All posts by sherly99blog

#UKSlang: UK Slang (11)

Today we will learn about other UK slangs  apart from those we have talked about in past sessions.

Let’s start!
1. Laughing gear: one’s mouth.

E.g. “It’s not funny. Shut your laughing gear!”
2. Know one’s onions: well versed on a subject.

E.g. “That guy sure knows his onions.”
3. Hard cheese: expression of bad luck.

E.g. “The new rules is a hard cheese for the employees.”
4. Go to spare: become angry or frustrated.

E.g. “All his problems make him go to spare.”
5. Eating irons: eating utensils.

E.g. “Let us prepare the eating irons.”
6. Do one’s nut: become enraged.

E.g. “I gave him the news, and he did his nut.”
7. Bang to the rights: caught in the act.

E.g. “The police came and caught the robber bang to rights in front of the store.”
8. Argy-bargy: heated confrontation.

E.g. “I don’t want us to get into argy bargy just because of this small problem.”
9. All mouth and no trousers: all talk, no action.

E.g. “He’s all mouth and no trousers. Nobody wants to listen to him.”
10. Sad arse: pathetic person.

E.g. “You are a sad arse! Can’t you even boil an egg?”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 6, 2017.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Whisper’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘whisper’.
Do you know other words to say it?

Let’s start.

  • Murmur.

Meaning: say something in a low, soft, or indistinct voice.
E.g. “He took the mug of coffee with a murmur of thanks.”

  • Mutter.

Meaning: speak quietly and in a low voice that is not easy to hear, often when you are worried or complaining about something.
E.g. “The woman next in line began to mutter of discontent to herself.”

  • Mumble.

Meaning: say something indistinctly and quietly, making it difficult for others to hear.
E.g. “I wish you wouldn’t mumble. I can’t hear you clearly.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, June 9, 2019.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Difficult’ (2)

Today we will learn more about other ways to say ‘difficult’.

You can review the first lesson here https://englishtips4u.com/2019/05/12/engvocab-other-ways-to-say-difficult/

Let’s start.

  • Onerous: involving a great deal of effort, trouble or difficulty (of a task or responsibility).

E.g. “This is the most onerous task I have ever done.”

  • Herculean: requiring great strength or effort.

E.g. “Moving the stove will be a herculean endeavor.”

  • Knotty: extremely difficult or intricate

E.g. “The new management team faces some knotty problems.”

  • Cumbersome: difficult to use or handle; very complicated and inefficient.

E.g. “Although the machine looks cumbersome, it is actually easy to use.”

  • Sisyphean: impossible to complete (of a task).

E.g. “It is a sisyphean endeavor to get the two company to work together in a constructive manner.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, May 12, 2019.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Difficult’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘difficult’.
Do you know some synonyms of ‘difficult’?

Let’s start.

  • Arduous: hard to accomplish or achieve; needing a lot of effort and energy.

E.g. “She took the arduous task and devote her heart and soul to it.”

  • Toilsome: involving hard or difficult work, or great effort.

E.g. “Housework after a long journey is toilsome.”

  • Strenuous: something that takes a lot of effort, work or energy to do.

E.g. “The doctor advised my brother to avoid strenuous exercise.”

  • Operose: involving or displaying much industry or effort.

E.g. “The expanding process of my company is too slow and operose.”

  • Grueling: extremely tiring and demanding.

E.g. “The freshmen were put through a week of grueling endurance tests.”

  • Laboriuos: requiring considerable effort and time (especislly of a task, process, or journey).

E.g. “Collecting the experiment materials is a long and laborious task.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 28, 2019.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Afraid’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘afraid’
Do you know other words to say it?

Let’s start.

  • Aghast: struck with overwhelming shock; filled with sudden fright or horror.

E.g. “The police stood aghast at the terrible sight.”

  • Petrified: extremely frightened that one is unable to move.

E.g. “The idea of talking in public petrified him.”

  • Frantic: wild or distraught with fear, anxiety, or extreme emotion.

E.g. “He was quite frantic by the time we got home.”

  • Timorous: full of fear.

E.g. “The victim talked with a timorous voice.”

  • Edgy: tense, nervous, or irritable.

E.g. “I am feeling edgy about the exam tomorrow.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, March 31, 2019.

#WOTD: Morose

Today we will learn about the word ‘morose’.
#WOTD

Do you know the meaning of ‘morose’?
#WOTD

‘Morose’ is an adjective.
‘Morose’ is pronounced as /məˈrōs/.
#WOTD

‘Morose’ means sullen and ill-tempered.
#WOTD

Some synonyms of ‘morose’:
1. Dour.
2. Surly.
3. Somber.
4. Unhappy.
5. Fed up.
#WOTD

Examples of ‘morose’ in sentences:
“Why are you so morose these days?”
#WOTD

Examples of ‘morose’ in sentences:
“He was silent and morose since the tragedy happened.”
#WOTD

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, March 17, 2019.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Like’

Do you know other ways to say ‘like’?
Today we will learn about other words to say ‘like’.

Let’s start.

  • Relish: to like or enjoy something.

E.g. “I relish the challenge of doing jobs that others turn down.”

  • Keen: to be eager, excited or interested in something.

E.g. “She’s very keen to learn about Japanese culture.”

  • Fond: having an affection or liking for.

E.g. “My family are all fond of going to the cinema.”

  • Applaud: show strong approval of (a person or action).

E.g. “We applaud the family’s decision to remain silent over the issue.”

  • Esteem: respect and admiration, typically for a person.

E.g. “I esteem your uncle for his kindness.”

  • Fancy: to like or want something.

E.g. “Do you fancy going out for lunch at the restaurant?”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, March 2, 2019.

#WOTD: Brusque

Today we will learn about ‘brusque’.
Do you know the meaning of the word ‘brusque’?

‘Brusque’ is an adjective.
‘Brusque’ is pronounced as /brəsk/.
#WOTD

‘Brusque’ means short and abrupt in manner or speech.
#WOTD

Some synonims of ‘brusque’:
1. Curt.
2. Gruff.
3. Blunt.
4. Outspoken.
5. Harsh.
#WOTD

Examples of ‘brusque’ in sentences:
“His secretary was quite brusque with me.”
#WOTD

Examples of ‘brusque’ in sentences:
“The doctor spoke in a brusque tone.”
#WOTD

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, February 17, 2019.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Tired’

Do you know other words to describe tiredness?
Today we will learn other ways to say ‘tired’.

Let’s start.

  • Debilitated: in severely weakened state.

E.g. “He is debilitated after the treatment.”

  • Weary: feeling extremely tired, especially as a result of excessive exertion.

Note: ‘Exertion’ is the physical or perceived use of energy.
E.g. “They felt weary after all the hard work.”

  • Jaded: exhausted; losing interest because you have experienced something too many times.

E.g. “You look jaded, you need a holiday.”

  • Sapped: gradually weaken; exhausted of all your reserve energy.

E.g. “Loss of bloods has sapped his movements.”

  • Enervated: feel drained of energy or vitality.

E.g. “If you feel enervated by the heat, let’s go swimming.”

  1. Prostrate: completely overcome and lacking vitality, will, or power to rise.
    E.g. “She was prostrate with grief after her son’s death.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, February 2, 2019.

#WOTD: Pretermit

Today we will learn about ‘pretermit’.
Do you know the meaning of the word ‘pretermit’?

‘Pretermit’ is a verb.
‘Pretermit’ is pronounced as /ˌprēdərˈmit/.

‘Pretermit’ means to neglect (leave undone or leave out); to disregard intentionally (allow to pass unnoticed or unmentioned).

Some synonims of ‘pretermit’:
1. Omit.
2. Ignore.
3. Abandon.
4. Overlook.

Examples of ‘pretermit’ in sentences:
“He wants to pretermit anything that will remind him of his childhood.”

Examples of ‘pretermit’ in sentences:
“My company has pretermitted the invitation to work with other companies.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 20, 2019.

#WOTD: Obtuse

Today we will learn about ‘obtuse’.

Do you know the meaning of the word ‘obtuse’?
‘Obtuse’ means annoyingly insensitive or slow to understand.

Someone who is obtuse has difficulty understanding things, slow on the uptake or makes no effort to understand them.

Examples of ‘obtuse’ in sentences:
“Perhaps I’m being obtuse, but I don’t understand what you’re so upset about.”
“You were too obtuse to take the hint.”
“She seemed a bit obtuse after being called by the manager.”

Some synonims of ‘obtuse’:

  • Dim.
  • Dense.
  • Dull.
  • Slow-witted.
  • Stupid.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 6, 2019.

#EngVocab: Substitutes of “Little”

Do you know other words to say ‘little’?
Today we will learn about the substitutes of ‘little’.

Let’s start.

  • Petite: small and thin in an attractive way (of a woman).

E.g. “My aunt is petite, pretty, and very ambitious.

  • Pygmy: the smallest of a group (of animals or plants).

E.g. “No pygmy owls were present when we went to the bird sanctuary.”

  • Minuscule: very tiny.

E.g. “The film was shot in a minuscule amount of time.”

  • Skimpy: very small in size or amount.

E.g. They provided only skimpy details of the event.”

  • Wee: small; little (informal).

E.g. “I’ll have a wee drop of cream in my coffee.”

  • Puny: Small, tiny and weak.

E.g. “They laughed at my puny efforts.”

  • Diminutive: extremely or unusually small.

E.g. “She was a diminutive figure beside her big friend.”

  • Teeny: very small (informal).

E.g. “My cousin gave just a teeny slice of cake for me.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, December 16, 2018.

#EngClass: Blending Words (5)

Today we will learn more about ‘blending words’.

You can review the first lesson here englishtips4u.com/2012/06/27/engclass-blending-words/
You can review the second lesson here englishtips4u.com/2018/06/17/engclass-blending-words-2/
You can review the third lesson here englishtips4u.com/2018/07/01/engclass-blending-words-3/
You can review the fourth lesson here englishtips4u.com/2018/08/15/engclass-blending-words-4/

Here are some examples of blending words:

  • Cinedigm (cinema + paradigm).

Meaning: a new paradigm in cinema.
E.g. “The musical poetry become a cinedigm in recent years.”

  • Cosplay (costume + play).

Meaning: dressing up and pretending to be a fictional character.
E.g. “The most popular cosplay theme is anime character.”

  • Docudrama (documentary + drama).

Meaning: a dramatized television movie based on real events.
E.g. “They are making a docudrama about the controversial court case.”

  • Knowledge base (knowledge + database).

Meaning: a database used for knowledge sharing and management.
E.g. “Building a knowledge base system becomes one of the key point in the study.”

  • Imagineering (imagination + engineering).

Meaning: the implementation of creative ideas in practical form.
E.g. “This imagineering can probably attract the attention of the crowd.”

  • Ginormous (gigantic + enormous).

Meaning: extremely large.
E.g. “Our orders came in two ginormous boxes.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, December 2, 2018.

#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘Beautiful’ (2)

Today we will learn more about other ways to say ‘beautiful’.
You can review the first lesson here https://englishtips4u.com/2018/11/18/engvocab-substitutes-of-beautiful/

Let’s start.

  • Marvelous: causing great wonder; extraordinary.

E.g. “It was a marvelous performance.”

  • Angelic: exceptionally beautiful, innocent, or kind.

E.g. “She had an angelic smile.”

  • Slick: smooth and glossy (of skin or hair).

E.g. “His hair was dark brown and perfectly slick.”

  • Striking: noticeable, outstanding, attracting notice or attention.

E.g. “His eyes are his most striking feature.”

  • Swell: great or excellent; wealthy; elegant person (slang).

E.g. “You look swell in that dress!”

  • Enchanting: delightfully charming or attractive.

E.g. “The birds in the aviary at the zoo were enchanting.”

  • Flawless: without any blemished or imperfections; perfect.

E.g. “She had flawless olive skin and huge eyes with clear and bright pupil.”

  • Refined: elegant and cultured in appearance, manner, or taste.

E.g. “He has refined taste and manners.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, November 18, 2018.

#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘Beautiful’

Do you know other words to say ‘beautiful’?
Today we will learn about the substitutes of ‘beautiful’.

Let’s start.

  • Exquisite: very beautiful and delicate.

E.g. “Her wedding dress was absolutely exquisite.”

  • Splendid: excellent; very impressive.

E.g. “The fireworks looked very splendid in the dark sky.”

  • Astonishing: causing a feeling of great surprise or wonder; very surprising.

E.g. “The old man had an astonishing performance.”

  • Magnificent: very good; deserving to be admired.

E.g. “The scenery has a magnificent view.”

  • Breathtaking: inspiring or exciting.

E.g. “The house has breathtaking views from every room.”

  • Divine: extremely good, pleasant, or enjoyable.

E.g. “Their new place is quite divine.”

  • Ravishing: unusually attractive, pleasing, or striking.

E.g. “She looked absolutely ravishing in that dress.”

  • Delightful: giving great pleasure; highly pleasing.

E.g. “It has been a delightful evening.”

  • Dazzling: briliantly or showily bright, colorful, or impressive.

E.g. “The actor gave a dazzling smile in the movie premiere.”

  • Fetching: pleasant or attractive.

E.g. “You look very fetching in that hat.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, November 4, 2018.

#EngVocab: Phrasal Verbs Related to Work (2)

Do you know phrasal verbs related to work?
Today we will learn more about phrasal verbs related to work.
You can review the first lesson here englishtips4u.com/2018/06/01/engvocab-phrasal-verbs-related-to-work/

Let’s start.

  • Call off.

Meaning: to decide that a planned event will not happen.
Example: “My boss decided to call off the meeting.”

  • Run by.

Meaning: tell someone about an idea or plan so that they can give you their opinion.
Example: “It would be better to run by the idea with your manager first.”

  • Fill in for.

Meaning: to do somebody’s job for a short time while they are not there.
Example: Can you fill in for me for a few minutes?”

  • Drum up.

Meaning: to get support or business through hard work and effort.
Example: “He was trying to drum up the project.”

  • Take on.

Meaning: to agree to be responsible for something.
Example: “Don’t take on more than you can handle.”

  • Burn out.

Meaning: to become very phisically and emotionally tired by working too hard over a period of time.
Example: “Stop doing this high pressure job. You could burn out young.”

  • Draw up.

Meaning: prepare something in writing, especially an official document.
Example: “Both companies agree to draw up the contract.”

  • Knock off (informal).

Meaning: to leave work at the end of the day or stop working for a short break.
Example: “Do you want to knock off early today?”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, October 7, 2018.

#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘Big’

Do you know other words to say ‘big’?
Today we will learn about the substitutes of ‘big’.

Let’s start.

  • Colossal: extraordinarily great in size, extent, or degree.

E.g. “The owner was asking for a colossal amount of money for the house.”

  • Burly: large and strong; heavily built (of a person).

E.g. “A burly figure came towards him from across the road.”

  • Tremendous: very great in amount, scale, or intensity.

E.g. “We went to a tremendous party.”

  • Massive: large and heavy or solid.

E.g. “Eight massive stone pillars supported the roof.”

  • Strapping: healthy, big, and strong (especially of young person).

E.g. “My aunt remembered my brother as a strapping youth with a big appetite.”

  • Hefty: large in amount, size, force, etc.

E.g. “The film contains a hefty dose of comedy.”

  • Ample: more than enough; plentiful.

E.g. “You will have ample opportunity to ask questions after the presentation.”

  • Immense: marked by greatness especially in size or degree.

E.g. “The immense pressure causes the rock to fracture.”

  • Humongous: very huge (informal American slang).

E.g. “They have a humongous dog.”

  • Vast: very spacious or large; of great extent.

E.g. “Vast areas of land have become desert.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, September 9, 2018.

#EngVocab: Substitutes of ‘Delicious’

Do you know other words to say ‘delicious’?
Today we will learn about the substitutes of ‘delicious’.
Let’s start.

  1. Toothsome: extremely pleasing to the sense of taste.
    E.g. “The restaurant which once served a toothsome steak has closed.”
  2. Savory: full of flavor, delicious and tasty; usually something that someone has cooked.
    E.g. “She placed a huge dish of savory steaming meat before him.”
  3. Zestful: a taste which is spicy and flavorsome.
    E.g. “The drink has a zestful black cherry flavor.”
  4. Scrumptious: extremely appetizing or delicious.
    E.g. “We had a scrumptious lunch.”
  5. Palatable: acceptable to the palate; pleasant to taste.
    E.g. “The meal was barely palatable.”
  6. Luscious: having a pleasingly rich, sweet taste.
    E.g. “The dessert has great appearance and luscious flavor.”
  7. Delectable: looking or tasting extremely good.
    E.g. “The vegetable makes the food delectable.”
  8. Enticing: attractive or tempting; alluring.
    E.g. “An enticing smell came from the kitchen.”
  9. Ambrosial: exceptionally pleasing to taste or smell; especially delicious or fragrant.
    E.g. “We can smell the ambrosial aroma of the roast.”
  10. Sapid: having a strong, pleasant taste.
    E.g. “You should try this, the food has a sapid, harmonic taste.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 26, 2018.