All posts by sherly99blog

#IOTW: Idioms about Friendship

Hello, fellas! How was your weekend?

Today we will learn more idioms about friendship.
Do you know some idioms about friendship?
#IOTW

Let’s start.
1. Like two peas in a pod.
Meaning: very similar.
E.g. “My brother and his best friend were like two peas in a pod.”
#IOTW

  1. To bury the hatchet.
    Meaning: to end a conflict and become friendly.
    E.g. “My father and my mother agreed to bury the hatchet after years of arguing.”
    #IOTW

  2. To hit it off.
    Meaning: find yourself immidately and naturally friendly with someone.
    E.g. “My cousin met his friend at school and hit it off right away.”
    #IOTW

  3. Joined at the hip.
    Meaning: refers to friends who are always seen together.
    E.g. “My sister and her best friend are not joined at the hip. They have their own personal lives and spaces.”
    #IOTW

  4. To see eye to eye with someone.
    Meaning: agree with someone.
    E.g. “I don’t always see eye to eye with my mother.”
    #IOTW

  5. To build bridges.
    Meaning: to promote friendly relations between people or groups.
    E.g. “The cafe owner should build bridges with next door butcher.”
    #IOTW

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, November 10, 2019.

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#EngVocab: Synonyms of ‘Problem’ (2)

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘problem.’
Do you know the synonyms of ‘problem’?

Let’s start.
Some synonyms of ‘problems’:
1. Quandary
Meaning: a state of uncertainty over what to do in a difficult situation.
Example:
“My friend was in a quandary about which job to accept.”
#EngVocab

Some synonyms of ‘problems’:
2. Plight.
Meaning: an unfavourable or unfortunate condition.
Example:
“I had great sympathy for his plight.”
#EngVocab

Some synonyms of ‘problems’:
3. Vexation.
Meaning: something that causes annoyance, frustration, or worry.
Example:
“My brother was facing a vexation at work.”
#EngVocab

Some synonyms of ‘problems’:
4. Muddle.
Meaning: a disordered or confusing state.
Example:
“My company got into an awful muddle with the tax forms.”
#EngVocab

Some synonyms of ‘problems’:
5. Hitch.
Meaning: a temporary interruption or problem.
Example:
“The ceremony went off without a hitch.”
#EngVocab

Some synonyms of ‘problems’:
6. Snag
Meaning: an unexpected or hidden obstacle.
Example:
“I take every snag in my way as a stepping stone.”
#EngVocab

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, October 27, 2019.

#IOTW: Cat Idioms (2)

Do you know some cat idioms?

Here’s some cat idioms for you.
1. (Like) herding cats.
Meaning: difficult to coordinate.
Example: “She is like herding cats. We can’t cooperate with her.”

  1. A cat nap.
    Meaning: a short sleep during the day.
    Example: “It’s good to have a cat nap after the hard work.”

  2. Bell the cat.
    Meaning: take on a difficult or impossible task.
    Example: “My brother got a rise after he belled the cat.”

  3. Cat on a hot tin roof.
    Meaning: be extremely nervous.
    Example: “The trainee looks like a cat on a hot tin roof while waiting for the result of her internship application.”

  4. Cat’s paw.
    Meaning: a person being used by someone else.
    Example: “My friend treats his brother as a cat’s paw to get out of the problem.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, October 13, 2019.

#WOTD: Trouvaille

Today we will learn about ‘trouvaille’.
Do you know the meaning of the word ‘trouvaille’?

‘Trouvaille’ is a noun.
‘Trouvaille’ is pronounced as /trüˈvī/.
#WOTD

‘Trouvaille’ means a valuable discovery, or a lucky find.
#WOTD

Some synonims of ‘trouvaille’:
1. Collectible.
2. Valuable.
3. Showpiece.
4. Catch.
5. Godsend.
#WOTD

Examples of ‘trouvaille’ in sentences:
“After searching for a while, we found a trouvaille in the library.”
#WOTD

Examples of ‘trouvaille’ in sentences:
“The vase is a trouvaille, made from unique pattern glass.”
#WOTD

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, September 29, 2019.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Angry’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘angry’.
Do you know some synonyms of ‘angry’?

Let’s start.

  • Irate: being extremely angry.

E.g. “We have received some irate phone calls from customers.”

  • Vexed: annoyed, frustrated, or worried.

E.g. “It vexed me to think of others gossiping behind my back.”

  • Indignant: feeling or showing anger because of something that is wrong or not fair.

E.g. “My aunt was indignant after the false accusations.”

  • Aggrieved: unhappy and angry because of unfair treatment.

E.g. “My brother felt aggrievex at not being chosen for the team.”

  • Incensed: greatly enraged.

E.g. “The worker was incensed at the company decision to reduce yearly bonus.”

  • Waspish: readily expressing anger or irritation.

E.g. “The customer sounded waspish and impatient.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, September 15, 2019.

#EngVocab: Phrasal Verbs with ‘Beat’

Today we will learn about phrasal verbs with ‘beat’.
Do you know any phrasal verbs with ‘beat’?

Let’s start.

  • Beat to.

Meaning: to do something before someone else.
Example: “My company wants to release the same idea but another company has beat us to it.”

  • Beat out.

Meaning: to defeat or finished before the competitor.
Example: “The new leader beat out the rival company leader and won the contract.”

  • Beat up.

Meaning: to blame or critisize yourself or someone else.
Example: “Don’t beat up yourself up. You need to let it go.”

  • Beat down.

Meaning: to force someone to accept a lower price than what they wanted.
Example: “You need to beat down the seller to the price that suits you.”

  • Beat off.

Meaning: to stop someone or something from succeeding.
Example: “The small shop beat off the supermarket in selling the accesories.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, July 21, 2019.

#EngVocab: Phrasal Verbs with ‘Throw’

Today we will learn about phrasal verbs with ‘throw’.
Do you know phrasal verbs with ‘throw’?

Let’s start.

  • Throw off.

Meaning: get rid of something that has prevented you from doing what you want or behaving in the way you want.
Example: “It took me a week to throw off my cold.”

  • Throw in.

Meaning: add something extra without asking for more money.
Example: “I printed extra pictures and they threw in a photo album.”

  • Throw up

Meaning: produce something new in a hurry.
Example: “The company threw up other colours in the design.”

  • Throw away

Meaning: to waste something.
Example: “Don’t throw away this opportunity!”

  • Throw out.

Meaning: to discard something worthless or unnecessary.
Example: “We decided to throw out all our old clothes.”

  • Throw down.

Meaning: cause something to drop.
Example: “She threw down the magazines and went out.”

  • Throw on.

Meaning: to put on a piece of clothing quickly and carelessly.
Example: “I just threw down a pair of jeans and a T-shirt.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, July 4, 2019.

#WOTD: Gash

Today we will learn about ‘gash’.
Do you know the meaning of the word ‘gash’?

‘Gash’ is a noun.
‘Gash’ is pronounced as /ɡaSH/.
‘Gash’ is an English slang word.
#WOTD

‘Gash’ means a long, deep cut in your skin or in the surface of something.
#WOTD

Some synonims of ‘gash’:
1. Laceration.
2. Tear.
3. Split.
4. Rip.
5. Gouge.
#WOTD

Examples of ‘gash’ in sentences:
“The explosion left a wide gash in the rock.”
#WOTD

Examples of ‘gash’ in sentences:
“He was bleeding from a gash on his head.”
#WOTD

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, May 26, 2019.

#EngTrivia: “Happy” vs “Glad”

Do you know the difference between “happy” and “glad”?

“Happy” and “glad” are both adjectives.

We use them when we want to express pleasure.

The meaning of those words are almost the same but they are different in the term of usage.
“Happy” indicates a stronger feeling than “glad”.

“Happy” is more accented and positive, deeper felt.

“Happy” means:

  1. Feeling or showing pleasure or contentment.

a. having a sense of confidence in or satisfaction with (a person, arrangement, or situation).

E.g. “We are happy to announce the engagement of our daughter.”
b. satisfied with the quality or standard of.

E.g. “I had a very happy childhood.”
c. willing to do something.

E.g. “I’d be happy to help you.”
d. used in greetings.

E.g. “Happy new year, my best friend.”
2. Fortunate and convenient.

E.g. “I’m happy to have known you.”

(According to Google Translate Dictionary)
“Glad” is more formal than “happy”. We usually use “glad” in writing business letters or emails.

“Glad” is generally the opposite of sad and gloomy.

“Glad” means “pleased; delighted” (according to Google Translate Dictionary)

E.g. “I am glad to hear that you have passed the examination with a good record.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 7, 2018.

#UKSlang: UK Slang (11)

Today we will learn about other UK slangs  apart from those we have talked about in past sessions.

Let’s start!
1. Laughing gear: one’s mouth.

E.g. “It’s not funny. Shut your laughing gear!”
2. Know one’s onions: well versed on a subject.

E.g. “That guy sure knows his onions.”
3. Hard cheese: expression of bad luck.

E.g. “The new rules is a hard cheese for the employees.”
4. Go to spare: become angry or frustrated.

E.g. “All his problems make him go to spare.”
5. Eating irons: eating utensils.

E.g. “Let us prepare the eating irons.”
6. Do one’s nut: become enraged.

E.g. “I gave him the news, and he did his nut.”
7. Bang to the rights: caught in the act.

E.g. “The police came and caught the robber bang to rights in front of the store.”
8. Argy-bargy: heated confrontation.

E.g. “I don’t want us to get into argy bargy just because of this small problem.”
9. All mouth and no trousers: all talk, no action.

E.g. “He’s all mouth and no trousers. Nobody wants to listen to him.”
10. Sad arse: pathetic person.

E.g. “You are a sad arse! Can’t you even boil an egg?”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 6, 2017.

#UKSlang: UK Slang (11)

Today we will learn about other UK slangs  apart from those we have talked about in past sessions.

Let’s start!
1. Laughing gear: one’s mouth.

E.g. “It’s not funny. Shut your laughing gear!”
2. Know one’s onions: well versed on a subject.

E.g. “That guy sure knows his onions.”
3. Hard cheese: expression of bad luck.

E.g. “The new rules is a hard cheese for the employees.”
4. Go to spare: become angry or frustrated.

E.g. “All his problems make him go to spare.”
5. Eating irons: eating utensils.

E.g. “Let us prepare the eating irons.”
6. Do one’s nut: become enraged.

E.g. “I gave him the news, and he did his nut.”
7. Bang to the rights: caught in the act.

E.g. “The police came and caught the robber bang to rights in front of the store.”
8. Argy-bargy: heated confrontation.

E.g. “I don’t want us to get into argy bargy just because of this small problem.”
9. All mouth and no trousers: all talk, no action.

E.g. “He’s all mouth and no trousers. Nobody wants to listen to him.”
10. Sad arse: pathetic person.

E.g. “You are a sad arse! Can’t you even boil an egg?”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, August 6, 2017.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Whisper’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘whisper’.
Do you know other words to say it?

Let’s start.

  • Murmur.

Meaning: say something in a low, soft, or indistinct voice.
E.g. “He took the mug of coffee with a murmur of thanks.”

  • Mutter.

Meaning: speak quietly and in a low voice that is not easy to hear, often when you are worried or complaining about something.
E.g. “The woman next in line began to mutter of discontent to herself.”

  • Mumble.

Meaning: say something indistinctly and quietly, making it difficult for others to hear.
E.g. “I wish you wouldn’t mumble. I can’t hear you clearly.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, June 9, 2019.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Difficult’ (2)

Today we will learn more about other ways to say ‘difficult’.

You can review the first lesson here https://englishtips4u.com/2019/05/12/engvocab-other-ways-to-say-difficult/

Let’s start.

  • Onerous: involving a great deal of effort, trouble or difficulty (of a task or responsibility).

E.g. “This is the most onerous task I have ever done.”

  • Herculean: requiring great strength or effort.

E.g. “Moving the stove will be a herculean endeavor.”

  • Knotty: extremely difficult or intricate

E.g. “The new management team faces some knotty problems.”

  • Cumbersome: difficult to use or handle; very complicated and inefficient.

E.g. “Although the machine looks cumbersome, it is actually easy to use.”

  • Sisyphean: impossible to complete (of a task).

E.g. “It is a sisyphean endeavor to get the two company to work together in a constructive manner.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, May 12, 2019.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Difficult’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘difficult’.
Do you know some synonyms of ‘difficult’?

Let’s start.

  • Arduous: hard to accomplish or achieve; needing a lot of effort and energy.

E.g. “She took the arduous task and devote her heart and soul to it.”

  • Toilsome: involving hard or difficult work, or great effort.

E.g. “Housework after a long journey is toilsome.”

  • Strenuous: something that takes a lot of effort, work or energy to do.

E.g. “The doctor advised my brother to avoid strenuous exercise.”

  • Operose: involving or displaying much industry or effort.

E.g. “The expanding process of my company is too slow and operose.”

  • Grueling: extremely tiring and demanding.

E.g. “The freshmen were put through a week of grueling endurance tests.”

  • Laboriuos: requiring considerable effort and time (especislly of a task, process, or journey).

E.g. “Collecting the experiment materials is a long and laborious task.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, April 28, 2019.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Afraid’

Today we will learn about other ways to say ‘afraid’
Do you know other words to say it?

Let’s start.

  • Aghast: struck with overwhelming shock; filled with sudden fright or horror.

E.g. “The police stood aghast at the terrible sight.”

  • Petrified: extremely frightened that one is unable to move.

E.g. “The idea of talking in public petrified him.”

  • Frantic: wild or distraught with fear, anxiety, or extreme emotion.

E.g. “He was quite frantic by the time we got home.”

  • Timorous: full of fear.

E.g. “The victim talked with a timorous voice.”

  • Edgy: tense, nervous, or irritable.

E.g. “I am feeling edgy about the exam tomorrow.”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, March 31, 2019.

#WOTD: Morose

Today we will learn about the word ‘morose’.
#WOTD

Do you know the meaning of ‘morose’?
#WOTD

‘Morose’ is an adjective.
‘Morose’ is pronounced as /məˈrōs/.
#WOTD

‘Morose’ means sullen and ill-tempered.
#WOTD

Some synonyms of ‘morose’:
1. Dour.
2. Surly.
3. Somber.
4. Unhappy.
5. Fed up.
#WOTD

Examples of ‘morose’ in sentences:
“Why are you so morose these days?”
#WOTD

Examples of ‘morose’ in sentences:
“He was silent and morose since the tragedy happened.”
#WOTD

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, March 17, 2019.

#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Like’

Do you know other ways to say ‘like’?
Today we will learn about other words to say ‘like’.

Let’s start.

  • Relish: to like or enjoy something.

E.g. “I relish the challenge of doing jobs that others turn down.”

  • Keen: to be eager, excited or interested in something.

E.g. “She’s very keen to learn about Japanese culture.”

  • Fond: having an affection or liking for.

E.g. “My family are all fond of going to the cinema.”

  • Applaud: show strong approval of (a person or action).

E.g. “We applaud the family’s decision to remain silent over the issue.”

  • Esteem: respect and admiration, typically for a person.

E.g. “I esteem your uncle for his kindness.”

  • Fancy: to like or want something.

E.g. “Do you fancy going out for lunch at the restaurant?”

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, March 2, 2019.

#WOTD: Brusque

Today we will learn about ‘brusque’.
Do you know the meaning of the word ‘brusque’?

‘Brusque’ is an adjective.
‘Brusque’ is pronounced as /brəsk/.
#WOTD

‘Brusque’ means short and abrupt in manner or speech.
#WOTD

Some synonims of ‘brusque’:
1. Curt.
2. Gruff.
3. Blunt.
4. Outspoken.
5. Harsh.
#WOTD

Examples of ‘brusque’ in sentences:
“His secretary was quite brusque with me.”
#WOTD

Examples of ‘brusque’ in sentences:
“The doctor spoke in a brusque tone.”
#WOTD

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, February 17, 2019.