All posts by Mettadiana

The crescent moon. The meaning of love

#GrammarTrivia: “Seem” vs. “look”

Hola, Fellas! It’s finally Friday again. How do you do during this week? I hope you are doing well. This evening we are going to have a discussion about the difference between ‘seem’ and ‘look.’ In this term, both words are considered as copular verbs. Do you know what copular verb is?

Copular verb is a verb that connects subject of sentence to a subject complement. In other words, copular verb is linking verb. There are some words that are considered as copular verbs, such as ‘feel,’ ‘look,’ ‘smell,’ ‘taste,’ etc.  In this occasion, we will specifically talk about ‘look’ and its common substitute, ‘seem.’

Sometimes, you might face a confusion on whether you should use ‘seem’ or ‘look’ to express your opinion of an object. As illustration,

  • “She (look/seem) happy today.”
  • “You (look/seem) pretty today.”

Which verb will you choose to complete each of the example?

“You look pretty today.” “She looks happy today.” – @NeNi961111 

Seem and look. – @Syalaladubidum

You look pretty today. She seems happy today. – @niaangreinny

You look pretty today. She seems happy today. Am I right? – @innecfc

‘Look’ for the second question and ‘seem’ for the first I guess. – @ryutz_

“Seem”

In the first example, I would choose “seem” as the answer. “Seem” is a general copular verb to express our sense/impression about something. On the other words, we use “seem” when the judgement is subjective, it’s like you are using your intuition.

On the other hands, we can also say “She looks happy today” if we see her laughing or smiling. Here are some examples on how to use “seem’ in a sentence,

  • “The task seems difficult to be accomplished,”
  • “It seems like we are going to have a long chat this evening.”

“Look”

Meanwhile, I would say “You look pretty today” in the second illustration. “Look” is generally used as a result of a physical observation of an objectSo, you would say “look” if you can see the appearance of the object. For example,

  • “You look stylish with this dress,”
  • “This area looks dirty with these scattered trashes.”

 

source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, March 15, 2019

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#WOTD: Impetus

Hi, Fellas! How are you doing? How are your days so far? This evening we meet again in word of the day session. This time I am going to share ‘impetus’ as the topic. Have you ever heard about this word?

Impetus is adopted from Latin, ‘impetere,’ which means to attack. In a sentence, ‘impetus’ acts as a noun with a meaning a force to activate a process or to increase its activity. In addition, this word could mean a force in order to make something moving.

There are some synonyms of ‘impetus,’ such as

  • ‘boost,’
  • ‘stimulant,’
  • ‘encouragement,’
  • ‘motivation,’ etc.

 

To complete this discussion, I would like to give some sentences with ‘impetus.’

  • “The picture of a large sum of money is the impetus of corruption.”
  • “The permission to study abroad could be the impetus, so he’s been study harder lately.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, March 1, 2019

#WOTD: Foray

Hi, Fellas! How are you doing? In this evening we are going to have word of the day session. Anyway, have you heard about ‘foray’?

‘Foray’ originally comes from Middle English ‘forrayen,’ which means ‘forager.’

We can use ‘foray’ either as a noun or a verb in a sentence. If you regard it as a noun, ‘foray’ means a sudden invasion/attack. On the other hand, it also means an attempt to try a new activity. In addition, ‘foray’ always refers a new territory/scope or a new occupation. 

There are some synonyms of ‘foray,’ such as ‘irruption,’ ‘invasion,’ and ‘raid.’

Lastly, here are some example of sentences with ‘foray,’

  • “I heard that last night the police forayed that abandoned building. So, it’s true that there had been a suspicious activity there.”
  • “The author forayed into romance.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, February 1, 2019

#IOTW: Idioms about personality

Hi, hello, Fellas! Happy weekend. How are you doing? It’s such a great time to meet you again in our session. This evening I would like to share some idioms that refer personalities.

  1. Chatter box.”Meaning: someone who talks a lot.
    • Example:
      • “I bet she even talk in her sleep. She’s a chatter box.”
  2. Cold fish.” Meaning: someone who is expressionless. Most of us know it as “cold” in a simpler way.
    • Example:
      • “I have no idea why most girls love cold fishes [men]. Are they that attractive?”
  3. “Dark horse.” Meaning: someone who has greater ability than we had expected, or, on the other hand, someone who apparently has greater ability than she/he had shown before.
    • Example:
      • “I know he plays piano, but I never thought that he’s very skillful at playing classics. He’s such a dark horse.”
  4. Lone wolf.” Meaning: someone who is less social. He/she prefers to be alone.
    • Example:
      • “I don’t suggest you to come to Adam. That lone wolf won’t care about your existence.”
  5. “Party animal.” Meaning: someone who often go to a party.
    • Example:
      • “I bet we will meet Wilona in Jenny’s. She’s kind of a party animal.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, January 18, 2018

#EngTrivia: January’s trivia

Hey, Fellas! How do you do? How is your first week in this new year? This evening I am going to share some fun facts about January, as an opening month of the year.

  1. Do you know that January was named after a Roman God, Janus? Janus is pictured as a person who has two heads. It is said that he is an animistic spirit of doorway and archway. Scholar believe that Janus is a symbol all new beginnings. And maybe, this is why his name had been using as the name of the first month of the year.
  2. In America January is regarded as a National Soup Month. Unfortunately, I still can’t find the history behind this event. The source I read also showed that this event is  unofficial in America. Perhaps, Americans initiated this event due to winter season in the country.
  3. In Russia, Christmas will be celebrated on 7th January this year. The reason why Russian celebrate their Christmas differently is Russians are mostly Orthodox Christians. And Orthodox church use Julian calendar, which was made by Julius Caesar in 45 BC.
  4. January is also an important month for Haitians because Haiti Independence Day was proclaimed on 1 January 1804.
  5. If you were born in January, then you are lucky enough to have garnets as your birthstone. It is a red colored gemstone and it shapes like pomegranate.
  6. January is also well known as a National Blood Donor in America. This event was firstly initiated in 1970 by Richard Nixon, the 37th President of USA.

Anyway, that’s all I can share in this session. If you know anything else that is related to January, you are free to share it.

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, January 4, 2018

#EngKnowledge: The origin of Thanksgiving

Hi, Fellas, happy weekend! How are you doing during this week? Have you sensed holiday atmosphere in the air? Speaking of holiday, in this season I would like to share some information about the origin of thanksgiving

When you hear the word “thanksgiving,” what does suddenly come to your mind? Is it turkey? Or autumn? Family gathering? Do you know when was Thanksgiving celebrated for the first time? And where was it?

It is said that the first Thanksgiving was celebrated in North America, 1621. The tradition itself had been brought by English Pilgrims that came to Massachusetts. Some history stated it was acknowledged when The Pilgrims shared meals with the native, Wampanoag Indians, as a celebration of good harvest.

However, a historian named Michael Gannon stated that the culture had been existed around fifty years before. On September 1565, there were some colonists in St. Augustine, Florida, shared the Thanksgiving banquet to the natives.  Despite of the original start of Thanksgiving, an information from History.com stated that for more than two centuries since 1621, Thanksgiving was  celebrated in a different time by the colonist and Americans.  And in some moments, Thanksgiving was celebrated for different purpose, too. As Illustrations, during American Revolution, Thanksgiving even celebrated more than one day a year.

After that, in 1789, George Washington hold Thanksgiving to celebrate America’s independence and to express gratitude of successful American ratification. Finally,  in 1863, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed that Thanksgiving should be celebrated each year on final Thursday of November as a national event in America. However, the celebration was revised on the fourth Thursday of November by Franklin Roosevelt due to induce retail sale during Great Depression during 1930s. Ultimately, I think that nowadays’ Thanksgiving day is celebrated according to Roosevelt basis.
source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, November 30, 2018

#WOTD: Valorous

Hello, Fellas! How are you today? Isn’t today a lovely day since it’s weekend! Anyway, how’s your week so far? Mine is great because I finally got something I need in order to pursue my desired plan, or maybe you can say it my future.

Well, back to Englishtips4u session, this evening we are going to talk about a word called ‘valorous.’ Is there someone familiar with this word?

According to Merriam-webster dictionary, ‘valorous’ is an adjective with “brave” as a meaning. It is said that ‘valorous’ was originally derived from French ‘valeureux,’ but there is another statement that this word came from Latin ‘valorosus.’ In addition, there are some synonyms of ‘valorous,’ such as:

  • ‘bold,’
  • ‘dauntless,’
  • ‘valiant’ and
  • ‘courageous.’

Here are some example of the usage of ‘valorous’ in a sentence:

  • “I think someone who have courage to criticise our government is such valorous person.”
  • “He tackled the thief who was going to attack me with a knife. What a valorous act!”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, November 16, 2018

#EngTrivia: Commonly misspelled and missused vocabulary (2)

Hi, Fellas! Good evening and happy Friday! How’s your week so far? Well, in this evening I would to continue our session about  some vocabulary that are usually confusing due to similar letter arrangement. For you who missed the topic two weeks ago, you can read the article by following this link 

“Stationery” vs. “stationary”

Before I start explaining them, is there anyone know the difference of those words?

“Stationary means stability there is no change. While stationery means writing paper and everything related with write process.” – @al3ajalabead

“Stationery” is known as a noun, which means something that is used for writing, such as papers, pens, pencils, etc. Meanwhile, “stationary” is an adjective to refer something that is not moving. There are some similar words of “stationary” to make it clear, such as

  • “immobile,”
  • “static,” and
  • “motionless.”

Example:

  • “I am going to stationery shop to get some pencils.”
  • “Wall is a simple example of stationary material.”

“Principle” vs. “principal.”

“Principle” acts as a noun that means basic/fundamental belief or concept. On the other hand, “principal” can be either a noun or an adjective. As a noun, “principal” means an important person in an organisation, but as an adjective, this word means the most important.

EaEmple:

  • “I have a principle to not intervene my personal life with work.”
  • “Mr. Heidi is our school principal.”

“Affect” vs. “effect.”

“Affect” is a verb that means to give an impact to someone or something, while “effect” is the impact itself (noun).

Example:

  • “Deforestation affects the increase of global temperature.”
  • “Extinction of some species is one of the effects of global warming.”

source:

  • Merriam Webster

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, November 2, 2018

#EngTrivia: Commonly missused and misspelled vocabulary

Hi, Fellas! Good evening and happy Friday! How’s your week so far? I hope you experienced something great! Well, in this evening I would share some vocabulary that are usually confusing because most of them have almost similar letter arrangement or typography if I’m not mistaken.

“A lot” vs. “alot.”

Before I start explaining them, is there anyone know the the meaning of each of them and how we should use it?

“Not so good at explaining, but here’s my shot. “A lot” is for a particular ‘bunch’ of items. Eg: There’s a lot of books for A there, a lot of pencils for B here.” – @educareer_jp 

It is generally known that “a lot” can act as a pronoun or an adverb, which means many/pleunty.  Meanwhile, “allot” is verb, which means to distribute or to assign. There are some words that are related to “allot,” they are “allocate,” “administer,” “hand out,” etc.

Example:

  • “We have a lot of problem to deal with.”
  • “You are alloted 20 minutes to present your research findings.”

“Awhile” vs. “a while.”

Both “a while” and “awhile” means “a short period of time.” However, each of them have a different role in a sentence. “Awhile” acts as an adverb that explain something happens in a short time. On the other hand, “a while” is a noun phrase.

Example:

  • “I think I’m going to stay here awhile.”
  • “Pasta will be ready in a while.”

“Desert” vs. “dessert.”

“Desert” means to abandon/to leave something (verb), while “dessert” is food that usually served after meal and generally it’s sweet (noun).

Example:

  • “This town is very quiet it’s looked like deserted place.”
  • “I want cheese cake as my dessert.”

source:

  • Merriam Webster
  • Grammarly

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, October 19, 2018

#EngVocab: British vs. American vocabulary (2)

Hi, Fellas! Good evening. How are you today? In this session I would like to continue the topic of some differences between British and American vocabulary. 

  1. BrE: ‘flashlight’ vs. AmE; ‘torch.’
    • Example,
      • “Do you have a torch?”
      • “Do you have a flashlight?”
  2. BrE: ‘underground. vs. AmE: ‘subway.’
    • Example:
      • “Do you know which underground I should take to go to city’s library?”
      • “Do you know which subway I should take to go to city’s library?”
  3. BrE: ‘post’ vs. AmE: ‘mail.’
    • Example:
      • “You got a post from your mother.”
      • “You got a mail from your mother.”
  4. BrE: ‘trainers’ vs. AmE: ‘sneakers.’
    • Example:
      • “Where did you put my trainers?”
      • “Where did you put my sneakers?”
  5. BrE: ‘windscreen.’ vs. AmE: ‘windshield.’ 
    • Example:
      • “I think the windscreens are broken.”
      • “I think the windshields are broken.”
  6. BrE: ‘rubber’ vs. AmE: ‘eraser.’
    • Example:
      • “May I borrow your rubber?”
      • “May I borrow your eraser?”
  7. BrE: ‘courgette’ vs. AmE: ‘zucchini.’
    • Example:
      • “I think I’ll have baked courgette as side dish.”
      • “I think I’ll have baked zucchini as side dish.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, October 5, 2018


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^MD

#EngVocab: British vs American vocabulary

Hi, Fellas! Good evening. How are your days? In this session I would like to share some differences on British and American vocabulary. #

  1. BrE: ‘flat’ vs. AmE: ‘apartment.’
    • Example:
      • “I love your new flat.”
      • “I love your new apartment.”
  2. BrE: ‘ground floor’ vs. AmE: ‘first floor.’ 
    • Example:
      • “We will meet at Starbuck on the ground floor.”
      • “We will meet at Starbuck on the first floor.”
  3. BrE: ‘mobile phone’ vs. AmE: ‘cell phone.’
    • Example:
      • “I lost my mobile phone.”
      • “I lost my cell phone.”
  4. BrE: ‘chemist’s’ vs. AmE: ‘drugstore’ or ‘pharmacy.’
    • Example:
      • “I work at the chemist’s in Fifth Avenue.”
      • “I work at the drugstore in Fifth Avenue.”
  5. BrE: ‘timetable’ vs. AmE: ‘schedule.’
    • Example:
      • “Our class timetable is packed for the next two days.”
      • “Our class schedule is packed for the next two days.”
  6. BrE: ‘nappy’ vs. AmE: ‘diaper.’
    • Example:
      • “We need extra nappies for the baby.”
      • “We need extra diapers for the baby.”
  7. BrE: ‘loo,’ vs. AmE: ‘restroom/bathroom.’
    • example:
      • “I need to use the loo.”
      • “I need to use the restroom.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, September 21, 2018

 

#WOTD: Wanderlust

Hi, Fellas! Good evening. How’s your days? I hope you experienced something great! In this session I would like to talk about ‘wanderlust.’ Have you heard about it?

“I’ve heard about it. But i never know what it means,” – @angelccxo 

“Wanderlust = a desire to travel,” – @Aldo_Bandan 

I saw ‘wanderlust’ as a novel title in Wattpad beforehand. This word sounds nice, doesn’t it? ‘Wanderlust’ is a noun that has a meaning as a strong feeling to wander/travel.  Merriam-Webster Dictionary states that this word was form from a German, “wandern,” and “lust.”

Unfortunately, there is no any related word or synonym of “wanderlust” right now. #WOTD Finally, here are some example on using ‘wanderlust’ in a sentence:

  • “Wanderlust has led her to Paris.”
  • ‘I sometimes get annoyed by Ana because of her uncontrollable wanderlust.’

source:

Merriam Webster Dictionary

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, September 14, 2018

#WOTD: Paroxysm

Hi, Fellas! Good evening. How’s your days? I hope you experienced something great! In this session I would like to talk about ‘paroxysm.’ Have you heard about it?  

Well, the first time I saw ‘paroxysm’ was when I seeing through my Pinterest timeline. It caught my eyes because I felt like there was something behind this word. ‘Paroxysm’ is a noun that has a meaning as a sudden burst of emotion. it has to be a strong feeling and you cannot control it. As a simple illustration, jealousy!

On the other hand, according to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, you could also say that ‘paroxysm’ can also refers to an action.  There are some words that are similar to ‘paroxysm,’ they are ‘explosion,’ ‘eruption,’ ‘outburst,’ ‘convulsion,’ etc.

Here are some example on using ‘paroxysm’ in a sentence:

  1. “Paroxysm of laughter erupted when she was telling her funny experience.”
  2. ‘i was overwhelmed by paroxysm of jealousy when I saw him with another girl.’

source:

  • Cambridge Dictionary
  • Merriam Webster Dictionary

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, August 24, 2018

#EngVocab: What to say instead of using ‘very’ (2)

Hi, Fellas! Happy Friday night! How’s your work/school? This evening I am going to share some words that is used to substitute a strong expression, such as ‘very beautiful,’ ‘very smart,’ etc. 

  1. Exhausted.’ Meaning: ‘very tired.’ 
    • Example:
      • ‘I have many classes today and I still need to attend reading club meeting. I’m exhausted.’
  2. Gorgeous.’ Meaning: ‘very pretty’.
    • Example:
      • ‘You look gorgeous in that dress.’
  3. Hysterical.’ Meaning: ‘very funny.’
    • Example:
      • ‘Look at his hysterical act. I can barely laughing.’ 
  4. Exact.’ Meaning: ‘very accurate.’
    • Example:
      • ‘That was the exact answer I want to hear!’
  5. Obvious.’ Meaning: ‘very clear.’
    • Example:
      • ‘I know Jess likes Andrew. It is obvious.’’ 
  6. Captivating.’ Meaning: ‘very interesting.’ 
    • Example;
      • ‘She is the most captivating girl I have ever met.’ 
  7. Compelling.’ Meaning: ‘very powerful’ (effect).
    • Example:
      • ‘I have no doubt he would win the competition, his arguments are compelling’’ 
  8. Essential.’ Meaning: ‘very necessary.’
    • Example:
      • ‘Vitamin C is one of essential nutrients for our body.’ 
  9. Exceptional.’ Meaning: ‘very special.’ 
    • Example:
      • ‘You can have my dresses, even my jewelries, but not my books. They are exceptional!’ 
  10. Innovative.’ Meaning: ‘very creative.’
    • Example:
      • ‘I think her idea is innovative.’’ 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, August 10, 2018

#EngVocab: Types of injuries

Hi, Fellas! Happy Friday night! How’s your day? I hope you have a great one.

“I feel so excited because tomorrow I am gonna meet my old friends…’ – @mukmukhsin

“Exhausting day.” – @Albet_isla 

“I feel so great because today is the last day of exam, and of course I’ll be free from my lectures.” – @FathiaRD

This evening we are going to talk about injuries. Do you know what kind of
injuries we usually have? Bruise? Sprain?

“Hamstring, football fans must be familiar with this injury haha.. It is a muscle strain injuries. It happens when the athletes do acceleration rapidly that can torn their muscle, or maybe overused their knee.” – @Albet_isla

  1. ‘Cut.’ Meaning: a wound that is caused by incision of sharp edged
    things, such as a knife.

    •  Example:
      • ‘Don’t touch my hand. I’ve just had a paper cut.’
  2. ‘Fracture.’ Meaning: one kind of injuries that is caused by the cracking/breaking of your bones.
    • Example:
      • ‘He got an arm fracture from falling down the stairs.’
  3. ‘Bruise.’ Meaning: a bluish/purplish color on your skin led by the bursting of your blood vessels.
    • Example:
      • ‘I’ve just accidentally knocked my knee. I hope it wouldn’t cause any bruise.’
  4. ‘Splinter.’ Meaning: a small and thin break on your skin. I think in
    Bahasa it is known for ‘goresan.’

    • Example:
      • ‘In spite of a cut, you can get a splinter if you use the knife carelessly.’
  5. ‘Sunburn.’ Meaning: a reddening skin (inflamation) because of the overexposure of ultraviolet.
    • Example:
      • ‘I was told that Aloe vera is used to treat sunburn.’
  6. ‘Whiplash.’ Meaning: asuddent jolt, e.g., on the neck, limbs, or arms, which cause an injury.
    • Example:
      • ‘I experienced whiplash on my knee when I was started
        yoga for the very first time.’
  7. ‘Bite.’ Meaning: a kind of injuries that formed if you were bitten by someone or animals, such as dogs, cats, or maybe snakes.
    • Example:
      • ‘The dog’s bite left a mark for a quite long time.’
  8. ‘Sting.’ Meaning: a wound that is form by (usually) a sharp object that pierce through your skin, such as needles.
    • Example:
      • ‘I have a bee sting on my shoulder.’

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, July 27, 2018

#EngVocab: Ways of expressing dislike

Hi, Fellas, how’s your day? I hope you have a great one, especially, it’s weekend!

Alright, this evening I would like to talk about some vocabulary that is related to ‘dislike.’ Before I start, I want to know whether you know the other words to express ‘disllke.’ Who knows it will be one of the words I am going to share to you.

1). ‘Can’t stand.’ Meaning: to not like something/someone very much.

Example:

  • ‘I can’t stand being around him.’

“In bahasa: tidak bisa bertahan.” – @Subaggiyo

“It is an expression that used when you can’t handle something and makes you want to give up, whether in the situation of angry or sad. P.s. that’s what I usually see and use it ” – @NeNi961111

 

2). ‘Allergic.’ Meaning: a strong feeling of not liking (aversion) something or maybe someone.

  • Example:
    • ‘She is allergic to shopping in malls.’

3). ‘Disgust.’ Meaning:

  1. a strong feeling of dislike because someone/something has an unpleasant trait, whether it is an appearance, smell, behavior, etc.
  2. anger of something bad, unfair, or inappropriate.

Examples:

  • ‘His arrogance disgusts me,’ ‘

4). ‘Detest.’ Meaning: an extreme dislike. Merriam Webster dictionary states that ‘detest’ is synonymous with ‘hate’ and it sometimes can be violent.

Example:

  • ‘I actually detest our school’s new regulation.’

5). ‘Dread.’ Meaning: to fear something greatly.

Example:

  • ‘My little brother dreads lightning. That’s why he always stay with my mother when it is raining.’

The next is ‘loathe.’ Does anyone know its meaning?

“Hate something so much.” – @aminocte

“It resembles with hate..” – @nanangfauzi

“Benci.” – @kaoshitam

“Feel dislike or disgust for sth.” – @uzunyolarabasi

6). ‘Loathe.’ has a similar meaning to ‘detest.’ The question is, what is the difference?

Merriam Webster said that ‘detest’ expresses antipathy while ‘loathe’ expresses intolerance.

Example:

  • ‘Andrew’s decision on terminating the project is loathed by his team members.’

7). ‘Repel.’ Meaning: be repulsive to something. On the other word, ‘repel’ could means resisting something.

Example:

  • ‘The idea of eating broccoli repels her.’

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, June 29, 2018

#WOTD: Roseate

Hi, Fellas!! Happy Eid al-Fitr for those who celebrate it. Happy holiday for those who in a vacation. How was your day anyway?

This evening I would like to talk about the word “roseate.” This word came from Latin, “roseus,” and it was adapted and known as an English word in 15th century. “Roseate” acts an adjective, which means pink or a color that resembles a rose.

  • Example
    • “I love the roseate cardigan.”

On the other hand, “roseate” also mean optimistic. In this matter, there are some words that are related to “roseate,” such as “confident,” “doubtless,” “assuring,” etc.

  • Example:
    • “Where’s my roseate Emma? I am sure you will pass the test.”

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, June 16, 2018

#EngTrivia: Confusing words (3)

Hi, Fellas! How’s your day? This evening I would like to discuss some words that might be confusing.

“Possibility” vs “chance”

I am sure you ever heard “possibility” and “chance.” These two words are similar, but they don’t have an exact meaning.

“Possibility” is something that might happen and it usually lead by past event.

Example:

  • “It’s cloudy, I think there’s a possibility of raining today.”

Meanwhile, “chance” is an event that unpredictably happens without any cause.

Example:

  • “I am afraid we don’t have a chance to get the scholarship.”

“Possibility is a thing possible; that which may take place or come into being. Chance is doing something that has a significant risk of failure; luck.” – @JuvKehkash27

“Priceless” vs “worthless”

Next, we will talk about “priceless” and “worthless.” Is there anyone could explain the difference between these words?

“priceless is costly because of quality while worthless is valueless..” – @AsyariAzhar

At a glance, “priceless” and “worthless” may be same, which is (something) has no value. However, “priceless” and “worthless” completely have opposite meanings.

“Priceless” is usually used to describe a thing that has a very high value it can’t be calculate or something that cannot be set with any price.

Example:

  • “The time we spend with our family is priceless.”

On the other hand, “worthless” explains something that has no value at all (useless).

Example:

  • “Sometimes talking to narrow minded people is worthless. It will not lead you anywhere.”

“Tolarable” vs “tolerant”

The last is “tolerable” and “tolerant.” Anyone want to help me explaining the meaning of each of them?

“Tolerable is capable to being endured whereas tolerant is accepting pains calmly.” – @AsyariAzhar 

“Tolerable” refers the object we talk about, whether it is acceptable to us or not, while “tolerant” is our capacity to accept something.

For example,

  • “I actually have a seafood allergy, but fish is tolerable.”
  • “My sister is not tolerant to sunlight. Her skin will easily get burnt.”

 

Source:

  • Merriam-webster dictionary
  • Cambridge Dictionary
  • Oxford Dictionary

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, April 26, 2018