Category Archives: English

#UKSlang: Sherlock (1)

Who here is a fan of BBC’s Sherlock and just can’t wait for the next season? The detective, along with his sidekick, Dr Watson, has captured the hearts of many across the world. In my opinion, the modern twist added to the latest adaptation only made the iconic detective story fresher and more relatable. If you haven’t seen it, go check the original DVDs.

Sherlock SS1.jpg
BBC’s Sherlock.

Most characters on BBC’s Sherlock are well-articulated, and although it makes it a little difficult for non-native speaker to understand what they are saying, it does provide a good amount of new words to add into our vocabulary.

This article will discuss some of the slangs. If you are using these words, use them with caution, because some of them are quite impolite. We’ll start with season 1.

  1. “Sorry — gotta dash. I left my riding crop in the mortuary.” – Sherlock (S01E01).
    Gotta dash (v.) = to have to go quickly, to be in a hurry.

  2. “I’ll make you that cuppa. You rest your leg.” – Mrs Hudson (S01E01).
    Cuppa (n.) = a cup of coffee or tea.

  3. John: “What do people normally say?”
    Sherlock: “’Piss off!’” (S01E01).
    Piss off (v.) = Go away.

  4. “Either way, you’re wasted as a cabbie.” – Sherlock (S01E01).
    Cabbie (n.) = taxi driver.
    Cab (n.) = taxi.

  5. “Because I had a row, in the shop, with a chip-and-PIN machine.” – John (S01E02).
    Row (n.) = quarrel, fight.

  6. “Well, grab a pew.” – Sebastian (S01E02).
    Grab a pew (v.) = take a seat.

  7. “Your friend… he’s an arrogant sod.” – Dimmock (S01E02).
    Sod (n.) = an obnoxious person.

  8. “Nine million quid, for what?” – Sherlock (S01E02).
    Quid (n.) = pound sterling.

  9. “We end up havin’ a bit of a ding-dong, don’t we?” – Murder suspect (S01E03).
    Ding-dong (n.) = an argument.

  10. “Told you you should’ve gone with the lilo.” – Sarah (S01E03)
    Lilo (n.) = an inflatable plastic or rubber mattress.

If you have others, drop them on the comment section below!


Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, 21 March, 2018.




#WOTD: Scilicet

Hello, Fellas. Welcome back to #WOTD sesion. How did you do today? This evening I would like to discuss the word “scilicet.” Has any of you heard about this? If so, could you tell us the meaning of “scilicet”?

I found “scilicet” when I accidentally look “word of the day” section in Merriam Webster dictionary.

The dictionary describes “scilicet” is an adverb that is synonymous to “namely.” “Scilicet” is derived from Latin, “scire,” which means ‘to know’ and “licere,” which means ‘to be permitted.’

It is also said that this word is usually can be found in a legal related instruments. In addition, Oxford dictionary states that “scilicet” has a function to explain an ambiguous or obscure statement. There are some words that is synonymous to “scilicet,” they are “namely” and “to wit (that is to say).”

Lastly, here are some example of “scilicet” contained sentences:

  1. “The top ten happiest countries are come from Europe, scilicet Finland, Denmark, and Sweden.”
  2. “In some region funeral can attracts people, scilicet the funeral in Bali (Ngaben) and in Toraja have their cultural value and uniqueness that lead other people to witness the ceremony.”



Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, March 15, 2018


#EngVocab: Adjectives That Describe Personalities (2)

We know that English is very rich in expressions. We can describe anyone and anything with so many ways; idioms, phrases, and words amongst many others. We will discuss one of them.

Before you continue reading, you might want to check our previous article on this subject: #EngVocab: Adjectives That Describe Personalities.

Anhedonic = unable to feel happiness.
“In the ‘Winnie the Pooh,’ Eeyore is described as a depressed, anhedonic stuffed donkey.”

Agreeable = pleasant, enjoyable.
“She’s an agreeable companion. You won’t get bored.”

Assertive = self-assured, confident (without being aggressive).
“As a team leader, you should be more assertive.”

Bold = strong, brave, willing to take a risk.
“She’s so bold. She does not wait for anyone to introduce her to the CEO.”

Brooding = showing deep unhappiness.
“He’s always brooding; I don’t know what’s wrong with him.”

Childish = immature.
“She’s so childish that she always throws tantrums over small problems.”

Childlike = innocent, having good qualities associated with a child.
“Her laughter is childlike; it’s contagious.”

Chirpy = cheerful, lively.
“Quenzino is such a chirpy little fella. I wanna pinch his cheeks.”

A chirpy baby (Picture from WordPress).


Dark = mysterious.
“Whenever I forget to bring my driving license with me, the police always look like dark and intimidating figures.”

Dim = stupid (informal use) OR dim-witted = slow (in Bahasa Indonesia: lemot).
“Please don’t use sarcasm with him. He’s dim; he won’t get it.”

To make it easier to memorize them, try to use one of the words on the list on your daily conversations. Be careful with some words that have a negative connotation.

P.S.: The list will continue.


Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 12 March, 2018.


#IOTW: Idioms related to books and reading

Hello, Fellas. How’s your day? Do any of you love reading? Do you realise that tomorrow is a World Book Day? In order to welcome the day, I would like to share some idioms with the word ‘book.’

The first one is the famous one. I bet you regularly find it in some literature or even in your daily communication.

  1. “An open book.” Meaning: something/someone that is easily to be understand.
    • Example:
      • “My mom always know my way of thinking like an open book.
  2. “To take a leaf out of someone’s book.” Meaning: to imitate someone.
    • Example:
      • “Sometimes my sister irritates me because she always take a leaf out of my book.
  3. “To read between the lines.” Meaning: looking for an implied meaning.
    • Example:
      • “When you feel the world pushing you down over and over again, try to read between the lines. I believe something happens in order to lead you to be better or to a better place.”
  4. “The oldest trick in the book.” Meaning: the dishonest action that had been used over and over again.
    • Example:
      • “Aren’t you bored with the same oldest trick in the book, Matt?”
  5. “In someone’s good books.” Meaning: an expression that show if someone is pleased with you.
    • Example:
      • “His performance was in the jury’s good book.”
  6. “Bring someone to book.” Meaning: to punish someone.
    • Example:
      • “Charlie was brought to the book because of his fight with Ben.”
  7. “Balance the book.” Meaning: a process to make sure that your income and outcome match with your (bank) account note.
    • Example:
      • “I think you should balance the book. It’s strange that you always run out of money before the end of the month.”
  8. “Use every trick in the book.” Meaning: you have used every possible way to get/do something.
    • Example:
      • “I have used every trick in the book to pursue her, but she doesn’t even notice it.”
  9. “Have your nose in the book.” Meaning: to read all the time. On the other hand it also means to refer someone who is being oblivious to her/his surrounding because s(he) is to absorbed to the book.
    • Examples:
      • “She won’t respond if you call her while she’s having her nose in the book. Trust me.”



Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, March 1, 2018

#EngTalk: How to Start a Conversation

Image by WordPress


Sometimes, we could feel nervous when we are about to start a conversation in English. The feeling of awkwardness of saying something in a foreign language, coupled with the concern about saying something wrong or grammatically incorrect, could be overwhelming.

However, the more you familiarise yourself with speaking in English, the more confident you could be. Therefore, always practice when you have a chance. You can start with everyday conversation with a friend or a colleague.

When passing a friend on a hallway at school or meeting somewhere else, we can say:
– How are you?
– Hey, what’s up?
– Hi, how is it going?

If it’s a colleague at work, a more formal interaction is expected. We can start with:
– How are you today?
– What have you been up to lately?
– How was your weekend? (if weekend has just passed) OR Have you got plans for the weekend? (if weekend is about to come).
– Have you heard of that news?

But what if we are in a situation when there is no one we are familiar with?
When you are in a party or a gathering, and there is no one there whom you know, you can always start a conversation and turn a stranger into an acquaintance.

Here are some sentences you could use to start a conversation with a stranger:
–  I don’t believe we have met. I’m Katie.
– What is it that you do for a living?
– Do you go to school near here?
– Do you live around here?
– This is such a great event. What do you think?

You can also start with complimenting a person’s appearance or performance. For example:
– I like your outfit. Where did you buy it?
– I couldn’t help but staring at your necklace. It’s beautiful.
– You gave an interesting speech. I’d like to know your thoughts about…

Making comments about someone’s physical appearance is fine if we are already good friends with him/her, but never point out what a stranger’s lacking as it is considered impolite. For example:
– You look uncomfortable in that clothes ×
– It seems like you have gained some weight ×


If you feel that you might require some helps getting into a conversation with strangers, bring a friend. After a while, you should be confident to do it on your own.


Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 26 February 2018.


#EngKnowledge: Chinese New Year tradition

Hola, Fellas! What a beautiful day, isn’t it? Well, it must be because we are going to have a long weekend. For those who are going to celebrate Chinese New Year tomorrow, I hope you’ll have a wonderful family reunion tonight. Speaking of Chinese New Year, this evening I am going to share some information about Chinese New Year tradition.

Traditionally, when Chinese New Year is coming most people will clean their house. It is believed that cleaning the house will sweep away the bad luck. Celebrating a new year means welcoming a new beginning. Thus, removing all of the matters of the past would give a space for a new hope, prosperity, and fortune. That is why cleaning the house on Chinese New Year is prohibited.

Besides cleaning the house, some people will have a new hair cutting, buy some new outfits and other stuffs as a completion of the new start. After cleaning the house, Chinese will have a Chinese New Year eve dinner with their family, which is today. It is similar to having a family reunion in Thanksgiving, Christmas eve, as well as (if I’m not mistaken) Eid Mubarak eve. This is the most important event of Chinese New Year celebration because it would be a moment for a family to be rebound and share happiness.

Some sources states that dumpling is the most important food in this family dinner, especially in northern China. Its pocket like shape is believed will bring wealth, harmony and happiness to those who eat it. The various fillings of the dumplings will related to the fortune that awaits you in the next year.

The next thing I am going to talk about is generally the main focus of Chinese New Year, the red packet! (hong bao in Chinese). it is publicly known that a red packet contains a certain sum of money. The red packet is traditionally given from married couple to their parents and younger relatives. This is a symbol of blessing and the red color of the envelope is a symbol of happiness.

Lastly, in the following days Chinese usually go to temple and pray before visiting their another family member and relatives. That was a general tradition of Chinese New Year. People may have a similar yet a quite different one because it might be adjusted to another local tradition.

Well, I may have to call it a night. Happy Chinese New year for those who celebrate it. Have a joyful moment with your family and enjoy your special dinner.


Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, February 15, 2018

#EngTips: IELTS academic writing task 1 (chart data)

Hello, Fellas. How are you? Time flies so fast, doesn’t it? It’s already February.

Today, I’m going to give some tips about performing IELTS academic writing test. For you who have some additional tips, either based on your own experience or the tips and trick guidance you’ve read, are free to share it..

I had actually shared the tips of paraphrasing, which acts as the introduction of your essay, some times ago. If you missed the session, you can read it through this link

In this session, we will discuss planning the structure of the essay based on data chart. This might seem difficult, but I personally think that writing an essay from data chart is simpler than the others, such as maps and processes.

I read Barron’s Writing for The IELTS as a guidance. It suggests us to make some a list to determine and at the same time classify the data from the chart.

Firstly, we need to make a list that includes general information of the data, such as the object, the recorded time and place(s), and others.

Here is the illustration:


(Source: Barron’s Writing for The IELTS)
  • Title: Average daily sales, by number of servings
  • What (object): Average daily sales
  • When: winter and summer
  • Where: Vista cafe

Next step, you can make a comparison as well as the details from the object you have figured out.

For example:

Object comparison:

  1. Median daily sales (serving) of foods and beverages in winter


  • The highest serving: hot coffee (above 70)
  • The second highest serving: soup (50)
  • Medium number of serving: salad and ice cream (25 for each item)
  • The lowest serving: ice coffee (below 5)
  1. Median daily sales (serving) of foods and beverages in summer.


  • The highest serving: ice coffee (40)
  • The second highest serving: ice cream (35)
  • Medium number of serving: hot coffee (30)
  • Lowest number of serving: salad and soup (25)

From the details given, you can start writing your essay by comparing the data and also describing the details’ information (discussion). According to the example, you can compare the highest and the lowest food/drink serving in each season.

Lastly, make your conclusion. This part can be put either before the or after the discussion. Besides, you can write your conclusion by using the comparison information in general. For illustration, “Overall, hot coffee and soup are the most purchased items in winter while Ice coffee and ice cream reached the highest servings in summer.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, February 1, 2018

#WOTD: Cacophony

Hi, Fellas! It’s good to see you again this evening. How’s your day?

In this session we are going to discuss “cacophony.” Is there anyone have an idea of the meaning of this word?

“Ex. Shouting wife.. Lol.” – @cris_zysier

Oxford Dictionary states that “cacophony” is an unpleasant/harsh sound. In a simpler way hand you can also define it as a noise. It is said that “cacophony” was derived from a Greek word called “kakophonia” or “kakophonos.” Kakophonos itself is the combination of “kakos,” which means “bad,” and “phone” (sound).

There are some example of cacophonies in our daily life, such as the sound of vehicles on the road followed by the shouting horns, chatter, or a mixed sound of music. According to Merriam-Webster dictionary, there are some related vocabulary to “cacophony.” They are “blast,” “uproar,” “clatter,” etc.

Lastly, here are some example of sentences that contain “cacophony”

  • “The room is full of people. I think I will stay here since their voices are cacophonies to me.”
  • “The increasing number of personal vehicles is the main cause of cacophony on the road.”



Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, January 18, 2018

#WOTD: Youthquake

Hello, dear Fellas. I wish you a happy new year although the moment has already passed. I hope you will achieve your plans and have a better year!

Today we will have a talk about ‘youthquake.’ Maybe some of you knew that ‘youthquake’ is actually the word of the year in 2017, but this word is new for me and perhaps for one of you, too. Besides, there is no time limit in learning. Don’t you agree?

I saw ‘youthquake’ at the very first time while I was browsing some news in Jakarta Post. It stated that Oxford Dictionary named it as the word of 2017.

Is there anyone who can tell me what it means?

“A change affected by youth?” – @puputrbc

‘Youthquake’ means a significant change in some aspect, such as political, social, business, culture, etc., that was lead by young people. Could you give me some example of something as the product of the change? As a simple illustration, I think the significant raise of cafes is.

“Startup business, I guess.” – @kaonashily

Even though this word is just recently known, but it is said that ‘youthquake’ was mentioned publicly in 1960s by Vague Magazine editor. Here are some example of ‘youthquake’ in sentences:

  • “Have you noticed that youthquake had already existed along with the rapid development of social media?”
  • “Youthquake had silently changed our lifestyle.”



Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, January 4, 2018

#EngTalk: Your plan on holidays

Hi, Fellas. How are you? How’s your day?

Since the previous week, I can feel the atmosphere of holiday! Maybe it is because of the students in my school have already been in their vacation.

“Me, too.” – @Mirtaindah 

Speaking of holiday, do you have any plan for the holiday?

“Barbecue party on Christmas eve. Stay at home all day on New year.” – @T_Xfen

“Oh I have. I am going home!!” – @riverningtyas

“As a shift-worker, I don’t have any holiday based on ‘red date’ / tanggal merah.” – @shunusuke 

Mine was used to be just lying on my bed until noon because I used to watch movies until almost dawn. I still remember around 6-7 years ago, when I was still a high school student, I would rent a lot of DVDs along the holiday. However, I can’t do that anymore because I barely can keep myself wide awake when the clock hits 10 PM.

On the other hand, I have a friend who always spend the year-end holidays with her family members.

“You know who it is… yeah.. that’s.. ((((((me)))))” –@ferinayuu

She told me that every year they would go somewhere, such as Kaliurang, and rent a villa or hotel rooms for staying. Then the next days, they would go on off road and exploring the tourism sites in Kaliurang. I even spotted the same designed T-shirt for each of her family member. Such a warm family, right?

In spite of the two examples I have shared, I ever saw some people who like spending the holidays to study, for example attending an intensive course. For those who are currently studying in university, they would join the exchange program or a short course. As the alternative, some of them joined a volunteering program.

What about you? Feel free to share your usual activities during the holidays.

“I used to clean my bag, my shoes, my clothes etc. Because I’m working start Monday to Friday. So, I don’t have many times to clean & clear all of my items at home ” – @kalya_soenar 

Well, whatever you’ve planned for this holiday be sure to enjoy it, especially when you are with your closest relatives.

“Happy holiday!!! 🌼🌼🌼🌼🌼🌼” – @mllehesti 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, December 21, 2017

#EngTrivia: Choice of words

Hi, Fellas.  How are you today? We meet again in #EngTrivia session.

This evening I will share some words which can be the alternative of daily casual words. You can use these selections in your IELTS test essay performance.

  1. ‘Accelerate.’ Meaning: ‘speed up.’
    • Example:
      • “My friend had join a special class in his high school, so he can accelerate his grade.”
  2. ‘Additionally.’ Meaning: ‘there is more.’
    • Example:
      • “Additionally, we have to prepare the gift for this holiday session.”
  3. ‘Allow.’ Meaning: ‘let.’
    • Example:
      • “My parents allowed me to drive to school.”
  4. ‘Anecdote.’ Meaning: ‘joke.’
    • Example:
      • “There are plenty of silly anecdote in social media nowadays.”
  5. ‘Anticipate.’ Meaning: ‘expect.’
    • Example:
      • “The movie was as good as I have anticipated.”
  6.  ‘Beneficial.’ Meaning: ‘good for (something).’
    • Example:
      • “Do you think this purchasing system would be beneficial for our company?”
  7. ‘Utilize.’ Meaning: ‘use.’
    • Example:
      • “This manual has a detail description of utilizing the incubator.”
  8.  ‘Sufficient.’ Meaning: ‘enough.’
    • Example:
      • “Our country still have a sufficient rice stock and it will last approximately until next year.”
  9. ‘Pleased.’ Meaning: ‘happy.’
    • Example:
      • “Pleased to meet you.”
  10. ‘Perhaps.’ Meaning: ‘maybe.’
    • Example:
      • “I am not sure I would able to attend the meeting on time. Perhaps, my assistant could cover me for several minutes.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, December 7, 2017

#EngVocab: Phrasal verbs related to shopping

Hi, Fellas! We finally meet again in #EngVocab session. Today I am going to share some phrasal verbs related to shopping.

Is anyone here fond of shopping? Could you give me some example of phrasal verbs that I possibly share to you this evening?

  1. ‘Sell out.’: Meaning: selling all of the supply you have.
    • Example:
      • “This face moisturizer is women’s favorite. So, it is usually sold out in a meantime.”
  2. Try on.’ Meaning: to put on a piece of clothing in order to see if it fits.
    • Example:
      • “Try this dress on. We can make some correction if it’s too big on you.”
  3. Pay for.’ Meaning: giving the money to buy something.
    • Example:
      • “Don’t worry, I will pay for the cakes.”
  4. ‘Queue up’ or ‘line up.’ Meaning: waiting in a line behind a person.
    • Example:
      • “You can sit on the sofa in the customer service area while lining up at the cashier.”
  5. Shop around.’ Meaning: to compare the prices before buying something.
    • Example:
      • “If you want to get the best outfit with the best price in Beringharjo, you have to shop around the market.
  6. ‘Take off.’ Meaning: to remove a clothing.
    • Example:
      • “Take off your jeans before you try the skirt.”
  7. ‘Turn down.’ Meaning: refusing something.
    • Example:
      • “The vendor gave me too high price for the shoes. So, I turned it down.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, November 23, 2017

#IOTW: Fear

Hello, fellas! Did you enjoy the Halloween event few days ago? In the theme of Halloween, we will talk about the idioms related to fear, nervousness, and anxiety. Here we go!


  1. Shake like a leaf

Meaning: to tremble violently with fear and nervousness

E.g.: “Before I went into the exam room, I was shaking like a leaf.”


  1. Scared stiff

Meaning: utterly terrified that one cannot move

E.g.: “He was scared stiff when the dog barked at him.”


  1. Send shivers down (one’s) spine

Meaning: to cause an intense feeling of fear, nervousness, exhilaration, or excitement in someone.

E.g.: “This creepy old house is sending shivers down my spine! Let’s get out from here.”


  1. Bated breath

Meaning: if you wait for something with bated breath, you wait in an anxious or excited way to see what’s happen next.

E.g.: “We waited with bated breath for the winner to be announced.”


  1. Bundle of nerves

Meaning: someone who is very nervous, anxious, or uneasy.

E.g.: “Ann is doing her college entrance exam today. She’s a bundle of nerves!”


  1. Break out in a cold sweat

Meaning: to begin sweating because one is nervous or frightened.

E.g.: “I get nervous at the dentist and usually break out in a cold sweat.”


  1. Make one’s blood run cold

Meaning: to shock or horrify someone.

E.g.: “I could tell you a horror story that would make your blood run cold.”




  • Cambridge Idioms Dictionary.

  • Farlex Dictionary of Idioms



Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, November 3, 2017.

#EngTrivia: Common confusing adjectives

Hola, Fellas, welcome to English Trivia session. How are you today? In this #EngTriva we are going to have a talk about some adjectives that are commonly confusing.

‘Each’ vs. ‘every’

The first are ‘each’ and ‘every.’ Does any of you can explain what is the difference between those words? ‘Each’ and ‘every’ are actually similar in referring singular noun

However, ‘each’ is used to indicate individual object/person. Meanwhile ‘every’ indicates a group of similar object, for instances doctors, teachers, apples, books, days, etc.

In a special case, we usually use ‘each’ when there are only two objects at the moment.


  • “She wear socks on each of her feet.”

On the other hand, if there are more than two objects the use of ‘each’ and ‘every’ is interchangeably.


  • “I donated every books I have to the town’s library,”
  • “Dina gave each of her old clothes to her sister.”

‘Farther’ vs. ‘further’

I found an articles in about these words. It stated that ‘farther’ is used to refer physical distance while ‘further’ refers figurative or metaphorical distance.


  • “We need to drive farther to reach Anyer beach,”
  • “We can discuss the financial planning further in the next meeting.”

‘Sick’ vs. ‘ill’

The last ones are ‘sick’ and ‘ill.’ The general difference between ‘sick’ and ‘ill’ is their formality. If you are included in less formal communication, you may use the word ‘sick.’ In addition, ‘sick’ describes a short term disease while ‘ill’ can describe both short term and long term disease.


  • “Maya couldn’t come to school for three days because she was sick,”
  • “Finally she appears fresher today. The project she’s just handled certainly made her look ill.”


Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, November 9, 2017

#EngTrivia: How do you read ‘1800s’ and its friends?

Hello Fellas.. how’s your Thursday? Are you also excited like me to welcome Friday, which means weekend, tomorrow?

Alright, maybe some of you have noticed the title of today’s session, “how do you read ‘1800s’ and its friends?” It doesn’t mean that we will be focus on ‘1800s,’ but do you know how to spell it? Is it “one thousand and eight hundreds”? Just like we spell fifties (50s)?

I even couldn’t think about a single thing while I found the word ‘1800s’ in my English textbook.

Generally, ‘1800s’ indicates a century and after I did a browsing in the internet, it stated that ‘1800s’ is spelled “eighteen hundreds.” So, you read by dividing the ‘18’ (eighteen) and ‘00s’ (hundreds).


  • 1300s: thirteen hundreds
  • 1400s: fourteen hundreds
  • 1700s: seventeen hundreds

Then, what about the century which is started in millennial era, such as 2000s, 2100s, 2200s, and so on? Could you tell me what is the proper pronounce of those years?

Similarly, you pronounce ‘2100s’ by separating ’21’ and ’00s.’ So, it will be “twenty one hundreds.” Then “twenty two hundreds” for ‘2200s,’ “twenty three hundreds” for ‘2300s,’ and so on.


Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, October 26, 2017

#EngTrivia: Confusing words (2)

Hello, Fellas. How was your day? In this session we are going to continue our discussion about some confusing words.

‘Harm,’ ‘injury,’ and ‘damage.’

Do you know the difference of those words?

Regarding to Merriam-webster dictinary, if ‘harm’ acts as a verb, it means to make someone/something to be hurt/broken. On the other words, ‘harm’ can also be a noun which is something that has a bed effect on someone or another thing.


  • “The acidic solutions may harm the metals.”
  • “I mean no harm.”

What about ‘injury’? This word means a physical harm on someone. It is usually cause by an accident.


  • “I got this injury from falling down of my motorbike.”

Meanwhile, according to BBC ‘damage’ is a physical harm on something (non-living/abstract object), such as economy, impression, electronics, etc.


  • “This rumor can cause a damage on her reputation.”

‘During,’ ‘while,’ and ‘for.’

If you check on the dictionary, ‘during’ means the entire time of an event/a moment, such as, holiday, school (grade), party, meeting, etc.


  • “I made this sweater during the term holiday.”

Ecenglish. Com also states that ‘during’ is a preposition to indicate the time of an event.


  • “There were many interesting performances during last year’s Christmas holiday.”

On the other hand ‘while’ means a short period of time.


  • “I will take a rest for a while.”

In addition, we can also use ‘while’ as a conjunction when two events happen at the same time.


  • “I was showering while my brother came home.”

The last is ‘for.’ This word is used to indicate a specific time of an event. So, when we put ‘for’ in a sentence, it is followed by the length of time.


  • “My mother well be in Paris for two weeks.”



Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, October 12, 2017

#EngQuote: Elon Musk

Elon Musk is a 21st century engineer and industrialist. He has always been a thinker and a creator. Musk manages companies that specialize in self-driving cars (Tesla Motors) and private space exploration & Mars colonization (SpaceX). Previously, Elon Musk co-founded and sold PayPal, the world’s leading Internet payment system. Musk was the real life inspiration for Robert Downey, Jr.’s character, Tony Stark, in the Iron Man franchise. He was a cameo in Iron Man 2.

Here are several quotes from Elon Musk.

Elon Musk 1Elon Musk 2Elon Musk 3Elon Musk 4Elon Musk 5Elon Musk 6Elon Musk 7Elon Musk 8Elon Musk 9Elon Musk 10Elon Musk 11Elon Musk 12Elon Musk 13


Compiled and written by @anhtiss in @EnglishTips4U. Saturday, October 7, 2017.


Related Post(s):

#EngVocab: Other ways to say ‘little’

Hello, fellas! What are you doing? Do you know that there are some other words to express ‘little?’

  1. Tiny (adj). Meaning: extremely small
    • Example:
      • “The glass shattered into a thousand tiny pieces.”
  1. Teeny (adj). Meaning: informal expression of tiny.
    • Example:
      • “Just a teeny slice of cake for me, please.”
  1. Diminutive (adj). Meaning: notably small.
    • Example:
      • “Ant-man is such a diminutive figure, less than two feet tall.”
  1. Microscopic (adj).:Meaning very small and only able to be seen with a microscope.
    • Example:
      • “He photographed every aspect of the object in microscopic detail.”
  1. Petite (adj). Meaning: small in size.
    • Example:
      • “She was small and petite with long blonde hair.”
  1. Slight (adj). Meaning: small in amount
    • Example:
      • “There’s a slight chance of rain.”
  1. Wee (adj).:Meaning: small, little (informal word use by mainly Scottish people)
    • Example:
      • “The wizard reached out, caught the wee creature in his hand”
  1. Minuscule (adj).. Meaning: rather less, rather small.
    • Example:
      • “The new chemical substance is harmless in such minuscule amounts.”

That’s all for today, fellas! See you on another session!

Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, September 23, 2017.