All posts by Mettadiana

The crescent moon. The meaning of love

#EngVocab: What to say instead of using ‘very’ (2)

Hi, Fellas! Happy Friday night! How’s your work/school? This evening I am going to share some words that is used to substitute a strong expression, such as ‘very beautiful,’ ‘very smart,’ etc. 

  1. Exhausted.’ Meaning: ‘very tired.’ 
    • Example:
      • ‘I have many classes today and I still need to attend reading club meeting. I’m exhausted.’
  2. Gorgeous.’ Meaning: ‘very pretty’.
    • Example:
      • ‘You look gorgeous in that dress.’
  3. Hysterical.’ Meaning: ‘very funny.’
    • Example:
      • ‘Look at his hysterical act. I can barely laughing.’ 
  4. Exact.’ Meaning: ‘very accurate.’
    • Example:
      • ‘That was the exact answer I want to hear!’
  5. Obvious.’ Meaning: ‘very clear.’
    • Example:
      • ‘I know Jess likes Andrew. It is obvious.’’ 
  6. Captivating.’ Meaning: ‘very interesting.’ 
    • Example;
      • ‘She is the most captivating girl I have ever met.’ 
  7. Compelling.’ Meaning: ‘very powerful’ (effect).
    • Example:
      • ‘I have no doubt he would win the competition, his arguments are compelling’’ 
  8. Essential.’ Meaning: ‘very necessary.’
    • Example:
      • ‘Vitamin C is one of essential nutrients for our body.’ 
  9. Exceptional.’ Meaning: ‘very special.’ 
    • Example:
      • ‘You can have my dresses, even my jewelries, but not my books. They are exceptional!’ 
  10. Innovative.’ Meaning: ‘very creative.’
    • Example:
      • ‘I think her idea is innovative.’’ 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, August 10, 2018

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#EngVocab: Types of injuries

Hi, Fellas! Happy Friday night! How’s your day? I hope you have a great one.

“I feel so excited because tomorrow I am gonna meet my old friends…’ – @mukmukhsin

“Exhausting day.” – @Albet_isla 

“I feel so great because today is the last day of exam, and of course I’ll be free from my lectures.” – @FathiaRD

This evening we are going to talk about injuries. Do you know what kind of
injuries we usually have? Bruise? Sprain?

“Hamstring, football fans must be familiar with this injury haha.. It is a muscle strain injuries. It happens when the athletes do acceleration rapidly that can torn their muscle, or maybe overused their knee.” – @Albet_isla

  1. ‘Cut.’ Meaning: a wound that is caused by incision of sharp edged
    things, such as a knife.

    •  Example:
      • ‘Don’t touch my hand. I’ve just had a paper cut.’
  2. ‘Fracture.’ Meaning: one kind of injuries that is caused by the cracking/breaking of your bones.
    • Example:
      • ‘He got an arm fracture from falling down the stairs.’
  3. ‘Bruise.’ Meaning: a bluish/purplish color on your skin led by the bursting of your blood vessels.
    • Example:
      • ‘I’ve just accidentally knocked my knee. I hope it wouldn’t cause any bruise.’
  4. ‘Splinter.’ Meaning: a small and thin break on your skin. I think in
    Bahasa it is known for ‘goresan.’

    • Example:
      • ‘In spite of a cut, you can get a splinter if you use the knife carelessly.’
  5. ‘Sunburn.’ Meaning: a reddening skin (inflamation) because of the overexposure of ultraviolet.
    • Example:
      • ‘I was told that Aloe vera is used to treat sunburn.’
  6. ‘Whiplash.’ Meaning: asuddent jolt, e.g., on the neck, limbs, or arms, which cause an injury.
    • Example:
      • ‘I experienced whiplash on my knee when I was started
        yoga for the very first time.’
  7. ‘Bite.’ Meaning: a kind of injuries that formed if you were bitten by someone or animals, such as dogs, cats, or maybe snakes.
    • Example:
      • ‘The dog’s bite left a mark for a quite long time.’
  8. ‘Sting.’ Meaning: a wound that is form by (usually) a sharp object that pierce through your skin, such as needles.
    • Example:
      • ‘I have a bee sting on my shoulder.’

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, July 27, 2018

#EngVocab: Ways of expressing dislike

Hi, Fellas, how’s your day? I hope you have a great one, especially, it’s weekend!

Alright, this evening I would like to talk about some vocabulary that is related to ‘dislike.’ Before I start, I want to know whether you know the other words to express ‘disllke.’ Who knows it will be one of the words I am going to share to you.

1). ‘Can’t stand.’ Meaning: to not like something/someone very much.

Example:

  • ‘I can’t stand being around him.’

“In bahasa: tidak bisa bertahan.” – @Subaggiyo

“It is an expression that used when you can’t handle something and makes you want to give up, whether in the situation of angry or sad. P.s. that’s what I usually see and use it ” – @NeNi961111

 

2). ‘Allergic.’ Meaning: a strong feeling of not liking (aversion) something or maybe someone.

  • Example:
    • ‘She is allergic to shopping in malls.’

3). ‘Disgust.’ Meaning:

  1. a strong feeling of dislike because someone/something has an unpleasant trait, whether it is an appearance, smell, behavior, etc.
  2. anger of something bad, unfair, or inappropriate.

Examples:

  • ‘His arrogance disgusts me,’ ‘

4). ‘Detest.’ Meaning: an extreme dislike. Merriam Webster dictionary states that ‘detest’ is synonymous with ‘hate’ and it sometimes can be violent.

Example:

  • ‘I actually detest our school’s new regulation.’

5). ‘Dread.’ Meaning: to fear something greatly.

Example:

  • ‘My little brother dreads lightning. That’s why he always stay with my mother when it is raining.’

The next is ‘loathe.’ Does anyone know its meaning?

“Hate something so much.” – @aminocte

“It resembles with hate..” – @nanangfauzi

“Benci.” – @kaoshitam

“Feel dislike or disgust for sth.” – @uzunyolarabasi

6). ‘Loathe.’ has a similar meaning to ‘detest.’ The question is, what is the difference?

Merriam Webster said that ‘detest’ expresses antipathy while ‘loathe’ expresses intolerance.

Example:

  • ‘Andrew’s decision on terminating the project is loathed by his team members.’

7). ‘Repel.’ Meaning: be repulsive to something. On the other word, ‘repel’ could means resisting something.

Example:

  • ‘The idea of eating broccoli repels her.’

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, June 29, 2018

#WOTD: Roseate

Hi, Fellas!! Happy Eid al-Fitr for those who celebrate it. Happy holiday for those who in a vacation. How was your day anyway?

This evening I would like to talk about the word “roseate.” This word came from Latin, “roseus,” and it was adapted and known as an English word in 15th century. “Roseate” acts an adjective, which means pink or a color that resembles a rose.

  • Example
    • “I love the roseate cardigan.”

On the other hand, “roseate” also mean optimistic. In this matter, there are some words that are related to “roseate,” such as “confident,” “doubtless,” “assuring,” etc.

  • Example:
    • “Where’s my roseate Emma? I am sure you will pass the test.”

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Friday, June 16, 2018

#EngTrivia: Confusing words (3)

Hi, Fellas! How’s your day? This evening I would like to discuss some words that might be confusing.

“Possibility” vs “chance”

I am sure you ever heard “possibility” and “chance.” These two words are similar, but they don’t have an exact meaning.

“Possibility” is something that might happen and it usually lead by past event.

Example:

  • “It’s cloudy, I think there’s a possibility of raining today.”

Meanwhile, “chance” is an event that unpredictably happens without any cause.

Example:

  • “I am afraid we don’t have a chance to get the scholarship.”

“Possibility is a thing possible; that which may take place or come into being. Chance is doing something that has a significant risk of failure; luck.” – @JuvKehkash27

“Priceless” vs “worthless”

Next, we will talk about “priceless” and “worthless.” Is there anyone could explain the difference between these words?

“priceless is costly because of quality while worthless is valueless..” – @AsyariAzhar

At a glance, “priceless” and “worthless” may be same, which is (something) has no value. However, “priceless” and “worthless” completely have opposite meanings.

“Priceless” is usually used to describe a thing that has a very high value it can’t be calculate or something that cannot be set with any price.

Example:

  • “The time we spend with our family is priceless.”

On the other hand, “worthless” explains something that has no value at all (useless).

Example:

  • “Sometimes talking to narrow minded people is worthless. It will not lead you anywhere.”

“Tolarable” vs “tolerant”

The last is “tolerable” and “tolerant.” Anyone want to help me explaining the meaning of each of them?

“Tolerable is capable to being endured whereas tolerant is accepting pains calmly.” – @AsyariAzhar 

“Tolerable” refers the object we talk about, whether it is acceptable to us or not, while “tolerant” is our capacity to accept something.

For example,

  • “I actually have a seafood allergy, but fish is tolerable.”
  • “My sister is not tolerant to sunlight. Her skin will easily get burnt.”

 

Source:

  • Merriam-webster dictionary
  • Cambridge Dictionary
  • Oxford Dictionary

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, April 26, 2018

#EngGame: Nationality (2)

Hi, Fellas. This mini game is actually had been performed before. If you missed the first part, you can check it by following this link.

Just like the previous game, I will give the names of the country and you will tell me and the other Fellas the nationality of the people who live in the given country. I will give you 8 clues which are the suffix usually put after the name of the country. They are: “-ian,” “-ean,” “-an,” “-ese,” “-er,” “-ic,” “-ish,” and “–i.”

 Ok, let’s start..

 

  1. Yemen: _______
  2. Luxembourg: ________
  3. New Zealand: ________
  4. Pakistan: _______
  5. Venezuela: ________
  6. Qatar: _______
  7. Myanmar: ________
  8. Denmark: ______
  9. Austria: _______
  10. Germany: _______

ANSWER

  1. Yemeni
  2. Luxembourgish
  3. New Zealander
  4. Pakistani
  5. Venezuelan
  6. Qatari
  7. Bumese
  8. Danish
  9. Austrian
  10. German

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, March 29, 2018

#IOTW: Idioms related to books and reading

Hello, Fellas. How’s your day? Do any of you love reading? Do you realise that tomorrow is a World Book Day? In order to welcome the day, I would like to share some idioms with the word ‘book.’

The first one is the famous one. I bet you regularly find it in some literature or even in your daily communication.

  1. “An open book.” Meaning: something/someone that is easily to be understand.
    • Example:
      • “My mom always know my way of thinking like an open book.
  2. “To take a leaf out of someone’s book.” Meaning: to imitate someone.
    • Example:
      • “Sometimes my sister irritates me because she always take a leaf out of my book.
  3. “To read between the lines.” Meaning: looking for an implied meaning.
    • Example:
      • “When you feel the world pushing you down over and over again, try to read between the lines. I believe something happens in order to lead you to be better or to a better place.”
  4. “The oldest trick in the book.” Meaning: the dishonest action that had been used over and over again.
    • Example:
      • “Aren’t you bored with the same oldest trick in the book, Matt?”
  5. “In someone’s good books.” Meaning: an expression that show if someone is pleased with you.
    • Example:
      • “His performance was in the jury’s good book.”
  6. “Bring someone to book.” Meaning: to punish someone.
    • Example:
      • “Charlie was brought to the book because of his fight with Ben.”
  7. “Balance the book.” Meaning: a process to make sure that your income and outcome match with your (bank) account note.
    • Example:
      • “I think you should balance the book. It’s strange that you always run out of money before the end of the month.”
  8. “Use every trick in the book.” Meaning: you have used every possible way to get/do something.
    • Example:
      • “I have used every trick in the book to pursue her, but she doesn’t even notice it.”
  9. “Have your nose in the book.” Meaning: to read all the time. On the other hand it also means to refer someone who is being oblivious to her/his surrounding because s(he) is to absorbed to the book.
    • Examples:
      • “She won’t respond if you call her while she’s having her nose in the book. Trust me.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, March 1, 2018

#EngKnowledge: Chinese New Year tradition

Hola, Fellas! What a beautiful day, isn’t it? Well, it must be because we are going to have a long weekend. For those who are going to celebrate Chinese New Year tomorrow, I hope you’ll have a wonderful family reunion tonight. Speaking of Chinese New Year, this evening I am going to share some information about Chinese New Year tradition.

Traditionally, when Chinese New Year is coming most people will clean their house. It is believed that cleaning the house will sweep away the bad luck. Celebrating a new year means welcoming a new beginning. Thus, removing all of the matters of the past would give a space for a new hope, prosperity, and fortune. That is why cleaning the house on Chinese New Year is prohibited.

Besides cleaning the house, some people will have a new hair cutting, buy some new outfits and other stuffs as a completion of the new start. After cleaning the house, Chinese will have a Chinese New Year eve dinner with their family, which is today. It is similar to having a family reunion in Thanksgiving, Christmas eve, as well as (if I’m not mistaken) Eid Mubarak eve. This is the most important event of Chinese New Year celebration because it would be a moment for a family to be rebound and share happiness.

Some sources states that dumpling is the most important food in this family dinner, especially in northern China. Its pocket like shape is believed will bring wealth, harmony and happiness to those who eat it. The various fillings of the dumplings will related to the fortune that awaits you in the next year.

The next thing I am going to talk about is generally the main focus of Chinese New Year, the red packet! (hong bao in Chinese). it is publicly known that a red packet contains a certain sum of money. The red packet is traditionally given from married couple to their parents and younger relatives. This is a symbol of blessing and the red color of the envelope is a symbol of happiness.

Lastly, in the following days Chinese usually go to temple and pray before visiting their another family member and relatives. That was a general tradition of Chinese New Year. People may have a similar yet a quite different one because it might be adjusted to another local tradition.

Well, I may have to call it a night. Happy Chinese New year for those who celebrate it. Have a joyful moment with your family and enjoy your special dinner.

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, February 15, 2018

#EngTips: IELTS academic writing task 1 (chart data)

Hello, Fellas. How are you? Time flies so fast, doesn’t it? It’s already February.

Today, I’m going to give some tips about performing IELTS academic writing test. For you who have some additional tips, either based on your own experience or the tips and trick guidance you’ve read, are free to share it..

I had actually shared the tips of paraphrasing, which acts as the introduction of your essay, some times ago. If you missed the session, you can read it through this link https://englishtips4u.com/2017/03/21/engtips-ielts-academic-writing-task-1-paraphrasing/

In this session, we will discuss planning the structure of the essay based on data chart. This might seem difficult, but I personally think that writing an essay from data chart is simpler than the others, such as maps and processes.

I read Barron’s Writing for The IELTS as a guidance. It suggests us to make some a list to determine and at the same time classify the data from the chart.

Firstly, we need to make a list that includes general information of the data, such as the object, the recorded time and place(s), and others.

Here is the illustration:

engtips

(Source: Barron’s Writing for The IELTS)
  • Title: Average daily sales, by number of servings
  • What (object): Average daily sales
  • When: winter and summer
  • Where: Vista cafe

Next step, you can make a comparison as well as the details from the object you have figured out.

For example:

Object comparison:

  1. Median daily sales (serving) of foods and beverages in winter

Details:

  • The highest serving: hot coffee (above 70)
  • The second highest serving: soup (50)
  • Medium number of serving: salad and ice cream (25 for each item)
  • The lowest serving: ice coffee (below 5)
  1. Median daily sales (serving) of foods and beverages in summer.

Details:

  • The highest serving: ice coffee (40)
  • The second highest serving: ice cream (35)
  • Medium number of serving: hot coffee (30)
  • Lowest number of serving: salad and soup (25)

From the details given, you can start writing your essay by comparing the data and also describing the details’ information (discussion). According to the example, you can compare the highest and the lowest food/drink serving in each season.

Lastly, make your conclusion. This part can be put either before the or after the discussion. Besides, you can write your conclusion by using the comparison information in general. For illustration, “Overall, hot coffee and soup are the most purchased items in winter while Ice coffee and ice cream reached the highest servings in summer.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, February 1, 2018

#WOTD: Cacophony

Hi, Fellas! It’s good to see you again this evening. How’s your day?

In this session we are going to discuss “cacophony.” Is there anyone have an idea of the meaning of this word?

“Ex. Shouting wife.. Lol.” – @cris_zysier

Oxford Dictionary states that “cacophony” is an unpleasant/harsh sound. In a simpler way hand you can also define it as a noise. It is said that “cacophony” was derived from a Greek word called “kakophonia” or “kakophonos.” Kakophonos itself is the combination of “kakos,” which means “bad,” and “phone” (sound).

There are some example of cacophonies in our daily life, such as the sound of vehicles on the road followed by the shouting horns, chatter, or a mixed sound of music. According to Merriam-Webster dictionary, there are some related vocabulary to “cacophony.” They are “blast,” “uproar,” “clatter,” etc.

Lastly, here are some example of sentences that contain “cacophony”

  • “The room is full of people. I think I will stay here since their voices are cacophonies to me.”
  • “The increasing number of personal vehicles is the main cause of cacophony on the road.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, January 18, 2018

#WOTD: Youthquake

Hello, dear Fellas. I wish you a happy new year although the moment has already passed. I hope you will achieve your plans and have a better year!

Today we will have a talk about ‘youthquake.’ Maybe some of you knew that ‘youthquake’ is actually the word of the year in 2017, but this word is new for me and perhaps for one of you, too. Besides, there is no time limit in learning. Don’t you agree?

I saw ‘youthquake’ at the very first time while I was browsing some news in Jakarta Post. It stated that Oxford Dictionary named it as the word of 2017.

Is there anyone who can tell me what it means?

“A change affected by youth?” – @puputrbc

‘Youthquake’ means a significant change in some aspect, such as political, social, business, culture, etc., that was lead by young people. Could you give me some example of something as the product of the change? As a simple illustration, I think the significant raise of cafes is.

“Startup business, I guess.” – @kaonashily

Even though this word is just recently known, but it is said that ‘youthquake’ was mentioned publicly in 1960s by Vague Magazine editor. Here are some example of ‘youthquake’ in sentences:

  • “Have you noticed that youthquake had already existed along with the rapid development of social media?”
  • “Youthquake had silently changed our lifestyle.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, January 4, 2018

#EngTalk: Your plan on holidays

Hi, Fellas. How are you? How’s your day?

Since the previous week, I can feel the atmosphere of holiday! Maybe it is because of the students in my school have already been in their vacation.

“Me, too.” – @Mirtaindah 

Speaking of holiday, do you have any plan for the holiday?

“Barbecue party on Christmas eve. Stay at home all day on New year.” – @T_Xfen

“Oh I have. I am going home!!” – @riverningtyas

“As a shift-worker, I don’t have any holiday based on ‘red date’ / tanggal merah.” – @shunusuke 

Mine was used to be just lying on my bed until noon because I used to watch movies until almost dawn. I still remember around 6-7 years ago, when I was still a high school student, I would rent a lot of DVDs along the holiday. However, I can’t do that anymore because I barely can keep myself wide awake when the clock hits 10 PM.

On the other hand, I have a friend who always spend the year-end holidays with her family members.

“You know who it is… yeah.. that’s.. ((((((me)))))” –@ferinayuu

She told me that every year they would go somewhere, such as Kaliurang, and rent a villa or hotel rooms for staying. Then the next days, they would go on off road and exploring the tourism sites in Kaliurang. I even spotted the same designed T-shirt for each of her family member. Such a warm family, right?

In spite of the two examples I have shared, I ever saw some people who like spending the holidays to study, for example attending an intensive course. For those who are currently studying in university, they would join the exchange program or a short course. As the alternative, some of them joined a volunteering program.

What about you? Feel free to share your usual activities during the holidays.

“I used to clean my bag, my shoes, my clothes etc. Because I’m working start Monday to Friday. So, I don’t have many times to clean & clear all of my items at home ” – @kalya_soenar 

Well, whatever you’ve planned for this holiday be sure to enjoy it, especially when you are with your closest relatives.

“Happy holiday!!! 🌼🌼🌼🌼🌼🌼” – @mllehesti 

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, December 21, 2017

#EngTrivia: Choice of words

Hi, Fellas.  How are you today? We meet again in #EngTrivia session.

This evening I will share some words which can be the alternative of daily casual words. You can use these selections in your IELTS test essay performance.

  1. ‘Accelerate.’ Meaning: ‘speed up.’
    • Example:
      • “My friend had join a special class in his high school, so he can accelerate his grade.”
  2. ‘Additionally.’ Meaning: ‘there is more.’
    • Example:
      • “Additionally, we have to prepare the gift for this holiday session.”
  3. ‘Allow.’ Meaning: ‘let.’
    • Example:
      • “My parents allowed me to drive to school.”
  4. ‘Anecdote.’ Meaning: ‘joke.’
    • Example:
      • “There are plenty of silly anecdote in social media nowadays.”
  5. ‘Anticipate.’ Meaning: ‘expect.’
    • Example:
      • “The movie was as good as I have anticipated.”
  6.  ‘Beneficial.’ Meaning: ‘good for (something).’
    • Example:
      • “Do you think this purchasing system would be beneficial for our company?”
  7. ‘Utilize.’ Meaning: ‘use.’
    • Example:
      • “This manual has a detail description of utilizing the incubator.”
  8.  ‘Sufficient.’ Meaning: ‘enough.’
    • Example:
      • “Our country still have a sufficient rice stock and it will last approximately until next year.”
  9. ‘Pleased.’ Meaning: ‘happy.’
    • Example:
      • “Pleased to meet you.”
  10. ‘Perhaps.’ Meaning: ‘maybe.’
    • Example:
      • “I am not sure I would able to attend the meeting on time. Perhaps, my assistant could cover me for several minutes.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, December 7, 2017

#EngVocab: Phrasal verbs related to shopping

Hi, Fellas! We finally meet again in #EngVocab session. Today I am going to share some phrasal verbs related to shopping.

Is anyone here fond of shopping? Could you give me some example of phrasal verbs that I possibly share to you this evening?

  1. ‘Sell out.’: Meaning: selling all of the supply you have.
    • Example:
      • “This face moisturizer is women’s favorite. So, it is usually sold out in a meantime.”
  2. Try on.’ Meaning: to put on a piece of clothing in order to see if it fits.
    • Example:
      • “Try this dress on. We can make some correction if it’s too big on you.”
  3. Pay for.’ Meaning: giving the money to buy something.
    • Example:
      • “Don’t worry, I will pay for the cakes.”
  4. ‘Queue up’ or ‘line up.’ Meaning: waiting in a line behind a person.
    • Example:
      • “You can sit on the sofa in the customer service area while lining up at the cashier.”
  5. Shop around.’ Meaning: to compare the prices before buying something.
    • Example:
      • “If you want to get the best outfit with the best price in Beringharjo, you have to shop around the market.
  6. ‘Take off.’ Meaning: to remove a clothing.
    • Example:
      • “Take off your jeans before you try the skirt.”
  7. ‘Turn down.’ Meaning: refusing something.
    • Example:
      • “The vendor gave me too high price for the shoes. So, I turned it down.”

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, November 23, 2017

#EngTrivia: Common confusing adjectives

Hola, Fellas, welcome to English Trivia session. How are you today? In this #EngTriva we are going to have a talk about some adjectives that are commonly confusing.

‘Each’ vs. ‘every’

The first are ‘each’ and ‘every.’ Does any of you can explain what is the difference between those words? ‘Each’ and ‘every’ are actually similar in referring singular noun

However, ‘each’ is used to indicate individual object/person. Meanwhile ‘every’ indicates a group of similar object, for instances doctors, teachers, apples, books, days, etc.

In a special case, we usually use ‘each’ when there are only two objects at the moment.

Example:

  • “She wear socks on each of her feet.”

On the other hand, if there are more than two objects the use of ‘each’ and ‘every’ is interchangeably.

Example:

  • “I donated every books I have to the town’s library,”
  • “Dina gave each of her old clothes to her sister.”

‘Farther’ vs. ‘further’

I found an articles in quickanddirtytips.com about these words. It stated that ‘farther’ is used to refer physical distance while ‘further’ refers figurative or metaphorical distance.

Example:

  • “We need to drive farther to reach Anyer beach,”
  • “We can discuss the financial planning further in the next meeting.”

‘Sick’ vs. ‘ill’

The last ones are ‘sick’ and ‘ill.’ The general difference between ‘sick’ and ‘ill’ is their formality. If you are included in less formal communication, you may use the word ‘sick.’ In addition, ‘sick’ describes a short term disease while ‘ill’ can describe both short term and long term disease.

Example:

  • “Maya couldn’t come to school for three days because she was sick,”
  • “Finally she appears fresher today. The project she’s just handled certainly made her look ill.”

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, November 9, 2017

#EngTrivia: How do you read ‘1800s’ and its friends?

Hello Fellas.. how’s your Thursday? Are you also excited like me to welcome Friday, which means weekend, tomorrow?

Alright, maybe some of you have noticed the title of today’s session, “how do you read ‘1800s’ and its friends?” It doesn’t mean that we will be focus on ‘1800s,’ but do you know how to spell it? Is it “one thousand and eight hundreds”? Just like we spell fifties (50s)?

I even couldn’t think about a single thing while I found the word ‘1800s’ in my English textbook.

Generally, ‘1800s’ indicates a century and after I did a browsing in the internet, it stated that ‘1800s’ is spelled “eighteen hundreds.” So, you read by dividing the ‘18’ (eighteen) and ‘00s’ (hundreds).

Examples:

  • 1300s: thirteen hundreds
  • 1400s: fourteen hundreds
  • 1700s: seventeen hundreds

Then, what about the century which is started in millennial era, such as 2000s, 2100s, 2200s, and so on? Could you tell me what is the proper pronounce of those years?

Similarly, you pronounce ‘2100s’ by separating ’21’ and ’00s.’ So, it will be “twenty one hundreds.” Then “twenty two hundreds” for ‘2200s,’ “twenty three hundreds” for ‘2300s,’ and so on.

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, October 26, 2017

#EngTrivia: Confusing words (2)

Hello, Fellas. How was your day? In this session we are going to continue our discussion about some confusing words.

‘Harm,’ ‘injury,’ and ‘damage.’

Do you know the difference of those words?

Regarding to Merriam-webster dictinary, if ‘harm’ acts as a verb, it means to make someone/something to be hurt/broken. On the other words, ‘harm’ can also be a noun which is something that has a bed effect on someone or another thing.

Example:

  • “The acidic solutions may harm the metals.”
  • “I mean no harm.”

What about ‘injury’? This word means a physical harm on someone. It is usually cause by an accident.

Example:

  • “I got this injury from falling down of my motorbike.”

Meanwhile, according to BBC ‘damage’ is a physical harm on something (non-living/abstract object), such as economy, impression, electronics, etc.

Example:

  • “This rumor can cause a damage on her reputation.”

‘During,’ ‘while,’ and ‘for.’

If you check on the dictionary, ‘during’ means the entire time of an event/a moment, such as, holiday, school (grade), party, meeting, etc.

Example:

  • “I made this sweater during the term holiday.”

Ecenglish. Com also states that ‘during’ is a preposition to indicate the time of an event.

Example:

  • “There were many interesting performances during last year’s Christmas holiday.”

On the other hand ‘while’ means a short period of time.

Example:

  • “I will take a rest for a while.”

In addition, we can also use ‘while’ as a conjunction when two events happen at the same time.

Example:

  • “I was showering while my brother came home.”

The last is ‘for.’ This word is used to indicate a specific time of an event. So, when we put ‘for’ in a sentence, it is followed by the length of time.

Example:

  • “My mother well be in Paris for two weeks.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, October 12, 2017

#EngTrivia: Confusing words

Hello, Fellas. How was your day?

In this session we are going to talk about some words which are resembles one another), for instance “appreciative” and “appreciable.” Do you know the meaning of those two words? How are they different?

“Appreciative” vs. “appreciable”

Regarding to Merriam-webster dictionary, “appreciative” means showing appreciation. There are some synonyms of this word, such as “admiring,” “applauding,” and “favorable.”

Example:

  • “I always love to show my creation to her because she is very appreciative.”

Meanwhile, “appreciable” means large enough to be noticed/measured. In other words, you can say “eye catching,” “prominent,” or “detectable.”

Example:

  • “There is an appreciable culture difference between Indonesia and America.”

“Shortly” vs. “briefly.”

If you asked me earlier about those two words, I might have said that they are synonymous. After I read some references, “shortly” means in a short time. In a simple way, you can also say “soon” or “in a while.”

Example:

  • “My mom will be home shortly.”

On the other hand, “briefly” means in a short period (space) of time.

Example:

  • “I am in a hurry, so I will briefly explain about simple tense to you.”

“Considerable” vs. “considerate”

“Considerable” or you can also say “significant” acts as an adjective which means something large or in a huge number of quantity. In other words, it also means something is worth consideration.

Example,

  • “The difference between tennis and football participant is considerable,”
  • “His project idea is considerable.”

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, September 28, 2017