Category Archives: English

#EngKnowledge: Twitter Handles to Expand Your Vocabularies

Many of us are on self-quarantine due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Not only to keep ourselves safe and healthy, we are doing this to prevent further transmission of the virus to other people with whom we interact. We might not be showing symptoms (asymptomatic), but it does not always mean we are not carrying the virus with us. For me, it is better to be safe than sorry.

However, being on self-quarantine does come with challenging times. Eventually, I noticed my sleep pattern changes as I sleep or take frequent naps during the day and stay awake almost the whole night. Do you also experience the same?

I figured that I needed to find new interests to keep me busy and I decided to read and learn more especially about topics that I had never really touched before the pandemic.
Recently, I completed the 30-day word challenge by Merriam-Webster Dictionary.

Merriam Webster
Source: Merriam-Webster Dictionary’s Twitter handle

On this article, I’m going to share some accounts that will help you expand your vocabularies and learn grammar effectively.
1. Merriam-Webster dictionary
@MerriamWebster provides you with Word of the Day, the background story behind words and phrases, and trending words.

  1. Dictionary.com
    @Dictionarycom also provides word of the day and trending words, with quite a sassy and hilarious manner.
  2. The Oxford English Dictionary
    My most favourite feature of @OED is its Word of the Year, which doesn’t only cover the most searched word of the year as it might also introduce a new word that is widely used but not registered on any dictionaries yet.
  3. The Yuniversity
    @The_YUNiversity posts daily vocabulary and grammar lessons in just a few tweets and helpful infographics. Its explanation is also really easy to comprehend. Bonus: KPop fans will relate so much to this handle.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 11 June 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: World Environment Day 2020

Hello everyone, how are you doing? It’s been raining a lot here in Bali, Indonesia, despite we have entered dry season. By the way, did you know that 5 June is celebrated every year as World Environment Day?

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Photo by Akil Mazumder on Pexels.com

World Environment Day (WED) is observed every year on 5 June to raise global awareness to take positive environmental action to protect nature and the planet Earth.

UN designates 5 June as World Environment Day in 1972 and two years later (1974), WED is celebrated for the first time under the slogan “Only One Earth.” During 1974-1983, WED was celebrated 10 times but only in three countries (USA, Canada, and Bangladesh).

World Environment Day 2020 is focusing on biodiversity and will be hosted in Colombia in partnership with Germany. The theme of World Environment Day 2020 is “Celebrate Biodiversity.” Videos highlighting the biodiversity and environmental achievements of different regions of Colombia will be featured throughout the day, including images and drone footage of strategic ecosystems. We can join the conversation online with the hashtag #ForNature.

Air pollution, overpopulation, deforestation, and climate crisis have been some of the major factors that affect our environment. By actively participating to decrease the impact of any factors above, we might have hope for a better environment. Humans are not the only species on this planet and our actions have significant impact on the existence of other species. Furthermore, studies show deforestation and loss of wildlife cause increases in infectious diseases, including the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

We have only one Earth and we live on this world together, fellas. Let’s let nature be nature and do our parts to help reduce the negative impact of climate crisis. Stay safe everywhere you are.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, 5 June 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: Eid al-Fitr 2020

Hi, hello, everyone, how was your Eid holiday?

I’ll admit that to me it felt different as we have been in self-quarantine for a while that I lost count of what day it is. Do you also experience the same? Share your story!

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Photo by Khairul Onggon on Pexels.com

Eid al-Fitr is an important holiday for Muslims worldwide. In Indonesia, it is usually marked by 7-10 days of holiday to accommodate those who do homecoming trip. We didn’t see the hustle and bustle this year as much as the previous years due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

It is also marked with visiting the houses of our close friends and relatives to ask and give forgiveness for our wrongs, which is usually ended with dining together. The signature dishes are ketupat (rice cake wrapped in coconut leaf), opor ayam (braised chicken soup), and rendang. What about in your countries?

Aside of that, we also provide assorted cakes and cookies, such as nastar (pineapple tart), putri salju (literally snow princess), and kaasstengels (soft cheese sticks), accompanied with cold juice to the guests. Given the pandemic, most of us might skip all these traditions and some might not get the chance to meet our families.

Stay strong, fellas. Sometimes we need to make a sacrifice to keep ourselves and our loved ones safe.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 25 May 2020.


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#EngTips: Eid al-Fitr During COVID19 Pandemic

A big holiday is coming in less than a week for us in Indonesia, but sadly, it’s most likely that this year’s Eid al-Fitr will be very different than the previous years. Regardless, it’s a difficult situation for all of us so we need to work together to help flatten the curve.

What can we do on this year’s Eid? Here’s what we recommend.

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Photo by Tayeb MEZAHDIA on Pexels.com
  1. Save the funds for emergency.
    I think we can put less priority on new clothing or lavish celebrations in favour of emergency funds and donation to those who are in need.
    Do you agree, fellas?

  2. Stay in the city.
    I understand that the situation is very different from one person to another but if you still can stay in the city where you’ve been living, consider not doing the homecoming trip until we get the situation under control. This is to avoid spreading the COVID-19 virus to our family and relatives in our hometown.

  3. Minimise movement and keep physical distance.
    The Eid prayer is an important part of the Eid holiday. If the local government considers it safe to do so, still maintain your distance from other people. Keeping a safe distance between two people could reduce the risk of getting infected by the virus.

  4. Make use of the technology.
    Make use of our smartphones to contact our loved ones by, perhaps, having a virtual celebration. It is very important to stay connected as well as checking up on each other.

Those are the tips that we can share, fellas. Happy holiday and stay safe!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 18 May 2020.


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#EngVocab: Healthcare Professionals

Hi, everyone! I hope you are doing well. It’s an awful time for all of us around the world, but I think we have to give special credits to our healthcare professionals who might be working tirelessly during this pandemic.

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Photo by Retha Ferguson on Pexels.com

On this article, we are sharing some occupations that can be called healthcare professionals. Healthcare professionals are defined as people who may provide health care treatment and advice based on formal training and experience.

  1. Physician/doctor/medical practitioner: a person qualified to practice medicine.
  2. Surgeon: a medical practitioner qualified to practice surgery.
  3. Physician’s assistant: someone qualified to assist a physician and carry out routine clinical procedures under the supervision of a physician.
  4. Nurse: a person trained to care for the sick or infirm, especially in a hospital.
  5. Dentist: a person qualified to treat the diseases and conditions that affect the teeth and gums.
  6. Midwife: a person (typically a woman) trained to assist in childbirth.
  7. Physiotherapist/physical therapist: a person qualified to treat disease, injury, or deformity by physical methods such as massage, heat treatment, and exercise.
  8. Psychiatrist: a medical practitioner specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of mental illnesses.
  9. Psychologist: an expert in the scientific study of the human mind and its functions, especially those affecting behavior in a given context.
  10. Pharmacist: a person who is professionally qualified to prepare and dispense medicinal drugs.

Aside of those mentioned above, let’s not forget to thank all the support workers that help run a health facility. Donate if you can, fellas, and follow the government’s instruction of staying home and keeping our personal hygiene and health to help ease the work of healthcare professionals.

Stay safe, everywhere you are.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 14 May 2020.


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#EngVocab: Family Phrasal Verbs

Today we will learn about family phrasal verbs.
Do you know some useful phrasal verbs to talk about family?

Let’s start.

  1. Get together.
    Meaning: to meet in order to discuss something or to spend time together.
    E.g. “All the members of the family get together once a year.”
  2. Take after.
    Meaning: to look or behave like an older member of your family.
    E.g. “Your daughter doesn’t take after you at all.”
  3. Put up with.
    Meaning: tolerate or accept someone with unpleasant behaviour.
    E.g. “His wife must have been a saint to put up with him all those years.”
  4. Get along with.
    Meaning: to have a friendly relationship with someone.
    E.g. “I don’t really get along with my sister’s husband.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, May 10, 2010.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Tired’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘tired.’
Do you know some substitutes of ‘tired?

Let’s start.

  1. Debilitated.
    Meaning: in a severely weakened state.
    E.g
    “This treatment will debilitate her for several weeks.”
  2. Enervated.
    Meaning: feel drained of energy or vitality.
    E.g.
    “Getting locked in the small room for a long time enervated her to the point of collapsing.”
  3. Bushed.
    Meaning: extremely tired, exhausted.
    E.g.
    “That project completely bushed him.”
  4. Knackered
    Meaning: to be thoroughly exhausted or worn out.
    E.g.
    “I was knackered at the end of the competition.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, March 29, 2020.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Dirty’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘dirty.’
Do you know some substitutes of ‘dirty’?

Let’s start.

  1. Cruddy.
    Meaning: dirty, unpleasant, or of low quality.
    E.g
    “The seller gave my brother-in-law a really cruddy bag.”
  2. Mucky.
    Meaning: dirty and messy; covered with or consisting of dirt or filth.
    E.g.
    “The tables in the restaurant are mucky because fewer employees work in the weekend.”
  3. Unkempt.
    Meaning: having an untidy or disheveled appereance.
    E.g.
    “He woke up late so he went to work unkempt.”
  4. Scuzzy.
    Meaning: dirty, shabby, or foul in condition or character.
    E.g.
    “We went to his scuzzy room in the apartment.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 12, 2020.

#IOTW: Idioms about job

Today we will learn about job idioms.
Do you know some idioms about job?

Let’s start.

  1. Move up in the world.
    Meaning: to become more successful; have more money or better social position.
    E.g. “My boss moved up in the world after that big project.”
  2. Off the hook.
    Meaning: no longer in trouble; have escaped from difficult situation.
    E.g. “The servant was so miserable so my aunty let her off the hook.”
  3. Burn the candle at both ends.
    Meaning: working long hours without rest; working late into the night and beginning again early in the morning.
    E.g. “You can’t burn the candle at both ends forever. You have to enjoy life.”
  4. Learn the ropes.
    Meaning: learn how to do a particular job or task.
    E.g. “They must learn the ropes before they start the community service “

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 26, 2020.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Stink’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘stink.’
Do you know the synonyms of ‘stink’?

Let’s start.

  1. Stench.
    Meaning: a strong and very unpleasant smell.
    E.g.
    “The stench of the rotten meat rose into the air.”
  2. Effluvium.
    Meaning: a smelly gas, vapor, or an exhalation.
    E.g.
    “The effluvium from the experiment made the student cover their nose.”
  3. Miasma.
    Meaning: a highly unpleasant or unhealthy vapor rising from the ground or other source.
    E.g.
    “Miasma from the polution hung in the air above the city.”
  4. Fetor.
    Meaning: a strong offensive smell.
    E.g.
    “The mixture aromatic herbs burning became a fetor with healthful fragrance.”
  5. Mephitis
    Meaning: a noxious or foul-smelling gas or vapour.
    E.g.
    “The mephitis permeated the air and spread to the whole room.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, February 2, 2020.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Clumsy’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘clumsy.’
Do you know the synonyms of ‘clumsy’?

Let’s start.

  1. Gawky.
    Meaning: nervously awkward and ungainly.
    E.g. “Her metamorphosis from a gawky teenager to a mature young woman happened so quickly.”
  2. Cloddish.
    Meaning: foolish, awkward, or clumsy.
    E.g. “However fashionable his clothes, he always looks cloddish.”
  3. Inept.
    Meaning: having or showing no skill; clumsy.
    E.g. “My brother is quite inept at sports.”
  4. Maladroit
    Meaning: awkward in movement or unskilled in behaviour or action.
    E.g. “The maladroit driver almost caused an accident.”
  5. Bungling.
    Meaning: to do something wrong by many clumsy mistakes, in a careless or stupid way.
    E.g. “If he keeps bungling, he will lose the job.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, February 20, 2020.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Rude’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘rude.’
Do you know the synonyms of ‘rude’?

Let’s start.

  1. Churlish.
    Meaning: rude in a mean-spirited and surly way.
    E.g. “It would be churlish to refuse such a generous offer.”
  2. Derogatory
    Meaning: showing a critical or disrespectful attitude.
    E.g. “I didn’t like the way he made derogatory comments about his classmate.”
  3. Curt.
    Meaning: rudely brief in speech or abrupt in manner.
    E.g. “His tone was curt and unfriendly.”
  4. Crass.
    Meaning: behaving in a stupid and offensive way without considering how other people might feel.
    E.g. “My aunt made crass comments about my worn-out clothes.”
  5. Impertinent
    Meaning: rude and not showing respect, especially towards someone older or in a higher position than you
    E.g. “The new employee is an impertinent young woman.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, March 1, 2020.

#ENGTIPS: HOW TO LEARN ENGLISH QUICKLY (5 TIPS)

Hello fellas, do you want to learn English quickly? Learning English fast can seem impossible, but as long as you have the right strategy, it probably isn’t.

  • Read Everything about English

The first strategy is to read everything about English you can get your hands on. Classic literature, newspapers, websites, emails, your social media feed, etc. These contents will be full of new vocabulary, grammars, and idioms. This is good for you to enrich your vocabulary.

  • Talk with Others

Fellas, language is created to communicate, so the second strategy to learn English quickly is talk with other people. You may seek out native speakers for an informal language exchange, so you will learn English appropriately. You can also enroll in a course or take online English classes.

  • Subscribe to YouTube Channels (in English)

The next strategy is very recommended for you. This is so easy and fun to do. There is an English Youtube channel out there for you. Subscribe and listen while driving, watch during the commute to school or work, or anytime when you are at home.

At first, you might find the accents difficult, but after that you will soon start to understand them. Find YouTubers from different parts of the world to learn how the accents differ.

  • Go Abroad

Do you like travelling? You can also learn English quickly from your travelling activities. Make sure that the country do you want to visit is an English-speaking country. Think about New Zealand, Australia, the UK, Canada, and USA.

  • Don’t Kick Yourself while You’re Down

It could take some time to learn something. When you start feeling no progress in your English, don’t say “I don’t/can’t speak English.” Better say, “I’m learning English and making improvement every day.” Learning and practicing show that you care about your own growth and progress.

That’s all for today fellas, see you next time!

Compiled by @2013happyy for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, 11 March 2020.

#EngTalk: Generation Equality

Hi, hello, everyone! How are you doing today? Yesterday, we celebrated the International Women’s Day so this article will be related to it.

As we know it, the theme for this year’s International Women’s Day is ‘I Am Generation Equality: Realizing Women’s Rights.’ So what do you think about the theme, fellas?

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

For me, equality is about no discrimination towards someone regardless of whether the person is a male or female. The same opportunity, the same appreciation, and consequently, the same responsibility. I’d love to read your thoughts about it. I think I was fortunate to grow up in an environment that emphasises how women should be encouraged and supported to be the best version of themselves and I think everyone should have the same chance. Do you agree, fellas?

We have made progress, but there’s still so much to do to ensure that we could become the generation equality. I will start with promoting a safe environment for women to live in and to thrive, be it in a family, at school, or at the workplaces. The work that needs to be done is not necessarily exclusive to one type of sex or gender. We should always respect, support, and care about each other.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 9 March 2020.


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#GrammarTrivia: Be + To Infinitive

Hello, fellas. In this session we will learn how to use be + to infinitive.

Be + to infinitive is used to express formal or official arrangements or to give formal instructions or orders.

Examples:
1) The Prime Minister is to visit Indonesia next month. (formal or official arrangements)
2) All students are to attend the class. (formal instructions or orders)

The structure is often used in newspaper, radio and television reports to talk about future events and expresses near certainty.

Examples:
1) The government is to increase tobacco duty.
2) A man is to appear in court this morning charged with the murder of the footballer.

Be + to infinitive is commonly used in conditional sentences to express a precondition.

Examples:
1) They will have to study hard if they are to pass the exam.
2) If I am to catch the train, I shall have to go now.

Sources:
BBC Learning English, https://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/learnit/learnitv103.shtml
English Practice, Be + infinitive, https://www.englishpractice.com/improve/infinitive/
Grammaring, BE + TO-infinitive, https://www.grammaring.com/be-to-infinitive

Compiled and written @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Tuesday, March 3, 2020

#UKSlang: Slang in Harry Potter Books

Who here is a Harry Potter fan? Even though the books and movies were all released, except for the Fantastic Beasts, I’m feeling a little flashback to Hogwarts. We are sharing some slang used on Harry Potter books.

JK Rowling

 

“Bloody hell!”
We know this one to be used a lot by Ron. It is a common expression in Britain, Australia, and New Zealand. It could express a lot, from surprise to disgust to anger, etc.

Bloody hell

 

“Blimey.”
A popular British word to express surprise. Similar to ‘wow.’

“Bollocks!”
This is a word we should not use carelessly, as it means male genitalia parts. However, it’s used in the same way as ‘nonsense.’

“Codswallop!”
Also means ‘nonsense.’

“Git.”
Somewhat derogatory, git is used to describe a foolish person. Hagrid used it once to refer to Mr Filch.

Mr Filch

 

“Mental.”
Meaning crazy or insane.

Mental

 

“Peckish.”
The feeling of small hunger, wanting to eat but not quite hungry yet.

“Snog.”
To kiss passionately, to make out.

 

Feel free to add more on the comment section below!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 5 March 2020.


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#EngTrivia: Ways to Express Condolences

Fellas, have you ever tried comforting someone who has just lost his/her/their loved ones? What do you usually do or say on such occasion?

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Photo by Azim Islam on Pexels.com

When someone has just lost someone he/she loves, it is tempting to say something that goes like, “When I lost (insert our loved ones) this is what happened/this is how it went.”

We might think that by saying it, it could help the other person to realise that he/she is not alone. However, a tragedy is a tragedy, whether it happens to us or to someone else. Therefore, refrain from saying something like that as it can be perceived that we are comparing other people’s misery to ours.

We should also avoid saying, “It’s a part of life/it will get better soon/you will feel better soon,” because it could mean that we are trivialising the other person’s loss.

It is also not advisable to ask a grieving person, “Are you okay?” or “How are you feeling?” because of course losing someone we love will never feel okay. This is crucial especially if you are considering to become a journalist who covers the life of famous people.

So what can we do to express our condolences?
Say something that offers sympathy and understanding.
E.g.:
“I’m sorry for the passing of your…”
“I’m sorry for your loss.”
“This must be hard for you.”
“Our sincere sympathy for you and your family.”

Say something that offers help.
E.g.:
“I’m here if you need anything.”
“Take a rest while I take care of everything else.”

Be there for the grieving person.
If it is possible for you to be present, be there for the grieving person. Often a person who has just lost someone he/she loves needs time to process the grief and it is not an easy process. It also doesn’t finish overnight. Be a moral support by ensuring the said person gets enough rest or eat healthy food and try not to exhaust them with the necessity of making a decision.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 26 February 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: Word of the Year

Hi, fellas, did you know that Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year 2019 is ‘climate emergency?’

We face more and more weather and climate-related crisis every year, so it is natural that people all around the world are getting more curious about the term ‘climate emergency’ and decided to look it up on the dictionaries.

As defined by Oxford Dictionaries, climate emergency is “a situation in which urgent action is required to reduce or halt climate change and avoid potentially irreversible environmental damage resulting from it.”

But what is ‘Word of the Year’ and how did this tradition start?

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Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

 

Word(s) of the Year refers to any of various assessments as to the most important word(s) or expression(s) during a specific year.

The first known version of this tradition is the German one, Wort des Jahres, which was started in 1971. The American Dialect Society is the oldest English version, started in 1991. By early 2000s, a lot of organisations began to announce their versions of Word(s) of the Year for various purposes and with various criteria for the assessment.

Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year for the last five years are:

2015: Face with tears of joy emoji or laughing-crying emoji, the first emoji to have ever been selected.
2016: Post-truth.
2017: Youthquake.
2018: Toxic.
2019: Climate emergency.

The American Dialect Society also chose the Word of the Decade, which is ‘web’ for 1990s, ‘to google’ for 2000s, and singular ‘they’ for 2010s. According to the Society, the Word of the 20th century is jazz and the Word of the Past Millennium is ‘she.’

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 20 February 2020.


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