Category Archives: grammar

#GrammarTrivia: Using “How About” and “What About” (Revisit)

Hello, fellas. How are you today? In this session we will learn the use of how about and what about.

(More: https://englishtips4u.com/2014/04/24/engtrivia-how-about-vs-what-about/)

The meaning and usage of how about and what about are the same. Both carry the meaning of suggestions or offers. How about and what about precede a noun (or pronoun) or the –ing form of a verb.

Examples:

1) A: We need an additional player.
B: How about (What about) Danny? Let’s ask him if he wants to join.

2) A: What should we do tomorrow?
B: How about (What about) going to the beach?

How about and what about are commonly used in informal spoken English, but are frequently not used in writing.

How about you? and What about you? refer to the information or question immediately preceding them.

Examples:

1) A: I’m hungry. How about you?
B: Yes. I’m hungry too.

2) A: Are you tired?
B: No. What about you?
A: I’m a little tired.

Source:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, November 7, 2019

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#GrammarTrivia: Using ‘Which’ to Modify a Whole Sentence

Hello, fellas. Today we will learn how to use which to modify a whole sentence. Which is usually used in a clause modifying a noun or a relative clause (an adjective clause)

(More on relative clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/08/engclass-relative-clause/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/09/engclass-relative-clause-2/)

A sentence is modified by which in informal and spoken English. It is not generally deemed appropriate in formal writing. If it is written, a comma comes before it to reflect a pause in speech.

Examples:

1) Liverpool won the UEFA Champions League. That did not surprise me.
Liverpool won the UEFA Champions League, which did not surprise me.

2) We are facing a long dry season. This is too horrible.
We are facing a long dry season, which is too horrible.

The pronouns that and this refer to the ideas of the previous sentences “Liverpool won the UEFA Champions League” and “We are facing a long dry season”. Then, they are replaced by which.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written  by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Tuesday, October 15, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: Parallelism Structure

Hello fellas, how are you doing? Today we will discuss #GrammarTrivia Do you know what is “Parallelism” in English?

Parallelism or Parallel structure is important, especially in Academic circles or in the Business Corp. So whether you speaking or whether your writing this principle of Parallelism will help you to communicate more effectively.

Parallelism is speaking or writing technique in which you can communicate more powerfully by balancing different part of your sentence.

Let’s check some examples of Parallelism sentences:

1. Verb + Verb

E.g :Janet sings and dances.”

We see verb (sings) and verb (dances), so that sentence is Parallelism.

2. Gerund + Gerund

E.g: “We enjoy reading and cooking.”

We see gerund (reading) and (cooking), so that sentence is Parallelism.

3. Infinitive noun + Infinitive noun

E.g: “I like to watch movies and to travel abroad.”

We see that infinitive and noon (to watch movie) and infinitives and noun (to travel abroad).

4. Adverb + Adverb

E.g: “The Police acted quickly and carefully.”

We see that (quickly) and adverb (carefully), so that sentence is Parallelism.

5. Noun + Noun ( for long sentences)

E.g: “The Job demands professional qualifications, the ability to manage others and experience working around the globe.”

The parallelism structure of that sentence is become:

“The Job demands professional qualifications, managerial ability and global experience.”

Sometimes, it is very normal to write sentences there are not Parallel in the beginning, but after you correct them to become parallel structure, your writing or speaking are becoming more powerfully.

Fellas, you can learn more completely about parallelism structure from this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8pIidfrSG4&t=353s

That’s all for today and See you tomorrow!

Compiled and written by @2013happyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, October 23, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: The Use of ‘The’ or No Article with Names

Hello, fellas. This session is still related to when we should use articles or not.

(More: https://englishtips4u.com/2019/09/18/grammartrivia-using-a-or-no-article-for-generalization/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2019/10/05/grammartrivia-the-use-of-the/)

1) The does not precede titled names.
Examples:
I saw Mr. Jones.
Doctor Charles graduated in 2004.
President Obama spent his childhood in Indonesia.

2) The does not come before the names of continents.
Examples:
There are many great football players in Europe.
Africa is often hit by starvation.

3) The names of most countries are not preceded by the.
Examples:
Germany produces several prominent scientists.
Massive floods took place in China.

4) The comes before the names of only a few countries, such as the United States, the Netherlands, the Philippines, the Czech Republic, the United Arab Emirates, the Dominican Republic.
Examples:
Donald Trump is the President of the United States.
Euro 1988 was won by the Netherlands.

5) The is not used with the names of cities.
Examples:
Kuala Lumpur was the capital city of Malaysia.
There are many football clubs in London.

6) The is used with the names of rivers, oceans, and seas.
Examples:
The Nile River is in Africa.
The Indian Ocean is known for its wave.

7) The does not precede the names of lakes.
Example:
Samosir lies in the middle of Lake Toba.

8) The comes before the names of mountain ranges.
Example:
Many tourists visited the Alps.

9) The is not used with the names of individual mountains.
Example:
They climbed Mount Merapi.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, October 13, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: The Use of ‘The’

Hello, fellas. This session is still related to the previous session about the use of an article.

(More: https://englishtips4u.com/2019/09/18/grammartrivia-using-a-or-no-article-for-generalization/)

Beside a/an, the other article is the. The precedes

1) singular count nouns
e.g. the cat

2) plural count nouns
e.g. the cats

3) noncount nouns
e.g. the fruit

The is used when the speaker and his/her listener are thinking about the same specific person(s) or thing(s).
e.g. Have you fed the cat?

In the example above, the speaker and the listener are thinking about the same specific cat. The listener knows which cat the speaker is talking about. There is only one cat about which the speaker could be talking.

The is also used when the speaker mentions a noun the second time.
e.g. I had a book. I gave the book to Sally.

I had a book constitutes the first mention. In the second mention, the listener knows which book the speaker is talking about: the book the speaker had.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Tuesday, October 1, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: Using “A” or No Article for Generalization

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn how to use a or no article. A or no article is used when a speaker is making a generalization.

A comes before a singular noun when a generalization is expressed.

Examples:
1) A leaf is green.
2) A cat makes a good pet.

In the above-mentioned examples, the speaker is talking about any leaf and any cat, all leaves and all cats, leaves and cats in general.

No article is used when a speaker is making a generalization with a plural count noun.

Examples:
3) Leaves are green.
4) Cats make good pets.

The meaning of these examples is similar to that of example 1 and 2. Sometimes an expression of quantity (e.g., almost all, most, some) is used in a generalization.

Examples:
5) She saw some cats in her room.
6) Most students read books.

If a generalization is about an uncountable noun, no article is used.

Examples:
7) Milk is good for your health.
8) Fruit contains vitamins.

Some can be used in the generalization of an uncountable noun.

Examples:
9) Can you get me some food?
10) He drank some milk.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, September 14, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: Length of Time (How Long & It + Take)

Hello, fellas. How long have you been learning English? In this session we will learn how to ask about and express length of time.

According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, a question about length of time is started by how long.

Examples:
1) How long did you sleep last night?
2) How long will they stay in New York?

How long can be replaced by how many + minutes/hours/days/weeks/months/years.

Example:
How many weeks will they stay in New York?

On the other hand, length of time can be expressed by this formula:

It + Take + (Someone) + Length of Time + Infinitive

(Infinitive = to + the simple form of a verb)

Examples:
1) It takes 90 minutes to play football.
2) It took Mary two months to write her book.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Tuesday, August 27, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: Conditional Sentences Using ‘As If’, ‘As Though’ and ‘Like’

Hello, fellas. How’s life today? On this occasion we will learn several forms of conditional sentences. According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, a conditional sentence usually comprises of an adverb clause of condition or if-clause, which contains a condition, and a result clause, which shows a result. Besides, an adverb clause can be introduced by whether or not, even if, in case, in the event that, unless and only if.

(More on conditional sentences: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/06/04/engclass-conditional-sentences-revisit/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2019/02/05/grammartrivia-other-forms-of-conditional-sentences/)

Conditional sentences can also be formed by using as if, as though and like. The use of as if or as though usually carries the same meaning as an untrue conditional sentence.

Examples:
1) She kept playing as if she were a child.
Fact: She is not a child.
2) He explained the lesson to his classmates as though he had learned all the materials.
Fact: He did not learn all the materials.

In conditional sentences, like precedes a clause. However, it is not generally considered appropriate in formal English and more common in informal English.

Example:
It looks like it is going to be sunny.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Tuesday, August 13, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: The Past Perfect Progressive

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn the past perfect progressive.

To begin with, we need to understand the past perfect first. The past perfect conveys an idea that an activity was completed before another activity or time in the past.

(More on the past perfect: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/12/26/engclass-past-perfect-tense/)

Example:
Felix had finished his study when Mary started her tertiary education.
First: Felix finished his study.
Second: Mary started her tertiary education.

In the past perfect progressive, the emphasis is put on the duration of an activity that was in progress before another activity or time in the past.

Example:
She had been reading a book for two hours before I came.

The past perfect progressive may also express a meaning that an activity was in progress close in time to another activity or time in the past.

Example:
He was tired because he had been running.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 4, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: Relative Clauses to Modify Pronouns

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn the use of relative clauses to modify pronouns.

According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, a relative clause is a dependent clause modifying a noun. Further information about a noun is described, identified, or given by the clause. It is also called an adjective clause.

(More on relative clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/08/engclass-relative-clause/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/09/engclass-relative-clause-2/)

Relative clauses can also be used to modify indefinite pronouns (everyone, everybody, everything, someone, somebody, something, anyone, anybody, anything, no one, nobody, nothing)

Example:
1) There is somebody whom she wants to see.
2) Anything which they said was irrelevant.

Pronouns such as the one(s) and those can be modified by relative clauses, too.

Example:
1) Catherine was the only one whom I talked to in the class.
2) The governments provide scholarships for those who are unable to pay their tuition fees.

Relative clauses are extremely rarely used to modify personal pronouns (I, you, she, he, it, we, they). Even though it is possible, it is very formal and uncommon.

Example:
It is I who help the students.

Source:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, July 19, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: “Always” in the Progressive

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn the use of always in the progressive.

Always is usually used in the simple present to describe habits or everyday activities.
Example: I always go to school at 6:30.

It may be used in the present progressive to complain, express annoyance or anger.
Example: She is always coming late!

Beside always, the words forever and constantly can also be used in the present progressive to convey annoyance.
Example: She is always/forever/constantly coming late!

Always, forever, and constantly may be used in the past progressive to express annoyance or anger.
Example: She was always/forever/constantly coming late.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, July 6, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: The Present Progressive and the Simple Present to Express the Future

Hello, fellas. In the previous session of #GrammarTrivia on June 11, 2019, we learned how the future is expressed in time clauses.

(More on the future in time clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2019/06/15/grammartrivia-expressing-the-future-in-time-clauses/)

Our session today is about using the present progressive and the simple present to express the future.

The future is expressed by the present progressive when a sentence concerns a planned event or definite intention. Its future meaning is conveyed by future time words or the context.

Example:
My sister is seeing a doctor next Wednesday.

The simple present may also be used to express the future in a sentence if it concerns a definite schedule or timetable. It usually contains future time words. Only several verbs are used in this way, e.g., open, close, begin, end, start, finish, arrive, leave, come, return.

Example:
The competition starts tomorrow.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, June 19, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: Expressing the Future in Time Clauses

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn how to express the future in time clauses.

A time clause is an adverb clause beginning with such words as when, before, after, as soon as, until, and while. However, will or be going to is not used in a time clause. The clause carries future meaning despite its simple present tense.

Example:
Dave will arrive soon. When he arrives, we will see him.

Sometimes a time clause uses the present progressive to express an activity that will be in progress in the future.

Example:
While I am studying overseas next year, I am going to visit several tourism destinations.

To emphasize the completion of the act before the other act takes place in the future, the present perfect is used in a time clause.

Example:
She will take a rest after she has finished her project.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, June 7, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: Using Already, Yet, Still, and Anymore

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn the use of several adverbs. They are already, yet, still, and anymore.

1) Already
• Meaning: Something occurred before now.
• Position: Midsentence.
• Example: The computer is already there.

2) Yet
• Meaning: Something did not take place before now (until this time), but it may happen in the future.
• Position: End of sentence.
• Example: The mail has not come yet.

3) Still
• Meaning: A situation continues its existence from past to present with no change.
• Position: Midsentence.
• Example: We can still play the guitar.

4) Anymore
• Meaning: A past situation has changed or does not continue at present. It has the same meaning as any longer.
• Position: End of sentence.
• Example: She does not teach English anymore.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, May 20, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: Predicate Adjectives

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn predicate adjectives.

According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, adjectives are words describing nouns. They are usually placed right before nouns. An adjective can also follow a linking verb such as be, feel, look, smell, sound, taste, appear, seem, and become.

(More on linking verbs: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/08/23/engclass-linking-verb/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2012/03/12/engclass-linking-verbs/)

However, several adjectives only occur after linking verbs and they cannot come directly before nouns they describe. A predicate adjective should be changed into its corresponding form to use in front of a noun.

Here are predicate adjectives and their corresponding forms:

alike= like similar

alive= live living

alone= lone

afraid= frightened

asleep= sleeping

Examples:

1) The two brothers look alike.

2) We completed our projects in a similar manner.

3) The girl is afraid of heights.

4) The frightened child cried for his mother.

Sources:
Deborah Phillips, Longman Complete Course for The TOEFL Test
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, May 8, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: Verbs of Perception

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn the use of verbs of perception. Verbs of perception express the experience of one of the physical senses. They are also called perception verbs or perceptual verbs.

Several of them are followed by the simple form of a verb (the infinitive form without to) or the -ing form (the present participle).

They are:
see
notice
watch
look at
observe
hear
listen to
feel
smell

The two forms often carry little difference in meaning, except that the –ing form frequently gives the notion of while.

Examples:
1) He saw his friend ride a bicycle.
2) He saw his friend riding a bicycle. (He saw his friend while he was riding a bicycle)

Sometimes, the use of –ing form means that an activity is already in progress when it is perceived.

Examples:
1) When she walked into her boarding house, she heard her roommate crying. (The crying was in progress when she first heard it)
2) When she walked into her boarding house, she heard her roommate cry. (She heard the crying from beginning to end)

Sources:
ThoughtCo., Verb of Perception, https://www.thoughtco.com/verb-of-perception-1692486
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 28, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: Expressions Followed by “-ing”

Hello, fellas. In this session we will discuss several expressions which are followed by –ing.

1) have fun/a good time
Example: I had fun watching movies.

have trouble/difficulty
Example: We had trouble looking for the key.

have a hard time/difficult time
Example: They had a hard time climbing the ladder.

2) spend/waste + expression of time or money
Example: Steve spent a lot of time reading novels.

3) sit/stand/lie + expression of place
Example: Angela sat on the floor typing a letter.

4) find/catch + pro(noun)
Both find and catch carry the meaning of discover.
Example: On my way home, I found a man crying for help.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, March 16, 2019

#GrammarTrivia: “Seem” vs. “look”

Hola, Fellas! It’s finally Friday again. How do you do during this week? I hope you are doing well. This evening we are going to have a discussion about the difference between ‘seem’ and ‘look.’ In this term, both words are considered as copular verbs. Do you know what copular verb is?

Copular verb is a verb that connects subject of sentence to a subject complement. In other words, copular verb is linking verb. There are some words that are considered as copular verbs, such as ‘feel,’ ‘look,’ ‘smell,’ ‘taste,’ etc.  In this occasion, we will specifically talk about ‘look’ and its common substitute, ‘seem.’

Sometimes, you might face a confusion on whether you should use ‘seem’ or ‘look’ to express your opinion of an object. As illustration,

  • “She (look/seem) happy today.”
  • “You (look/seem) pretty today.”

Which verb will you choose to complete each of the example?

“You look pretty today.” “She looks happy today.” – @NeNi961111 

Seem and look. – @Syalaladubidum

You look pretty today. She seems happy today. – @niaangreinny

You look pretty today. She seems happy today. Am I right? – @innecfc

‘Look’ for the second question and ‘seem’ for the first I guess. – @ryutz_

“Seem”

In the first example, I would choose “seem” as the answer. “Seem” is a general copular verb to express our sense/impression about something. On the other words, we use “seem” when the judgement is subjective, it’s like you are using your intuition.

On the other hands, we can also say “She looks happy today” if we see her laughing or smiling. Here are some examples on how to use “seem’ in a sentence,

  • “The task seems difficult to be accomplished,”
  • “It seems like we are going to have a long chat this evening.”

“Look”

Meanwhile, I would say “You look pretty today” in the second illustration. “Look” is generally used as a result of a physical observation of an objectSo, you would say “look” if you can see the appearance of the object. For example,

  • “You look stylish with this dress,”
  • “This area looks dirty with these scattered trashes.”

 

source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, March 15, 2019