Category Archives: conversation

#ENGCLASS: PARADOX

Two days ago, we talked about oxymoron, which is a figure of speech that is made of two or more words with contradictory meaning. If you want to read the article on oxymoron, CLICK HERE.

Today, we are going to talk about its sibling, paradox. Both have similar features and are often mixed up.

Penrose triangle (picture by Wikipedia)

What is a paradox? The word paradox came from Latin word ‘paradoxum’, which came from Greek word ‘paradoxon’, which means ‘contrary to expectation.’

Just as an oxymoron, a paradox is also a figure of speech. Furthermore, it is a rhetorical device that seems to contradict itself, but actually has some truth to it.

Does this confuse you, fellas? To put it simply, a paradox is a statement that is logical but contrary to our expectation.

Example:

  1. “The only constant thing is change (Indonesian: satu-satunya hal yang tidak pernah berubah adalah perubahan).”
    Explanation: nothing in life is constant, except change. Change happens all the time, to everything, and to everyone, which makes it constant.
  2. “Failure leads to success (Indonesian: kegagalan adalah sukses yang tertunda).”
    Explanation: by failing over and over again, it means we keep trying and it might mean that someday we will be successful.
  3. “Social media brought us apart and brought us together (Indonesian: media sosial mendekatkan yang jauh dan menjauhkan yang dekat).”
    Explanation: focusing on social media often makes us ignore the people who are physically present around us.
  4. “The more you learn, the less you know (Indonesian: seperti padi, semakin berisi, semakin merunduk).”
    Explanation: the more knowledgeable we are, the more we will realise that there are so many things of which we have little knowledge.
  5. “The enemy of my enemy is my friend (Indonesian: musuh dari musuh saya adalah sekutu saya).”
    Explanation: meeting another enemy could easily make someone our enemy, too, but sometimes they can become our friend out of a mutual dislike towards someone else.

How do paradox and oxymoron differ?
How do we differentiate a paradox and an oxymoron when we see them in a sentence? The key is to remember that an oxymoron is made of words that have opposite meanings, while a paradox is a collection of words that contradicts itself. Check our sources below for complete reading.

Source:
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/paradox
https://www.dictionary.com/e/paradox-oxymoron/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox
https://tom-stevenson.medium.com/13-paradoxes-you-can-use-to-improve-your-life-today-b32d7dca4e0f

Do you have a favourite paradox, fellas? Share it with us.

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 21 November 2020.

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#EngClass: Oxymoron
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#ENGCLASS: GOOD STORYTELLING

A few days ago, one of our followers requested tips on storytelling, especially how to narrate a story in a way that the readers/audience will understand.

Bear in mind that storytelling is not only useful on writings; even audio and visual messages need a good storytelling. Whether you are telling a story verbally or via visual cues, a good storytelling skill is necessary.

Take TV or YouTube ads, for example. Even if they are told via audio-visual, most of them have good storyline. This is especially important to send a message to the audience that the products the ads are trying to sell are worthy.

If you are wondering where to start, think of a storytelling as another way of reporting something but add some emotions to it to make it more relatable to the audience. Therefore, you first need to figure out what you are trying to tell. What is it that you want other people to know? Define this first as the main idea of your story.

Photo by Lina Kivaka on Pexels.com

From the main idea, develop the story with 4 Ps:
People: characters of the story
Place: the time and location of the story
Plot: how the story starts and ends
Purpose: what is the reason behind the storytelling

Let’s take for example the Harry Potter franchise. We have Harry as the protagonist and Voldemort as the antagonist and the others as supporting characters. They are the ‘people’ of the Harry Potter story.

The time and the location of the story are England and Scotland in the 90s, which means the story should present how England and Scotland looked like at that time. Of course, there are Hogwarts and the wizarding world as a fictional element to this story, which were created based on the author’s imagination.

And then there is plot, which begins with the murder of Harry’s parents. The story then tells Harry’s journey to defeat Voldemort and ends with Voldemort’s destruction. Along the way, there are major and minor subplots to keep the readers interested.

The last one is purpose. What is the purpose of the telling of Harry Potter story? Is it good against evil? Is it portraying the reality at the time? Is it for entertainment? Is it trying to send a message?

Once you have the general idea of the story, begin creating the structure by deciding the parts of the story that are important. How we meet the main character, how the other characters are introduced, and what happens to them.

You can use linear plot, which is a plot where events happen in chronological order. However, if you feel confident, you can try using non-linear plot. It will keep the readers/audience curious to figure out the exact timeline of the story.

Now, how do we make a storytelling effective?

1. Keep it simple
It’s good to give enough details to the story, but sometimes the less is the better, especially if there is a constraint on time and resources.

2. Keep it focused
An elaborated story is good as long as it does not stray from the purpose of the storytelling. Back to the Harry Potter example, we are all invested in how Harry will finally win the war against Voldemort, so Uncle Vernon’s family tree won’t really be necessary. Not only it does not add much to the storyline, it could also be distracting.

3. Be relatable
A great story appeals to our emotions: we care about what happens to the characters because we see parts of ourselves in them. We struggle with Harry when he is living with the Dursleys, we can understand how Ron is sometimes jealous of Harry, we are annoyed by Draco Malfoy, and some of us agree with Hermione in her bossiest, nosiest moments.

4. Use concise language
Concise means delivering a message clearly and briefly, only in a few words. Some of the ways to achieve this are reading a lot, expanding your vocabulary, and doing a lot of practice.

I hope you find this article helpful. Feel free to add your most favourite way of telling a story.

P.S.: mine is using a non-linear plot, jumping from one event to another, and preparing a plot twist or even a vague ending.

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 9 November 2020.

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#ENGCLASS: EMPATHY, SYMPATHY, AND HOW TO EXPRESS THEM

The year 2020 has been tough for everybody. Many people fell ill, lost their loved ones, lost their jobs and livelihood. During this difficult time, we can always use or offer empathy and sympathy.

Are you still unclear of what the difference is between empathy and sympathy, fellas? We will discuss it on this article, as well as how to express them.

Photo by Lisa Fotios on Pexels.com

Empathy is the ability to understand what the other person is feeling. Sympathy is feeling pity or sorrow for someone else’s misfortune, sometimes including the ability to offer helps or condolences.

Let’s say a friend has just broken up. By listening and understanding what the friend is going through, we are showing empathy. By offering our help to make the friend feel better, we are showing sympathy.

So, in a way, we will show more efforts in staying by our friend’s side and listening to our friend’s problem with empathy. With sympathy, we proactively offer condolences and even our assistance. Similar, but not exactly the same.

Both empathy and sympathy are emotional skills that, just like other skills, need some practicing. By meeting more people from different backgrounds, seeing their struggles, and showing kindness to those in need can be some of the ways to practice these skills.

Now, how do we express empathy and sympathy?

Just like I mentioned before, empathy requires a lot of listening and understanding. When someone going through difficult times, it’s easy for us to go to them and say, “I’ve had worse. You should do this or that.”

Sometimes, that is not what the other person needs. When someone comes to us with their problems, they don’t necessarily require solutions. Perhaps the solutions are what they’ve known all along; they only need someone to talk to.

Which is why some of the best ways to show empathy are:
– listening to the problem and acknowledging it
– saying that it’s reasonable to feel bad or upset
– thanking the person for opening up to us
– letting the person know that we are there for them

Meanwhile, to show sympathy, we can do the following:
– saying, “I’m sorry for what happened. My thoughts are with you.”
– offering help by saying, “Tell me if you need anything.”
– giving support and words of encouragement
– assisting the person

For situations that require us to show empathy and sympathy, there is one thing that we should always keep in mind: this is not about us. The person suffering the most should get the most attention, even if they are suffering silently.

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 26 October 2020.

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#EngTalk: Accents

Hi, hello, everyone. How are you today? I hope you are safe and healthy.

Who here is a fan of British accent? I know I am. It just sounds strong, distinct, and unique, although sometimes it takes me a while to understand what the speaker is saying. I often find myself trying to imitate the accent. Most people that I speak with say that I have American or Australian accent, though, so I’m not sure what happened. What do you think of the many, many accents from English speaking people?

@NeNi961111: OH MY!! MEEEEE. I like British accent so much, want to speak, but end up with American accent.

@RAKemal: I used to have (mimic?) standard British accent. Then I went to a week-long Indonesian-American joint-conference and there went my accent.

@sfn520: I don’t know what accent I’m using, I just speak English.

@mrivaldi__: I am! i feel mesem2 sendiri, if i’m watching british got talent. Their voices was quite sexy.

@fatimatulKN: I am a big fan of harry potter movies, jolly (british-korean youtuber), sorted food (british cooking youtube channel). British accent itu kedengeran classy, sophisticated, well educated, kayak yg pinter gt orangnya yg ngomong.

Photo by Ian Panelo on Pexels.com

English came from the UK but even in its home country, there are several areas where people speak with different accents and dialects. Cockney, Geordie, Scottish, and Estuary English are some of them.

@NeNi961111: I only know Scottish, and that’s quite difficult but never the other 3 before.

@Keystone_Eng: Yes, its one of the things I love about England, there are loads of different accents. There are many different accents in the UK. For example, my native accent is a Yorkshire accent. It’s very different to the other accents.

One of my friends has a strong Cockney accent despite being born and growing up in Indonesia. If you are looking for an example of Cockney accent, watch the movie My Fair Lady (1964). The leading lady, Eliza Doolittle (Audrey Hepburn), speaks in a strong Cockney accent and is then transformed into an upper class lady by a phonetics professor, Henry Higgins.

“The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plain…”

The trailer of My Fair Lady (1964).

Personally, I consider correct pronunciation is more important than trying to acquire an accent. After all, the purpose of language is to help two people communicate, so as long as both have the same understanding on the topic, it is fine.

Of course the case would be different if you are taking a test to measure your English proficiency in relations to scholarship or work opportunities, for example TOEFL or IELTS. The institution that requires the test might apply a certain standard.

Do you agree that paying attention to correct pronunciation is more important than accents?

@gluon0x: We are on the same page.

@sfn520: Yes, I agree. I don’t pay much attention to my accent, as long as my pronunciation is understandable. And I learn English so that I can read some English movies, comics, etc.

@fernandoqc6: Yeah, totally agree. Additionally, there are some other strong accents. These kind of accent (such as French, Indian) should be tough to “change” it.

@NeNi961111: Agreee

Compiled and written by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 10 September 2020.

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#EngTrivia: Rupert Grint’s Accents

#EngTalk: Lunch and Snacks

Some of you might have returned to work at the office and we are all aware of the risks and difficulties. Take care of yourself, fellas, and keep your surroundings clean and hygienic.

Over the past few days, Indonesian Twitter users have been engaged in quite an odd debate about packed lunch. It started when a lady uploaded ideas for lunch boxes that she’d been preparing for her husband and apparently some people thought she was being too nice to her husband. Some also questioned whether she did that because she was a woman and assumed that it was her duty to be in the kitchen.

I personally think the lunch box was sweet and commendable. Preparing food for our loved ones is an act of love. It’s just as simple as that. Bear in mind that anyone can prepare food for anyone they love, regardless of the gender. After all, cooking is one of the basic surviving skills.

Furthermore, preparing our own meal ensures that we know what goes into the meal and helps us control our portion as not to overeat.

What do you think about this matter, fellas?

agil (@IvIcnrn): well said here. just can’t understand why some people got mad about it.

pexels-photo-90893.jpeg
Photo by Keegan Evans on Pexels.com

For health reasons, I have been eating mostly plant-based food. I limit meat and poultry consumption to once a week or once in two weeks. I still eat fish and eggs and dairy products, though, so I cannot really say I am a vegetarian or pescatarian.

I have also limited my carbohydrates intake and, if possible, replacing the carbs with something that contains a lot of fibres and low glycemic index. Our metabolism rate slows as we age, so unless we are really, really physically active, all the excess carbs will turn into fat. By now you must have started guessing how old I am, LOL.

Instead of having three big meals a day, I limit my daily intake to one big meal in the morning and then settle for fruits and vegetables for the rest of the day, usually 3-4 times.

My favourite type of vegetable dish to prepare is ‘pecel’ or assorted boiled vegetables (usually spinach, water spinach, bean sprouts, and long beans) with spicy peanut sauce. I love peanut sauce and the taste it gives to the vegetables.

I feel so fortunate living in Indonesia because we have plenty of vegetables to go with our daily meals. We can simply go to a small neighbourhood stall in the morning to buy a pack of vegetables with affordable price. And we can cook them in various ways, too. We can be creative with carrots, green beans, mustard greens (sawi), bok choy, cabbages, lettuces, tomatoes, and many more.

Don’t forget tempe and tofu, which are basically Indonesian staple food. They also have good amount of protein in them. Sometimes, I simply boil them and prepare separated dipping chili sauce.

For the snack, if I feel really hungry, I go with yam, sweet potato, edamame, or a bowl of fresh fruits as watermelon, pineapple, and papaya are pretty easy to find.

What about you, fellas? What are your favourite lunch menu and snacks in between meals? Share it on the comment section below.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 2 July 2020.


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#EngVocab: Adjectives That Describe Personalities (2)

We know that English is very rich in expressions. We can describe anyone and anything with so many ways; idioms, phrases, and words amongst many others. We will discuss one of them.

Before you continue reading, you might want to check our previous article on this subject: #EngVocab: Adjectives That Describe Personalities.

Anhedonic = unable to feel happiness.
“In the ‘Winnie the Pooh,’ Eeyore is described as a depressed, anhedonic stuffed donkey.”

Agreeable = pleasant, enjoyable.
“She’s an agreeable companion. You won’t get bored.”

Assertive = self-assured, confident (without being aggressive).
“As a team leader, you should be more assertive.”

Bold = strong, brave, willing to take a risk.
“She’s so bold. She does not wait for anyone to introduce her to the CEO.”

Brooding = showing deep unhappiness.
“He’s always brooding; I don’t know what’s wrong with him.”

Childish = immature.
“She’s so childish that she always throws tantrums over small problems.”

Childlike = innocent, having good qualities associated with a child.
“Her laughter is childlike; it’s contagious.”

Chirpy = cheerful, lively.
“Quenzino is such a chirpy little fella. I wanna pinch his cheeks.”

pexels-photo-774910.jpeg
A chirpy baby (Picture from WordPress).

 

Dark = mysterious.
“Whenever I forget to bring my driving license with me, the police always look like dark and intimidating figures.”

Dim = stupid (informal use) OR dim-witted = slow (in Bahasa Indonesia: lemot).
“Please don’t use sarcasm with him. He’s dim; he won’t get it.”

To make it easier to memorize them, try to use one of the words on the list on your daily conversations. Be careful with some words that have a negative connotation.

P.S.: The list will continue.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 12 March, 2018.


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#EngTalk: How to Start a Conversation

pexels-photo-515169.jpeg
Image by WordPress

 

Sometimes, we could feel nervous when we are about to start a conversation in English. The feeling of awkwardness of saying something in a foreign language, coupled with the concern about saying something wrong or grammatically incorrect, could be overwhelming.

However, the more you familiarise yourself with speaking in English, the more confident you could be. Therefore, always practice when you have a chance. You can start with everyday conversation with a friend or a colleague.

When passing a friend on a hallway at school or meeting somewhere else, we can say:
– How are you?
– Hey, what’s up?
– Hi, how is it going?

If it’s a colleague at work, a more formal interaction is expected. We can start with:
– How are you today?
– What have you been up to lately?
– How was your weekend? (if weekend has just passed) OR Have you got plans for the weekend? (if weekend is about to come).
– Have you heard of that news?

But what if we are in a situation when there is no one we are familiar with?
When you are in a party or a gathering, and there is no one there whom you know, you can always start a conversation and turn a stranger into an acquaintance.

Here are some sentences you could use to start a conversation with a stranger:
–  I don’t believe we have met. I’m Katie.
– What is it that you do for a living?
– Do you go to school near here?
– Do you live around here?
– This is such a great event. What do you think?

You can also start with complimenting a person’s appearance or performance. For example:
– I like your outfit. Where did you buy it?
– I couldn’t help but staring at your necklace. It’s beautiful.
– You gave an interesting speech. I’d like to know your thoughts about…

Making comments about someone’s physical appearance is fine if we are already good friends with him/her, but never point out what a stranger’s lacking as it is considered impolite. For example:
– You look uncomfortable in that clothes ×
– It seems like you have gained some weight ×

 

If you feel that you might require some helps getting into a conversation with strangers, bring a friend. After a while, you should be confident to do it on your own.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 26 February 2018.


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#GrammarTrivia: Confusing verbs

Hello, Fellas. We meet again. How are you today? This evening we are going to have a discussion about confusing verbs.

Who had felt dilemmatic about the using of ‘make’ and ‘do’ in a sentence? Because sometimes I did.

‘Make’ vs. ‘do’

After I read some references, it is said that we use ‘do’ to indicate an activity/action.

Examples:

  • “Do your homework,”
  • “You should do your work,”
  • “It’s my schedule to do the laundry.”

Likewise, we can also use ‘do’ even if there is no physical object to be shown.

For illustration:

  • “I would do anything for you,”
  • “She didn’t do anything wrong,”
  • “I do nothing since this morning.”

Meanwhile, ‘make’ is used when someone is creating/building/performing something. It is usually something that you can see/touch (physical object).

Examples:

  • “I am making cheesecake,”
  • “Please, don’t make him cry.”
  • “Smartphone makes us communicating with someone easily.”

‘Say’ vs. ‘tell.’

According to Cambridge dictionary, ‘say’ focuses on the words in someone speech. For illustrations,

  • “He said,I want to buy apples.’

On the other hand, ‘say’ also acts as a reporting verb.

Example:

  • “He said he wanted to buy apples.”

Meanwhile ‘tell’ is used to report the message of the speech or to instruct someone.

Example:

  • “He told me that he wanted to buy apples,”
  • “Tell him to buy apples.”

‘Shall’ vs. ‘will.’

In simple future tense, we traditionally use ‘shallafter the first person pronoun (I and we) while ‘you,’ ‘they,’ ‘she,’ ‘he,’ and ‘it’ are followed by ‘will.’

For instances:

  • “We shall go to supermarket to buy some vegetables and meat,”
  • “You will get a good grade if you study harder.”

However, when we want to emphasis something the rules are reversed. The first pronouns are followed by ‘will,’ while ‘shall’ is placed after the second and the third pronouns.

Illustration,

  • “I will not forgive you,”
  • “She shall read the textbooks as her thesis refrences.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, August 31, 2017

#EngTips: Ending conversations (revisit)

There are some reasons that make people end a conversation. They might have another work to do or they have reached a conclusion of a discussion. In a certain condition, they don’t know how to continue a conversation with someone.

Excuse yourself in a discussion would seem like a trivial matter, but apparently there are rules to demonstrate it appropriately.

No matter how you dislike the topic or even the person you talk to, you need to give them a positive impression. It is necessary, especially when you are in a business or other formal conversation. You can give her/him a smile and tell your gratitude for her/his companion. You may start it by saying:

  • “It was really nice meeting/talking to you..”
  • “I’m so glad meeting/talking to you..”
  • “I would love to continue this chat, but..”

If you really have something to do, you may give them a reason on why you need to leave. However, if you are not willing to state it for the sake of privacy, you may say:

  • “…. I need/have to do something,” or “… I have works to be done.”
  • “… I need to go somewhere.”

On the other hand, you can use the previous phrases to finish a conversation, that makes you uncomfortable politely.

Finally, say goodbye to your company. If you want to continue your discussion in another time, you can also tell her/him your wish to meet again

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Tuesday, April 18, 2017.

#EngTalk: Polite Small Talks

Some of us might prefer a deep, meaningful conversation over a small talk. However, upon meeting a new person, we are rarely in a situation where we could jump into a serious discussion. That is when need small talk.

If it is done correctly, small talk can be comfortable. The key is keeping the small talk casual, not bringing any discomfort, but is still good enough to connect two people. For example, we should go with topics that both persons like rather than dislike.

There are also several things to avoid when trying to connect to our interlocutor. We should avoid making fun of or commenting on our interlocutor’s physical appearance, as we cannot be sure if the interlocutor is comfortable to discuss about that.

Here is what we recommend to make our small talk more enjoyable but still courteous.

  1. Start with a friendly greeting and a smile.
    Smile is a universal language and it almost always earns us a positive feedback from our interlocutor.
  2. Use an approachable body language.
    We should keep our phone away for a while and look at the interlocutor. By doing so, we are giving signal to our interlocutor that we are paying attention.
  3. Avoid pointing out somebody’s lacking in something.
    Physical appearance, except for the good things, is rarely a pleasant topic. Try not to mention about somebody’s weight or age or mismatched clothes. Instead, compliment the person on something. Tell him that his hair looks great or his face is radiant.
  4. Find a common ground.
    Find a topic that both we and our interlocutor can relate to and that can possibly be extended to a longer conversation. For example, favourite sports, favourite TV shows, favourite teachers, etc. Who knows by the end of the conversation, we already recommend new TV shows to watch to each other?
  5. Tell something about ourselves, but not too much.
    We can start with something we like but we should also ask our interlocutor’s opinion. Remember, if the interlocutor feels like we never give him a chance to speak, he can easily get bored.
  6. Listen well.
    Not only will our interlocutor feel appreciated, listening well and paying attention can also help us find more common grounds, which means more topics to talk about.
  7. Mention about hanging out again.
    If you really enjoy talking to each other, express your interest to meet again. We can try saying, “We should talk more about this over coffee,” or something similar.
  8. Say goodbye nicely.
    Although small talk is often a pastime during a certain event, we should make our interlocutor feel important. Therefore, when we bid adieu, we should also express that we hope to hear from our interlocutor.

We can say:
“I’ll see you around.”
“I hope we can meet again soon.”
“It’s been a pleasure talking to you.”

All in all, our eloquence can always be improved by practicing more. As the saying goes, “Practice makes perfect.”

So never get tired of practicing, fellas. Try making small talks with your friends and teacher every day in English.

 

Compiled and written by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 3 April 2017.

 

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#EngTips: Nosy questions and how to answer them

Meeting relatives is fun, but also has its downsides. For example, frequently asked nosy questions. Yes, “Where’s your girlfriend/boyfriend?”, “Have you graduated yet?”, and so on. Sometimes it gets really annoying, doesn’t it?

How do you usually respond to these questions? Below are a few tips that might prove useful.

1. Answer with another question.

This one is a rather aggressive approach in answering the questions. It may be impolite to some people, so be careful.

If you’re asked by a cousin or relative of the same age, you can use this method. Don’t forget to add laughter or a smile to make it less threatening.

2. Comment on the question rather than answering.

“That’s a good question.” sounds like you’re answering a question regarding your presentation. But it works most of the time, because the people who ask you these questions mostly just making small talk.

Or you could simply say “Let’s just hope for the best.” and add a meaningful smile at the end of your statement.

3. Pass the answer to said question to another person. (my personal favorite)

Almost every time someone drops an annoying question, I directed the question to anyone around me.

  • Q: When are you going to get married?

  • A: Just ask Mom. She’s my decision maker.

Another form of this method is to direct the question to someone that isn’t even there. For example, direct it to your boyfriend or girlfriend or anyone that isn’t related to you but might influence your decision.

4. Pretend you don’t understand the question.

Act puzzled. Act dumb. Or at least ask the questioner to repeat the question. As I said before, most people aren’t that curious with your life. They are just making small talk. But if they insist, they will be baffled by your inability to respond to their question. They will get tired eventually.

5. Answer honestly, if you want to.

This is probably the best approach if you want to convert the small talk into something more serious. If you have the honest answer and are not tired of answering the question, just answer the question.

6. Just smile (and wave).

Smile. Smile. Smile. And then probably divert the question into another subject. It’s just like The Penguins of Madagascar: Just smile and wave, boys. Smile and wave.

Drop a comment if you have more tips to add.

 

Compiled and written by @bintilvice for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, July 8, 2016

 


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^MQ

#USSlang: American slang (19)

  1. Pad. Meaning: a place to live.
    • Example:
      • “I need to find a new pad. Could you accompany me when I’m searching for it, Steve?”
  2. Peanuts. Meaning: a very small amount of money or no money at all.
    • Example:
      • “Julia won’t do the task for peanuts.”
  3. Pop for (something). Meaning: buy.
    • Example:
      • “It’s David’s turn to pop for popcorn.”
  4. Quarterback. Meaning: lead.
    • Example:
      • “I think Jeff is the right person to quarterback today’s meeting.”
  5. Rack. Meaning: bed.
    • Example:
      • “If you want to look good on your wedding day, you must hit the rack now, Patty.”
  6. Racket Meaning: noise.
    • Example:
      • “Javier can’t sleep last night because there was a lot of racket in his house.”
  7. Rag. Meaning: newspaper.
    • Example:
      • “Jane’s article is posted on the rag today. Have you read it?”
  8. Split. Meaning: leave.
    • Example:
      • “Could you please tell your sister that I’ll split the city tomorrow morning, Dave?”
  9. Trash. Meaning: destroy.
    • Example:
      • “Juliet’s brother trashed her room.”
  10. Upbeat. Meaning: positive.
    • Example:
      • “Jason always has an upbeat mind.”

Compiled and written by @iisumarni at @EnglishTips4U  on Sunday, May 5, 2013

Related post(s):

^MQ

#EngConvo: Singlish

So today I am going to share about #Singlish #EngConvo

Based on the interview with @della_angelina and Zhen Min, they came up with conversation about food

Of course, food is irresistible to the South East Asian societies :)

So here are two conversations I would like to share

Note: Sentences in brackets (…) are the English translations of the previous Singlish sentence

 

The 1st one is a conversation between ZM and D about D’s favourite eating place:

 

ZM: Where is your favourite makan place?

(Where is your favourite eating place?)

D: That time my friend bring me to Dover, to chicken rice place. It is damn good, and super cheap. 2 dollars only.

(That time my friend brought me to Dover, to this chicken rice place. It is very good and very cheap. Only 2 dollars)

 

The 2nd one is a conversation between a food stall seller and a buyer:

 

Seller (S): What you want?

(What would you like?)

Buyer (B): I don’t know lhe, I want nasi lemak, and I want es bandung

(I don’t know, I want nasi lemak, and I want es bandung)

S: I only sell nasi lemak if you want es bandung you go that stall, lha

(I only sell nasi lemak. If you want es bandung you should go to that stall)

B: Alamak

(Oh my God/Okay fine)

S: You want nasi lemak with chilli?

(Do you want chilli on your nasi lemak?)

B: Little bit.

S: Take away or eat here?

B: Eat here.

S: Okay, 3.50

(Okay, 3.50 dollars)

B: I give you 15, can or not?

(Is it okay to pay with 15 dollars?)

S: No lha, got no change, you have 50 cent?

(No, I have no change, you have 50 cents?)

B: Nevermind lah, I will go drink stall first and come back, okay?

(Nevermind, I will go to the drink stall first and then come back here)

S: Okay.

 

So, what do you think?

 

Hope you had fun reading the Singlish conversations :) and hope this #EngConvo is useful :D

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4u on Devember 20, 2014

 

Source:

Thank you again to @della_angelina Zhen Min and Mithun for your contribution to the #Singlish sessions

#EngTrivia: Singlish

Some of us might have heard the word Singlish, Singaporean English. Throughout our Twitter sessions, fellas would ask about it occasionally. So in this post, we will some trivia about it based on an interview with colleagues currently living and previously lived in Singapore plus other sources.

Singapore was under the British colonial for 146 years (1819-1965). In the 1950s, those who worked as civil servants or for the government had to speak English. Schools which are available were Chinese schools and English schools.

With English language around them, it was then picked up by non-English speakers, creating another kind of ‘language’. This then becomes Singlish, a “creole language” (constructed from a simplified language). Therefore the present Singlish comes from the general population itself, the Singaporeans.

But, isn’t Singlish a slang?

The answer is.. well, some might say, but it’s actually not.

It is a constructed language based on English itself, different Chinese dialects and Malay (Bahasa Melayu). Singlish is a creole language from those different languages. Apparently Singlish is similar to Malaysian English.

Complicated? Not really. Singlish seems simple and unique. Yet apparently the government is complaining saying it lacks identity, it is an on-going argument.

Note: The information below was gathered through online interview with colleagues currently living and previously lived in Singapore.

Question: As those who uses/used Singlish, what do you think of it as a user?

Della, from Indonesia, stated that she can express herself very well in Singlish. To her, Singlish allows her to express more and has become one of her fluent ‘language.’

Zhen Min, from Singapore, stated she can express herself faster in Singlish. She would speak it to friends and colleagues or use it for casual writing. She would use it as affectation of language.

“I would change (to Singlish) if I am stressing on something” – Zhen Min, Singapore

Mithun, from India, stated he initially could not understand Singlish but then realises how amazing it is as a language itself. Singlish uses very little words to express more or the same.

“For example the word ‘can’. I don’t have to say the full sentence,I can just use it for almost anything and it makes sense” – Mithun, India

 

Question: So, what is Singlish like?

kinda hard to understand what they are talking about… :/ – @mu_afi

My friend supposed me S’porean ’cause my Singlish – @dyanaamalia

To those who are not familiar with Singlish, the language might sounds new and pretty hard to understand. However, to those who are familiar with Singlish and use it in daily conversation, especially to Singaporeans, the language comes naturally to them… just like how we use bahasa Indonesia in here Indonesia.

 

Sources:

 

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, July 26, 2014

 

Related post(s):

 

^MQ

 

#EngTips: Receiving Suggestions – Part 2

Hey hey, fellas! Let’s continue yesterday’s #EngTips discussion on how to respond to suggestions.

We’ve talked about how to make suggestions  & how to accept them. Following up the two, in today’s #EngTips, we’ll talk about how to refuse suggestions.

I don’t know about you, fellas, but I always find it harder to say ‘No’. Mmm… Or should I say, I find it hard to say ‘No’ without offending others. Perhaps you can consider the following expression when you need to refuse suggestions:…

1. Let’s not. – Ayo jangan kita lakukan.
Contoh:
A: Let’s go on a date.
B: Let’s not.

2. I’d rather not. – Aku lebih memilih untuk tidak begitu.
Contoh:
A: I think you should go out with me.
B: I’d rather not.

3. I don’t feel like it. – Aku tidak merasa ingin lakukan itu.
Contoh:
A: How about a trip to the salon?
B: I don’t feel like it.

4. I dislike + noun/V-ing … – Aku tidak suka…
Contoh:
A: Don’t you think it’s a good idea to stroll the park?
B: I dislike any kind of workout.

5. I don’t particularly like + noun/V-ing… – Aku tidak suka…
Contoh:
A: You should give it a try.
B: I don’t particularly like adventures.

6. I’m afraid I can’t + V1… – Sayang sekali aku tidak bisa…
Contoh:
A: You could wait a while.
B: I’m afraid I can’t (wait).

7. What an awful / bad idea! – Itu ide yang buruk!
Contoh:
A: Why don’t you call him?
B: What a bad idea!

One last tip before we end today’s session, it never hurts to thank others for their attention and suggestions.
It might sound or feel less offensive if we first thank that person and then say ‘no’, perhaps followed by some sort of excuse.
Imagine how hurt you would feel if somebody just say ‘No’ to your offer or suggestion. That would sound rude, wouldn’t it?

So, that’s all for today, fellas! For more useful tips, head to: #EngTips

Compiled and written by @Miss_Qiak at @EnglishTips4U on August 1, 2014

Related post:
#EngTips: Making Suggestions
#EngTips: Receiving Suggestions – Part 1
#EngTips: Receiving Suggestions – Part 2

#EngTips: Receiving apologies

In this article, I’ll share some expressions you can use when someone apologize to you.

So, when was the last time someone apologize to you? How did you respond to it?

Here are some expressions you can use to accept an apology:

  1. Don’t worry about it. Arti: Jangan risau soal itu.
  2. Forget about it. Arti: Lupakan hal itu.
  3. Don’t mention it. Arti: Jangan ungkit hal itu.
  4. It’s not important. Arti: Itu tidak penting.
  5. It doesn’t matter. Arti: Itu tidak penting/bermasalah.
  6. It happens. Arti: Itu biasa terjadi.
  7. No problem. Arti: Tidak ada masalah.
  8. It’s all right. Arti: Semua baik-baik saja.
  9. It’s ok. Arti: Tidak apa-apa.
  10. I don’t mind. Arti: Aku tidak keberatan.
  11. Let’s forget about it. Arti: Ayo kita lupakan hal itu.
  12. We’ll say no more about it. Arti: Kita tidak akan bicarakan hal itu lagi.
  13. We’ll consider the matter closed. Arti: Kita anggap hal ini tuntas.

One wise friend said, “There’s no shame nor cowardice in an apology. The best apology is not expressed in words, but in action.”

That same friend also said,

“Life becomes easier when you learn to accept an apology you never got.”

And that’s a wrap! I hope you like this article and find the discussion useful, fellas. :)

Compiled and written by @Miss_Qiak at @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, July 10, 2014

Related post:

 

^MQ

#EngTips: Making apologies

How often do you apologize for something? How do you usually express your apology? In this post we will share some expressions you can use in an apology.

The most common expression used to express an apology is ‘I’m sorry,’ but do you know that ‘to apologize’ is not the same as ‘to be sorry?’

  • To apologize is to admit your mistake, that you are at fault.
  • To be sorry only expresses regret, when something you prefer not to happen, happened.

To express an apology, you can consider the following options:

  1. ‘I do apologize for…’
    • Example: “I do apologize for breaking the window.”
    • Arti: “Aku minta maaf sebab telah memecahkan kaca jendela.”
  2. ‘I must apologize for…’
    • Example: “I must apologize for ruining your pretty dress.”
    • Arti: “Aku minta maaf telah merusak bajumu yang cantik.”
  3. ‘I’d like to apologize for…’
    • Example: “I’d like to apologize for coming in late.”
    • Arti: “Aku mau minta maaf sebab telah datang terlambat.”
  4. ‘I shouldn’t have…’
    • Example: “I shouldn’t have lied to you.”
    • Arti: “Aku seharusnya tidak berbohong padamu.”
  5. ‘It’s all my fault.’
    • Example: “I shouldn’t have left you alone. It’s all my fault.”
    • Arti: “Seharusnya tidak kutinggalkan kamu sendirian. Ini semua salahku.”
  6. ‘Please forgive me for…’
    • Example: “Please forgive me for dumping you.”
    • Arti: “Kumohon maafkan aku sebab telah mencampakkanmu.”
  7. ‘I’m terribly sorry for…’
    • Example: “I’m terribly sorry for being a jerk.”
    • Arti: “Aku sangat menyesal/minta maaf sebab menjadi seorang bajingan.”
  8. ‘Please accept my apologies for…’
    • Example: “Please accept my apologies for making you mad.”
    • Arti: “Terimalah permintaan maafku sebab telah membuatmu marah.”

 

Someone once told me,

“There’s no shame nor cowardice in an apology. And the best apology is not in words, but in action.”

 

And that’s a wrap. I hope you like this post and find the discussion useful, fellas.

Compiled and written by @Miss_Qiak at @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, July 3, 2014

 

Related post(s):

 

^MQ

#IOTW: Idioms related to education

Hello fellas:) Today we’re going to talk about…. Education! We’re going to talk about idioms related to it. Let’s start!

  1. Learn something off by heart. Meaning: to learn something in such a way that you can say it from memory.
    • Example:
      • “Danya learnt everything in the book off by heart.”
  2. Three Rs. Meaning: used to refer to the basic areas of education: reading, writing and arithmetic.
    • Example:
      • “Some people could easily leave school without even mastering the basic three Rs.”
  3. With flying colors. Meaning: to do something very successfully.
    • Example:
      • “Della hopes that she could pass all her exams with flying colors.”
  4. Bookworm. Meaning: someone who reads a lot.
    • Example:
      • “Is Nina a bookworm?”
  5. Copycat. Meaning: someone who does or says exactly the same as someone else.
    • Example:
      • “Don’t be a copycat. Do them with your own way.”

That’s all I can share for today, fellas. Do you often use those idioms?

Compiled and written by @waitatiri at @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, April 2, 2014.


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