All posts by sherly99blog

#EngClass: Pronunciation of -ed

​Today we will learn about pronunciation of -ed.

Do you know how to pronounce -ed?

Pronunciation of suffix -ed depends on the last sound of the verb or noun which is usually a consonant.
Suffix -ed can be pronounced in three different ways:

  1. /id/

If the last consonant sound of the word ends in one of these sounds, the suffix -ed is pronounced as /id/.
Examples of words ending in the /id/ sound:

Wanted /t/

Ended /d/
2. /t/

If the last consonant sound of the word is voiceless (no vibration of the vocal cords), the suffix -ed is pronounced as /t/.
Examples of words ending in /t/ sound:

Hoped /p/

Laughed /gh/

Faxed /s/

Liked /k/

Sniffed /f/

Washed /sh/

Watched /ch/

Kissed /ss/

Danced /c/

Fixed /x/

  1. /d/

If the last consonant sound of the word is voiced sound (the vocal cords are vibrated), the suffix -ed is pronounced as /d/.

With voiced sounds, the vocal chords are vibrated, which can be felt in the throat. All vowels are voiced, and some consonants.
Examples of words ending in /d/ sound: 

Begged /g/

Allowed /vowels/

Played /vowels/

Claimed /m/

Grabbed /b/

Saved /v/

Honoured /r/

Peeled /l/

Signed /n/

Pleased /z/

Used /s/

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, February 12, 2017.

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#EngVocab: Types of Phobia

​Today we will learn about types of phobia.

Phobia is an extreme, persistent, abnormal or irrational fear of a specific thing or situation.
There are three types of phobia:

  1. Specific (simple) phobia.

It is the fear of a particular object or situation.

E.g.

a. Ailurophobia: fear of cats.

b. Cynophobia: fear of dogs.

c. Aquophobia: fear of water.

d. Nyctophobia: fear of darkness.

e. Hematophobia: fear of blood.

f. Astraphobia: fear of thunder.

g. Odontophobia: fear of dentists.

h. Aviophobia: fear of flying.

i. Emetophobia: fear of vomiting.

j. Trypanophobia: fear of needles and injections.
2. Social phobia.

It is the fear of social situations.

E.g.

a. Glossophobia: fear of public speaking.

b. Ocholophobia: fear of crowds.

c. Scopophobia: fear or being watched or stared at.

d. Allodoxaphobia: fear of opinions.

e. Rhabdophobia: fear of being criticized or punished.

  1. Agoraphobia.

It is fear of crowded spaces or enclosed public places.

E.g.

a. Claustrophobia: fear of closed spaces.

b. Monophobia: fear of being alone.

c. Hodophobia: fear of travelling.

d. Gephyrophobia: fear of bridges.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, February 5, 2017.

#EngQuiz: Irregular Past Participles (2)

​Today I will give you exercises about irregular past participle.

Give the correct form of irregular past participle for the word in the parentheses.

  1. Why has Jim (leave) already?

  2. She has (know) about the problem for three months.

  3. I have (give) some money to Jess.

  4. Have you (choose) your university yet?

  5. The weather had (become) very cold, so we went inside.

  6. Don’t worry! We haven’t (forget) about the meeting.

  7. She has finally (come).

  8. I have (be) looking for ages, but I haven’t (find) any keys yet.

  9. The books had (fall) off the table, and were over the floor.

  10. By the time we arrived, the children had (eat) the chocolate.

  11. We have (keep) this secret for three years.

  12. They have (begin) painting the room.

  13. This was the first time he had (do) his homework.

  14. Mom wasn’t home, she had (go) to the supermarket.

  15. I have (hang) the clothes in the hanger.

Answers: 1. Left; 2. Known; 3. Given; 4. Chosen; 5. Become; 6. Forgotten; 7. Come; 8. Been, Found; 9. Fallen; 10. Eaten; 11. Kept; 12. Begun; 13. Done; 14. Gone; 15. Hung.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 29, 2017.

#EngClass: Pronunciation of -s

​Today we will learn about pronunciation of final -s.

Pronunciation is the way in which a word is pronounced.

Pronunciation of final -s depends on the last sound of the verb or noun which is usually a consonant.
Final -s can be pronounced in three different ways:

  1. /iz/ 

If the last consonant sound of the word is a sibilant sound (a hissing or buzzing sound), the final -s is pronounced as /iz/.
Examples of words ending in the /iz/ sound:

Buses /s/

Sizes /z/

Wishes /sh/

Matches /ch/

Boxes /x/

Languages /ge/

Replaces /ce/

Kisses /ss/
2. /s/

If the last consonant sound of the word is voiceless, the final -s is pronounced as /s/.
Examples of words ending in /s/ sound:

Pets /t/

Sleeps /p/

Books /k/

Cliffs /f/

Months /th/
3. /z/

If the last consonant sound of the word is voiced sound, the final -s is pronounced as /z/.
Examples of words ending in /z/ sound: 

Grabs /b/

Lids /d/

Dogs /g/

Hills /l/

Musicians /n/

Repairs /r/

Dreams /m/

Plays /y/

Sings /ng/

Gloves /v/

Sees (vowel sound)

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 22, 2017.

#EngQuiz: Final -s / -es

​Hi fellas, how was your weekend? I had to work all day this weekend but I enjoyed it. I hope you had fun too.
Today I will give you exercises about final -s / -es. You can check https://englishtips4u.com/2017/01/01/engclass-final-s-es/ for the theory.
Add the right form of -s or -es to the word in parentheses.

  1. He (watch) TV in the evening.

  2. I found some (box) in the garage.

  3. Jane has (stitch) in her leg.

  4. The girl had three (wish).

  5. Mike (miss) his father.

  6. I have three new (shirt).

  7. Won (wax) his car every weekend.

  8. Dhita (study) history and she always (pass) her exams with an A grade.

  9. The clock (buzz) when the alarm (go) off.

  10. My brother (get) up at 6.00 am then (wash) his face and (brush) his teeth.

  11. She (sell) baby (cloth) for (girl).

  12. My cousin (like) to play with my (toy).
    Answers: 1. Watches; 2. Boxes; 3. Stitches; 4. Wishes; 5. Misses; 6. Shirts; 7. Waxes; 8. Studies, passes; 9. Buzzes, goes; 10. Gets, washes, brushes; 11. Sells, clothes, girls; 12. Likes, toys.
    That’s all for today fellas. See you next Sunday.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 15, 2017.

#EngClass: Irregular Plural Nouns

​Hi fellas, how was your weekend?

Today we will learn about irregular plural nouns.

An irregular plural noun is an irregular noun in the plural form. 

An irregular noun is a noun that becomes plural by changing its spelling in other ways than adding an “s” or “es” to the end of the word.

Although most nouns have plurals formed according to regular rules, some nouns have unusual, or irregular plurals.
1. Certain nouns do not add a letter to the end, but change the word itself.

E.g. 

Man –> Men

Tooth –> Teeth

Mouse –> Mice
2. Certain other nouns have the same plural form as singular form.

E.g. 

Deer –> Deer

Bison –> Bison

Sheep –> Sheep
3. Some nouns that end in -f or -fe, the plural form end with -ves.

E.g.

Knife –> Knives

Leaf –> Leaves

Shelf –> Shelves
4. Some nouns that end in -o, the plural form end with -es.

E.g.

Hero –> Heroes

Potato –> Potatoes

Echo –> Echoes
That’s all for today fellas. See you next Sunday.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 8, 2017.

#EngClass: Final -s / -es

​Hi fellas, Happy New Year! May love, success, luck, and friendship come knocking at your door.

Today we will learn about final -s or -es.

A final -s or -es is added to a noun to make a noun plural.

E.g. 

Noun: Friend; Noun + -s: Friends.

Noun: Class; Noun + -es: Classes.
A final -s or -es is added to a simple present verb when the subject is a singular noun or third person singular pronoun.

E.g. 

Verb: work; Verb + -s: Jane works at the bank.

Verb: watch; Verb + -es: She watches television.
For most words (whether a verb or a noun), simply a final -s is added to spell the word correctly.

E.g.

Sing –> sings.

Song –> songs.
Final -es is added to words that end in -sh, -ch, -s, -z, and -x.

E.g. 

Wash –> washes.

Watch –> watches.

Class –> classes.

Buzz –> Buzzes.

Box –> boxes.
For words that end in -y:

1. If -y is preceded by a vowel, only -s is added.

E.g.

Toy –> toys.

Buy –> buys.

2. If -y is preceded by a consonan, the -y is changed to -i and -es is added.

E.g.

Baby –> babies.

Cry –> cries.
That’s all for today fellas. I hope you understand how to use final -s / -es in daily conversation.

See you next Sunday.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 1, 2017.

#EngQuiz: Tag Questions

​Merry Christmas fellas! May your life be filled with joy and happiness and may each new day bring you moments to cherish.
Today I will give you some exercises about tag questions.

You can check the theory here http://wp.me/p2s6nT-30d
Add tag questions to the following.

1. I am invited, … ?

2. Something is wrong with Jenny today, … ?

3. You’ve never been to Paris, … ?

4. Poppy would like to come with us to the party, … ?

5. James can’t come with us, … ?

6. Gerry is a student, … ?

7. That is your umbrella, … ?

8. There aren’t any problem, … ?

9. They won’t be here, … ?

10. They want to come, … ?

11. We don’t have enough food, … ?

12. You studied for the test, … ?

13. You should go now, … ?

14. You are joking, … ?

15. You could do it for me, … ?
Answer: 1. Am I not / aren’t I; 2. Isn’t it; 3. Have you, 4. Wouldn’t she; 5. Can he; 6. Isn’t he; 7. Isn’t it; 8. Are there; 9. Will they; 10. Don’t they; 11. Do we; 12. Didn’t you; 13. Shouldn’t you; 14. Aren’t you; 15. Couldn’t you.
That’s all for today fellas. See you next Sunday. Happy holiday. 

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, December 25, 2016.

#EngClass: Possessive Nouns

​Hi fellas, how was your weekend? I had fun at my uncle’s villa.

Today we will talk about possessive nouns.

A noun names a person, place, thing, idea, quality or action. 

A possessive noun shows ownership by adding an apostrophe, an -s or both. 
To make a singular noun possessive, simply add an apostrophe and an -s.

E.g. The girl –> The girl’s

The girl’s book is on the table.
Note: If a singular noun ends in -s, there are two possible forms:

1. Add an apostrophe and -s: Lois’s book.

2. Add only an apostrophe: Lois’ book.
To make a plural noun possessive:

1. Add only an apostrophe to a plural noun that ends in -s.

E.g. The girls’ books are on the table.

2. Add an apostrophe and -s to plural nouns that do not end in -s.

E.g. The men’s books are on the table.
Why don’t you try some exercises fellas.

Complete the sentences with the possessive form of the nouns in parentheses.

1. (Boy) –> The … hat is red.

2. (Boys) –> The … hats are red.

3. (Sister) –> Do you know my … husband?

4. (Sisters) –> Do you know my … husbands?
Answers: 1. Boy’s ; 2. Boys’ ; 3. Sister’s ; 4. Sisters’.
That’s all for today fellas. See you next Sunday.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, December 18, 2016.

#EngClass: Tag Questions

​Hi fellas, how are you? I am so excited for Christmas.

Today we will learn about tag questions. 

A tag question is a question added at the end of a sentence.

Tag questions (or question tags) turn a statement into a question. 

They are often used for checking information that we think we know is true. 

Usually if the main clause is positive, the question tag is negative, and if the main clause is negative, the question tag is positive.
Affirmative (positive) sentence + negative tag –> affirmative answer expected.

E.g. Mom is here, isn’t she? –> Yes, she is.
Negative sentence + affirmative (positive) tag –> negative answer expected.

E.g. You don’t like tea, do you? –> No, I don’t.
The tag pronoun for this/that = it.

E.g. This is your book, isn’t it?
The tag pronoun for these/those = they.

E.g. These are yours, aren’t they?
In sentence with there + be, there is used in the tag.

E.g. There is a meeting tonight, isn’t there?
Personal pronouns are used to refer to indefinite pronouns.

E.g. Everything is okay, isn’t it?
‘They’ is usually used in a tag to refer to everyone, everybody, someone, somebody, no one, nobody.

E.g. Everyone took the test, didn’t they?
Sentence with negative words take affirmative tag.

E.g. You’ve never been there, have you?
I am supposed to be here, am I not? –> formal English.

I am supposed to be here, aren’t I –> common in spoken English.
How is it fellas? The lesson’s quite easy, isn’t it? Then in the next two weeks I will give you exercises depend on today lesson.

That’s all for today fellas. See you next Sunday.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, December 10, 2016.

#EngClass: Non-count nouns

In this article, we will learn about non-count nouns. Most non-count nouns refer to a ‘whole’ that is made up of different parts.

Many nouns can be used as either non-count or count nouns, but the meaning is different. Examples:

  • Non-count: Anna has brown hair.
  • Count: Tim has a hair on his jacket.

To express a particular quantity, some non-count nouns may be preceded by unit expressions. For example:

  • a spoonful of sugar,
  • a glass of water,
  • a cup of coffee,
  • a quart of milk,
  • a loaf of bread,
  • a grain of rice,
  • a bowl of soup,
  • a bag of flour,
  • a pound of meat,
  • a piece of furniture,
  • a piece of paper,
  • a piece of jewelry.

The following are typical of nouns which are commonly used as non-count nouns:

  1. Whole groups made up of similar items:
    • baggage, clothing, equipment, food, fruit, furniture, garbage, hardware, jewelry, junk, luggage, machinery, mail, makeup, money/cash/change, postage, scenery, traffic, etc.
  2. Fluids:
    • water, coffee, tea, milk, oil, soup, gasoline, blood, etc.
  3. Solids:
    • ice, bread, butter, cheese, meat, gold, iron, silver, glass, paper, wood, cotton, wool, etc.
  4. Gases:
    • steam, air, oxygen, nitrogen, smog, smoke, pollution, etc.
  5. Particles:
    • rice, chalk, corn, dirt, dust, flour, grass, hair, pepper, salt, sand, sugar, wheat, etc.
  6. Abstractions:
    • beauty, confidence, courage, education, enjoyment, fun, happiness, health, advice, information, news, time, space, energy, homework, work, grammar, vocabulary, etc.
  7. Languages:
    • Arabic, Chinese, English, Spanish, etc.
  8. Fields of study:
    • chemistry, engineering, history, literature, mathematics, psychology, dentistry, etc.
  9. General activities:
    • driving, studying, swimming, traveling, walking, etc.
  10. Recreation:
    • baseball, soccer, tennis, chess, poker, etc.
  11. Natural phenomena:
    • weather, dew, fog, hail, heat, humidity, lightning, rain, sleet, snow, thunder, wind, darkness, light, sunshine, electricity, fire, gravity, etc.

 

Should you have any comment or question regarding this topic, feel free to leave a message in the comment box down below.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, December 4,  2016

 

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^MQ

#EngVocab: Driving Phrasal Verbs

​Hello fellas! How was your weekend?

In our previous sessions, we have learned the phrasal verbs about telephone and travel. Today, we will learn about driving phrasal verbs.

Get set! Go!
1. Cut someone off: to drive in front of another vehicle in a sudden and dangerous way.

E.g. I was driving when someone recklessly cut me off and I almost hit him.

Note: You can also use this expression to mean that someone interrupts you in a conversation.
2. Pull over / Pull in: to move your vehicle to the side of the road and stop.

E.g. I pulled over to check the engine because the car had some weird noise.
3. Pull out (of): to move out from the side of the road.

E.g. As I turned a corner, a black car suddenly pulled out.

Note: this phrasal verb to pull out of can also mean to withdraw from a competition, and event or a position.
4. Speed up: to increase in speed; to accelerate. 

E.g. Speed up! They’re way ahead of us!
5. Fill up: to fill the fuel tank of a car.

E.g. Do I really need to turn off my car when filling it up with gas?
6. Knock somebody down: to hit by a car.

E.g. She was knocked down by a truck.
7. Run into: to collide with something.

E.g. A car run into his van.
8. Pick somebody up: to take on a person as a passenger.

E.g. Will you pick the children up from school?
9. Get in: to enter a car.

E.g. Hurry up! Get in the car!
10. Drive off: to leave a place in a vehicle.

E.g. Can you drive me off to the airport?
11. Slow down: to start to move more slowly.

E.g. Slow down! You’re driving too fast!
12. Run out (of): use all of something and not have any left.

E.g. My car is running out of gas and I have no money.
13. Break down: stop working (of a machine or vehicle).

E.g. I want to tell him that my car had break down at 8:00 am.
14. Drive up: move (a vehicle) near a person / place and then stop.

E.g. As that car was close to the fence, I have to drive up beside it on the other side.
15. Back up: to go in reverse.

E.g. We need to back up because there is an accident ahead.
16. Get out (of): to leave.

E.g. It will take a long time to get out of the city because of the traffic.
That’s all for today fellas. See you next Sunday.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, November 27, 2016.

#EngClass: Forming the Passive

​Hi fellas, how was your weekend?

Today we will learn about forming the passive.

Form of the passive: be + past participle.

In the passive, the object of an active verb becomes the subject of the passive verb.

Only transitive verbs (verbs that are followed by an object) are used in the passive. 
E.g.

1. Simple present. 

Active: Mei helps Alex. 

Passive: Alex is helped by Mei.
2. Present progressive.

Active: Mei is helping Alex.

Passive: Alex is being helped by Mei.
3. Present perfect.

Active: Mei has helped Alex.

Passive: Alex has been helped by Mei.
4. Simple past.

Active: Mei helped Alex.

Passive: Alex was helped by Mei.
5. Past progressive.

Active: Mei was helping Alex.

Passive: Alex was being helped by Mei.
6. Past perfect.

Active: Mei had helped Alex.

Passive: Alex had been helped by Mei.
7. Simple future.

Active: Mei will help Alex.

Passive: Alex will be helped by Mei.
8. Be going to.

Active: Mei is going to help Alex.

Passive: Alex is going to be helped by Mei.
9. Future perfect.

Active: Mei will have helped Alex.

Passive: Alex will have been helped by Mei.
Why don’t you try some exercises fellas? You can check the example above if you’re confuse.

Change the active to the passive by supplying the correct form of be + past participle.

1. Kai opens the door –> The door … by Kai.

2. Kai is opening the door –> The door … by Kai.

3. Kai has opened the door –> The door … by Kai.

4. Kai opened the door –> The door … by Kai.

5. Kai was opening the door –> The door … by Kai.

6. Kai had opened the door –> The door … by Kai.

7. Kai will open the door –> The door … by Kai.

8. Kai is going to open the door –> The door … by Kai.

9. Kai will have opened the door –> The door … by Kai.
Answer: 1. Is opened; 2. Is being opened; 3. Has been opened; 4. Was opened; 5. Was being opened; 6. Had been opened; 7. Will be opened; 8. Is going to be opened; 9. Will have been opened.
That’s all for today fellas. See you next Sunday.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, November 20, 2016

#EngVocab: Travel phrasal verbs

This time, we will learn about travel phrasal verbs.

A phrasal verb is made up of a verb plus a preposition or an adverb that function as a single verb. Let’s start!

  1. Drop off. Meaning: to take someone to a place and leave them there.
    • Example:
      • “Where do you want me to drop you off?”
  2. Touch down. Meaning: arrive on land (planes).
    • Example:
      • “Our plane touch down before midday.”
  3. Check out. Meaning: to leave and pay for your stay at a hotel.
    • Example:
      • “Jane checked out of the hotel and took a taxi to the airport.”
  4. Pick up. Meaning: to go and fetch someone from a place and take them somewhere else.
    • Example:
      • “Would you mind picking me up at 11.00?”
  5. Set out / set off. Meaning: to start a journey.
    • Example:
      • “We have to set off very early on Saturday.”
  6. Take off. Meaning: when a plane leaves and begins to fly.
    • Example:
      • “The plane is going to take off. Hold my hand!”
  7. Get in. Meaning: when a plane arrives on an airport.
    • Example:
      • “What time does your flight get in?”
  8. Speed up. Meaning: to increase speed.
    • Example:
      • “We’re late, speed up please!”
  9. Look around. Meaning: to explore what is near you, in your area.
    • Example:
      • “After we arrive there, we take a look around.”
  10. Hurry up. Meaning: to rush and not waste time.
    • Example:
      • “You’d better hurry up, we’re running out of time.”
  11. See off. Meaning: to go the airport or station to say goodbye to someone.
    • Example:
      • “We took Cilla to the airport to see her off.
  12. Stop over. Meaning: to change a flight in a city; stay at a place on the way to your final destination.
    • Example:
      • “When I went to Manila we stopped over in Qatar.”
  13. Get away (from someone or somewhere). Meaning: leave or escape from a person or place, often when it is difficult; to take a short break
    • Example:
      • “Matt asked Alice why she wanted to have a get away all of a sudden.”
  14. Back up. Meaning: vehicles have to wait in a long line because of congestion.
    • Example:
      • “The traffic has started to back up because of the accident.”
  15. Get on (a vehicle). Meaning: go onto a bus, train, plane or boat.
    • Example:
      • “We got on the train at 9 o’clock but it didn’t leave until 9.30.”
  16. Hop on (informal). Meaning: go onto a bus, train, plane or boat.
    • Example:
      • “With a one-day travel card you can hop on and off as many buses as you like.”
  17. Get off (a vehicle). Meaning: leave a train, bus plane or boat.
    • Example:
      • Get off at the bus stop after the cinema and I’ll meet you there.”
  18. Check in. Meaning: confirm your arrival at a hotel / airport.
    • Example:
      • “We need to check in two hours before the flight.”

 

 

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, November 13, 2016

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#EngClass: Subject complement

Complement is the word added to complete an incomplete sentence.

Subject complement is the word that follow a linking verb and identify or describe the subject.

Linking verb: is, am, are, was, were, appear, become, feel, look, remain, sound, taste, grow, etc.

There are two kinds of subject complements:

  1. If the subject complement is a noun or pronoun, it is a predicate nominative. Predicate nominatives (nouns and pronouns) explain the subject or give another name for the subject.
  2. If the subject complement is an adjective, it is a predicate adjective. Predicate adjective describe the subject.

 

Examples:

  1. Joe is a gourmet.
    • noun subject complement (a gourmet) after verb be (is).
  2. Joe became a gourmet.
    • noun subject complement (a gourmet) after linking verb (became).
  3. The meatballs are delicious.
    • adjective subject complement (delicious) after verb of being (are).
  4. The meatballs taste delicious.
    • adjective subject complement (delicious) after linking verb (taste).

 

Practice:

Task: Find the subject complement.

Hint: look for the linking verb to help you find the subject complement.

1. Ross seems worried.
Ross
‘Ross’ is the subject
seems
‘seems’ is the linking verb
worried
Correct!
2. Some caterpillars become butterflies.
Some caterpillars
‘Some caterpillar’ is the subject
become
‘become’ is the linking verb
butterflies
Correct!
3. You look happy.
You
‘You’ is the subject
look
‘look’ is the linking verb
happy
Correct!
4. The man became furious at the delay.
The man
‘The man’ is the subject
became
‘became’ is the linking verb
furious
Correct!
at the delay
‘at the delay’ is the adverb
4. The man became furious at the delay.
The man
‘The man’ is the subject
became
‘became’ is the linking verb
furious
Correct!
at the delay
‘at the delay’ is the adverb
5. The chlorine in the pool smelled harsh.
The chlorine
‘The chlorine’ is the subject
in the pool
‘in the pool’ is an adverb phrase. In combination with ‘the chlorine’, they form a noun phrase
smelled
‘smelled’ is the linking verb
harsh
Correct!
6. This bread tastes moldy to me.
This bread
‘This bread’ is the subject
tastes
‘tastes’ is the linking verb
moldy
Correct!
to me
‘to me’ is an adverb phrase.

 
Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, November 6, 2016

 

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#EngQuiz: Irregular Past Participle

Hi fellas, happy halloween! How was your weekend, spooky and scary enough? :)

Today we will talk about irregular past participle.

The past participle, also sometimes called the passive or perfect participle, is identical to past tense form (in -ed) in the case of regular verbs, but takes various forms in the case of irregular verbs.

To practice irregular past participle, I will give you some exercises.

Begin your response with “I have never … ”

E.g. Go to that clinic.

–> I have never gone to that clinic.

1. Wear a kimono. –> I have never …

2. Forget your name. –> I have never …

3. Build a house. –> I have never …

4. Feed a lion. –> I have never …

5. Hold a snake. –> I have never …

6. Steal anything. –> I have never …

7. Sleep in a tent. –> I have never …

8. Win a lottery. –> I have never …

9. Make apple pie. –> I have never …

10. Ride a horse. –> I have never …

11. Read that book. –> I have never …

12. Buy a designer bag. –> I have never …

13. Break a window. –> I have never …

14. Drive a truck. –> I have never …

15. See that movie. –> I have never …
Answers: 1. Worn; 2. Forgotten; 3. Built; 4. Fed; 5. Held; 6. Stolen; 7. Slept; 8. Won; 9. Made; 10. Ridden; 11. Read; 12. Bought; 13. Broken; 14. Driven; 15. Seen.
That’s all for today fellas. See you next sunday.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, October 30, 2016.

#EngKnowledge: International Phonetic Alphabet

Hi fellas, how was your weekend?

Today we will talk about international phonetic alphabet.

Some people forget how to spell the alphabet when they got asked to.

There are many lists of phonetic alphabet, from NATO & international aviation, british forces 1952, RAF 1942-43, Telecom B, British A or international, NY police, French, German, Italian, Spanish.

The widely used one is the phonetic alphabet by NATO.

The 26 code words in the NATO phonetic alphabet are assigned to the 26 letters of the English alphabet in alphabetical order as follows:

A – Alpha

B – Bravo

C – Charlie

D – Delta

E – Echo

F – Foxtrot

G – Golf

H – Hotel

I – India

J – Juliett

K – Kilo

L – Lima

M – Mike

N – November

O – Oscar

P – Papa

Q – Quebec

R – Romeo

S – Sierra

T – Tango

U – Uniform

V – Victor

W – Whiskey

X – Xray

Y – Yankee

Z – Zulu

Can you spell your full name fellas?

That’s all for today fellas, have a nice rest. See you next sunday.
Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, October 23, 2016.

#EngClass: Time related adverb clause

Adverb clauses are subordinate clauses that show relationships between ideas related to time, cause and effect, contrast and condition.

 

Some common used time related adverb clauses:

  1.  After means after that moment. ‘After’ takes the present for future events and the past or past perfect for past events.
    • Example:
      • After she graduates, she will get a job.
  2. Before means before that moment. ‘Before’ takes after the simple past or the present.
    • Example:
      • l left before he came.
  3. When means at the moment, at that time. ‘When’ takes either the simple past or the present. The dependent clause changes tense in relation to the when clause.
    • Example:
      • When I got there, he had already left.

 

There are others time related adverb clauses like while as, by the time, since, until, etc. Okay, why don’t you try some exercises.

Practice:

1. We will finish after he ……….
comes
correct!
came
2. He was talking on the phone when I ……….
arrive
arrived
correct!
3. I will leave before he ……….
comes
correct!
came
4. When I was in Chicago, I ……….. the museums.
visit
visited
correct!
5. When it began to rain, I ………. under the tree.
stand
stood
correct!
6. I washed the dishes when my daughter ………. asleep.
fall
fell
correct!
7. When I ………. him tomorrow, I will ask him.
see
correct!
saw

 

Composed and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, October 16, 2016

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