugly. At least I can go on a diet.”
C: “Oooh, that was savage!”

Shady and throwing shade
Shady = suspicious
Throwing shade = talking bad about something or someone, without naming (but the audience knows anyway).
E.g.: “I think her last Instagram post was a shade thrown to me. I don’t know why she’s so shady.”

Shook
Originally, the word has a more serious connotation, as it means ’emotionally or physically disturbed.’ Nowadays, netizen use it as a playful way to say ‘surprised.’
E.g.: “She broke up with him? I’m shook!”

Stoked
It means being excited or euphoric.
E.g.: “When they told me I was on the team, I was stoked.”

Tea
A gossip or personal information belonging to someone else. The phrase ‘spill the tea’ is used the same way as ‘spill the bean’ is used, that is ‘to reveal an information that is supposed to be a secret.
E.g.: “The tea is exceptionally good today.”

Woke
Supposedly has the same meaning as ‘awaken,’ which is being enlightened, always in the know of everything that is happening in the world, more than anyone else.
E.g.: “I never consume any products coming from animals anymore. I guess I can say I’m woke.”

 

As what we always suggest, avoid using slang or internet terms in a formal interaction. If you befriend your employer or boss on social media, for example, both of you are still expected to converse formally. Any school assignments, essays, job applications, letter of recommendations, or business emails should be free from these terms either.

@kaonashily: instantly I feel ‘gaul’ knowing these ‘nowadays’ words.

@babygraace: I think salty isn’t just used when someone is being made fun or embarrassed.  E.g.: omg some people that watch my car vlogs literally get salty at me because I don’t put both my hands on the wheel!

Q: @sakurayujin: What about ‘shooketh?’
A: Even more surprised than ‘shook.’

 

Compiled and written by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 11 June, 2018.


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#UKSlang: Sherlock (1)

Who here is a fan of BBC’s Sherlock and just can’t wait for the next season? The detective, along with his sidekick, Dr Watson, has captured the hearts of many across the world. In my opinion, the modern twist added to the latest adaptation only made the iconic detective story fresher and more relatable. If you haven’t seen it, go check the original DVDs.

Sherlock SS1.jpg
BBC’s Sherlock.

Most characters on BBC’s Sherlock are well-articulated, and although it makes it a little difficult for non-native speaker to understand what they are saying, it does provide a good amount of new words to add into our vocabulary.

This article will discuss some of the slangs. If you are using these words, use them with caution, because some of them are quite impolite. We’ll start with season 1.

  1. “Sorry — gotta dash. I left my riding crop in the mortuary.” – Sherlock (S01E01).
    Gotta dash (v.) = to have to go quickly, to be in a hurry.

  2. “I’ll make you that cuppa. You rest your leg.” – Mrs Hudson (S01E01).
    Cuppa (n.) = a cup of coffee or tea.

  3. John: “What do people normally say?”
    Sherlock: “’Piss off!’” (S01E01).
    Piss off (v.) = Go away.

  4. “Either way, you’re wasted as a cabbie.” – Sherlock (S01E01).
    Cabbie (n.) = taxi driver.
    Cab (n.) = taxi.

  5. “Because I had a row, in the shop, with a chip-and-PIN machine.” – John (S01E02).
    Row (n.) = quarrel, fight.

  6. “Well, grab a pew.” – Sebastian (S01E02).
    Grab a pew (v.) = take a seat.

  7. “Your friend… he’s an arrogant sod.” – Dimmock (S01E02).
    Sod (n.) = an obnoxious person.

  8. “Nine million quid, for what?” – Sherlock (S01E02).
    Quid (n.) = pound sterling.

  9. “We end up havin’ a bit of a ding-dong, don’t we?” – Murder suspect (S01E03).
    Ding-dong (n.) = an argument.

  10. “Told you you should’ve gone with the lilo.” – Sarah (S01E03)
    Lilo (n.) = an inflatable plastic or rubber mattress.

If you have others, drop them on the comment section below!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, 21 March, 2018.


 

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#UKSlang: UK slang (10)

Whilst preparing for a session to be delivered on Twitter, I found some slangs that are quite hilarious. I hope you find them fun, like I do. This time, we’ll talk about some slangs that are mostly used in the UK. Like all slangs, they’re suitable only in casual conversation.

Enough with the speech. Let’s start, shall we?

  1. A bunch of fives. Meaning: a punch in the face.
    • Example:
      • “I’ll give you a bunch of fives.”
      • Meaning: “I’m going to punch you in the face.”
  2. Pants. Meaning: not very good, not great.
    • Example:
      • “That’s pants.”
      • Meaning: “That’s not very good.”
  3. Nineteen to the dozen. Meaning: very fast, at a speedy rate at high speed.
    • Example:
      • “She was talking nineteen to the dozen.”
      • Meaning: “She was talking very fast.”
  4. Pear-shaped. Meaning: wrong result, deviate from expectation.
    • Example:
      • “It’s all gone pear-shaped.”
      • Meaning: “It’s all gone wrong.”
  5. A slice short of a loaf. Meaning: not very clever.
    • Example:
      • “That pretty girl is a slice short of a loaf.”
      • Meaning: “That pretty girl is not very clever.”
  6. As bright as a button. Meaning: clever.
    • Example:
      • “She’s as bright as a button.”
      • Meaning: “She’s clever.”
  7. Spend a penny. Meaning: visit the bathroom.
    • Example:
      • “Excuse me. I need to spend a penny.”
      • Meaning: “Excuse me. I need to visit the bathroom.”
  8. Parky. Meaning: cold.
    • Example:
      • “It’s parky outside.”
      • Meaning: “It’s cold outside.”
  9. Curtain twitcher. Meaning: a nosy neighbor.
    • Example:
      • “You’re such a curtain twitcher.”
      • Meaning: “You’re such a nosy neighbor.”
  10. Fluff. Meaning: fart.
    • Example:
      • “Did you just fluff?”
      • Meaning: “Did you just fart?”

That’s all for now, fellas! So, which one do you like best?

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, April 29, 2017

 

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#USSlang: Internet slang (2)

In this article, we’ll share some slang words we would most likely find on the internet. Do remember that we should avoid using slang words in formal situation.

Slang words are ideally only used in casual conversation and text. They are popular only for a certain period of time. Let’s start , shall we?

 

  1. Sus. Meaning: someone sketchy, shady.
    • Example:
      • I told you that guy over there was sus.
    • ‘Sus’ comes from the word suspect. As a slang, ‘sus’ suggests that someone is sketchy or shady.
    • Other than that, ‘sus’ can also mean ‘see you soon.’ Example:
      • I’m getting off work now. Sus.
  2. Boots. Meaning: emphasis, very much.
    • Example:
      • I had a very long day. I’m tired boots.
    • Tired boots = very tired
    • Add ‘boots’ to the end of an adjective or verb to emphasize on whatever you’re saying.
  3. Hunty. Meaning: a term of endearment for friends, usually used in the drag community.
    • Example:
      • Hey hunty, I’m home!
    • ‘Hunty’ is a combination of two words, ‘honey’ and ‘c*nt.’ It can sometimes be used in a demeaning way.
  4. Stan. Meaning: an obsessed fan (n.), admire (v.)
    • Example:
      • There’s a bunch of Stans waiting right outside the concert hall.
    • ‘Stan’ originated from Eminem song about an obsessed fan. ‘Stan’ was the main character in the song.
  5. OTP (One True Pairing) Meaning: your favorite relationship in a fandom, a couple that other people think matches the best.
    • Example:
      • My OTP is Glenn Alinskie Chelsea Olivia. They’re such a cute couple.
  6. Tea. Meaning: gossip, news or personal information belonging to someone else.
    • Example:
      • Spill the tea about what happened at the party.
  7. DR (double rainbow). Meaning: a term used to convey extreme happiness.
    • Example:
      • I got a promotion at work and have been seeing DRs all day.
  8. ICYMI (in case you missed it). Meaning: often used by people who missed things (often important) in social media or chat rooms.
    • Example:
      • ICYMI, my cat is sick and it ruined half of my wardrobe.
    • ICYMI can also be used in humorous way to point something which is already obvious.
  9. IMMD (it made my day). Meaning: a term used to show happiness, something awesome.
    • Example:
      • OMG! My boss just gave me a huge raise. #IMMD
  10. AMA (ask me anything). Meaning: a term to invite people to ask questions.
    • Example:
      • I have been studying for that exam all day. AMA.

There goes 10 internet slang words for now, fellas! Now that you have 10 more slang words in your repertoire, it’s time to put them to practice.

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, March 15, 2017


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#USSlang: Money

In this post; we would like to share the most common American slang for money.

  1. Bill. Meaning: one hundred dollars, or a piece of paper money.
    • Example:
      • a fifty-dollar bill.
  2. Wad. Meaning: a considerable amount of money.
    • Example:
      • a wad of cash.
  3. Buck. Meaning: commonly means a dollar, but can also mean an amount of money in general, or a hundred dollars.
    1. Example:
      1. his bag costs only fifty bucks.
      2. You can earn more bucks as you go.
  4. Fin/fiver/five-spot. Meaning: five-dollar bill.
  5. Sawbuck/ten-spot/Hamilton. Meaning: ten-dollar bill. Alexander Hamilton is pictured on the $10 banknote.
  6. C-note or Benjamin. Meaning: 100 dollar bill.
  7. Grand. Meaning: a thousand dollars.
    • Example:
      • five grands for a one-year program.
  8. Nickel. Meaning: originally refers to a coin worth five cents, but as a slang term it means something that costs five dollars.
  9. Dime. Meaning: originally means a coin worth ten cents, but as a slang term it means ten dollars.
  10. Other general terms for money: scratch, dough, moolah, cheddar, and smacker.

Compiled and written by @Fafafin for @EnglishTips4U on December 15, 2016.

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#AUSSlang: The Australian way

People from different part of the world have their own way to say things. Even though Australians speak English, like British & Americans, there are some words or slang which are unique to people from the country.

In this post, I’ll share some slang of the most common slang you might find in Australia. Let’s start!

  1. US: Cup of coffee | AU: Cuppa
slide1
Example: Would you like any sugar in your cuppa?

 

  1. US: Biscuit | AU: Biccie
slide2
Example: The best way to start your day is with a glass of warm milk and some biccie.

 

  1. US: Breakfast | AU: Breakkie
slide3
Example: Do you prefer chicken porridge or nasi uduk for breakkie?

 

  1. US: Afternoon | AU: Arvo
slide4
Example: It’s a very tiring day. Let’s have an arvo nap.

 

  1. US: Umbrella | AU: Brolly
slide5
Example: Always keep a brolly with you wherever you go. Especially in the raining season.

 

  1. US: Sunglasses | AU: Sunnies
slide6
Example: Oversized sunnies are trending now thanks to Syahrini.

 

  1. US: Track pants | AU: Tracky dacks
slide7
Example: Rihanna seems to like this green tracky dacks a lot.

 

  1. US: Convenience store | AU: Milk bar
slide8
Example: Let’s go to a milk bar and grab something to eat.

 

  1. US: Chocolate | AU: Choccie
slide9
Example: I really should stop eating so much choccie.

 

  1. US: Candy | AU: Lollies
slide10
Example: I don’t mind living off lollies, but my dentist wouldn’t approve.

 

  1. US: Guy | AU: Bloke
slide11
Example: Despite his attitude, he turned out to be a very nice bloke.

 

  1. US: Girl | AU: Bird
slide12
Example: She’s one of the most determined bird you might ever find on TV.

 

  1. US: Flip flops, sandals |AU: Thongs
slide13
Example: Somebody left these thongs outside. Are they yours?

 

  1. US: Lipstick | AU: Lippy
slide14
Example: I always keep at least one lippy in my purse.

 

  1. US: Gas station | AU: Servo
slide15
Example: Fortunately we found a servo in time. I almost ran out of petrol.

 

Alright! There goes 15 Australian slang you might want to know, especially if you’re planning to go to Australia.

 

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, September 28, 2016

 

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#EngVocab: Internet Slang

Here are 7 terms you might have noticed popping up a lot on social media these days.
1) Lit (adj.)

It’s used to describe an exciting event, a cool person, or general awesomeness.

Example:

  • Last night’s party was lit, buddy!

2) Fam (n.)

It’s used to refer to those close to you. These people can be your actual family, but most times it is used for close friends that you trust who are like family.

Example:

  • You always have my back, fam.

3) Sis (n.)

It is a shorter version of sister. Sis is known as the new bro. However you’d use bro, just replace it with sis and you’re good to go.

Example:

  • Sorry, but you can’t sit with us, sis.

4) Snatched (adj.)

It’s used to describe anything that looks really good or on point. It is a newer version of “fleek.”

Example:

  • Omg, I love your eyebrows. They’re snatched!

5) High-key / Low-Key (adj.)

High-key is used to describe something needing to be said out loud. But todays, it also used to alter word “very,” “a lot,” “intensely,” or “much.”

Example:

  • High-key don’t wanna move from the couch today. Or ever.

Low-key is clearly the opposite of “high-key”. It means to keep things as secret. But, nowadays, it also refers to “not really,” “not a lot,” “minimally.”

Example:

  • “I’m just low-key in love with him, OK?”

Here are both used in the same sentence:

  • “When you high-key want someone but you’re trying to be low-key.”

6) Ship (v./n.)

As a verb, it means to support a romantic pairing (usually of fictional characters).

As a noun, a ship is when a romantic pairing occurs between two characters.

Example:

  • I ship Andrew and Emma so much. They’re the cutest couple ever!

7) Savage (adj.)

It’s used to describe someone who doesn’t care about the consequences of his or her actions; bad-ass or hardcore.

Example:

  • Did you see the way he beat that snatcher? That was savage!

 

Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, August 6, 2016

 

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#UKSlang: UK slang (9)

Good evening, fellas! How has your day been? I hope it’s been fun. I spent mine in campus, it was fun yet leave my cream crackered right now.  :D

In tonight session, I’d like to share some #UKSlang. Are you guys interested? Check them out, fellas!

  1. Absobloodylootely. Meaning: to agree with someone highly in a rather enthusiastic fashion.
    • Example:
      • Q: Are you going to do?
      • A: Absobloodylootely!
  1. Bob’s your uncle. Meaning: “there you have it!” or “everything is alright.”
    • Example:
      • “You just have to take the first left, and Bob’s your uncle –There’s the restaurant!”
  1. Cream crackered. Meaning: to be really tired and exhausted.
    • Example:
      • “Sorry, I can’t come to your party. I’m cream crackered.”
  1. Chock-a-block. Meaning: closely packed together; extremely full; crowded.
    • Example:
      • “Books piled chock-a-block on the narrow shelf.”
  1. Tickety-boo. Meaning: as it should be; going smoothly; fine.
    • Example:
      • “You don’t have to worry, everything is Tickety-boo.”
  1. Twee. Meaning: overly dainty, delicate, cute, or quaint.
    • Example:
      • “Her bunny-themed tea set is so utterly twee.”
  1. Queer street. Meaning: a difficult situation, such as debt or bankruptcy
    • Example:
      • “Stop buying unnecessary things, that’ll land you in Queer Street!”

It’s a wrap for now. Thank you for joining me. I hope it has been useful for you and…. Have a great day, fellas!


Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, November 7 , 2015

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#USSlang: “Hump Day”

According to Oxford English Dictionary, “hump day” is the informal name for ‘Wednesday’.
Wednesday is seen as the midpoint (titik tengah) of a working week.
After Wednesday, we are moving closer towards the weekend. Everything feels easier and more bearable. Bearable = bisa dihadapi dengan mudah/santai.

This picture best describes the feeling of getting over a Wednesday:

 

Example: Over the hump! It’s Wednesday.

 

 

Why is it called a ‘hump’?

Surprisingly, it has something to do with camels. This is a hump (punuk unta).


Mondays and Tuesdays are seen as the hardest part of the week because we go back to work/school and get very busy on those days. Stress level usually peaked (memuncak) on Wednesday, then slows down on Thursday and Friday. Which is why Wednesdays are basically like the peak of a camel’s hump.

Here are some examples in using “hump day” in a sentence:

  • Hump day is always the hardest part of the week in this business.”
  • “Let’s look for a hump day treat and get over the stress.”
    • Treat = permen, suguhan, sesuatu yang enak.

Source: Oxford Dictionaries online, factsboard.com and keen.com for images

 

Compiled by @animenur for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, July 1, 2015

 

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#SASlang: South African slang

Did you know that South Africa is also one of the major English speaking countries in the world? Have you heard of any South African English slang?

So, in this post, I will be introducing a few South African slang which I thought is rather interesting to us Indonesians.

South African slang seems different to any other English slangs that might have existed… or it could also be a different English as a whole. Just like Singaporean English (Singlish), which we’ve discussed in a previous posts, South Africans adapt several languages too.

“South African English has a flavor of its own, borrowing freely from Afrikaans, which is similar to Dutch and Flemish, as well as from the country’s many African languages. Some words come from colonial-era Malay and Portuguese immigrants.”

“Note: In many words derived from Afrikaans, the letter “g” is pronounced in the same way as the “ch” in the Scottish “loch” or the German “achtung”– a kind of growl at the back of the throat.”

So with that in mind, let’s see some of the words they have:

1. Shame. We might think this is a bad word, but in South Africa it is actually quite endearing in social engagements

“Seriously, when in doubt, just say “Ag shame” and your sentiment will be greatly appreciated.”

Example:

A: “My brother won a million bucks yesterday.”

B: “Shame!”

2. Babelaas. It sounded like “bablas”, eh? It means hangover. “Babelaas” is also written “Babbelas.”

3. Lekker. One Dutch word quite known to a lot of people, meaning “good.”

  1. Ag (pronounced “Agh” or “ach”) “Ag” generally used at the beginning of a sentence, to express resignation or irritation.”

Or known as another way saying “Oh man” – It “is a filler word. We South Africans love our filler words” – used positively too.

It could be “Ag no man! What did you do that for?” or “Ag, I had a great time last night.”

5. Ja, nee. Meaning: yes, no – we who speak little English would think these two words are the most helpful, but here they say both.

“These two words are often used in succession to express agreement or confirmation.”

Example:

Ja, nee I’m fine thanks.”

6. Jawelnofine. Meaning: yes-well-no-fine – A more complicated one to understand but used for resignation or accepting unpleasant situation.

Example:

A: “The school fees have increased by over 20% this year?”

B: “Jawelnofine.

Jawelnofine is also another way of saying “How about that?”

7. Bioscope. Like the Indonesian bioskop or Afrikaan’s bioskoop meaning cinema.

8. In Singlish we have a different use of the word “later”. In South African slang, the word “later” means “just now.”

“Just now” is an unknown amount of time. They mean they’ll do it in the near future – not immediately.

Example:

“I’ll do the packing just now”

9. Eish (pronounced aysh). “Eish” used to express surprise, wonder, frustration or outrage – like Indonesian’s “eits.”

 

 

Source:

 

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, February 28, 2015

 

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#USSlang: African-American vernacular

February is special because of the celebration of Black History Month in United States and many other countries. It is an event to celebrate the heritage of African-American people. From their history, their struggle against racism, to their culture.

So, in this article, we will discuss some of the most common words used in African-American slang!

“also called african american vernacular english or AAVE, if i may add.” – @alasadulloh

You may have heard these words in hip-hop music and Hollywood movies. Like any other slang, they can’t be used in formal settings.

In fact, some can only be used among African-American people. They’d think it’s offensive if it’s used by other race. Which one? Let’s see from this list … plays something hip-hop to begin the session

1. Aight. Meaning: ‘Alright.’ Used at the end of a sentence to confirm.

  • Example:
    • Nobody gonna bring yo

    • u down, aight?

2. Bling. Meaning: accessories with diamonds, worn by rappers. Inspired by the sounds diamond makes when moved.

IMG_6057

3. Blown up. Meaning: very angry, or becoming very popular at short time.

  • Example:
    • “50 Cent has blown the fuck up!”

4. Bomb. Meaning: Something very cool.

  • Example:
    • “The new Beyonce album is the bomb, man!”

5. Boo. Meaning: Girlfriend/boyfriend; “boo = bae xD” – @nazhifa189

  • Example:
    • “You will always be my boo.”

6. Booty. Meaning: Butt.

  • Example:
    • “That guy has been staring at my booty.”

7. Candy-ass. Meaning: Weak or wimpy.

  • Example:
    • “Stop crying, you’re such a candy-ass!”

8. Crib. Meaning: House.

  • Example:
    • “Welcome to my crib, yo!”

IMG_6058

9. Folks. Meaning: People. In Australia, ‘folks’ is a slang that means “parents.”

  • Example:
    • “These guys are my folks, they’re with through happiness and sadness.”

10. Ho. Meaning: Slut, prostitute.

  • Example:
    • “That ho stole my boyfriend!”

11. Hood. Meaning: The ghetto, a community of African-American.

  • Example:
    • “I’m gonna meet my folks at the hood tonight.”

12. Holla. Meaning: A greeting OR expression of happiness.

  • Example:
    • “Holla! My boy just picked off that pass!”

13. Mo. Meaning: Short version for ‘more’.

  • Example:
    • “Remember that mo money means mo problem!”

14. Gangsta. Meaning: A gang member or something cool.

  • Example:
    • “That Nike hoodies are so gangsta.”

15. Ghetto. Meaning: Something that is not high-cultured.

  • Example:
    • “It’s ghetto when your hair is longer in the front than in the back.”
    • I think “it’s so ghetto” has the same feeling as “alay banget” in Indonesian language, no?

16. Peep. Meaning: Friends.

  • Example:
    • “Come hang with me and my peeps!”

17. Pimp. Meaning: Something good, cool, profitable or turning into something good.

  • Example:
    • “Let me pimp your car for you.”

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Important note about African-American slang:

The word ‘nigga’ may only be used among themselves. ‘Nigga’ is usually used as greeting or to mention a black person. But it still has a negative connotation when used by other race. So don’t use it unless you want to get into trouble!

Compiled and written by @animenur for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, January 31, 2015

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#USSlang: American slang (19)

  1. Pad. Meaning: a place to live.
    • Example:
      • “I need to find a new pad. Could you accompany me when I’m searching for it, Steve?”
  2. Peanuts. Meaning: a very small amount of money or no money at all.
    • Example:
      • “Julia won’t do the task for peanuts.”
  3. Pop for (something). Meaning: buy.
    • Example:
      • “It’s David’s turn to pop for popcorn.”
  4. Quarterback. Meaning: lead.
    • Example:
      • “I think Jeff is the right person to quarterback today’s meeting.”
  5. Rack. Meaning: bed.
    • Example:
      • “If you want to look good on your wedding day, you must hit the rack now, Patty.”
  6. Racket Meaning: noise.
    • Example:
      • “Javier can’t sleep last night because there was a lot of racket in his house.”
  7. Rag. Meaning: newspaper.
    • Example:
      • “Jane’s article is posted on the rag today. Have you read it?”
  8. Split. Meaning: leave.
    • Example:
      • “Could you please tell your sister that I’ll split the city tomorrow morning, Dave?”
  9. Trash. Meaning: destroy.
    • Example:
      • “Juliet’s brother trashed her room.”
  10. Upbeat. Meaning: positive.
    • Example:
      • “Jason always has an upbeat mind.”

Compiled and written by @iisumarni at @EnglishTips4U  on Sunday, May 5, 2013

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#USSlang: American slang (18)

  1. At sea. Meaning: bingung.
    • Example:
      • “Mary is at sea now. She couldn’t answer the test. We should leave her alone.”
  2. Badical. Meaning: sangat bagus.
    • Example:
      • “Ryan’s performance was badical last night. He got so many compliments.”
  3. Hit the books. Meaning: belajar.
    • Example:
      • “Luke, you’ve to stop playing. It’s time to hit the books or you won’t pass the final exams.”
  4. King size. Meaning: sangat besar.
    • Example:
      • “The burger is king size. I can’t eat it alone, let’s eat it together.”
  5. Make tracks. Meaning: pergi.
    • Example:
      • “What are you doing? It’s time for us to make tracks. Hurry!”
  6. Nook. Meaning: masalah.
    • Example:
      • “Who’s gonna solve the nook? You’re the one who made it, Jim.”
  7. Zeen. Meaning: mengerti.
    • Example:
      • “I’m so tired, please leave me alone, zeen?”
  8. Vege out. Meaning: tidak melakukan apa-apa.
    • Example:
      • “I want to vege out in my room this weekend. So don’t call me, kay.”
  9. Scrilla. meaning: uang.
    • Example:
      • “Don’t even ask him to buy you dinner. He doesn’t have scrilla. He just lost his job last week.”

 

Compiled and written by @iisumarni at @EnglishTips4U  on Thursday, April 4, 2013

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#UKSlang: “Bloody hell!”

Before we begin this #UKSlang session, I’d like you to check out the above video.

It’s a TV commercial by Tourism Australia (Badan Pariwisata Australia), meant to attract international travellers to visit. Released in 2007, the commercial created a huge controversy.

The commercial shows a group of Australian preparing themselves to greet tourists. It ended with the slogan. This is where the controversy is!

2015/01/img_5934.jpg

In this article, we will be discussing “Bloody hell” – its history, how it’s used, and the controversy!

“Bloody hell” is a curse word commonly used in United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries.

There are 2 ways to use it:

  1. As an exclamation (seruan).
    • Example:
      • Bloody Hell! Did you just posted a pic of me sleeping on Instagram?”
    • We use it like we use “Damn it!” in American slang.
  2. Another way is to include them in a sentence the way we use “Fuck” in American slang.
    • Example:
      • “Why the bloody hell didn’t you send the letters?”
    • “Bloody hell” is considered rude, but different country has different view on how rude it is.

In the UK, the media are not even allowed to print the words. It has to be censored into “b___y“. But in Australia, they are more relaxed about it. That’s why the words appeared in the TV commercial!

When it was first released in the UK, the Tourism Australia caused a stir and ended up being banned because of the words. For the British, the TV commercial was too rude, whilst Australians have no problem with it at all. It’s interesting how even for these English-speaking countries, cultural clash can still happen. Even the Australian Minister of Tourism Fran Bailey had to visit UK to lobby for the commercial to be shown.

But why does “bloody hell” considered rude? There different stories on its origin.

Many sources claim that it is rude because it is ‘blasphemous’ (menghina agama). Some say the words sounds violent because it reminds people of wars.

Others say the words were borrowed from German word “blode” which means “silly, stupid.”

Imagine how it was like when Ron Weasley said “bloody hell” many times in Harry Potter movies, which aimed for kids :D

Either way, “bloody hell” had become a curse word that feels distinctively British.

Here’s a funny video of all the “bloody hell” Ron Weasley said in Harry Potter movies:

“but, i don’t think ‘bloody hell’ is as rude as ‘fuck’, imo :/” – @purwamel

Yup! But apparently the British government thought it was too rude for a TV commercial.

“Is it same with another curse such as “shit” ?” – @ChristinaJeje

Yes. It is quite similar.

“huh? But once I watched Tp Ger on BB*, where one of the presenters said the words, uncensored.” – @afrizalfp

I think there might be a different regulation for commercials, print media, and movies/series.

“If it can make it into such movies (and maybe books, but I don’t quite remember), why so much fuss about it in commercials?” – @RAKemal

Hmmm… we’re not quite sure. Anyone knows why? Please leave a comment down below.

“That’s what I thought. Just that, I’m not sure. Either way, “bloody hell” sounds cooler than “fuck”, though not always.” – @afrizalfp

Image source: adweek.com

Compiled and written by @animenur for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 18, 2015

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#USSlang: American slang (17)

  1. Babbage. Meaning: fake.
    • Example:
      • “I know for sure that Alicia’s LV bag is babbage.”
  2. Close call. Meaning: a very dangerous situation.
    • Example:
      • “Drew had a close call with her teacher when she opened her notes during the test yesterday.”
  3. Dead presidents. Meaning: money.
    • Example:
      • “Ray, lend me some dead presidents. My Mom won’t give me.”
  4. Fuzz. Meaning: police.
    • Example:
      • “Damien was picked by the fuzz last year after he stole some CDs.”
  5. Gasser. Meaning: something hillarious.
    • Example:
      • “You shouldn’t miss Jackie Chan’s new film. It’s a real gasser!”
  6. Hecka. Meaning: very.
    • Example:
      • “I really like your dress. It’s a hecka adorable.”
  7. Mutt. Meaning: dog.
    • Example:
      • “Heath, what’s your mutt’s name? It’s so cute.”
  8. Nada. Meaning: nothing.
    • Example:
      • “I asked my father to give me some money and he gave me nada.”
  9. Radioactive. Meaning: very popular.
    • Example:
      • “It’s not possible for you to be her friend. She’s radioactive. You’re a geek.”

Compiled and written by @iisumarni at @EnglishTips4U  on Thursday, March 7, 2013

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#AUSSlang: Animals

We have talked about some Australian slang words related to food some time ago. This time around, we’ll continue with some Australian slang words related to animals.

1. Boomer. Meaning: A large male kangaroo.

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Boomer (Image by Wikipedia)

2. Joey. Meaning: Baby kangaroo in its mother’s pouch.

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Joey (Image via rantlifestyle.com)

3. Mob. Meaning: Group of kangaroo. (This is my fave thing about Australia: You could be sitting in a park then WOW).

In English, there are different ways to name a group of animals, depending on their species.
‘School’ is how a group of fish is called. “A school of fish.”
Interestingly, ‘murder’ is how a group of crow is called. “A murder of crow.”
‘Pack’ is for a group of lion or wolf. So “a pack of lion” is definitely not ‘sebungkus singa’. LOL.
4. Woofer. Meaning: dog.
5. Fruit salad. Meaning: dog/cat of mixed/unknown breeding. Interesting how Indonesians sometimes say ‘ras gado-gado’ for a cat or dog of mixed race.
6. Croc. Meaning: crocodile. Yes, like the shoes.
 
7. Brumby. Meaning: wild Australian horses.
8. Jumbuck. Meaning: Sheep.
9. Underground mutton. Meaning: Rabbit. Perhaps because we can also eat rabbit, just the way we eat mutton?

I was shocked when I first heard of this, but some kangaroos are allowed to be eaten in Australia. Eating kangaroos is a form of population control. Some species are protected, but some are so overpopulated they are allowed to be hunted.

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(Image via aussieblokes.net)
10. Budgie. Meaning: budgerigar, parkeet.
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(Image via petinfoclub.com)
11. Chook. Meaning: chicken.
12. Flutterby. Meaning: Butterfly.
13. Mozzie. Meaning: Mosquito.

14. White ants. Meaning: Termite. ‘Rayap.’

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(Image via termites101.org)
15. Cockie. Meaning: Cockroach or cockatoo. I’m sure you don’t want pics of the first one.
Source: alldownunder.com
Compiled by @animenur for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, December 7, 2014

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#AUSSlang: Food and drink

Being outdoor reminds me of summer’s all-time favourite activities – Barbeque parties! Barbeque happens to be a favourite past time for our neighbouring country Australia. So this post will be all about food & drink!

  1. Amber fluid. Meaning: Beer.
  2. Avo. Meaning: Short for avocado. Not to be confused with ‘arvo’ which means ‘afternoon.’
  3. Banana bender. Meaning: a person from Queensland (I wonder why! LOL).
  4. Barbie. Meaning: Short for barbeque. Not the doll.
  5. Billy. Meaning: A container to boil water. A teapot.
  6. Bog in. Meaning: To eat with enthusiasm. As the Javanese would say, “Nggragas.”
  7. Bikkie. Meaning: Biscuit.
  8. Brekkie. Meaning: Breakfast.
  9. Not my bowl of rice. Meaning: I don’t like it. Wonder why they are using rice. In England they’ve ‘not my cup of tea’, with the same meaning.
  10. Boozer. Meaning: A pub, from the British slang for alcohol ‘booze.’
  11. BYO (Bring Your Own) Meaning: A kind of unlicensed restaurant where customers bring their own drinks.
  12. Bush telly. Meaning: Campfire. LOL. ‘Telly’ is British slang for television.
  13. Chewie. Meaning: Chewing gum, not Chewbacca from Star Wars.
  14. Dog’s eye. Meaning: Meat pie. So next time you’re going to Aussie and someone offers you to eat dog’s eye, fear not.
  15. Chokkie. Meaning: Chocolate. By now you must have noticed a pattern in
  16. Crow eater. Meaning: A person from South Australia (I wonder why! LOL)
  17. Dingo’s breakfast. Meaning: No breakfast. Dingo is a native Australian wild dog.
  18. Drink with the flies. Meaning: To drink alone. Somehow this one makes me LOL.
  19. Off one’s face. Meaning: To get really drunk.
  20. Fairy floss. Meaning: Candy floss. In England, ‘fairy cake’ is how they call ‘cupcake.’
  21. Flake. Meaning: Shark meat, usually sold in fish-and-chips shop.
  22. Maccas. Meaning: McDonald’s. Instead of ‘McD.’
  23. Milk bar. Meaning: Corner shop selling take-away food.
  24. Muddy. Meaning: Mud crab, a popular delicacy.
  25. Bring a plate. Meaning: Instruction to bring food to a barbeque party. “Potluck party”
  26. Sanger. Meaning: Sandwich.

Source: koalanet.co.au

Compiled by @animenur for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, November 30, 2014

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#USSlang: ‘Basic bitch’

Today we’ll talk about a slang word that has gotten popular lately, esp. online: “Basic Bitch.”

A ‘basic bitch’ is an insult commonly targeted at young women.

It means a woman who is fulfilling all the stereotype of the most common girl. She loves the mall, she reads lifestyle magazine, she listens to Taylor Swift, she does Instagram – basically all the things every woman seems to be doing. Most of all, she is also happy about doing it. She doesn’t wish to be different or be out of the box.

‘Basic bitch’ is basically a way to say someone is boring, predictable, or had failed to surprise us. Or as urban Indonesians often say, ‘anaknya biasa banget’ or ‘orangnya ya gitu-gitu aja’ or ‘selera kebanyakan/umum.’

Example:

  • A: “What do you think of John’s new girlfriend?”
  • B: “Nah, she’s very basic.”

According to Urban Dictionary, ‘basic bitch’ started out as a slang word used in African-American communities. Its original meaning was ‘a girl who was too easy,’ or ‘a girl who would sleep or date with anyone.’ But language develops and now it is used to refer to ‘a stereotypical white woman.’

Some feminists criticise the use of the word because of their demeaning nature against women. (Demeaning = merendahkan.)

Here’s an interesting piece written by a girl who proudly refers to herself as basic: In defense of being ‘basic

People ridiculing others for preferring one specific flavor of coffee on a given day are the ones with a problem.

After all, it’s always better to stay true to yourself no matter what others think of it. It’s much better than being cool or different but fake. Being a basic is simply the opposite of being a hipster; you’re not aiming to be different or anti-mainstream.

There’s even a Buzzfeed quiz to check ‘How Basic Are You

Sources: Urban Dictionary, VICE, Red&Black

Compiled by @animenur for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, November 16, 2014

 

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