Category Archives: English

#EngVocab: ‘The Same’, ‘Similar’, ‘Like’, and ‘Alike’

Hello, fellas. Our session today is about some vocabularies with similar meaning – the same, similar, like, and alike – and how to use them in a sentence.

The same and similar are adjectives. However, same is always preceded by the.

Examples:

1) Jane and Mary have the same personalities.

2) Jane and Mary have similar personalities.

3) Their personalities are the same.

4) Their personalities are similar.

The other difference between the same and similar lies in the prepositions following them. As comes after the same, while to follows similar.

Examples:

1) Your smartphone is the same as mine.

2) Your smartphone is similar to mine.

There may be a noun between the same and as.

Example:

Jane is the same age as Mary.

There is a slight difference between like and alike. Like precedes a noun, but alike never comes before a noun.

Examples:

1) The house looks like a palace.

2) The two sisters are alike.

Sources:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition
Deborah Phillips, Longman Complete Course for the TOEFL Test

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, September 28, 2018

Advertisements

#GrammarTrivia: ‘You’, ‘One’, and ‘They’ as Impersonal Pronouns

Hello, fellas. How is it going in the end of September? Our session today is about impersonal pronouns.

According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, a pronoun refers to a noun. The noun it replaces is called the antecedent. Based on their antecedents, pronouns are divided into two categories: singular pronouns and plural pronouns. A singular pronoun refers to a singular noun. On the other hand, the antecedent of a plural pronoun is a plural noun.

Sometimes, pronouns are used to refer to no antecedent. They are called impersonal pronouns. There are three impersonal pronouns: you, one, and they. You and one carry the same meaning as they refer to “any person, people in general”. However, you is less formal than one and more common in everyday English.

Examples:

1) You should pay to attention to the announcement. (informal)

2) One should pay to attention to the announcement. (formal)

As an impersonal pronoun, they means “some people or somebody” in spoken English. However, the antecedent is implied or not stated.

Example:

Why did Ann lose her job?

They fired her.

On the sentence above, they refers to the people for whom Ann worked.

Sources:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, September 29, 2018

#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘Big’

Do you know other words to say ‘big’?
Today we will learn about the substitutes of ‘big’.

Let’s start.

  • Colossal: extraordinarily great in size, extent, or degree.

E.g. “The owner was asking for a colossal amount of money for the house.”

  • Burly: large and strong; heavily built (of a person).

E.g. “A burly figure came towards him from across the road.”

  • Tremendous: very great in amount, scale, or intensity.

E.g. “We went to a tremendous party.”

  • Massive: large and heavy or solid.

E.g. “Eight massive stone pillars supported the roof.”

  • Strapping: healthy, big, and strong (especially of young person).

E.g. “My aunt remembered my brother as a strapping youth with a big appetite.”

  • Hefty: large in amount, size, force, etc.

E.g. “The film contains a hefty dose of comedy.”

  • Ample: more than enough; plentiful.

E.g. “You will have ample opportunity to ask questions after the presentation.”

  • Immense: marked by greatness especially in size or degree.

E.g. “The immense pressure causes the rock to fracture.”

  • Humongous: very huge (informal American slang).

E.g. “They have a humongous dog.”

  • Vast: very spacious or large; of great extent.

E.g. “Vast areas of land have become desert.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, September 9, 2018.

#EngVocab: British vs American vocabulary

Hi, Fellas! Good evening. How are your days? In this session I would like to share some differences on British and American vocabulary. #

  1. BrE: ‘flat’ vs. AmE: ‘apartment.’
    • Example:
      • “I love your new flat.”
      • “I love your new apartment.”
  2. BrE: ‘ground floor’ vs. AmE: ‘first floor.’ 
    • Example:
      • “We will meet at Starbuck on the ground floor.”
      • “We will meet at Starbuck on the first floor.”
  3. BrE: ‘mobile phone’ vs. AmE: ‘cell phone.’
    • Example:
      • “I lost my mobile phone.”
      • “I lost my cell phone.”
  4. BrE: ‘chemist’s’ vs. AmE: ‘drugstore’ or ‘pharmacy.’
    • Example:
      • “I work at the chemist’s in Fifth Avenue.”
      • “I work at the drugstore in Fifth Avenue.”
  5. BrE: ‘timetable’ vs. AmE: ‘schedule.’
    • Example:
      • “Our class timetable is packed for the next two days.”
      • “Our class schedule is packed for the next two days.”
  6. BrE: ‘nappy’ vs. AmE: ‘diaper.’
    • Example:
      • “We need extra nappies for the baby.”
      • “We need extra diapers for the baby.”
  7. BrE: ‘loo,’ vs. AmE: ‘restroom/bathroom.’
    • example:
      • “I need to use the loo.”
      • “I need to use the restroom.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, September 21, 2018

 

#GrammarTrivia: Am/Is/Are Being + Adjective

Hello, fellas. Can you guess the differences between these two sentences: Tom is funny and Tom is being funny? One difference lies in the tense used in them. The first sentence uses simple present tense, while the second is written in present progressive tense. Due to the different tenses, the meaning they carry is not similar either.

According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, the use of simple present tense shows that an event or a situation exists in the past, present, and future. On the other hand, present progressive tense means that an event or a situation started in the past, is in progress when it is being said, and will probably end in the future.

(More on simple present tense and present progressive tense: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/10/09/engclass-simple-present-tense-positive/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2011/10/16/engclass-present-progressive-tense-positive/)

Present progressive tense may also be used with an adjective. The pattern is am/is/are being + adjective. It expresses someone’s temporary and uncharacteristic behaviour. However, only some adjectives can be used with such pattern: bad (ill-behaved), careful, cruel, fair, foolish, funny, generous, good (well-behaved), illogical, impolite, irresponsible, kind, lazy, logical, loud, nice, noisy, patient, pleasant, polite, quiet, responsible, rude, serious, silly, unfair, unkind, and unpleasant.

Based on the explanation above, in the first sentence Tom is known to be a funny person on a daily basis. On the contrary, as described by the second sentence, funny is not his characteristic.

Other examples:

1) Bill is generous.
This sentence means that generosity is Bill’s characteristic behaviour.

2) Bill is being generous.
In this example, Bill is said not to be generous in his daily life.

Sources:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, September 20, 2018

#WOTD: Wanderlust

Hi, Fellas! Good evening. How’s your days? I hope you experienced something great! In this session I would like to talk about ‘wanderlust.’ Have you heard about it?

“I’ve heard about it. But i never know what it means,” – @angelccxo 

“Wanderlust = a desire to travel,” – @Aldo_Bandan 

I saw ‘wanderlust’ as a novel title in Wattpad beforehand. This word sounds nice, doesn’t it? ‘Wanderlust’ is a noun that has a meaning as a strong feeling to wander/travel.  Merriam-Webster Dictionary states that this word was form from a German, “wandern,” and “lust.”

Unfortunately, there is no any related word or synonym of “wanderlust” right now. #WOTD Finally, here are some example on using ‘wanderlust’ in a sentence:

  • “Wanderlust has led her to Paris.”
  • ‘I sometimes get annoyed by Ana because of her uncontrollable wanderlust.’

source:

Merriam Webster Dictionary

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, September 14, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Using ‘Since’ and ‘For’ in Present Perfect Tense

Hello, fellas. How is life today? In this session we are going to learn about time signals frequently used in present perfect tense. They are since and for.

According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, present perfect tense mainly consists of have/has + past participle. It shows that an event occurred or never occurred before now. The time when the event took place is not important.

(More on present perfect tense: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/13/engclass-present-perfect-tense-vs-simple-past-tense/)

However, present perfect tense carries different meaning when since or for is used. Present perfect tense with since or for means that something happened in the past and continues to the present.

There is a difference between since and for. Since is followed by a particular time, while for precedes a duration of time.

Examples:

1) Indonesia has existed since 1945.

2) The students have played football for an hour.

Sources:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, September 12, 2018

#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘Delicious’

Do you know other words to say ‘delicious’?
Today we will learn about the substitutes of ‘delicious’.
Let’s start.

  1. Toothsome: extremely pleasing to the sense of taste.
    E.g. “The restaurant which once served a toothsome steak has closed.”
  2. Savory: full of flavor, delicious and tasty; usually something that someone has cooked.
    E.g. “She placed a huge dish of savory steaming meat before him.”
  3. Zestful: a taste which is spicy and flavorsome.
    E.g. “The drink has a zestful black cherry flavor.”
  4. Scrumptious: extremely appetizing or delicious.
    E.g. “We had a scrumptious lunch.”
  5. Palatable: acceptable to the palate; pleasant to taste.
    E.g. “The meal was barely palatable.”
  6. Luscious: having a pleasingly rich, sweet taste.
    E.g. “The dessert has great appearance and luscious flavor.”
  7. Delectable: looking or tasting extremely good.
    E.g. “The vegetable makes the food delectable.”
  8. Enticing: attractive or tempting; alluring.
    E.g. “An enticing smell came from the kitchen.”
  9. Ambrosial: exceptionally pleasing to taste or smell; especially delicious or fragrant.
    E.g. “We can smell the ambrosial aroma of the roast.”
  10. Sapid: having a strong, pleasant taste.
    E.g. “You should try this, the food has a sapid, harmonic taste.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 26, 2018.

#GrammarTrivia: Noun + of Which

Hello, fellas. After learning about how to use expressions of quantity in relative clauses last week, today we are still going to have a session on another form of relative clauses. It is the use of noun + of which.

(More on expressions of quantity in relative clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/08/30/grammartrivia-expressions-of-quantity-in-relative-clauses/)

According to Betty Schrampfer Azar, the pattern has the same meaning of whose. In other words, both of them show possession. Noun + of which is used in a relative clause modifying a thing and more common in formal written English. It is preceded by a comma.

(More on whose: https://englishtips4u.com/2014/06/01/engclass-how-to-use-who-whom-and-whose/)

Example:

1) Leo Tolstoy wrote a novel. The title of the novel is Anna Karenina.

    Leo Tolstoy wrote a novel, the title of which is Anna Karenina.

2) The student bought a book. The price of the book was affordable.

     The student bought a book, the price of which was affordable.

3) They like Indonesian food. The taste of the food is spicy.

     They like Indonesian food, the taste of which is spicy.

Source:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, September 5, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Expressions of Quantity in Relative Clauses

Hello, fellas. Today we are going to learn about expressions of quantity in relative clauses. An expression of quantity is used to express the number or amount of something. It may precede a noun whose number or amount it describes. Several examples of expressions of quantity are one, two, each, every, both, some, several, a few, a little, many, much, most, etc.

(More on expressions of quantity: https://englishtips4u.com/2017/03/05/engclass-expressions-of-quantity/)

In relative clauses, expressions of quantity with of come before the pronouns. However, the pronouns are only whom, which and whose. This pattern is preceded by a comma and more common in writing than speaking.

Examples:

1) There are 23 players in the German national team. Most of them are from Bayern Munich. (There are 23 players in the German national team, most of whom are from Bayern Munich.)

2) Pramoedya Ananta Toer wrote several books. Two of them are “Bumi Manusia” and “Anak Semua Bangsa”. (Pramoedya Ananta Toer wrote several books, two of which are “Bumi Manusia” and “Anak Semua Bangsa”.)

3) Students are reading the biography of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. One of his works is “The Marriage of Figaro”. (Students are reading the biography of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, one of whose works is “The Marriage of Figaro”.)

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @englishtipsforyou on Sunday, August 26, 2018

#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘Go’

Do you know other words to say ‘go’?
Today we will learn about the substitutes of ‘go’.

Let’s start.

  1. Pace: walk at a steady and consistent speed.
    E.g. “She quickened her pace when she thought someone was following her.”
  2. Stroll: walk in a slow, relaxed manner.
    E.g. “We sometimes stroll along the beach.”
  3. Travel: to make a journey, usually over a long distance.
    E.g. “My friend is travelling alone to United States.”
  4. Waddle: walk with short steps in a clumsy swaying motion.
    E.g. “My little brother is waddling around the living room.”
  5. Wander: walk or move in a leisurely, casual, or aimless way.
    E.g. “We are wandering all day around the city.”
  6. Lope: run or move with in an easy and relaxed way, taking a long bounding strike.
    E.g. “They would lope out to the park two miles away and walk back.”
  7. Move: the act of changing location from one place to another.
    E.g. “He stood up and began to move around the room.”
  8. Hurtle: move with a rushing sound.
    E.g. “His motorboat hurtled along the river.”
  9. Abscond: run away; usually includes taking something along.
    E.g. “He attempted to abscond from the punishment.”
  10. Evade: escape or avoid something either physically or mentally.
    E.g. “I could tell that he was trying to evade the issue.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on August 12, 2018.

#GrammarTrivia: Abridged Noun Clauses

Hello, fellas. In this session we are going to learn about the abridgement of noun clauses. A noun clause is a clause used as the subject, object or complement of a sentence. It can begin with a question word (who, whom, what, which, where, when, whose, why or how), that, if or whether.

(More on noun clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/02/06/engclass-noun-clause/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2013/02/04/grammartrivia-noun-clause/)

Noun clauses beginning with one of the question words or whether can be abridged. However, the abridgement is only possible if these requirements are fulfilled:

1) The main clause and the noun clause have the same subject or the subject of the noun clause is the same as the object of the main clause; and

2) The noun clause contains a modal verb either can/could or should.

There are 3 steps in the abridgement of noun clauses:

1) Omit the subject;

2) Omit the modal verb; and

3) Change the verb into an infinitive.

Examples:

1) I know what I should do. (I know what to do.)

2) She told me when I should go. (She told me when to go.)

3) Students learn how they could write journals. (Students learn how to write journals.)

Source:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @englishtipsforyou on Sunday, August 19, 2018

#WOTD: Paroxysm

Hi, Fellas! Good evening. How’s your days? I hope you experienced something great! In this session I would like to talk about ‘paroxysm.’ Have you heard about it?  

Well, the first time I saw ‘paroxysm’ was when I seeing through my Pinterest timeline. It caught my eyes because I felt like there was something behind this word. ‘Paroxysm’ is a noun that has a meaning as a sudden burst of emotion. it has to be a strong feeling and you cannot control it. As a simple illustration, jealousy!

On the other hand, according to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, you could also say that ‘paroxysm’ can also refers to an action.  There are some words that are similar to ‘paroxysm,’ they are ‘explosion,’ ‘eruption,’ ‘outburst,’ ‘convulsion,’ etc.

Here are some example on using ‘paroxysm’ in a sentence:

  1. “Paroxysm of laughter erupted when she was telling her funny experience.”
  2. ‘i was overwhelmed by paroxysm of jealousy when I saw him with another girl.’

source:

  • Cambridge Dictionary
  • Merriam Webster Dictionary

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, August 24, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Adjective Clauses as the Object of a Preposition

Hello, fellas. In everyday usage, the subject and verb of an adjective clause (relative clause) precede a preposition. On the other hand, to make it more formal, the clause is used as the object of the preposition.

(More on relative clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/08/engclass-relative-clause/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/09/engclass-relative-clause-2/)

According to Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, a preposition is a word used before its object (a noun, a noun phrase, or a pronoun), connecting it to another word. It usually shows a temporal, spatial or logical relationship of its object to the rest of a sentence. Examples of prepositions are about, at, by, for, from in, on, through, to, with, and without.

(More on prepositions: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/09/17/engclass-prepositions/)

If the preposition is followed by the adjective clause, pronouns to use are only whom or which. It is never followed by that or who.

Examples:

  • He is the man whom we talk about.

         He is the man about whom we talk.

  • The lecturer whom you should listen to is explaining course materials.

         The lecturer to whom you should listen is explaining course materials.

  • The view which we look at is breath-taking.

         The view at which we look is breath-taking.

  • Surabaya is the city which I live in.

         Surabaya is the city in which I live.

(in which has the same meaning as where)

Source:

Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition

GrammarBook.com, https://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/probPrep.asp

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @englishtipsforyou on Sunday, August 12, 2018

#EngClass: Blending Words (4)

Today we will learn more about ‘blending words’.

You can review the first lesson here.
You can review the second lesson here.
You can review the third lesson here.

Here are some examples of blending words:

  1. Globish (global + English).
    Meaning: a simplified version of English used by non-native speakers, consisting of the most common words and phrases only.
  2. Medicare (medical + care).
    Meaning: maintenance and restoration of health by the treatment and prevention of disease especially by trained and licensed professionals (as in medicine, dentistry, clinical psychology, and public health).
  3. Urinalysis: (urine + analysis).
    Meaning: analysis of urine by physical, chemical, and microscopical means to test for the presence of disease, drugs, etc.
  4. Hi-tech (high + technology).
    Meaning: resembling or making use of highly advanced technology or devices.
  5. Transistor (transfer + resistor).
    Meaning: a small electrical device containing a semiconductor, used in televisions, radios, etc.
  6. Vash (volcanic + ash).
    Meaning: very small solid particles ejected from a volcano during an eruption which have intermediate axes measuring 2 mm or less.
  7. Workfare: (work + welfare).
    Meaning: a welfare system that requires those receiving benefits to perform some work or to participate in job training.
  8. Mediclaim (medical + claim).
    Meaning: medical bill submitted to health insurance carriers and other insurance providers for services rendered to patients by providers of care. When you go to the doctor, hospital or other provider, your service generates a bill.
  9. Skylab (sky + laboratory).
    Meaning: a space station used for scientific, research and development, medical and/or dental testing, experimentation and/or research.
  10. Vegeburger (vegetable + burger).
    Meaning: a patty resembling a hamburger but made with vegetable protein, soybeans, etc., instead of meat.
  11. Lecdem (lecture + demonstration).
    Meaning: presentation of an example of what the lecturer is discoursing about.
  12. Infotech (information + technology).
    Meaning: The hardware, software, and associated technology and businesses that are composed or related to the practice and business of information technology.

References:
http://www.collinsdictionary.com
http://www.merriam-webster.com
Google dictionary
http://www.vocabulary.com
dictionary.cambridge.org
http://www.skybrary.aero
classroom.synonym.com
http://www.dictionary.com

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, July 29, 2018.

#GrammarTrivia: Reduced Adverb Clauses of Reason

After discussing reduced relative clauses and reduced adverb clauses of time, today we are going to learn the reduction of adverb clauses of reason.

(More: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/07/26/grammartrivia-reduced-relative-clauses/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2018/08/02/grammartrivia-reduced-adverb-clauses-of-time/)

Adverb clauses of reason are also called adverb clauses of cause and effect. They are introduced by conjunctions, such as because, now that, since, due to the fact that, and owing to the fact that. Like the other kinds of adverb clauses, they function as the dependent clause in a sentence.

(More on adverb clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/10/13/engclass-adverbial-clause/)

The reduction of an adverb clause of reason to an adverbial phrase is only possible when its subject is the same as the subject of the main clause. Omit the conjunction, so that it is not included in the adverbial phrase, and change the verb to its –ing form.

Example:

Because she lives far from her family, Nancy does everything herself.
Living far from her family, Nancy does everything herself.

Having + past participle means because.

Example:

Because I have read the novel, I want to give it to you.
Having read the novel, I want to give it to you.

It is also possible to change be in an adverb clause of reason to being.

Example:

Because she was sick, she did not attend the class.
Being sick, she did not attend the class.

Source:

Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @englishtipsforyou on Friday, August 10, 2018

#EngVocab: What to say instead of using ‘very’ (2)

Hi, Fellas! Happy Friday night! How’s your work/school? This evening I am going to share some words that is used to substitute a strong expression, such as ‘very beautiful,’ ‘very smart,’ etc. 

  1. Exhausted.’ Meaning: ‘very tired.’ 
    • Example:
      • ‘I have many classes today and I still need to attend reading club meeting. I’m exhausted.’
  2. Gorgeous.’ Meaning: ‘very pretty’.
    • Example:
      • ‘You look gorgeous in that dress.’
  3. Hysterical.’ Meaning: ‘very funny.’
    • Example:
      • ‘Look at his hysterical act. I can barely laughing.’ 
  4. Exact.’ Meaning: ‘very accurate.’
    • Example:
      • ‘That was the exact answer I want to hear!’
  5. Obvious.’ Meaning: ‘very clear.’
    • Example:
      • ‘I know Jess likes Andrew. It is obvious.’’ 
  6. Captivating.’ Meaning: ‘very interesting.’ 
    • Example;
      • ‘She is the most captivating girl I have ever met.’ 
  7. Compelling.’ Meaning: ‘very powerful’ (effect).
    • Example:
      • ‘I have no doubt he would win the competition, his arguments are compelling’’ 
  8. Essential.’ Meaning: ‘very necessary.’
    • Example:
      • ‘Vitamin C is one of essential nutrients for our body.’ 
  9. Exceptional.’ Meaning: ‘very special.’ 
    • Example:
      • ‘You can have my dresses, even my jewelries, but not my books. They are exceptional!’ 
  10. Innovative.’ Meaning: ‘very creative.’
    • Example:
      • ‘I think her idea is innovative.’’ 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, August 10, 2018

#GrammarTrivia: Reduced Adverb Clauses of Time

Hello, fellas. Last week we learned how to reduce relative clauses.

(More on reduced relative clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/07/26/grammartrivia-reduced-relative-clauses/)

In this session, we are still going to discuss the reduction of clauses. It is the reduction of adverb clauses of time.

(More on adverb clauses of time: https://englishtips4u.com/2011/10/13/engclass-adverbial-clause/)

In a sentence, an adverb clause functions as the dependent clause. It must be attached to the main clause or the independent clause (More on clauses: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/01/26/engclass-clause/). An adverb clause of time begins with a conjunction, such as after, before, since, when, and while.

The reduction of an adverb clause of time to an adverbial phrase is only possible when its subject is the same as the subject of the main clause. There are two ways of reducing the adverb clause of time:

1) Omit the subject and be
Example:
While I was studying, I fell asleep.
While studying, I fell asleep.

2) If there is no be, omit the subject and change the verb to its –ing form
Example:
Jane has lived abroad since she pursued her education.
Jane has lived abroad since pursuing her education.

Source:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @englishtipsforyou on Thursday, August 2, 2018