All posts by sherly99blog

#EngQuiz: Final -s/-es (2)

Today I will give you exercises about suffix -s / -es. You can visit https://englishtips4u.com/2017/01/01/engclass-final-s-es/ for its explanation.
What do the following people or things do?

Use suffix -s/-es in the answer.

E.g. 

Bank robber: Bank robber robs banks.

Hair stylist: Hair stylist styles hair.

Clothes hanger: Clothes hanger hangs clothes.
1. Storyteller

  1. Book publisher

  2. Fire extinguisher

  3. Animal trainer

  4. Stamp collector

  5. Mind reader

  6. Wage earner

  7. Tax collector

  8. Car driver

  9. Body painter

  10. Caregiver

  11. Hair dryer
    Answers: 1. Tells stories, 2. Publishes books, 3. Extinguishes fire, 4. Trains animals, 5. Collects stamps, 6. Reads minds, 7. Earns wages, 8. Collects taxes, 9. Drives cars, 10. Paints bodies, 11. Gives cares, 12. Dries hair.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 30, 2017.

Advertisements

#EngClass: Compound Nouns 

Today we will learn about compound nouns.

Compound nouns are words that consist of two or more words that are join together to make a single noun.

Compound nouns usually are formed by nouns plus nouns or adjectives or prepositions or verbs.

Compound nouns are expressed in three ways:

  1. Closed form: the words are written as a single word (no space)

E.g. 

a. Makeup: A smile is the best makeup any girl can wear.

b. Bedroom: If you’d like to stay, we got a spare bedroom for you.

c. Notebook: Suzan brought out a notebook to study at library.
2. Hyphenate form: the words are written with hyphen between words

E.g. 

a. Sister-in-law: My sister-in-law stared at her reflection in the mirror.

b. Six-pack: Harry got a six-pack in eight weeks.

c. Three-year-old: Gwen articulates well for a three-year-old kid.
3. Closed form: the words are written with a space between words

E.g. 

a. Post office: Look straight ahead and you will see the post office.

b. Sleeping bag: The sleeping bag is very warm.

c. First aid: Did you learn any first aid at school?

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, April 27, 2017.

#GrammarTrivia: Because vs Even though

Today we will learn about the different way to expressing result with ‘because’ and ‘even though.’

‘Because’ introduces an adverb clause; it is followed by a subject and verb.

Like ‘because,’ ‘even though’ introduces an adverb clause.
‘Because’ and ‘even though’ are subordinating conjunctions used to connect a subordinate clause to a main clause.

The main clause and subordinate clause in ‘because’ are balance, but the main clause and subordinate clause in ‘even though’ are contradiction.
‘Because’ is used to express expected results.

‘Even though’ is used to express unexpected results.
E.g.

  1. Because I was sick, I didn’t go to work.

  2. Even though I was sick, I went to work.

  3. Because the weather was horrible, I stayed at home.

  4. Even though the weather was nice, I stayed at home.

  5. Because the alarm rang, Hans woke up.

  6. Even though the alarm rang, Hans didn’t wake up.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 23, 2017.

#EngVocab: Phrasal verbs with ‘get’

Phrasal verb is a combination of verb and preposition or adverb or both. The combination usually gives a different meaning from the original verb. Do you know any phrasal verb with the word  ‘get’?

  1. Get up. Meaning: to get out of bed.
    • Example:
      • “I get up at 06.00 am in the morning.”
  2. Get through. Meaning: to succeed in finishing a task, or to manage to talk to someone on the phone.
    • Example:
      • “All these trials will get you through life.”
  3. Get over. Meaning: to overcome a problem, to recover from an illness.
    • Example:
      • “Don’t be sad, you will get over it.”
  4. Get out/get off. Meaning:  to leave.
    • Example:
      • “It’s dangerous, get out of there!”
  5. Get across. Meaning: to cause to be understood.
    • Example:
      • “The idea will get across on mind after the presentation.”
  6. Get along. Meaning: to have a friendly relationship.
    • Example:
      • “My cousin gets along well with his classmates.”
  7. Get away. Meaning: to leave or escape from a person or place.
    • Example:
      • “I need to get away from everything and everyone.”
  8. Get on with. Meaning: to start doing or continue doing activity.
    • Example:
      • “Let’s get on with the party!”
  9. Get in. Meaning: to go inside, to arrive.
    • Example:
      • “Hurry up, get in the car!”
  10. Get down (to). Meaning: to get serious.
    • Example:
      • “If you get down to something, you have to give full concentration.”
  11. Get by. Meaning: to manage to survive.
    • Example:
      • “I finally got by the problem after struggling for a while.”
  12. Get back. Meaning: to return from a place.
    • Example:
      • “I got back from Paris yesterday.”

 

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 16, 2017

 

Related post(s):

 

^MQ

#EngVocab: Suffix -phobia (4)

Today we will continue last week’s session about the list of phobias.

You can follow this link for last week’s session https://englishtips4u.com/2017/04/02/engvocab-suffix-phobia-3/

Here we go:

  1. Sesquipedalophobia: fear of long words

E.g. Irene has sesquipedalophobia so she rarely reads.

  1. Bibliophobia: fear of books

E.g. Jenny doesn’t go to library because she suffers from bibliophobia.

  1. Peladophobia: fear of bald people

E.g. Lisa doesn’t watch x-man because she has peladophobia.

  1. Alliumphobia: fear of garlic

E.g. My mom never cooks because she has alliumphobia.

  1. Eisotrophobia: fear if mirrors or looking in a mirror

E.g. My sister has been with eisotrophobia so her room has no mirror.

  1. Chrometophobia: fear of money

E.g. My cousin has chrometophobia so he never brings cash.

  1. Arithmophobia: fear of numbers

E.g. Jerry suffers from arithmophobia because he has failed his Math test ten times.

  1. Kathisophobia: fear of sitting down

E.g. My uncle has kathisophobia so there is no chair in his house.

  1. Leukophobia: fear of white color

E.g. Rose has leukophobia so her room is always dark.

  1. Metrophobia: fear of poetry

E.g. Tasya never attends poetry class because she has metrophobia.

  1. Triskaidekaphobia: fear of number thirteen

E.g. All buildings skip the thirteenth floor because of triskaidekaphobia.

  1. Somniphobia: fear of sleep

E.g. Tina has dark circles under her eyes because of somniphobia.
Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 9, 2017.

#EngVocab: Suffix -phobia (3)

Today we will learn about the list of phobias.

The suffix is used to specify some kind of fear to something.

Phobia is usually translated as an extreme or irrational fear of or aversion to a particular thing or subject.

The complete opposite is called a philia.
Here’s the list of phobias:

  1. Gamophobia: fear of marriage

E.g. Sally stays single until now because of gamophobia.

  1. Cacophobia: fear of ugliness

E.g. Nikita wears make up because of cacophobia.

  1. Anuptaphobia: fear of staying single

E.g. Tim always goes to club because of anuptaphobia.

  1. Novercaphobia: fear of step mother

E.g. Daisy moves out of her home because of novercapobia.

  1. Pentheraphobia: fear of mother-in-law

E.g. Yenny has pentheraphobia so she lives apart from her mother-in-law.

  1. Deipnophobia: fear of dining or dinner conversation

E.g. The beast has deipnophobia so he always eats dinner alone.

  1. Ichthyophobia: fear of fish

E.g. Cath has ichthyophobia so she never goes fishing with her parents.

  1. Mnemophobia: fear of memories

E.g. Jim never goes back to the house because of mnemophobia.

  1. Neophobia: fear of anything new

E.g. William never goes to mall because of neophobia.

  1. Octophobia: fear of the number 8

E.g. Phill chose the lower ground apartment because of octophobia.

  1. Ommetaphobia: fear of eyes

E.g. Lynn always eats fillet fish because of ommetaphobia.

  1. Sitophobia: fear of food

E.g. My mother has sitophobia so she never cooks.

  1. Trichopathophobia: fear of hair

E.g. Harris has trichopathophobia so he never goes to salon.

  1. Xanthophobia: fear of the color yellow or the word yellow

E.g. My brother has xanthophobia so he hides his crayons.

  1. Papyrophobia: fear of paper

E.g. Mike has papyrophobia so he always brings his laptop everywhere.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 2, 2017.

#EngQuiz: Correlative Conjunction

Hi fellas, how was your weekend? Did you have fun?

Today I will give you exercises about correlative conjunction.

You can check the theory here https://englishtips4u.com/2017/03/19/engclass-correlative-conjunction-2/
Put the correct verb be (is or are) in the following sentences:

  1. Not only Sam but also Jim … eating.

  2. Both the car and the motorcycle … new.

  3. Neither the manager nor the security … here.

  4. Not only his mother but also his friends … coming to the party.

  5. Either Merry or Fanny … calling Jane.

  6. Both her cousin and her mother-in-law … living with her.

  7. Neither coffee nor tea … being served on the table.

  8. Not only me but also my friends … wide awake today.

  9. Both Bangkok and Singapore … my destinations for this vacation.

  10. Either Ms. Lie or Mr. Wang … going to teach us today.
    Answers: 1. Is, 2. Are, 3. Is, 4. Are, 5. Is, 6. Are, 7. Is, 8. Are, 9. Are, 10. Is.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, March 26, 2017.

#EngClass: Correlative Conjunction (2)

Today we will learn about correlative conjunction.

Correlative conjunctions are also called paired conjunctions.

Paired conjunctions are two subjects connected by two words, such as neither…nor, not…only, and but…also. 

The conjunctions connect two balanced clauses, phrases, or words.

You can also check the theory here https://englishtips4u.com/2015/08/09/engclass-correlative-conjunction/

The two elements connected by both…and take a plural verb.

When two elements are connected by not only…but also, either…or, or neither…nor, the element that is closer to the verb determines whether the verb is singular or plural.

E.g. 

  1. Both my brother and my sister are here.

  2. Not only my brother but also my sister is here.

  3. Not only my sister but also my parents are here.

  4. Neither my brother nor my sister is here.

  5. Neither my sister nor my parents are here.
    The theory here is taken from ‘Understanding and Using English Grammar’ by Betty Schrampfer Azar.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, March 19, 2017.

#EngClass: Passive Form of Modals

Today we will learn about passive form of modals.
You can check the theory of modals here https://englishtips4u.com/2017/01/11/engclass-modal-verbs/
The passive form: modal + be + past participle

E.g

  1. The new phone will be launched soon.

  2. The window can’t be opened.

  3. Fred is supposed to be told about the meeting.

  4. This letter ought to be sent before March 25th.

  5. The computer may be bought by me.

  6. Decisions should not be made too quickly.

  7. The athlete must be given time out.

  8. The sunset could be seen very clearly yesterday.

The past-passive form: modal + have been + past participle

E.g.

  1. The package should have been sent last week.

  2. This tree must have been planted over 50 years ago.

  3. John might have been told about the employment.

  4. This house could have been built after the earthquake.

  5. The crew should have been prepared to work hard.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, March 12, 2017.

#EngClass: Expressions of Quantity

Today we will learn about expressions of quantity.

An expression of quantity is a word or group of words that tells the amount of something.

Some expressions of quantity are used only with countable nouns, some only with uncountable nouns, some with either countable or uncountable nouns.

You can check the explanation about uncountable nouns here https://englishtips4u.com/2016/12/04/engclass-non-count-nouns/
Some expressions of quantity that are used only with countable nouns:

  1. One

  2. Each

  3. Every 

We have the detail explanation here https://englishtips4u.com/2016/09/18/engclass-one-each-every/

  1. Two (number)

  2. Both

  3. A couple of

  4. A few

  5. Several

  6. Many

  7. A number of
    Some expressions of quantity that are used only with uncountable nouns:

  8. A little

  9. Much

  10. A great deal of
    Some expressions of quantity that are used with either countable or uncountable nouns:

  11. Not any

  12. Some

  13. A lot of

  14. Plenty of

  15. Most

  16. All
    Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, March 5, 2017.

#EngQuiz: Active vs Passive

Today I will give you exercises about active vs passive voice in sentences.

You can check the explanation here https://englishtips4u.com/2016/11/21/engclass-forming-the-passive/

Change the active to the passive:

  1. His tricks won’t fool me.

  2. Kath had returned the book to the library.

  3. James wrote that note.

  4. Alex is preparing the report.

  5. Bryan will invite Ana to the party.

  6. The teacher is going to explain the lesson.

  7. Shilvy has suggested a new idea.

  8. Is Mr. Brown painting your house?

  9. Someone stole my purse.

  10. The manager interviewed me.
    Answers:

  11. I won’t be fooled by his trick.

  12. The book had been returned to the library by Kath.

  13. That note was written by James.

  14. The report is being prepared by Alex.

  15. Ana will be invited to the party by Bryan. 

  16. The lesson is going to be explained by the teacher.

  17. A new idea has been suggested by Shilvy.

  18. Is your house being painted by Mr. Brown?

  19. My purse was stolen (by someone).

  20. I was interviewed by the manager. 
    Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, February 26, 2017.

#EngVocab: List of Philias

Today we will learn about the list of philias.

The suffix is used to specify some kind of attraction or affinity to something.

Philia is usually translated as affection, the love or obsession with a particular thing or subject.

The complete opposite is called a phobia.
Here’s the list of philias:

  1. Spectrophilia: attraction to ghosts

  2. Ailurophilia: attraction to cats

  3. Ergophilia: attraction to works

  4. Chrysophilia: attraction to golds

  5. Canophilia: attraction to dogs

  6. Lygophilia: attraction to darkness

  7. Stigmatophilia: attraction to tattoos

  8. Pluviophilia: attraction to rainy days

  9. Arctophilia: attraction to teddy bears

  10. Pogonophilia: attraction to beards

  11. Stegophilia: attraction to climbing

  12. Clinophilia: attraction to beds

  13. Timbrophilia: attraction to stamps

  14. Turophilia: attraction to cheese

  15. Heliophilia: attraction to sunlight

  16. Halophilia: attraction to salts

  17. Dendrophilia: attraction to trees

  18. Lithophilia: attraction to stones

  19. Logophilia: attraction to words

  20. Phytophilia: attraction to plants
    Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, February 19, 2017.

#EngClass: Pronunciation of -ed

​Today we will learn about pronunciation of -ed.

Do you know how to pronounce -ed?

Pronunciation of suffix -ed depends on the last sound of the verb or noun which is usually a consonant.
Suffix -ed can be pronounced in three different ways:

  1. /id/

If the last consonant sound of the word ends in one of these sounds, the suffix -ed is pronounced as /id/.
Examples of words ending in the /id/ sound:

Wanted /t/

Ended /d/
2. /t/

If the last consonant sound of the word is voiceless (no vibration of the vocal cords), the suffix -ed is pronounced as /t/.
Examples of words ending in /t/ sound:

Hoped /p/

Laughed /gh/

Faxed /s/

Liked /k/

Sniffed /f/

Washed /sh/

Watched /ch/

Kissed /ss/

Danced /c/

Fixed /x/

  1. /d/

If the last consonant sound of the word is voiced sound (the vocal cords are vibrated), the suffix -ed is pronounced as /d/.

With voiced sounds, the vocal chords are vibrated, which can be felt in the throat. All vowels are voiced, and some consonants.
Examples of words ending in /d/ sound: 

Begged /g/

Allowed /vowels/

Played /vowels/

Claimed /m/

Grabbed /b/

Saved /v/

Honoured /r/

Peeled /l/

Signed /n/

Pleased /z/

Used /s/

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, February 12, 2017.

#EngVocab: Types of Phobia

​Today we will learn about types of phobia.

Phobia is an extreme, persistent, abnormal or irrational fear of a specific thing or situation.
There are three types of phobia:

  1. Specific (simple) phobia.

It is the fear of a particular object or situation.

E.g.

a. Ailurophobia: fear of cats.

b. Cynophobia: fear of dogs.

c. Aquophobia: fear of water.

d. Nyctophobia: fear of darkness.

e. Hematophobia: fear of blood.

f. Astraphobia: fear of thunder.

g. Odontophobia: fear of dentists.

h. Aviophobia: fear of flying.

i. Emetophobia: fear of vomiting.

j. Trypanophobia: fear of needles and injections.
2. Social phobia.

It is the fear of social situations.

E.g.

a. Glossophobia: fear of public speaking.

b. Ocholophobia: fear of crowds.

c. Scopophobia: fear or being watched or stared at.

d. Allodoxaphobia: fear of opinions.

e. Rhabdophobia: fear of being criticized or punished.

  1. Agoraphobia.

It is fear of crowded spaces or enclosed public places.

E.g.

a. Claustrophobia: fear of closed spaces.

b. Monophobia: fear of being alone.

c. Hodophobia: fear of travelling.

d. Gephyrophobia: fear of bridges.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, February 5, 2017.

#EngQuiz: Irregular Past Participles (2)

​Today I will give you exercises about irregular past participle.

Give the correct form of irregular past participle for the word in the parentheses.

  1. Why has Jim (leave) already?

  2. She has (know) about the problem for three months.

  3. I have (give) some money to Jess.

  4. Have you (choose) your university yet?

  5. The weather had (become) very cold, so we went inside.

  6. Don’t worry! We haven’t (forget) about the meeting.

  7. She has finally (come).

  8. I have (be) looking for ages, but I haven’t (find) any keys yet.

  9. The books had (fall) off the table, and were over the floor.

  10. By the time we arrived, the children had (eat) the chocolate.

  11. We have (keep) this secret for three years.

  12. They have (begin) painting the room.

  13. This was the first time he had (do) his homework.

  14. Mom wasn’t home, she had (go) to the supermarket.

  15. I have (hang) the clothes in the hanger.

Answers: 1. Left; 2. Known; 3. Given; 4. Chosen; 5. Become; 6. Forgotten; 7. Come; 8. Been, Found; 9. Fallen; 10. Eaten; 11. Kept; 12. Begun; 13. Done; 14. Gone; 15. Hung.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 29, 2017.

#EngClass: Pronunciation of -s

​Today we will learn about pronunciation of final -s.

Pronunciation is the way in which a word is pronounced.

Pronunciation of final -s depends on the last sound of the verb or noun which is usually a consonant.
Final -s can be pronounced in three different ways:

  1. /iz/ 

If the last consonant sound of the word is a sibilant sound (a hissing or buzzing sound), the final -s is pronounced as /iz/.
Examples of words ending in the /iz/ sound:

Buses /s/

Sizes /z/

Wishes /sh/

Matches /ch/

Boxes /x/

Languages /ge/

Replaces /ce/

Kisses /ss/
2. /s/

If the last consonant sound of the word is voiceless, the final -s is pronounced as /s/.
Examples of words ending in /s/ sound:

Pets /t/

Sleeps /p/

Books /k/

Cliffs /f/

Months /th/
3. /z/

If the last consonant sound of the word is voiced sound, the final -s is pronounced as /z/.
Examples of words ending in /z/ sound: 

Grabs /b/

Lids /d/

Dogs /g/

Hills /l/

Musicians /n/

Repairs /r/

Dreams /m/

Plays /y/

Sings /ng/

Gloves /v/

Sees (vowel sound)

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 22, 2017.

#EngQuiz: Final -s / -es

​Hi fellas, how was your weekend? I had to work all day this weekend but I enjoyed it. I hope you had fun too.
Today I will give you exercises about final -s / -es. You can check https://englishtips4u.com/2017/01/01/engclass-final-s-es/ for the theory.
Add the right form of -s or -es to the word in parentheses.

  1. He (watch) TV in the evening.

  2. I found some (box) in the garage.

  3. Jane has (stitch) in her leg.

  4. The girl had three (wish).

  5. Mike (miss) his father.

  6. I have three new (shirt).

  7. Won (wax) his car every weekend.

  8. Dhita (study) history and she always (pass) her exams with an A grade.

  9. The clock (buzz) when the alarm (go) off.

  10. My brother (get) up at 6.00 am then (wash) his face and (brush) his teeth.

  11. She (sell) baby (cloth) for (girl).

  12. My cousin (like) to play with my (toy).
    Answers: 1. Watches; 2. Boxes; 3. Stitches; 4. Wishes; 5. Misses; 6. Shirts; 7. Waxes; 8. Studies, passes; 9. Buzzes, goes; 10. Gets, washes, brushes; 11. Sells, clothes, girls; 12. Likes, toys.
    That’s all for today fellas. See you next Sunday.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 15, 2017.

#EngClass: Irregular Plural Nouns

​Hi fellas, how was your weekend?

Today we will learn about irregular plural nouns.

An irregular plural noun is an irregular noun in the plural form. 

An irregular noun is a noun that becomes plural by changing its spelling in other ways than adding an “s” or “es” to the end of the word.

Although most nouns have plurals formed according to regular rules, some nouns have unusual, or irregular plurals.
1. Certain nouns do not add a letter to the end, but change the word itself.

E.g. 

Man –> Men

Tooth –> Teeth

Mouse –> Mice
2. Certain other nouns have the same plural form as singular form.

E.g. 

Deer –> Deer

Bison –> Bison

Sheep –> Sheep
3. Some nouns that end in -f or -fe, the plural form end with -ves.

E.g.

Knife –> Knives

Leaf –> Leaves

Shelf –> Shelves
4. Some nouns that end in -o, the plural form end with -es.

E.g.

Hero –> Heroes

Potato –> Potatoes

Echo –> Echoes
That’s all for today fellas. See you next Sunday.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 8, 2017.