All posts by sherly99blog

#EngClass: Degree Words (2)

Today we will learn about some degree words.

We use degree words to explain the intensity of an action, adjective or another adverb.

You can check the first lesson here https://englishtips4u.com/2012/08/27/engclass-degree-words/
Here’re some examples of degree words from positive to negative:

  1. Absolutely perfect!

E.g. “This suit is absolutely perfect for me!”

  1. Really excellent.

E.g. “The school’s teaching staff is really excellent.”

  1. Very good indeed.

E.g. “The food in the restaurant is very good indeed!”

  1. Very good.

E.g. “His skills in cooking is very good.”

  1. Good.

E.g. “When my nephew was only six, he was good at drawing.”

  1. Quite good.

E.g. “My teacher is quite good at teaching us.”

  1. Fairly good.

E.g. “The new variety show is fairly good.”

  1. Not very good.

E.g. “The interview I had was not very good.”

  1. Rather poor.

E.g. “Most of the land there is rather poor to cultivate.”

  1. Bad.

E.g. “I received bad treatment from him.”

  1. Very bad.

E.g. “I am having a very bad day.”

  1. Extremely bad.

E.g. “I don’t envy your journey in this extremely bad weather.”

  1. Utterly dreadful!

E.g. “The traffic is utterly dreadful!”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, October 15, 2017.

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#EngClass: Adverbs of Manner

Today we will learn about adverbs of manner.

Adverb of manner describes the way something happens.
Here’s a list of adverbs of manner:

  1. Well: in a good or satisfactory way.

E.g. “She responds well to the treatment.”
2. Awkwardly: in a worried or embarrased way.

E.g. “He awkwardly said he’s sorry.”
3. Carelessly: without care or concern; inattentively.

E.g. “She was fined for driving carelessly.”
4. Hard: with a great deal of effort.

E.g. “He’s been working hard all day.”
5. Deliberately: in a careful and unhurried way.

E.g. “She deliberately dressed down for the party.”

P.s.: Dress down = to dress informally. Dress up = to dress in smart or formal clothes. 
6. Late: not on time; after the expected time.

E.g. “She practically always late for school.”
7. Eagerly: emphasize a strong desire to do something.

E.g. “The sequel of that novel is eagerly anticipate by many readers.”
8. Fast: at high speed.

E.g. “That car was going fast.”
9. Fondly: with love.

E.g. “She looks fondly at the plants.”
10. Inquisitively: with curiousity.

E.g. “She wrinkled her brow inquisitively.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, October 1, 2017.

#EngClass: Adverbs of Frequency

Today we will learn about adverbs of frequency.

Adverbs of frequency describe how frequent something occurs or things happen.

Here’s the list of adverbs of frequency from the most frequent to the less frequent.
1. Always: at all times.

E.g. “She always eats breakfast every morning.”
2. Usually: refers to what normally happens.

E.g. “There’s usually a lot of traffic at this time of day.”
3. Often: many times.

E.g. “How often should I take this medicine?”
4. Sometimes: at times, now and then.

E.g. “Sometimes words hurt more than swords.”
5. Occasionally: at infrequent or irregular intervals.

E.g. “She watches the kids for us occasionally.”
6. Seldom: not often, rarely.

E.g. “He seldom writes to us.”
7. Ever: at any time.

E.g. “Nobody has ever solved this problem.”
8. Never: at no time in the past and future.

E.g. “Never trust another what you can do yourself.”
Source:

google dictionary
Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, September 17, 2017.

#EngClass: Using ‘So That’ (Expressing Purpose)

Today we will learn how to use ‘so that’ to express purpose.
You can learn about expressing purpose here:

https://englishtips4u.com/2016/10/12/engclass-expressing-purpose/
We use ‘so that’ to express purpose.

We often use it with modal verbs (can, would, will, etc.).

‘So that’ is often used instead of ‘in order to.’

We usually use so that with can/could and will/would.
So that + can

E.g. 

“I’m going to do my work now so that I can go home early.”
So that + could

E.g. 

“She moved back in with her father so that she could look after him.”
So that + will

E.g.

“We arrive at the theatre early so that we will have time to eat before the show.”
So that + would

E.g. 

“They wrote the notice in big letter so that it would stick out.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, September 3, 2017.

#EngClass: Indirect (Reporting) Speech (2)

Today we will learn more about reported speech.
You can review the first lesson here https://englishtips4u.com/2011/10/12/engclass-indirect-reporting-speech/ 

Reported speech is also called indirect speech, used to report something someone said.
E.g.

  1. Simple present –> simple past

E.g. 

Quoted speech: He said, “I work every day.”

Reported speech: “He said (that) he worked every day.”
2. Present progressive –> past progressive

E.g. 

Quoted speech: He said, “I am working.”

Reported speech: “He said (that) he was working.”
3. Present perfect –> past perfect

E.g.

Quoted speech: He said, “I have worked.”

Reported speech: “He said (that) he had worked.”
4. Simple past –> past perfect

E.g.

Quoted speech: He said, ” I worked.”

Reported speech: “He said (that) he had worked.”
5. Past progressive –> past perfect progressive

E.g.

Quoted speech: He said, ” I was working.”

Reported speech: “He said (that) he had been working.”
6. Past perfect –> past perfect

E.g.

Quoted speech: He said, “I had worked.”

Reported speech: “He said (that) he had worked.”
7. Simple future

E.g. 

Quoted speech: He said, ” I will work.”

Reported speech: “He said (that) he would work.”
8. Be going to

E.g.

Quoted speech: He said, ” I am going to work.”

Reported speech: “He said (that) he was going to work.”
9. Modal auxiliary

E.g. 

Quoted speech: He said, ” I can work.”

Reported speech: “He said (that) he could work.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 20, 2017.

#UKSlang: UK Slang (11)

Today we will learn about other UK slangs  apart from those we have talked about in past sessions.

Let’s start!
1. Laughing gear: one’s mouth.

E.g. “It’s not funny. Shut your laughing gear!”
2. Know one’s onions: well versed on a subject.

E.g. “That guy sure knows his onions.”
3. Hard cheese: expression of bad luck.

E.g. “The new rules is a hard cheese for the employees.”
4. Go to spare: become angry or frustrated.

E.g. “All his problems make him go to spare.”
5. Eating irons: eating utensils.

E.g. “Let us prepare the eating irons.”
6. Do one’s nut: become enraged.

E.g. “I gave him the news, and he did his nut.”
7. Bang to the rights: caught in the act.

E.g. “The police came and caught the robber bang to rights in front of the store.”
8. Argy-bargy: heated confrontation.

E.g. “I don’t want us to get into argy bargy just because of this small problem.”
9. All mouth and no trousers: all talk, no action.

E.g. “He’s all mouth and no trousers. Nobody wants to listen to him.”
10. Sad arse: pathetic person.

E.g. “You are a sad arse! Can’t you even boil an egg?”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 6, 2017.

#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘Laugh’

Today we will learn about the substitutes for ‘laugh.’ Do you know what word  we can use to replace ‘laugh?’
Let’s start!

  1. Snicker: smothered/half-suppressed laugh.

E.g. “Can you guess which part of this post made me snicker a bit?”
2. Giggle: laugh lightly in a nervous/silly manner.

E.g. “She was unable to suppress a giggle.”
3. Chuckle: laugh quietly.

E.g. “He gave a chuckle in response to her question.”
4. Chortle: laugh in breathy, gleeful way.

E.g. “Father used to chortle over such funny jokes.”
5. Guffaw: a loud and boisterous laugh.

E.g. “James guffawed with delight when he heard the news.”
6. Cackle: laugh in a harsh/sharp manner.

E.g. “Cut the cackle, John! You have to talk more seriously.”
7. Howl: laugh heartily.

E.g. “She began to howl when he walked out of the door.”
8. Titter: a short, half-suppressed laugh.

E.g. “His comments raised a titter.”
9. Hee-haw: a loud rude laugh.

E.g. “Doesn’t that deserve a little hee-haw?”
10. Bellow (of laughter): a very loud laugh.

E.g. “He gave a sudden bellow of laughter.”
Reference:

http://www.thefreedictionary.com

dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary
Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, July 23, 2017.

#EngClass: Reflexive Pronouns

Today we will learn about reflexive pronouns.

A reflexive pronoun is a pronoun that we use when the object reflects the subject.

A personal pronoun has its own reflexive pronoun.

There are two types of reflexive pronouns: singular and plural.
1. Singular:

a. I – myself

E.g. “I told myself to stay calm and and to be strong.”
b. You – yourself

E.g. “You have to believe in yourself.”
c. He – himself

E.g. “Ron decided to give himself a reward for working so hard.”
d. She – herself

E.g. “She cooled herself with a fan.”
e. It – itself

E.g. “Knowledge itself is power.”
2. Plural

a. You – yourselves

E.g. “Come and warm yourselves by the fire.”
b. They – themselves

E.g. “They prepare themselves before going picnic tomorrow.”
c. We – ourselves

E.g. “It’s important for all of us to be honest with ourself.”
Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, July 9, 2017.

#EngQuiz: Using Unless

Today I will give you exercises about how to use ‘unless’.

‘Unless’ can be defined as ‘if … not.’
E.g.

a. “I will go sight seeing tomorrow if it isn’t cold.”

b. “I will go sight seeing tomorrow unless it’s cold.”

Note: (a) and (b) have the same meaning.
Here we go!

Make sentences with the same meaning by using ‘unless’ (change ‘if … not’ to ‘unless’).

  1. People won’t know it if you don’t say anything.

  2. You can’t enter the train if you don’t have a ticket.

  3. Your fever will get worse if you don’t take the medicine.

  4. You can’t travel abroad if you don’t have a passport.

  5. You’ll get hungry during work if you don’t have breakfast.

  6. You’ll be late to school if you don’t wake up now.

  7. Your letter won’t get delivered if it doesn’t have the correct address.

  8. I’m sorry, but you can’t see the doctor if you don’t make an appointment.

  9. We can go to the zoo if it doesn’t rain.

  10. The ice will melt if you don’t put it in the freezer.
    Answers:

  11. People won’t know it unless you say anything.

  12. You can’t enter the train unless you have a ticket.

  13. Your fever will get worse unless you take the medicine.

  14. You can’t travel abroad unless you have a passport.

  15. You’ll get hungry during work unless you have breakfast.

  16. You’ll be late to school unless you wake up now.

  17. Your letter won’t get delivered unless it have the correct address.

  18. I’m sorry, but you can’t see the doctor unless you make an appointment.

  19. We can go to the zoo unless it rains.

  20. The ice will melt unless you put it in the freezer.
    Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, June 25, 2017.

#EngVocab: Phrasal Verbs with ‘Cut’

Today we will learn about phrasal verbs with ‘cut.’

Phrase is a combination of words (two or more).
Let’s start!

1.Cut off: to stop providing

E.g. “The water supply has been cut off.”
2. Cut down: to reduce the quantity of something

E.g. “Cut down your overall amount of physical activity!”
3. Cut up: to cut into smaller pieces

E.g. “She cut up the carrot and put them in the pot.”
4. Cut back: to consume less

E.g. “The doctor has told me to cut back red meat.”
5. Cut in: to interrupt a conversation

E.g. “We were having a conversation when he came up and cut in.”
6. Cut out: to remove part of something

E.g. “I cut out the article of the newspaper.”
7. Cut across: to take a shortcut

E.g. “Let’s cut across the field on our way home!”
8. Cut through: create a passage way

E.g. Someone had cut a path through the woods.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, June 11, 2017.

#EngClass: Complex Sentences

Today we will learn about complex sentences.

A complex sentence is made from an independent clause and dependent clause or clauses.

An independent clause can stand on its own and be a sentence, while dependent clause can not.

Dependent clauses include adverb clauses, adjective clauses and noun clauses.
1. Adverb clause: a dependent clause that functions as an adverb.

Subordinating conjunctions that link the clauses: when, as, if, since, so, after, although, etc.

E.g.

a. She likes the book.

The story is uncomplicated. 

“She likes the book because the story is uncomplicated.”
b. I finish eating dinner.

I watch korean drama.

“After I finish eating dinner, I watch korean drama.”
2. Adjective clause: a dependent clause that acts as adjective.

Relative pronouns that link the clauses: who, which, that, etc.

E.g.

a. The man arrived in the morning. 

He is a teacher. 

“The man who arrived in the morning is a teacher.”
b. The girl is my classmate.

The girl wears pink jacket.

” The girl whose jacket is pink is my classmate.”
3. Noun clause: a dependent clause that acts as noun.

The sentences usually link by: wh question, -ever.

E.g.

a. I don’t know.

He does such things.

“I don’t know why he does such things.”
b. Have you seen the man?

The man is the new manager.

“Have you seen the man who is the new manager?”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, May 22, 2017.

#EngClass: Compound Nouns (2)

Today we will continue our lesson about compound nouns.

You can visit englishtips4u.com/2017/04/27/engclass-compound-nouns/for the first lesson.
Compound nouns can be made from:

  1. Two nouns

E.g. 

a. Backpack: Suzy was carrying a backpack.

b. Bathroom: I have to go to the bathroom.

c. Toothpaste: Her mouth is full of toothpaste.
2. An adjective and a noun

E.g.

a. Full moon: A full moon hovered in the sky.

b. Mobile phone: He forgot to charge his mobile phone.

c. Whiteboard: She look at the whiteboard.
3. A verb and a noun

E.g.

a. Washing mashine: Is the washing machine working now?

b. Swimming pool: The hotel has a restaurant, bar, and swimming pool.

c. Driving license: The policeman asked to see his driving license.
4. A noun and a verb

E.g. 

a. Sunrise: There was a spectacular sunrise yesterday.

b. Haircut: I’ve had a really awful haircut.

c. Rainfall: Heavy rainfall in the mountain caused the floods.
5. Other combination

a. A preposition and a noun

E.g. Upstairs: I went upstairs and had a shower.

b. A noun and prepositional phrase.

E.g. Brother-in-law: The fact that he is your brother-in-law should not affect your decision.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, May 7, 2017.

#EngQuiz: Final -s/-es (2)

Today I will give you exercises about suffix -s / -es. You can visit https://englishtips4u.com/2017/01/01/engclass-final-s-es/ for its explanation.
What do the following people or things do?

Use suffix -s/-es in the answer.

E.g. 

Bank robber: Bank robber robs banks.

Hair stylist: Hair stylist styles hair.

Clothes hanger: Clothes hanger hangs clothes.
1. Storyteller

  1. Book publisher

  2. Fire extinguisher

  3. Animal trainer

  4. Stamp collector

  5. Mind reader

  6. Wage earner

  7. Tax collector

  8. Car driver

  9. Body painter

  10. Caregiver

  11. Hair dryer
    Answers: 1. Tells stories, 2. Publishes books, 3. Extinguishes fire, 4. Trains animals, 5. Collects stamps, 6. Reads minds, 7. Earns wages, 8. Collects taxes, 9. Drives cars, 10. Paints bodies, 11. Gives cares, 12. Dries hair.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 30, 2017.

#EngClass: Compound Nouns 

Today we will learn about compound nouns.

Compound nouns are words that consist of two or more words that are join together to make a single noun.

Compound nouns usually are formed by nouns plus nouns or adjectives or prepositions or verbs.

Compound nouns are expressed in three ways:

  1. Closed form: the words are written as a single word (no space)

E.g. 

a. Makeup: A smile is the best makeup any girl can wear.

b. Bedroom: If you’d like to stay, we got a spare bedroom for you.

c. Notebook: Suzan brought out a notebook to study at library.
2. Hyphenate form: the words are written with hyphen between words

E.g. 

a. Sister-in-law: My sister-in-law stared at her reflection in the mirror.

b. Six-pack: Harry got a six-pack in eight weeks.

c. Three-year-old: Gwen articulates well for a three-year-old kid.
3. Closed form: the words are written with a space between words

E.g. 

a. Post office: Look straight ahead and you will see the post office.

b. Sleeping bag: The sleeping bag is very warm.

c. First aid: Did you learn any first aid at school?

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, April 27, 2017.

#GrammarTrivia: Because vs Even though

Today we will learn about the different way to expressing result with ‘because’ and ‘even though.’

‘Because’ introduces an adverb clause; it is followed by a subject and verb.

Like ‘because,’ ‘even though’ introduces an adverb clause.
‘Because’ and ‘even though’ are subordinating conjunctions used to connect a subordinate clause to a main clause.

The main clause and subordinate clause in ‘because’ are balance, but the main clause and subordinate clause in ‘even though’ are contradiction.
‘Because’ is used to express expected results.

‘Even though’ is used to express unexpected results.
E.g.

  1. Because I was sick, I didn’t go to work.

  2. Even though I was sick, I went to work.

  3. Because the weather was horrible, I stayed at home.

  4. Even though the weather was nice, I stayed at home.

  5. Because the alarm rang, Hans woke up.

  6. Even though the alarm rang, Hans didn’t wake up.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 23, 2017.

#EngVocab: Phrasal verbs with ‘get’

Phrasal verb is a combination of verb and preposition or adverb or both. The combination usually gives a different meaning from the original verb. Do you know any phrasal verb with the word  ‘get’?

  1. Get up. Meaning: to get out of bed.
    • Example:
      • “I get up at 06.00 am in the morning.”
  2. Get through. Meaning: to succeed in finishing a task, or to manage to talk to someone on the phone.
    • Example:
      • “All these trials will get you through life.”
  3. Get over. Meaning: to overcome a problem, to recover from an illness.
    • Example:
      • “Don’t be sad, you will get over it.”
  4. Get out/get off. Meaning:  to leave.
    • Example:
      • “It’s dangerous, get out of there!”
  5. Get across. Meaning: to cause to be understood.
    • Example:
      • “The idea will get across on mind after the presentation.”
  6. Get along. Meaning: to have a friendly relationship.
    • Example:
      • “My cousin gets along well with his classmates.”
  7. Get away. Meaning: to leave or escape from a person or place.
    • Example:
      • “I need to get away from everything and everyone.”
  8. Get on with. Meaning: to start doing or continue doing activity.
    • Example:
      • “Let’s get on with the party!”
  9. Get in. Meaning: to go inside, to arrive.
    • Example:
      • “Hurry up, get in the car!”
  10. Get down (to). Meaning: to get serious.
    • Example:
      • “If you get down to something, you have to give full concentration.”
  11. Get by. Meaning: to manage to survive.
    • Example:
      • “I finally got by the problem after struggling for a while.”
  12. Get back. Meaning: to return from a place.
    • Example:
      • “I got back from Paris yesterday.”

 

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 16, 2017

 

Related post(s):

 

^MQ

#EngVocab: Suffix -phobia (4)

Today we will continue last week’s session about the list of phobias.

You can follow this link for last week’s session https://englishtips4u.com/2017/04/02/engvocab-suffix-phobia-3/

Here we go:

  1. Sesquipedalophobia: fear of long words

E.g. Irene has sesquipedalophobia so she rarely reads.

  1. Bibliophobia: fear of books

E.g. Jenny doesn’t go to library because she suffers from bibliophobia.

  1. Peladophobia: fear of bald people

E.g. Lisa doesn’t watch x-man because she has peladophobia.

  1. Alliumphobia: fear of garlic

E.g. My mom never cooks because she has alliumphobia.

  1. Eisotrophobia: fear if mirrors or looking in a mirror

E.g. My sister has been with eisotrophobia so her room has no mirror.

  1. Chrometophobia: fear of money

E.g. My cousin has chrometophobia so he never brings cash.

  1. Arithmophobia: fear of numbers

E.g. Jerry suffers from arithmophobia because he has failed his Math test ten times.

  1. Kathisophobia: fear of sitting down

E.g. My uncle has kathisophobia so there is no chair in his house.

  1. Leukophobia: fear of white color

E.g. Rose has leukophobia so her room is always dark.

  1. Metrophobia: fear of poetry

E.g. Tasya never attends poetry class because she has metrophobia.

  1. Triskaidekaphobia: fear of number thirteen

E.g. All buildings skip the thirteenth floor because of triskaidekaphobia.

  1. Somniphobia: fear of sleep

E.g. Tina has dark circles under her eyes because of somniphobia.
Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 9, 2017.

#EngVocab: Suffix -phobia (3)

Today we will learn about the list of phobias.

The suffix is used to specify some kind of fear to something.

Phobia is usually translated as an extreme or irrational fear of or aversion to a particular thing or subject.

The complete opposite is called a philia.
Here’s the list of phobias:

  1. Gamophobia: fear of marriage

E.g. Sally stays single until now because of gamophobia.

  1. Cacophobia: fear of ugliness

E.g. Nikita wears make up because of cacophobia.

  1. Anuptaphobia: fear of staying single

E.g. Tim always goes to club because of anuptaphobia.

  1. Novercaphobia: fear of step mother

E.g. Daisy moves out of her home because of novercapobia.

  1. Pentheraphobia: fear of mother-in-law

E.g. Yenny has pentheraphobia so she lives apart from her mother-in-law.

  1. Deipnophobia: fear of dining or dinner conversation

E.g. The beast has deipnophobia so he always eats dinner alone.

  1. Ichthyophobia: fear of fish

E.g. Cath has ichthyophobia so she never goes fishing with her parents.

  1. Mnemophobia: fear of memories

E.g. Jim never goes back to the house because of mnemophobia.

  1. Neophobia: fear of anything new

E.g. William never goes to mall because of neophobia.

  1. Octophobia: fear of the number 8

E.g. Phill chose the lower ground apartment because of octophobia.

  1. Ommetaphobia: fear of eyes

E.g. Lynn always eats fillet fish because of ommetaphobia.

  1. Sitophobia: fear of food

E.g. My mother has sitophobia so she never cooks.

  1. Trichopathophobia: fear of hair

E.g. Harris has trichopathophobia so he never goes to salon.

  1. Xanthophobia: fear of the color yellow or the word yellow

E.g. My brother has xanthophobia so he hides his crayons.

  1. Papyrophobia: fear of paper

E.g. Mike has papyrophobia so he always brings his laptop everywhere.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 2, 2017.