Category Archives: idiom

#IOTW: Idioms Related to Transportation and Travel

Hello, fellas! How’s your weekend?
Let’s discuss idioms related to transportation and travel! Here we go! #IOTW
On the same boat: sharing a particular experience or circumstance with someone else. 

E.g.: “You’re not the only one who failed to get the concert ticket. We’re on the same boat!” 

Jump on the bandwagon: to join or follow something once it is successful or popular. 

E.g.: “I heard Black Panther movie is phenomenal, but I’m not going to jump on the bandwagon and watch it. Superhero movie isn’t my cup of tea.”

Paddle one’s own canoe: to be able to act independently. 

E.g.: “Since I turned 25 this year, mom expected me to paddle my own canoe.”

Backseat driver: someone who tells the others how to do things. 

E.g.: “I don’t need a backseat driver on this project. Stop pestering me with all your advice.”

Hit the road: to leave, especially on a road trip.

E.g.: “Let’s hit the road before dawn.”
Itchy feet: the need to leave or to travel. 

E.g.: “Seeing the picture of a beach really gives me the itchy feet.”

Sail through (something): to complete something quickly and with ease. 

E.g.: “My thesis sailed through the professor with no debate.”

A third/fifth wheel: An unwanted or unnecessary person. 

E.g.: “Ann invited me to go to the movies, but if she also invited her boyfriend, I wouldn’t be joining. I would feel like a third wheel there.”
That wraps up our session, fellas! See you on another session.

Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, March 24, 2018.

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#IOTW: Idioms related to books and reading

Hello, Fellas. How’s your day? Do any of you love reading? Do you realise that tomorrow is a World Book Day? In order to welcome the day, I would like to share some idioms with the word ‘book.’

The first one is the famous one. I bet you regularly find it in some literature or even in your daily communication.

  1. “An open book.” Meaning: something/someone that is easily to be understand.
    • Example:
      • “My mom always know my way of thinking like an open book.
  2. “To take a leaf out of someone’s book.” Meaning: to imitate someone.
    • Example:
      • “Sometimes my sister irritates me because she always take a leaf out of my book.
  3. “To read between the lines.” Meaning: looking for an implied meaning.
    • Example:
      • “When you feel the world pushing you down over and over again, try to read between the lines. I believe something happens in order to lead you to be better or to a better place.”
  4. “The oldest trick in the book.” Meaning: the dishonest action that had been used over and over again.
    • Example:
      • “Aren’t you bored with the same oldest trick in the book, Matt?”
  5. “In someone’s good books.” Meaning: an expression that show if someone is pleased with you.
    • Example:
      • “His performance was in the jury’s good book.”
  6. “Bring someone to book.” Meaning: to punish someone.
    • Example:
      • “Charlie was brought to the book because of his fight with Ben.”
  7. “Balance the book.” Meaning: a process to make sure that your income and outcome match with your (bank) account note.
    • Example:
      • “I think you should balance the book. It’s strange that you always run out of money before the end of the month.”
  8. “Use every trick in the book.” Meaning: you have used every possible way to get/do something.
    • Example:
      • “I have used every trick in the book to pursue her, but she doesn’t even notice it.”
  9. “Have your nose in the book.” Meaning: to read all the time. On the other hand it also means to refer someone who is being oblivious to her/his surrounding because s(he) is to absorbed to the book.
    • Examples:
      • “She won’t respond if you call her while she’s having her nose in the book. Trust me.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, March 1, 2018

#IOTW: Idioms with ‘party’

Hello, fellas! What are you doing in the last days of 2018? New Year will be coming soon! It’s a good time to look at idioms on party and celebration. Here we go!

  1. After-party. Meaning: a relaxed time in which people sit and talk after they have been at a party.
    • Example:
      • “When the New Year celebration finished, they had an after-party in the rooftop.”
  2. Party animal. Meaning: someone who loves going to parties.
    • Example:
      • “Jon is a real party animal. He’s rarely at home.”
  3. Party pooper. Meaning: a person who refuses to join in the fun of a party.
    • Example:
      • “It’s better not to invite my cousin. She’s a party pooper who always leaves first.”
  4. Party hearty. Meaning: to celebrate.
    • Example:
      • “Our basketball team won the competition, so we decided to party hearty!”
  5. Crash the party. Meaning: to attend a party without being invited.
    • Example:
      • “He crashed the party and ended up causing trouble.”
  6. Piss on (one’s) party. Meaning: to ruin or underestimate someone’s efforts, plans, or ideas.
    • Example:
      • “Sorry to piss on your party, but there’s no way we’ll finish the report in one night.”
  7. Party foul. Meaning: a term of behavior that is inappropriate or unacceptable at a party.
    • Example:
      • “You spilled wine on the carpet! That’s a party foul.”
  8. Party piece. Meaning: some ways (trick, song, poem) that someone often do to entertain people at parties.
    • Example:
      • “Her party piece has always been impersonating celebrity’s voices.”
  9. The life and soul of the party. Meaning: someone who’s at the center of all parties.
    • Example:
      • “The party isn’t complete without Dan. He’s truly the life and soul of the party!”
  10. Be a party to something. Meaning: take part in a (secret) plan or agreement.
    • Example:
      • “I don’t know that they held the surprise celebration. Were you a party to this, Nat?”

That wraps up our session, fellas! Have a great time in New Year! Good bye!
Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, December 30, 2017.


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#IOTW: Idioms related to medical and health

Hello, Fellas, how are you? I hope you are always as fit as fiddle.

Today I am going to share some idioms related to health. I am sure that maybe you’ve heard about some of them.

  1. “Alive and kicking.” Meaning: (just like the previous phrase “as fit as fiddle”) to be healthy.
    • Example:
      • “Hello, John, how are you? You look alive and kicking.
  2. “Break out in a cold sweat.” Meaning: to perspire from fever/anxiety.
    • Example:
      • “It seems like you are going to break out in a cold sweat. Just relax, everything will be all right.”
  3. “Bring (someone) around.” Meaning: to cure someone/to restore consciousness.
    • Example:
      • “Donna’s one of the best cardiologist. She always brings her patients around successfully.”
  4. “Feel on top of the world.” Meaning: to be very healthy.
    • Example:
      • “I think this supplement works. I am currently feeling on top of the world.”
  5. “Flare up.” Meaning: (an illness) suddenly begin again.
    • Example:
      • “I thought I have completely recover from the flu, but the fever suddenly flared up.”
  6. “Go under a knife.” Meaning: to have an operation in surgery.
    • Example:
      • “She is going under a knife to remove the breast tumor.”
  7. “Head shrinker.” Meanimg: a psychiatrist.
    • Example:
      • “Well, I recommend you to see dr. Robert. He is a good head shrinker.”
  8. “In a family way.” Meaning: pregnant.
    • Example:
      • “Have you heard that Marissa is in a family way?”
  9. “Out cold” Meaning: unconscious.
    • Example:
      • “I don’t know what happened to him. He was shivering before he is out cold.
  10. “Pull through.” Meaning: to recover from serious illness.
    • Example:
      • “Hannah is still unable to go to school even though she has pulled through the dengue fever,”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, August 3, 2017.

#IOTW: Idioms in K-pop Song Titles

Hello, fellas! How familiar are you with K-pop songs?

I’ve noticed a trend where a lot of K-pop songs are using English titles or sometimes a Korean title with a different English title in parenthesis (e.g.: ‘서원을 말해봐 (Genie)’ by SNSD). The sentence 서원을 말해봐 (read: seo-won-eul mal-hae-bwa) which means ‘tell me your wish’ has a different title in English called ‘Genie.’

This might happens because K-pop are trying to expand into the international market, thus, having song title in English is more effective to garner the attention of overseas people. Another reason is because most of overseas listeners of K-pop can’t type the Korean alphabet, so with the English title, people can easily find the song and the music video.

Not only an English title, but some of popular K-pop song are using idiomatic expression in English too. Here are some idiom in K-pop song titles.

  1. One of a kind. (Song by GD, 2012)
  • Meaning: the only item of a particular type.
    • E.g.: “Kwon Jiyoung is a leader of popular boy-group who has produced more than 160 songs. He’s absolutely one of a kind.”
  1. Blood, sweat & tears. (Song by BTS, 2016)
  • Meaning: a lot of effort and suffering.
    • E.g.: “Namjoon produces the songs with blood, sweat, and tears to make it well known internationally.”
  1. Born with a silver spoon. (Inspired from Silver Spoon by BTS, 2015)
  • Meaning: to be in a high social class or be rich from birth.
    • E.g.: “Taehyung wasn’t born with a silver spoon in his mouth. He earned his success through hard work.”
  1. Spine breaker. (Song by BTS, 2014)
  • Meaning: someone who demands the parents to always buy fancy things so he/she could keep up with expensive trends.
    • E.g.: “Jin is such a spine breaker. He wears a limited edition shoes after begging her mom to buying them for him.”
  1. Home run. (Song by GOT7, 2016)
  • Meaning: a highly successful achievement.
    • E.g.: “After starring a drama called Dream High 2, Jaebum & Jinyoung scored a home run. They debuted as a duo and later in a popular boy-group.”

 

  1. Mental breakdown. (Inspired from MTBD by CL, 2014)
  • Meaning: the state of being overwhelmed by a situation that one’s can’t handle.
    • E.g.: “Chaelin almost had a mental breakdown because she thought that she had lost the shoes given by Rihanna.”

 

  1. Lionhearted. (Inspired from Lion Heart by SNSD, 2015)
  • Meaning: exceptionally corageous or brave.
    • E.g.: “Hyoyeon is lionhearted. She usually dances with a cute concept in a group, but she dares to perform a ballroom dance all alone.”

 

  1. Play with fire. (Song by BLACKPINK, 2016)
  • Meaning: to do something that could cause a great trouble later.
    • E.g.: “Jennie is playing with fire because she doesn’t wear a helmet while driving the motorcycle.”

 

  1. Play Russian roulette. (Inspired from Russian Roullete by Red Velvet, 2016)

Russian roulette is a dangerous game of chance in which the player holds a gun containing one bullet to your head and shoot, the player wins if the bullet does not come out.

  • Meaning: to take big risks, in a way which is very dangerous.
    • E.g.: “Yeri is playing Russian roulette by pursuing her career in the entertainment industry since 12 years old.”
  1. Lovey-dovey. (Song by T-ara, 2011)
  • Meaning: to express affection in an extravagantly sentimental way.
    • E.g.: “There’s a lovey-dovey couple at Kirin-art School. They are Jiyeon and Jaebum whom are always holding hands together.”

Source:
– Cambridge Idioms Dictionary.
– McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs.

Featured photo by Jeon Han – Korea.net

Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, July 1, 2017.

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#IOTW: Idioms related to Science & Technology

Hey, fellas! How’s life? We’re going to share idioms related to science and technology.
1. On the same wavelength. Meaning: to have the same ideas or opinions as another person.

  • Example:
    • “We’re on the same wavelength. We see football in the same way.”


2. Light years ahead. Meaning: much more advanced than someone or something in terms of development or success.

  • Example:
    • “The new operation system puts this hand phone light-years ahead of its competitors.”


3. Hit the airwaves. Meaning: to be broadcasted on radio or TV for the first time.

  • Example:
    • “If you want to become famous, you have to hit the airwaves to promote your band.”

 

4. Hold the wire. Meaning: used when we want someone not to hang up during the phone call.

  • Example:
    • Hold the wire, please. I’ll pull you through.” 


5. Get your wires crossed. Meaning: If people get their wires crossed, they have a different understanding.

  • Example:
    • “We got our wires crossed about what time we were supposed to meet.”

 

6. Fire on all cylinders. Meaning: working at full strength; making every possible effort.

  • Example:
    • “The factory is firing on all cylinders to finish the orders on time.”

 

7. Cog in the machine. Meaning: a person who does an unimportant job in a large company or organization.

  • Example:
    • “I decided to set up my own online business because I was tired of being a cog in the machine.”


8. Well-oiled machine. Meaning: something that works very well; company that operates without problems.

  • Example:
    • “Willy-wonka factory runs like a well-oiled machine.”

That’s all I can share for today, fellas. I hope it could be useful for you.
Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Friday, May 19, 2017.


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#IOTW: Idioms on clothing (3)

  1. Air one’s dirty linen in public. Meaning: to discuss someone’s private problem to others.
    • Example:
      • “Astrid is untrustworthy. I heard it when she was airing Vivi’s dirty linen in public yesterday.”
  2. As comfortable as an old shoe. Meaning: very comfortable/familiar.
    • Example:
      • “Ana’s family is very friendly. I felt as comfortable as an old shoe when I stayed at her home last night.”
  3. Best bib and tucker. Meaning: someone’s best clothing.
    • Example:
      • “This prom night only happens once in our life. You have to wear your best bib and tucker.”
  4. Bore the pants off. Meaning: to frighten someone very badly.
    • Example:
      • “Did you heard about the current plane crash? I thought it was Albert’s flight. It really bored my pants off.
  5. Emperor’s new clothes. Meaning: a situation in which people are afraid to criticize something because everyone seems to think it’s good. This idiom is used when many people believe that it is not true.
    • Example:
      • “It’s like an emperor’s new clothes when my sister tell us the reason why she runaway.”
  6. Hand in glove with (someone). Meaning: very close with someone.
    • Example:
      • “I used to be hands in glove with my friends, but we are like strangers now.”
  7. Hang on (someone’s) coattails. Meaning: to have one’s fortune or being successful because of another person.
    • Example:
      • “He won’t be a manager if he didn’t hang on Andrew’s coattails.”
  8. Wear sackcloth and ashes. Meaning: to behave that you are very sorry for something you have done.
    • Example:
      • “Tristan is still mad at me even though I have apologized to him and wore my sackcloth and ashes.
  9. Talk through one’s hat. Meaning: to say something without knowing/understanding the facts.
    • Example:
      • “I really hate my aunt because she always thinks that she’s right and talk through my hat.
  10. Stuffed shirt. Meaning: a person who is too rigid/formal.
    • Example:
      • “Just have a seat and relax. Don’t be a stuffed shirt.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, May 25, 2017.

#IOTW: Idioms with ‘books’

“How could I be such an open book to him when, half the time, I had no idea what was milling around in his head?” -Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner

Hi, fellas! Do you know what it means to be an open book? Open book is surely one of those idioms with word ‘book.’ It means sb or sth that is easily understood.

Just so you know, we have covered many idioms: from parts of the body, name of places, Ancient Times, and many more.

Today, we’re going to share idioms with word ‘book.’ Here are 7 idioms with word ‘book.’

  • hit the books (mainly US and Australian informal): to study
    Ann isn’t coming. She’s got to hit the books.
  • throw the book at somebody: to severely punish someone 

    My lecturer said that she would throw the book at me if I kept procrastinating over my assignments.

  • crack a book: to open up one’s books, especially in order to study 

     

    You had better crack the books if you want to pass the exams.

  • read sb. like a book: understand someone’s thoughts and motives easily 

    You don’t like this gift, right? I can read you like a book.

  • blot one’s copybook: to damage one’s own reputation through bad behavior 

    She really blotted her copybook by coming late to the meeting.

  •  

    turn-up for the book(s): a surprising or unexpected event 

    So among all candidates, I am the one getting the job. That’s a turn-up for the books.

  • sing from the same hymnbook: to make the same or similar statements, especially to express the same opinions in public asa result of a prior agreement. 

    Before we release any statements, make sure that everyone from the campaign sings from the same hymnbook.  #IOTW

 

Compiled and written by @nkusumawicitra for @Englishtips4u on Friday, April 7, 2017

 

 

 

RELATED POST(S):

#IOTW: Idioms in Taylor Swift’s songs

#IOTW: Idioms in Taylor Swift’s songs (2)

#IOTW: Idioms on human body

#IOTW: 5 Idioms from Ancient Times

#IOTW: Idioms on the sitcom “The Big Bang Theory”

1. Worth a shot. Meaning: something that is worth trying as there is a chance of success.

  • Example:
    • “I’ve been clicking the site many times just to get the tickets for Star Wars premiere. Well, it’s worth a shot.”

 

2. Cut to the chase. Meaning: get to the point and saying what is important without delay.

  • Example:
    • “What are you talking about? I didn’t get your point. Cut to the chase, Sheldon!”

 

3. Pull out all the stops. Meaning: to do every effort to achieve the best result.

  • Example:
    • “I’m happy that you give me a huge bouquet of roses. Leonard, you really pull out all the stops.”

 

4. Apples to oranges. Meaning: to describe or compare two totally different things.

  • Example:
    • “I’m a remarkable physicist while Wolowitz is just an engineer. It’s like comparing apples to oranges, Amy.”

 

5. Snake in the grass. Meaning: someone who’s feign friendship with the intent to deceive.

  • Example:
    • “Penny is sweet but she is gossiping about us in the back. She is the snake in the grass.”

6. Way to make lemonade. Meaning: make the best out of bad situation.

  • Example:
    • “Rajesh wants to be a businessman after his scientific career comes to an end. What a way to make lemonade.”

 

7. Eat heart out. Meaning: to suffer from envy or jealousy.

  • Example:
    • “The whole Engineering Department was eating their hearts out when Leslie took me to check out the CERN Supercollider.”

 

8. Mum’s the word. Meaning: a pledge to keep the secret.

  • Example:
    • “Sshhh! Mum’s the word, Bernie. A luminous fish which glows in the dark is my billion dollar idea.”

 

Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, March 29, 2017

 

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#IOTW: Idioms from name of place

Here are some idioms from the name of place, fellas.
1) Coals to Newcastle: doing something that is completely unnecessary.
Example:

To give Mr. Kim money is like carrying coals to Newcastle because he is already so rich he doesn’t need any more money.

2) Crossing the Rubicon: to pass a point of no return
Example:
Abigail will have crossed the Rubicon when she sends the college application.

3) Rome was not built in a day: great things cannot be done instantly, they take time and patience.
Example:
A: ‘It feels like he’s spent all of his live writing the book.’
B: ‘well, Rome wasn’t built in a day.’

4) New York minute: something that happened in very short time
Example:
She gets all the jobs done in a New York minute, what a fast learner she is!

5) Cut the Gordian knot: to solve a very complex problem in a simple way
Example:
She cut the Gordian knot off the difficult equation.

6) Himalayan blunder: a very serious mistake or error.
Example:
He got a warned for his Himalayan blunder.

source:

https://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/cat/17.html


Compiled and written by @AnienditaR at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, March 18, 2017

Continue reading #IOTW: Idioms from name of place

#IOTW: Idioms related to education and school

  1. Easy as ABC. Meaning: very easy.
    • Example:
      • “Learning mathematics is easy as ABC.”
  1. Bookworm. Meaning: someone who reads a lot
    • Example:
      • “No wonder she is genius. She is a bookworm.”
  1. Brainstorm. Meaning: try to develop idea or think of a new idea.
    • Example:
      • “In this group discussion, we need to brainstorm for our environment campaign.”
  1. Call the roll. Meaning: call students’ names on a roll and expect them to answer if they are there.
    • Example:
      • “Every morning when the class starts, the teacher calls the roll.”
  1. Cap and gown. Meaning: a special cap called a mortarboard and a special robe which is worn in academic ceremony.
    • Example:
      • “The students wore cap and gown on their graduation day.”
  1. Count noses. Meaning: to count the number of people.
    • Example:
      • “The teacher stopped to count the nose several times during the field trip.”
  1. Cover a lot of ground. Meaning: to complete a lot of material in a class or course.
    • Example:
      • “I covered a lot of ground in Physics class last semester.”
  1. Cow college. Meaning: a school where farming or agriculture is studied.
    • Example:
      • “He graduated from cow college in America.”
  1. Crack a book. Meaning: to open a book to study (usually used in the negative)
    • Example:
      • “It shocked me when I got my test result. It was good although I didn’t crack a book that much.”
  1. Crank out a paper. Meaning: to write a paper or essay in mechanical way.
    • Example:
      • “I have to crank out a paper to pass this subject.”

 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Tuesday, February 21, 2017

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#IOTW: Idioms for overwhelmed multitasker

Have you ever tried to do more than one thing at a time, e.g., tasks or activities? Did you succeed in accomplishing all of them?

Well, I always try to find occasions where I can squeeze more activities while doing another because I always have so much things that I want to do. Sometimes I succeed because they’re relatively easy, like ironing my clothes while listening to a thought-provoking podcast. But sometimes I fail, like when I tried singing along to my playlist while writing. I ended up writing what I sang! And apparently, that’s a problem that a lot of us have in common, that there are actually several idioms about doing multiple things at the same time. So now I want to share you some of those idioms about doing multiple things at the same time, or as we like to call it, multitasking.
1. To walk and chew gum (at the same time): to be able to do more than one thing at a time.
  • Example:
    • You’re the kind of person who walks and chew gum at the same time, so I guess this task load won’t be a problem for you.
2. To spread oneself too thin: to try to do too many things at once.
  • Example:
    • I think Sarah is spreading herself too thin, she takes 10 courses this semester, works at the lab, and teaches several private students.
3. To have too many irons in the fire: to be engaged in too many activities.
  • Example:
    • Would you please do the dishes tonight? I’m having too many irons in the fire right now to do the chores.
4. Torn between something and something: finding it very difficult to choose between two possibilities.
  • Example:
    • I’m torn between writing my field trip report and writing the new article for my community.
Wow, at this point it starts to get a more and more overwhelming, right, fellas?
5. To rob Peter to pay Paul: to pay a debt, obligation, etc. by creating or leaving unpaid another.
  • Example:
    • I haven’t finished sewing the blue dress, but I’m gonna have to rob Peter to pay Paul again, because I only have 6 hours to knit this hat.
6. To burn the candle at both ends: to work oneself from early in the morning until late at night and get very little rest.
  • Example:
    • He has to burn the candle at both ends every day if he wants to be able to cover his family expenses.
7. To fall between two stools: to fail to achieve either of two aims as a result of not being able to choose one to focus on.
  • Example:
    • We need to narrow our target now in order not to fall between two stools.
Is there any idiom that relates with your multitasking activity right now, fellas? Which idiom is it?

Compiled and written by @Fafafin for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, February 2, 2017

#IOTW: Idioms in Taylor Swift’s songs (2)

Idioms are important and very useful to give variation in conversation. They help you sound like native speakers and are useful to enrich your vocabulary.

So, what is an idiom? Idiom or idiomatic expression is a group of words in a fixed order that have a particular meaning that is different from their literal meanings. So, it won’t make sense if you change the words because they are fixed expressions. For example if you say ‘the math test was a piece of macaroon’ instead of ‘the math test was a piece of cake,’ you’ll just confuse the hearer.

In this instance, we are going to talk about idioms found in Taylor Swift’s songs. We have previously shared some here: #IOTW: Idioms in Taylor Swift’s songs.

Here are some more idioms from Taylor Swift’s songs:

1. In your wildest dream. If you say something will happen ‘in your wildest dreams’, it means: it isn’t likely to happen or you think it is impossible to happen.

“Staring at the sunset, babe. Red lips and rosy cheeks. Say you’ll see me again. Even if it’s just in your wildest dream.”

– Wildest Dreams

Example:

  • I want Taylor Swift to come to my graduation day and sing for me, but I think it probably won’t happen, even in my wildest dreams.

2. Last straw. Meaning: the final thing; the thing or action that is too much and goes too far

“You don’t have to call anymore, I won’t pick up the phone, This is the last straw, Don’t wanna hurt anymore.”

– You’re Not Sorry

Example:

  • My boyfriend told me he would be late for dinner, but the last straw was seeing with a girl. I told him our relationship was over.

3. Sweep (someone) off (someone’s) feet. This expression describes a feeling when you fall in love instantly with someone.

“I’m not a princess, This ain’t a fairy tale, I’m not the one you’ll sweep off her feet, Lead her up the stairwell”

– White Horse

Example:

  • She hopes a gorgeous man will sweep her off her feet on Valentine’s Day.

4. To know something like the back of your hand. This expression is used when talking about things/places/persons you know really well.

“And we know it’s never simple. Never easy. Never a clean break. No one here to save me. You’re the only thing I know like the back of my hand”

– Breathe

Example:

  • Don knows Sherlock Holmes TV series like the back of his hand. He has watched them many times.

5.Touch and go. It means precarious or uncertain; with a risk of not succeeding.

“I’m walking past through the traffic lights. Busy streets and busy lives. And all we know. Is touch and go.”

– State Of Grace

Example:

  • It’s touch and go if I will ever go out.It’s still raining cats and dogs.

6. To take someone/ something for granted. It means to expect someone or something will be always available to serve you without thanks or recognition.

“You’re the kind of man who makes me sad, While she waits up,You chase down the newest thing, And take for granted what you have”

– Girl At Home

Example:

  • He left you because you took him for granted all this time.

7. To wear your heart on your sleeve. It means that you show your feelings obviously.

“Got the radio on, my old blue jeans. And I’m wearing my heart on my sleeve. Feeling lucky today, got the sunshine. Could you tell me what more do I need.”

– A Place In This World

Example:

  • I wear my heart on my sleeve. I can’t hide my feelings when I’m feeling down.

8. An open book. If someone is an open book, s/he is fairly predictable. You know what s/he is thinking or feeling.

“But here I am an open book. Turn the page it’s all the rage. Get a look on the inside. Oh what you get is what you see.”

– The Diary Of Me

Example:

  • Harry is an open book. You’ll know right away if he’s sad.

9. Safe and sound. If you are safe and sound, it means you are unharmed and healthy.

“You’ll be alright. No one can hurt you now. Come morning light. You and I’ll be safe and sound.”

– Safe And Sound

Example:

  • It was a rough trip, but we arrived safe and sound.

There are more idioms in Taylor Swift’s songs. Leave us a comment below if you find more idioms in her songs.

 

Compiled and written by @kusumawicitraa for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, January 27, 2017

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#IOTW: Idioms to express tiredness

Here are some idioms to express tiredness. Shall I start now or just get some sleep a little more? LOL, just kidding. Check these out, fellas!

1. Dead tired. Meaning: Totally exhausted or fatigued.

Example:

  • I was dead tired after running my first 5000 marathon.

2. Dead on one’s feet. Meaning: to be extremely tired.

Example:

  • My sister was doing her room all day and was dead on her feet.

3. Dog-tired. Meaning: to be extremely tired.

Example:

  • He usually got home around midnight, dog-tired after a long day at work.

4. Ready to drop. Meaning: to be so tired and nearly too exhausted to stay standing.

Example:

  • I’ve been shopping all day with Mom. I’m ready to drop!

5. Out like a light. Meaning: to be so tired that you fall asleep very quickly.

Example:

  • As soon as his head touched the pillow, he was out like a light.

Trivia:
@fikaa328: In Korean language, you can say gae phigon, which means dog-tired too.

 

Compiled and written by @AnienditaR for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, November 12, 2016

 

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#IOTW: Idioms on human body

Here are 10 idioms from head to toe.

  1. Head start. Meaning: to start something earlier than others.
    Example:

    • “I got a head start on the race because I was the youngest.”
  2. Head over heels. Meaning: to be deeply in love with someone.
    Example:

    • “Everybody knows that Ted is head over heels for Robin.”
  3. See eye to eye. Meaning: to completely agree or view something the same way with someone.
    Example:

    • “My best friend and I see eye to eye on a lot of things.”
  4. Let one’s hair down. Meaning: to relax and enjoy yourself.
    Example:

    • “I need to go to a silent place and let my hair down this weekend.”
  5. Neck of the woods. Meaning: a nearby location; a neighborhood.
    Example:

    • “Tom is the wealthiest man in my neck of the woods.”
  6. Learn by heart. Meaning: to learn something so well that it can be written or recited without thinking; to memorize.
    Example:

    • “I have to learn The Civil Code by heart for my closed-book examination.”
  7. Old hand. Meaning: someone who is very experienced at something.
    Example:

    • “The maid is an old hand at cleaning the house.”
  8. Pat on the back. Meaning: to praise someone for something.
    Example:

    • “The teacher patted all the students on the back for their good work.”
  9. Pull one’s leg. Meaning: to tease someone.
    Example:

    • “Calm down, buddy. I was just pulling your leg.”
  10. Rule of thumb. Meaning: basic rule.
    Example:

    • “The rule of thumb is that the students wear black pants and white shirts.”

Compiled and written by @AnienditaR for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, December 10, 2016

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#IOTW: Christmas idioms

1. Be no angel. Meaning: to behave badly occasionally.

Example:

  • She‘s no angel but it’s expected of her if you treat her that way.

2. Christmas comes but once a year. Meaning: Since Christmas only happens once a year, we should treat it as a special time by being good to others or by indulging our children or ourselves.

Example:

  • Christmas comes but once a year, let’s get something for every one.

3. Cold turkey. Meaning: to withdraw from (an addictive substance or a habit)abruptly and completely.

Example:

  • People usually try to quit smoking by going cold turkey.

4. Deck the halls. Meaning: to indulge in copious amount of alcoholic drinks as a way of dealing with stress.

Example:

  • I’m so tired, I just want to deck the halls for the rest of the day.

5. Don’t get your tinsel in a tangle. Meaning: Get over it! Don’t get stressed out.

Example:

  • Don’t get your tinsel in a tangle. He’s only here for the party.

6. Trim the tree. Meaning: to decorate a (Christmas) tree.

Example:

  • Now that I’ve made my choice, let’s trim the tree and get ready for Christmas.

7. To cancel someone’s Christmas. Meaning: To kill someone; to destroy someone.

Example:

  • If he keeps bugging me, I’m gonna cancel his Christmas.

8. Christmas came early (this year). Meaning: When you receive some unexpected good news or good fortune.

Example:

  • Congratulations! I heard you’re promoted. Sounds like Christmas came early this year.

9. Like turkeys voting for Christmas. Meaning: to accept a situation which will have very bad results for them.

Example:

  • When she signed up to organize the reunion, she was like a turkey voting for Christmas.

10. Christmas tree. Meaning: A drunkard, a person who is frequently or habitually drunk.

Example:

  • A well-dressed Christmas tree sat in the corner – lit up, of course.

 

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, December 28, 2016

 

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