Category Archives: English

#WOTD: Youthquake

Hello, dear Fellas. I wish you a happy new year although the moment has already passed. I hope you will achieve your plans and have a better year!

Today we will have a talk about ‘youthquake.’ Maybe some of you knew that ‘youthquake’ is actually the word of the year in 2017, but this word is new for me and perhaps for one of you, too. Besides, there is no time limit in learning. Don’t you agree?

I saw ‘youthquake’ at the very first time while I was browsing some news in Jakarta Post. It stated that Oxford Dictionary named it as the word of 2017.

Is there anyone who can tell me what it means?

“A change affected by youth?” – @puputrbc

‘Youthquake’ means a significant change in some aspect, such as political, social, business, culture, etc., that was lead by young people. Could you give me some example of something as the product of the change? As a simple illustration, I think the significant raise of cafes is.

“Startup business, I guess.” – @kaonashily

Even though this word is just recently known, but it is said that ‘youthquake’ was mentioned publicly in 1960s by Vague Magazine editor. Here are some example of ‘youthquake’ in sentences:

  • “Have you noticed that youthquake had already existed along with the rapid development of social media?”
  • “Youthquake had silently changed our lifestyle.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, January 4, 2018

Advertisements

#EngTalk: Your plan on holidays

Hi, Fellas. How are you? How’s your day?

Since the previous week, I can feel the atmosphere of holiday! Maybe it is because of the students in my school have already been in their vacation.

“Me, too.” – @Mirtaindah 

Speaking of holiday, do you have any plan for the holiday?

“Barbecue party on Christmas eve. Stay at home all day on New year.” – @T_Xfen

“Oh I have. I am going home!!” – @riverningtyas

“As a shift-worker, I don’t have any holiday based on ‘red date’ / tanggal merah.” – @shunusuke 

Mine was used to be just lying on my bed until noon because I used to watch movies until almost dawn. I still remember around 6-7 years ago, when I was still a high school student, I would rent a lot of DVDs along the holiday. However, I can’t do that anymore because I barely can keep myself wide awake when the clock hits 10 PM.

On the other hand, I have a friend who always spend the year-end holidays with her family members.

“You know who it is… yeah.. that’s.. ((((((me)))))” –@ferinayuu

She told me that every year they would go somewhere, such as Kaliurang, and rent a villa or hotel rooms for staying. Then the next days, they would go on off road and exploring the tourism sites in Kaliurang. I even spotted the same designed T-shirt for each of her family member. Such a warm family, right?

In spite of the two examples I have shared, I ever saw some people who like spending the holidays to study, for example attending an intensive course. For those who are currently studying in university, they would join the exchange program or a short course. As the alternative, some of them joined a volunteering program.

What about you? Feel free to share your usual activities during the holidays.

“I used to clean my bag, my shoes, my clothes etc. Because I’m working start Monday to Friday. So, I don’t have many times to clean & clear all of my items at home ” – @kalya_soenar 

Well, whatever you’ve planned for this holiday be sure to enjoy it, especially when you are with your closest relatives.

“Happy holiday!!! 🌼🌼🌼🌼🌼🌼” – @mllehesti 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, December 21, 2017

#EngTrivia: Choice of words

Hi, Fellas.  How are you today? We meet again in #EngTrivia session.

This evening I will share some words which can be the alternative of daily casual words. You can use these selections in your IELTS test essay performance.

  1. ‘Accelerate.’ Meaning: ‘speed up.’
    • Example:
      • “My friend had join a special class in his high school, so he can accelerate his grade.”
  2. ‘Additionally.’ Meaning: ‘there is more.’
    • Example:
      • “Additionally, we have to prepare the gift for this holiday session.”
  3. ‘Allow.’ Meaning: ‘let.’
    • Example:
      • “My parents allowed me to drive to school.”
  4. ‘Anecdote.’ Meaning: ‘joke.’
    • Example:
      • “There are plenty of silly anecdote in social media nowadays.”
  5. ‘Anticipate.’ Meaning: ‘expect.’
    • Example:
      • “The movie was as good as I have anticipated.”
  6.  ‘Beneficial.’ Meaning: ‘good for (something).’
    • Example:
      • “Do you think this purchasing system would be beneficial for our company?”
  7. ‘Utilize.’ Meaning: ‘use.’
    • Example:
      • “This manual has a detail description of utilizing the incubator.”
  8.  ‘Sufficient.’ Meaning: ‘enough.’
    • Example:
      • “Our country still have a sufficient rice stock and it will last approximately until next year.”
  9. ‘Pleased.’ Meaning: ‘happy.’
    • Example:
      • “Pleased to meet you.”
  10. ‘Perhaps.’ Meaning: ‘maybe.’
    • Example:
      • “I am not sure I would able to attend the meeting on time. Perhaps, my assistant could cover me for several minutes.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, December 7, 2017

#EngVocab: Phrasal verbs related to shopping

Hi, Fellas! We finally meet again in #EngVocab session. Today I am going to share some phrasal verbs related to shopping.

Is anyone here fond of shopping? Could you give me some example of phrasal verbs that I possibly share to you this evening?

  1. ‘Sell out.’: Meaning: selling all of the supply you have.
    • Example:
      • “This face moisturizer is women’s favorite. So, it is usually sold out in a meantime.”
  2. Try on.’ Meaning: to put on a piece of clothing in order to see if it fits.
    • Example:
      • “Try this dress on. We can make some correction if it’s too big on you.”
  3. Pay for.’ Meaning: giving the money to buy something.
    • Example:
      • “Don’t worry, I will pay for the cakes.”
  4. ‘Queue up’ or ‘line up.’ Meaning: waiting in a line behind a person.
    • Example:
      • “You can sit on the sofa in the customer service area while lining up at the cashier.”
  5. Shop around.’ Meaning: to compare the prices before buying something.
    • Example:
      • “If you want to get the best outfit with the best price in Beringharjo, you have to shop around the market.
  6. ‘Take off.’ Meaning: to remove a clothing.
    • Example:
      • “Take off your jeans before you try the skirt.”
  7. ‘Turn down.’ Meaning: refusing something.
    • Example:
      • “The vendor gave me too high price for the shoes. So, I turned it down.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, November 23, 2017

#IOTW: Fear

Hello, fellas! Did you enjoy the Halloween event few days ago? In the theme of Halloween, we will talk about the idioms related to fear, nervousness, and anxiety. Here we go!

 

  1. Shake like a leaf

Meaning: to tremble violently with fear and nervousness

E.g.: “Before I went into the exam room, I was shaking like a leaf.”

 

  1. Scared stiff

Meaning: utterly terrified that one cannot move

E.g.: “He was scared stiff when the dog barked at him.”

 

  1. Send shivers down (one’s) spine

Meaning: to cause an intense feeling of fear, nervousness, exhilaration, or excitement in someone.

E.g.: “This creepy old house is sending shivers down my spine! Let’s get out from here.”

 

  1. Bated breath

Meaning: if you wait for something with bated breath, you wait in an anxious or excited way to see what’s happen next.

E.g.: “We waited with bated breath for the winner to be announced.”

 

  1. Bundle of nerves

Meaning: someone who is very nervous, anxious, or uneasy.

E.g.: “Ann is doing her college entrance exam today. She’s a bundle of nerves!”

 

  1. Break out in a cold sweat

Meaning: to begin sweating because one is nervous or frightened.

E.g.: “I get nervous at the dentist and usually break out in a cold sweat.”

 

  1. Make one’s blood run cold

Meaning: to shock or horrify someone.

E.g.: “I could tell you a horror story that would make your blood run cold.”

 

 

Source:

  • Cambridge Idioms Dictionary.

  • Farlex Dictionary of Idioms

 

 

Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, November 3, 2017.

#EngTrivia: Common confusing adjectives

Hola, Fellas, welcome to English Trivia session. How are you today? In this #EngTriva we are going to have a talk about some adjectives that are commonly confusing.

‘Each’ vs. ‘every’

The first are ‘each’ and ‘every.’ Does any of you can explain what is the difference between those words? ‘Each’ and ‘every’ are actually similar in referring singular noun

However, ‘each’ is used to indicate individual object/person. Meanwhile ‘every’ indicates a group of similar object, for instances doctors, teachers, apples, books, days, etc.

In a special case, we usually use ‘each’ when there are only two objects at the moment.

Example:

  • “She wear socks on each of her feet.”

On the other hand, if there are more than two objects the use of ‘each’ and ‘every’ is interchangeably.

Example:

  • “I donated every books I have to the town’s library,”
  • “Dina gave each of her old clothes to her sister.”

‘Farther’ vs. ‘further’

I found an articles in quickanddirtytips.com about these words. It stated that ‘farther’ is used to refer physical distance while ‘further’ refers figurative or metaphorical distance.

Example:

  • “We need to drive farther to reach Anyer beach,”
  • “We can discuss the financial planning further in the next meeting.”

‘Sick’ vs. ‘ill’

The last ones are ‘sick’ and ‘ill.’ The general difference between ‘sick’ and ‘ill’ is their formality. If you are included in less formal communication, you may use the word ‘sick.’ In addition, ‘sick’ describes a short term disease while ‘ill’ can describe both short term and long term disease.

Example:

  • “Maya couldn’t come to school for three days because she was sick,”
  • “Finally she appears fresher today. The project she’s just handled certainly made her look ill.”

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, November 9, 2017

#EngTrivia: How do you read ‘1800s’ and its friends?

Hello Fellas.. how’s your Thursday? Are you also excited like me to welcome Friday, which means weekend, tomorrow?

Alright, maybe some of you have noticed the title of today’s session, “how do you read ‘1800s’ and its friends?” It doesn’t mean that we will be focus on ‘1800s,’ but do you know how to spell it? Is it “one thousand and eight hundreds”? Just like we spell fifties (50s)?

I even couldn’t think about a single thing while I found the word ‘1800s’ in my English textbook.

Generally, ‘1800s’ indicates a century and after I did a browsing in the internet, it stated that ‘1800s’ is spelled “eighteen hundreds.” So, you read by dividing the ‘18’ (eighteen) and ‘00s’ (hundreds).

Examples:

  • 1300s: thirteen hundreds
  • 1400s: fourteen hundreds
  • 1700s: seventeen hundreds

Then, what about the century which is started in millennial era, such as 2000s, 2100s, 2200s, and so on? Could you tell me what is the proper pronounce of those years?

Similarly, you pronounce ‘2100s’ by separating ’21’ and ’00s.’ So, it will be “twenty one hundreds.” Then “twenty two hundreds” for ‘2200s,’ “twenty three hundreds” for ‘2300s,’ and so on.

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, October 26, 2017

#EngTrivia: Confusing words (2)

Hello, Fellas. How was your day? In this session we are going to continue our discussion about some confusing words.

‘Harm,’ ‘injury,’ and ‘damage.’

Do you know the difference of those words?

Regarding to Merriam-webster dictinary, if ‘harm’ acts as a verb, it means to make someone/something to be hurt/broken. On the other words, ‘harm’ can also be a noun which is something that has a bed effect on someone or another thing.

Example:

  • “The acidic solutions may harm the metals.”
  • “I mean no harm.”

What about ‘injury’? This word means a physical harm on someone. It is usually cause by an accident.

Example:

  • “I got this injury from falling down of my motorbike.”

Meanwhile, according to BBC ‘damage’ is a physical harm on something (non-living/abstract object), such as economy, impression, electronics, etc.

Example:

  • “This rumor can cause a damage on her reputation.”

‘During,’ ‘while,’ and ‘for.’

If you check on the dictionary, ‘during’ means the entire time of an event/a moment, such as, holiday, school (grade), party, meeting, etc.

Example:

  • “I made this sweater during the term holiday.”

Ecenglish. Com also states that ‘during’ is a preposition to indicate the time of an event.

Example:

  • “There were many interesting performances during last year’s Christmas holiday.”

On the other hand ‘while’ means a short period of time.

Example:

  • “I will take a rest for a while.”

In addition, we can also use ‘while’ as a conjunction when two events happen at the same time.

Example:

  • “I was showering while my brother came home.”

The last is ‘for.’ This word is used to indicate a specific time of an event. So, when we put ‘for’ in a sentence, it is followed by the length of time.

Example:

  • “My mother well be in Paris for two weeks.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, October 12, 2017

#EngQuote: Elon Musk

Elon Musk is a 21st century engineer and industrialist. He has always been a thinker and a creator. Musk manages companies that specialize in self-driving cars (Tesla Motors) and private space exploration & Mars colonization (SpaceX). Previously, Elon Musk co-founded and sold PayPal, the world’s leading Internet payment system. Musk was the real life inspiration for Robert Downey, Jr.’s character, Tony Stark, in the Iron Man franchise. He was a cameo in Iron Man 2.

Here are several quotes from Elon Musk.

Elon Musk 1Elon Musk 2Elon Musk 3Elon Musk 4Elon Musk 5Elon Musk 6Elon Musk 7Elon Musk 8Elon Musk 9Elon Musk 10Elon Musk 11Elon Musk 12Elon Musk 13

 

Compiled and written by @anhtiss in @EnglishTips4U. Saturday, October 7, 2017.

 

Related Post(s):

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Little’

Hello, fellas! What are you doing? Do you know that there are some other words to express ‘little?’

  1. Tiny (adj): extremely small
  • E.g.: “The glass shattered into a thousand tiny pieces.”

 

  1. Teeny (adj): informal expression of tiny.
  • E.g.: “Just a teeny slice of cake for me, please.”

 

  1. Diminutive (adj): notably small
  • E.g.: “Ant-man is such a diminutive figure, less than two feet tall.”

 

  1. Microscopic (adj): very small and only able to be seen with a microscope.
  • E.g.: “He photographed every aspect of the object in microscopic detail.”

 

  1. Petite (adj): small in size
  • E.g.: “She was small and petite with long blonde hair.”

 

  1. Slight (adj): small in amount
  • E.g.: “There’s a slight chance of rain.”

 

  1. Wee (adj): small, little (informal word use by mainly Scottish people)
  • E.g.: “The wizard reached out, caught the wee creature in his hand”

 

  1. Minuscule (adj): rather less, rather small.
  • E.g.: “The new chemical substance is harmless in such minuscule amounts.”

 

That’s all for today, fellas! See you on another session!

 

Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, September 23, 2017.

#EngTrivia: Confusing words

Hello, Fellas. How was your day?

In this session we are going to talk about some words which are resembles one another), for instance “appreciative” and “appreciable.” Do you know the meaning of those two words? How are they different?

“Appreciative” vs. “appreciable”

Regarding to Merriam-webster dictionary, “appreciative” means showing appreciation. There are some synonyms of this word, such as “admiring,” “applauding,” and “favorable.”

Example:

  • “I always love to show my creation to her because she is very appreciative.”

Meanwhile, “appreciable” means large enough to be noticed/measured. In other words, you can say “eye catching,” “prominent,” or “detectable.”

Example:

  • “There is an appreciable culture difference between Indonesia and America.”

“Shortly” vs. “briefly.”

If you asked me earlier about those two words, I might have said that they are synonymous. After I read some references, “shortly” means in a short time. In a simple way, you can also say “soon” or “in a while.”

Example:

  • “My mom will be home shortly.”

On the other hand, “briefly” means in a short period (space) of time.

Example:

  • “I am in a hurry, so I will briefly explain about simple tense to you.”

“Considerable” vs. “considerate”

“Considerable” or you can also say “significant” acts as an adjective which means something large or in a huge number of quantity. In other words, it also means something is worth consideration.

Example,

  • “The difference between tennis and football participant is considerable,”
  • “His project idea is considerable.”

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, September 28, 2017

#WOTD: Debutante

Hello, Fellas. How are you today? This evening we are going to discuss “debutante.” Are you familiar with this word?

The very first time I found “debutante” is when I was reading historical fiction novel. It was about a selection to get a bride for crown prince of a kingdom.

If you take a look in Merriam-Webster dictionary, “debutante” is originally a French word. It means grand attendance of an upper-class young lady to parties. Since they are a high-class parties, the lady definitely wears her best gown to create a good impression.

Generally, debutantes will be presented in a royal party in order where the nobles may choose one of them as their soon-to-be bride. Here are some illustration of the “debutante” usage in a sentence:

  • “Nina is the most debutante in this season.”
  • “A debutante should have a beauty as well as a good education.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, September 14, 2017

#GrammarTrivia: Confusing verbs

Hello, Fellas. We meet again. How are you today? This evening we are going to have a discussion about confusing verbs.

Who had felt dilemmatic about the using of ‘make’ and ‘do’ in a sentence? Because sometimes I did.

‘Make’ vs. ‘do’

After I read some references, it is said that we use ‘do’ to indicate an activity/action.

Examples:

  • “Do your homework,”
  • “You should do your work,”
  • “It’s my schedule to do the laundry.”

Likewise, we can also use ‘do’ even if there is no physical object to be shown.

For illustration:

  • “I would do anything for you,”
  • “She didn’t do anything wrong,”
  • “I do nothing since this morning.”

Meanwhile, ‘make’ is used when someone is creating/building/performing something. It is usually something that you can see/touch (physical object).

Examples:

  • “I am making cheesecake,”
  • “Please, don’t make him cry.”
  • “Smartphone makes us communicating with someone easily.”

‘Say’ vs. ‘tell.’

According to Cambridge dictionary, ‘say’ focuses on the words in someone speech. For illustrations,

  • “He said,I want to buy apples.’

On the other hand, ‘say’ also acts as a reporting verb.

Example:

  • “He said he wanted to buy apples.”

Meanwhile ‘tell’ is used to report the message of the speech or to instruct someone.

Example:

  • “He told me that he wanted to buy apples,”
  • “Tell him to buy apples.”

‘Shall’ vs. ‘will.’

In simple future tense, we traditionally use ‘shallafter the first person pronoun (I and we) while ‘you,’ ‘they,’ ‘she,’ ‘he,’ and ‘it’ are followed by ‘will.’

For instances:

  • “We shall go to supermarket to buy some vegetables and meat,”
  • “You will get a good grade if you study harder.”

However, when we want to emphasis something the rules are reversed. The first pronouns are followed by ‘will,’ while ‘shall’ is placed after the second and the third pronouns.

Illustration,

  • “I will not forgive you,”
  • “She shall read the textbooks as her thesis refrences.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, August 31, 2017

#EngTrivia: Confusing Singular/Plural Word

English plurals are usually easy to form. We can add -s to the end of the singular word, e.g.: chair (singular) or two chairs (plural). But, like almost all of the rules in English grammar, there are exceptions for the plural form of some nouns. Here is a list of the confusing singular/plural words.

 

Criterion & Criteria

‘Criterion’ is singular form and ‘criteria’ is plural form.

Meaning: a rule or principal used in evaluation.

E.g.:

“One criterion for grading this essay will be announced.”

“What were the criteria used to choose the winner?”

 

Phenomenon & Phenomena

‘Phenomenon’ is singular form and ‘phenomena’ is plural form.

Meaning: an observable fact or event.

E.g.:

“Star Wars eventually became a cultural phenomenon.”

“Lightning and earthquakes are natural phenomena.”

 

Datum & Data

‘Datum’ is singular form and ‘data’ is plural form.

Meaning: a single piece of information

E.g.:

“The datum shows little without the rest of the statistics.”

“The data were collected over a period of three months.”

 

Stratum & strata

‘Stratum’ is singular form and ‘strata’ is plural form.

Meaning: a level or class to which people are assigned according to their social status, education, or income.

E.g.:

“Discrimination exist in every stratum of society.”

“Different social strata are most likely crashing into each other.”

 

Bacterium & bacteria

‘Bacterium’ is singular form and ‘bacteria’ is plural form.

Meaning: a type of unicellular microorganism that are important to human because of their chemical activities but some of its type often cause disease.

E.g.:

“Every bacterium is prokaryotic.”

“Tetanus is a serious ilness caused by Clostridium tetani bacteria.”

plural singular

Source:

  • Merriam-Webster Dictionary

 

 

Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, August 23, 2017.

 

#GrammarTrivia: Tricky prepositions

Hello, Fellas. Happy Independence Day! How’s your day? Did you attend the rising flag ceremony like I did?

Today we would discuss some tricky prepositions, such as “ask for.”’ “ask to,” “into,” “in to,” etc.

“Into” vs. “in to”

“Into” shows the motion towards something else, for illustration a place (a room).

Example:

  • “I walk into the meeting room,”
  • “The bird fly into its nest.”

Meanwhile “in to” is generally an adverb ‘in’ which is followed by preposition ‘to.’

Example:

  • “I turn in to Thomson Road,”
  • “Put this pen in to the pencil case.”

“Ask for” vs. “ask to.”

“Ask for” is a phrasal verb that express our request for something (an object).

Example:

  • “I will ask for a new phone on my birthday,”
  • “Mr. John asks for his coffee.”

On the other hand, “ask to” is used when you wish someone to do something (verb).

Example:

  • “I asked Donna to clean the living room,”
  • “Daddy asked me to buy apples.”

“Think about” vs. “think of”

If you are thinking about something for a long time/considering something, then you will use “think about.”

Example:

  • “I was thinking about pursuing my master degree in UK.”
  • “My mom thought about our plan to move to Florida.”

However, if you are imagining something/spontaneously thinking about something, then you use “think of.”

Example:

  • “I thought of having a private library in my home,”
  • “This song makes me think of our high school moments.”

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, August 17, 2017

#EngQuote: Haruki Murakami

Haruki Murakami is a Japanese writer. His books and stories have been bestsellers in Japan as well as internationally. Haruki has received several noted awards for his fiction and non-fiction works. He was also referred to as one of the world’s greatest living novelist by The Guardian.

1Q84, Norwegian Wood, On Seeing The 100% Perfect Girl, Underground etc are some of Murakami’s works. He is known mostly for his humorous work focusing on the loneliness of Japan’s work dominated generation. Here are several quotes from the author, Haruki Murakami.

Murakami1Murakami2Murakami3Murakami4Murakami5Murakami6Murakami7Murakami8Murakami9Murakami10Murakami11

Compiled and written by @anhtiss at @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, August 12, 2017.

 

#UKSlang: UK Slang (11)

Today we will learn about other UK slangs  apart from those we have talked about in past sessions.

Let’s start!
1. Laughing gear: one’s mouth.

E.g. “It’s not funny. Shut your laughing gear!”
2. Know one’s onions: well versed on a subject.

E.g. “That guy sure knows his onions.”
3. Hard cheese: expression of bad luck.

E.g. “The new rules is a hard cheese for the employees.”
4. Go to spare: become angry or frustrated.

E.g. “All his problems make him go to spare.”
5. Eating irons: eating utensils.

E.g. “Let us prepare the eating irons.”
6. Do one’s nut: become enraged.

E.g. “I gave him the news, and he did his nut.”
7. Bang to the rights: caught in the act.

E.g. “The police came and caught the robber bang to rights in front of the store.”
8. Argy-bargy: heated confrontation.

E.g. “I don’t want us to get into argy bargy just because of this small problem.”
9. All mouth and no trousers: all talk, no action.

E.g. “He’s all mouth and no trousers. Nobody wants to listen to him.”
10. Sad arse: pathetic person.

E.g. “You are a sad arse! Can’t you even boil an egg?”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 6, 2017.

#IOTW: Idioms related to medical and health

Hello, Fellas, how are you? I hope you are always as fit as fiddle.

Today I am going to share some idioms related to health. I am sure that maybe you’ve heard about some of them.

  1. “Alive and kicking.” Meaning: (just like the previous phrase “as fit as fiddle”) to be healthy.
    • Example:
      • “Hello, John, how are you? You look alive and kicking.
  2. “Break out in a cold sweat.” Meaning: to perspire from fever/anxiety.
    • Example:
      • “It seems like you are going to break out in a cold sweat. Just relax, everything will be all right.”
  3. “Bring (someone) around.” Meaning: to cure someone/to restore consciousness.
    • Example:
      • “Donna’s one of the best cardiologist. She always brings her patients around successfully.”
  4. “Feel on top of the world.” Meaning: to be very healthy.
    • Example:
      • “I think this supplement works. I am currently feeling on top of the world.”
  5. “Flare up.” Meaning: (an illness) suddenly begin again.
    • Example:
      • “I thought I have completely recover from the flu, but the fever suddenly flared up.”
  6. “Go under a knife.” Meaning: to have an operation in surgery.
    • Example:
      • “She is going under a knife to remove the breast tumor.”
  7. “Head shrinker.” Meanimg: a psychiatrist.
    • Example:
      • “Well, I recommend you to see dr. Robert. He is a good head shrinker.”
  8. “In a family way.” Meaning: pregnant.
    • Example:
      • “Have you heard that Marissa is in a family way?”
  9. “Out cold” Meaning: unconscious.
    • Example:
      • “I don’t know what happened to him. He was shivering before he is out cold.
  10. “Pull through.” Meaning: to recover from serious illness.
    • Example:
      • “Hannah is still unable to go to school even though she has pulled through the dengue fever,”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, August 3, 2017.