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Content creator to www.englishtips4u.com

#EngTrivia: Idioms and Expressions with the Same or Similar Meanings in English and Indonesian

What are you doing for the Saturday night? I hope that you are staying safe at home but if you must go outside for essential purposes that cannot be delayed, please exercise safety precautions.

Several years ago, we posted an article about common expressions in English and its Indonesian counterparts. You can check it here: Expressions in English and Their Indonesian Counterparts Part 1 and Part 2. 

The background of these articles was that there are expressions in English that we cannot quite translate into Indonesian; we just know what they mean, thus we were trying to find similar expressions in Indonesian to help understand the English version better.

For this article, we are going to do something similar: we’ll start a series of idioms and expressions that have similar or even the same meanings in English and Indonesian. An example submitted by one of our followers on Twitter:

@fatfukuro: Don’t judge a book by its cover (Eng) and jangan menilai buku dari sampulnya (Ina).

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

So here is the list of what we compiled so far:

  1. Backbone (Eng) = Tulang punggung (Ina)
    Meaning: the chief support of a system or an organisation.

  2. Backstab (Eng) = Menusuk dari belakang (Ina)
    Meaning: the action or practice of harming someone’s reputation whilst feigning friendship.

  3. Big-headed (Eng) = Besar kepala (Ina)
    Meaning: conceited or arrogant.

  4. Big-hearted (Eng) = Besar hati (Ina)
    Meaning: kind and generous.

  5. Big mouth (Eng) = Besar mulut (Ina)
    Meaning: a boastful person.

  6. Blue blood (Eng) = Darah biru (Ina)
    Meaning: a person of noble or royal birth.

  7. Bookworm (Eng) = Kutu buku (Ina)
    Meaning: someone who loves reading.

  8. Brainwash (Eng) = Cuci otak (Ina)
    Meaning: force someone to adopt a radically different belief.

  9. Brokenhearted (Eng) = Patah hati (Ina)
    Meaning: overwhelmed by grief or disappointment.

  10. Cold-blooded (Eng) = Berdarah dingin (Ina)
    Meaning: deliberately cruel or violent.

  11. Cool-headed (Eng) = Kepala dingin (Ina)
    Meaning: calm.

  12. Empty-handed (Eng) = Tangan hampa (Ina)
    Meaning: unsuccessful, fruitless effort.

  13. Fall in love (Eng) = Jatuh hati (Ina)
    Meaning: develop romantic feelings towards someone or deep liking for something.

  14. Flesh and blood (Eng) = Darah daging (Ina)
    Meaning: someone related to us by blood.

  15. Get some fresh air (Eng) = Cari angin (Ina)
    Meaning: go outside to take a break from a possibly stressful situation.

  16. Go in one ear, out of the other (Eng) = Masuk kuping kiri, keluar kuping kanan (Ina)
    Meaning: of a piece of information that is quickly forgotten.

  17. Golden child (Eng) = Anak emas (Ina)
    Meaning: a favoured child amongst a group of children.

  18. Half-heartedly (Eng) = Setengah hati (Ina)
    Meaning: not feeling fully committed or engaged to an activity.

  19. Head of the family (Eng) = Kepala keluarga (Ina)
    Meaning: someone who leads a family.

  20. Heavy heart (Eng) = Berat hati (Ina)
    Meaning: with much sadness and regret.

  21. Hot seat (Eng) = Kursi panas (Ina)
    Meaning: being in a position of heavy duty and responsibility.

  22. Iron fist (Eng) = Tangan besi (Ina)
    Meaning: of a government or someone exercising power in a ruthless or oppressive manner.

  23. Law of the jungle (Eng) = Hukum rimba (Ina)
    Meaning: of a world where those who are strong and apply ruthless self-interest will be most successful.

  24. Lift one’s hat to… (Eng) = Angkat topi (Ina)
    Meaning: praise, salute, congratulate, or pay tribute to someone.

  25. Open arms (Eng) = Tangan terbuka (Ina)
    Meaning: a warm welcome.

  26. Open secret (Eng) = Rahasia umum (Ina)
    Meaning: of a secret who is known to many people.

  27. Out of control (Eng) = Hilang kendali (Ina)
    Meaning: of something that’s no longer possible to manage.

  28. Pen pal (Eng) = Sahabat pena (Ina)
    Meaning: someone with whom we develop friendship by sending letters to one another, particularly if we live in different countries.

  29. Put one’s hands up (Eng) = Angkat tangan (Ina)
    Meaning: raise one’s hands to surrender.

  30. Quick on one’s feet (Eng) = Cepat kaki (Ina)
    Meaning: able to think and take quick action.

  31. Right hand (Eng) = Tangan kanan (Ina)
    Meaning: an assistant, the most important position next to someone.

  32. Scapegoat (Eng) = Kambing hitam (Ina)
    Meaning: someone who is blamed for the wrongdoings, mistakes, or faults of others.

  33. Silent witness (Eng) = Saksi bisu (Ina)
    Meaning: an object that displays traces of evidences of a crime.

  34. Stage fright (Eng) = Demam panggung (Ina)
    Meaning: nervousness before or during an appearance before an audience.

  35. Stepping stone (Eng) = Batu loncatan (Ina)
    Meaning: an action or event that helps someone to make progress towards a specified goal.

  36. Take something to one’s heart (Eng) = Memasukan ke dalam hati (Ina)
    Meaning: take criticism seriously and be affected or upset by it.

  37. Tangled web (Eng) = Benang kusut (Ina)
    Meaning: of a situation or a problem that is confusing or difficult to solve.

  38. Throw a towel (Eng) = Lempar handuk (Ina)
    Meaning: stop trying or doing something because lacking of determination or conviction that one can win or be successful.

  39. Turn a blind eye (Eng) = Tutup mata (Ina)
    Meaning: pretend not to notice something is happening, usually something bad.

  40. Two-faced (Eng) = Bermuka dua (Ina)
    Meaning: of someone being insincere or acting one way in certain situations and then in a contrary manner in others.

  41. Walk away (Eng) = Ambil langkah seribu (Ina)
    Meaning: easily, casually, or irresponsibly abandon a situation in which one is involved or for which one is responsible.

  42. Wash one’s hands of… (Eng) = Cuci tangan (Ina)
    Meaning: not wanting to be involved with someone or something, not taking responsibility of someone or something.

  43. Watch one’s mouth (Eng) = Jaga lidah/mulut (Ina)
    Meaning: being careful of what one says.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 11 July 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngQAs 6 July 2020: ‘in the bed’ or ‘on the bed,’ How to Improve English for Children, and Is Grammar Important?

On our special #EngQAs, our followers on Twitter are invited to send their questions related to English learning and we will try to answer it within the session. Here are some questions that were sent to us on 6 July.

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

  1. By @lvlcnrn: Which one is correct: in the bed or on the bed?
  2. By @SDN2_PanSi: How to improve English skills for elementary students?
  3. By @Adith_Thyo: Grammar dalam bahasa Inggris perlu/pentingkah?

 

Answers:

  1. I personally prefer using ‘on the bed’, as in my understanding, the preposition ‘on’ means physically in contact with or supported by a surface. The phrase ‘in the bed’ might refer to being inside the bed, as in the bedroom. More on preposition: #GrammarTrivia: “in” vs. “at” (Prepositions of Place)
  2. It’s important to constantly repeat the parts of speech (word types) and improve the children’s vocabulary. Here are some tips that you can also try: #EngTips: Learning at Different Ages
  3. Sangat penting, karena grammar adalah tata bahasa yang membantu kita berkomunikasi dengan lebih efektif. Akan tetapi, jangan khawatir berbahasa Inggris karena takut salah grammar. Dipelajari saja sambil jalan. More on whether grammar is important: #EngClass: Understanding the Basics of English Grammar

 

Remember that our DM on Twitter and our mention tab are open for you to discuss any topics that are related to English learning. Mention us or send us a DM.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 6 July 2020.


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#EngTalk: Lunch and Snacks

Some of you might have returned to work at the office and we are all aware of the risks and difficulties. Take care of yourself, fellas, and keep your surroundings clean and hygienic.

Over the past few days, Indonesian Twitter users have been engaged in quite an odd debate about packed lunch. It started when a lady uploaded ideas for lunch boxes that she’d been preparing for her husband and apparently some people thought she was being too nice to her husband. Some also questioned whether she did that because she was a woman and assumed that it was her duty to be in the kitchen.

I personally think the lunch box was sweet and commendable. Preparing food for our loved ones is an act of love. It’s just as simple as that. Bear in mind that anyone can prepare food for anyone they love, regardless of the gender. After all, cooking is one of the basic surviving skills.

Furthermore, preparing our own meal ensures that we know what goes into the meal and helps us control our portion as not to overeat.

What do you think about this matter, fellas?

agil (@IvIcnrn): well said here. just can’t understand why some people got mad about it.

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Photo by Keegan Evans on Pexels.com

For health reasons, I have been eating mostly plant-based food. I limit meat and poultry consumption to once a week or once in two weeks. I still eat fish and eggs and dairy products, though, so I cannot really say I am a vegetarian or pescatarian.

I have also limited my carbohydrates intake and, if possible, replacing the carbs with something that contains a lot of fibres and low glycemic index. Our metabolism rate slows as we age, so unless we are really, really physically active, all the excess carbs will turn into fat. By now you must have started guessing how old I am, LOL.

Instead of having three big meals a day, I limit my daily intake to one big meal in the morning and then settle for fruits and vegetables for the rest of the day, usually 3-4 times.

My favourite type of vegetable dish to prepare is ‘pecel’ or assorted boiled vegetables (usually spinach, water spinach, bean sprouts, and long beans) with spicy peanut sauce. I love peanut sauce and the taste it gives to the vegetables.

I feel so fortunate living in Indonesia because we have plenty of vegetables to go with our daily meals. We can simply go to a small neighbourhood stall in the morning to buy a pack of vegetables with affordable price. And we can cook them in various ways, too. We can be creative with carrots, green beans, mustard greens (sawi), bok choy, cabbages, lettuces, tomatoes, and many more.

Don’t forget tempe and tofu, which are basically Indonesian staple food. They also have good amount of protein in them. Sometimes, I simply boil them and prepare separated dipping chili sauce.

For the snack, if I feel really hungry, I go with yam, sweet potato, edamame, or a bowl of fresh fruits as watermelon, pineapple, and papaya are pretty easy to find.

What about you, fellas? What are your favourite lunch menu and snacks in between meals? Share it on the comment section below.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 2 July 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngTrivia: Extended Family Members

When it comes to family members, we have our immediate family members consisting of our parents, siblings, spouses, and children. This group might also include our half-siblings (siblings we have from different parents).

And then there are our close relatives, such as grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, and cousins.

What we also count as our relatives are the extended family members, who are still related to us by blood but not as close as our immediate family members or our close relatives. Who are they and how do we address them?

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Photo by Craig Adderley on Pexels.com

Say, my grandfather has a younger brother. In Indonesian, I will simply call him ‘Kakek’ or grandfather, just as how I call my grandfather. But in English, I will refer to him as my great uncle. The same applies to great aunt.

And then I have a cousin, who is a child of my parent’s sibling. I will refer to this cousin as my first cousin. If my parent’s cousin has a child, that person is my second cousin. My child will also refer to the child of my cousin’s as the second cousin.

What about my parent’s cousins? In Indonesian, I will call them uncles and aunts. In English, they are still called cousins only with ‘removal’, that implies different generation. For example, my father’s first cousin is my first cousin once removed. The term applies both ways. My father’s first cousin will also refer to me as his/her/their first cousin once removed. My children will refer to them as the first cousin twice removed and vice versa.

The last but not least, we have the in-laws, who are related to us by marriage. Our spouse’s parents are our parents in law and our spouse’s siblings are our siblings in law.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 20 June 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: Twitter Handles to Expand Your Vocabularies

Many of us are on self-quarantine due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Not only to keep ourselves safe and healthy, we are doing this to prevent further transmission of the virus to other people with whom we interact. We might not be showing symptoms (asymptomatic), but it does not always mean we are not carrying the virus with us. For me, it is better to be safe than sorry.

However, being on self-quarantine does come with challenging times. Eventually, I noticed my sleep pattern changes as I sleep or take frequent naps during the day and stay awake almost the whole night. Do you also experience the same?

I figured that I needed to find new interests to keep me busy and I decided to read and learn more especially about topics that I had never really touched before the pandemic.
Recently, I completed the 30-day word challenge by Merriam-Webster Dictionary.

Merriam Webster
Source: Merriam-Webster Dictionary’s Twitter handle

On this article, I’m going to share some accounts that will help you expand your vocabularies and learn grammar effectively.
1. Merriam-Webster dictionary
@MerriamWebster provides you with Word of the Day, the background story behind words and phrases, and trending words.

  1. Dictionary.com
    @Dictionarycom also provides word of the day and trending words, with quite a sassy and hilarious manner.
  2. The Oxford English Dictionary
    My most favourite feature of @OED is its Word of the Year, which doesn’t only cover the most searched word of the year as it might also introduce a new word that is widely used but not registered on any dictionaries yet.
  3. The Yuniversity
    @The_YUNiversity posts daily vocabulary and grammar lessons in just a few tweets and helpful infographics. Its explanation is also really easy to comprehend. Bonus: KPop fans will relate so much to this handle.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 11 June 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngKnowledge: World Environment Day 2020

Hello everyone, how are you doing? It’s been raining a lot here in Bali, Indonesia, despite we have entered dry season. By the way, did you know that 5 June is celebrated every year as World Environment Day?

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Photo by Akil Mazumder on Pexels.com

World Environment Day (WED) is observed every year on 5 June to raise global awareness to take positive environmental action to protect nature and the planet Earth.

UN designates 5 June as World Environment Day in 1972 and two years later (1974), WED is celebrated for the first time under the slogan “Only One Earth.” During 1974-1983, WED was celebrated 10 times but only in three countries (USA, Canada, and Bangladesh).

World Environment Day 2020 is focusing on biodiversity and will be hosted in Colombia in partnership with Germany. The theme of World Environment Day 2020 is “Celebrate Biodiversity.” Videos highlighting the biodiversity and environmental achievements of different regions of Colombia will be featured throughout the day, including images and drone footage of strategic ecosystems. We can join the conversation online with the hashtag #ForNature.

Air pollution, overpopulation, deforestation, and climate crisis have been some of the major factors that affect our environment. By actively participating to decrease the impact of any factors above, we might have hope for a better environment. Humans are not the only species on this planet and our actions have significant impact on the existence of other species. Furthermore, studies show deforestation and loss of wildlife cause increases in infectious diseases, including the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

We have only one Earth and we live on this world together, fellas. Let’s let nature be nature and do our parts to help reduce the negative impact of climate crisis. Stay safe everywhere you are.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, 5 June 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: Eid al-Fitr 2020

Hi, hello, everyone, how was your Eid holiday?

I’ll admit that to me it felt different as we have been in self-quarantine for a while that I lost count of what day it is. Do you also experience the same? Share your story!

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Photo by Khairul Onggon on Pexels.com

Eid al-Fitr is an important holiday for Muslims worldwide. In Indonesia, it is usually marked by 7-10 days of holiday to accommodate those who do homecoming trip. We didn’t see the hustle and bustle this year as much as the previous years due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

It is also marked with visiting the houses of our close friends and relatives to ask and give forgiveness for our wrongs, which is usually ended with dining together. The signature dishes are ketupat (rice cake wrapped in coconut leaf), opor ayam (braised chicken soup), and rendang. What about in your countries?

Aside of that, we also provide assorted cakes and cookies, such as nastar (pineapple tart), putri salju (literally snow princess), and kaasstengels (soft cheese sticks), accompanied with cold juice to the guests. Given the pandemic, most of us might skip all these traditions and some might not get the chance to meet our families.

Stay strong, fellas. Sometimes we need to make a sacrifice to keep ourselves and our loved ones safe.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 25 May 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngTips: Eid al-Fitr During COVID19 Pandemic

A big holiday is coming in less than a week for us in Indonesia, but sadly, it’s most likely that this year’s Eid al-Fitr will be very different than the previous years. Regardless, it’s a difficult situation for all of us so we need to work together to help flatten the curve.

What can we do on this year’s Eid? Here’s what we recommend.

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Photo by Tayeb MEZAHDIA on Pexels.com
  1. Save the funds for emergency.
    I think we can put less priority on new clothing or lavish celebrations in favour of emergency funds and donation to those who are in need.
    Do you agree, fellas?

  2. Stay in the city.
    I understand that the situation is very different from one person to another but if you still can stay in the city where you’ve been living, consider not doing the homecoming trip until we get the situation under control. This is to avoid spreading the COVID-19 virus to our family and relatives in our hometown.

  3. Minimise movement and keep physical distance.
    The Eid prayer is an important part of the Eid holiday. If the local government considers it safe to do so, still maintain your distance from other people. Keeping a safe distance between two people could reduce the risk of getting infected by the virus.

  4. Make use of the technology.
    Make use of our smartphones to contact our loved ones by, perhaps, having a virtual celebration. It is very important to stay connected as well as checking up on each other.

Those are the tips that we can share, fellas. Happy holiday and stay safe!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 18 May 2020.


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#EngVocab: Healthcare Professionals

Hi, everyone! I hope you are doing well. It’s an awful time for all of us around the world, but I think we have to give special credits to our healthcare professionals who might be working tirelessly during this pandemic.

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Photo by Retha Ferguson on Pexels.com

On this article, we are sharing some occupations that can be called healthcare professionals. Healthcare professionals are defined as people who may provide health care treatment and advice based on formal training and experience.

  1. Physician/doctor/medical practitioner: a person qualified to practice medicine.
  2. Surgeon: a medical practitioner qualified to practice surgery.
  3. Physician’s assistant: someone qualified to assist a physician and carry out routine clinical procedures under the supervision of a physician.
  4. Nurse: a person trained to care for the sick or infirm, especially in a hospital.
  5. Dentist: a person qualified to treat the diseases and conditions that affect the teeth and gums.
  6. Midwife: a person (typically a woman) trained to assist in childbirth.
  7. Physiotherapist/physical therapist: a person qualified to treat disease, injury, or deformity by physical methods such as massage, heat treatment, and exercise.
  8. Psychiatrist: a medical practitioner specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of mental illnesses.
  9. Psychologist: an expert in the scientific study of the human mind and its functions, especially those affecting behavior in a given context.
  10. Pharmacist: a person who is professionally qualified to prepare and dispense medicinal drugs.

Aside of those mentioned above, let’s not forget to thank all the support workers that help run a health facility. Donate if you can, fellas, and follow the government’s instruction of staying home and keeping our personal hygiene and health to help ease the work of healthcare professionals.

Stay safe, everywhere you are.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 14 May 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#EngTalk: Generation Equality

Hi, hello, everyone! How are you doing today? Yesterday, we celebrated the International Women’s Day so this article will be related to it.

As we know it, the theme for this year’s International Women’s Day is ‘I Am Generation Equality: Realizing Women’s Rights.’ So what do you think about the theme, fellas?

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

For me, equality is about no discrimination towards someone regardless of whether the person is a male or female. The same opportunity, the same appreciation, and consequently, the same responsibility. I’d love to read your thoughts about it. I think I was fortunate to grow up in an environment that emphasises how women should be encouraged and supported to be the best version of themselves and I think everyone should have the same chance. Do you agree, fellas?

We have made progress, but there’s still so much to do to ensure that we could become the generation equality. I will start with promoting a safe environment for women to live in and to thrive, be it in a family, at school, or at the workplaces. The work that needs to be done is not necessarily exclusive to one type of sex or gender. We should always respect, support, and care about each other.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 9 March 2020.


RELATED ARTICLE(S):

#UKSlang: Slang in Harry Potter Books

Who here is a Harry Potter fan? Even though the books and movies were all released, except for the Fantastic Beasts, I’m feeling a little flashback to Hogwarts. We are sharing some slang used on Harry Potter books.

JK Rowling

 

“Bloody hell!”
We know this one to be used a lot by Ron. It is a common expression in Britain, Australia, and New Zealand. It could express a lot, from surprise to disgust to anger, etc.

Bloody hell

 

“Blimey.”
A popular British word to express surprise. Similar to ‘wow.’

“Bollocks!”
This is a word we should not use carelessly, as it means male genitalia parts. However, it’s used in the same way as ‘nonsense.’

“Codswallop!”
Also means ‘nonsense.’

“Git.”
Somewhat derogatory, git is used to describe a foolish person. Hagrid used it once to refer to Mr Filch.

Mr Filch

 

“Mental.”
Meaning crazy or insane.

Mental

 

“Peckish.”
The feeling of small hunger, wanting to eat but not quite hungry yet.

“Snog.”
To kiss passionately, to make out.

 

Feel free to add more on the comment section below!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 5 March 2020.


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#EngTrivia: Ways to Express Condolences

Fellas, have you ever tried comforting someone who has just lost his/her/their loved ones? What do you usually do or say on such occasion?

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Photo by Azim Islam on Pexels.com

When someone has just lost someone he/she loves, it is tempting to say something that goes like, “When I lost (insert our loved ones) this is what happened/this is how it went.”

We might think that by saying it, it could help the other person to realise that he/she is not alone. However, a tragedy is a tragedy, whether it happens to us or to someone else. Therefore, refrain from saying something like that as it can be perceived that we are comparing other people’s misery to ours.

We should also avoid saying, “It’s a part of life/it will get better soon/you will feel better soon,” because it could mean that we are trivialising the other person’s loss.

It is also not advisable to ask a grieving person, “Are you okay?” or “How are you feeling?” because of course losing someone we love will never feel okay. This is crucial especially if you are considering to become a journalist who covers the life of famous people.

So what can we do to express our condolences?
Say something that offers sympathy and understanding.
E.g.:
“I’m sorry for the passing of your…”
“I’m sorry for your loss.”
“This must be hard for you.”
“Our sincere sympathy for you and your family.”

Say something that offers help.
E.g.:
“I’m here if you need anything.”
“Take a rest while I take care of everything else.”

Be there for the grieving person.
If it is possible for you to be present, be there for the grieving person. Often a person who has just lost someone he/she loves needs time to process the grief and it is not an easy process. It also doesn’t finish overnight. Be a moral support by ensuring the said person gets enough rest or eat healthy food and try not to exhaust them with the necessity of making a decision.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 26 February 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: Word of the Year

Hi, fellas, did you know that Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year 2019 is ‘climate emergency?’

We face more and more weather and climate-related crisis every year, so it is natural that people all around the world are getting more curious about the term ‘climate emergency’ and decided to look it up on the dictionaries.

As defined by Oxford Dictionaries, climate emergency is “a situation in which urgent action is required to reduce or halt climate change and avoid potentially irreversible environmental damage resulting from it.”

But what is ‘Word of the Year’ and how did this tradition start?

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Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

 

Word(s) of the Year refers to any of various assessments as to the most important word(s) or expression(s) during a specific year.

The first known version of this tradition is the German one, Wort des Jahres, which was started in 1971. The American Dialect Society is the oldest English version, started in 1991. By early 2000s, a lot of organisations began to announce their versions of Word(s) of the Year for various purposes and with various criteria for the assessment.

Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year for the last five years are:

2015: Face with tears of joy emoji or laughing-crying emoji, the first emoji to have ever been selected.
2016: Post-truth.
2017: Youthquake.
2018: Toxic.
2019: Climate emergency.

The American Dialect Society also chose the Word of the Decade, which is ‘web’ for 1990s, ‘to google’ for 2000s, and singular ‘they’ for 2010s. According to the Society, the Word of the 20th century is jazz and the Word of the Past Millennium is ‘she.’

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 20 February 2020.


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#EngVocab: Words Related to Mobile Phone

Nowadays, a mobile phone has become a permanent part to our hands. We check our phones constantly even if there is no notification of incoming messages or calls or anything important on social medias. Do you also experience the same, fellas?

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Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

This article will discuss words related to mobile phones.

1. Credit
This is a common term for prepaid mobile phone service, where we purchase some amount to use the provider’s service. In Indonesian, the term ‘phone credit’ has the same meaning as ‘pulsa.’

2. Data
(Mobile) data is what connects the phone to the internet when it is not connected to a Wi-Fi network.

3. Plans
Plans mean a package that might include a number of SMS, several minutes of phone calls, and some gigabits of mobile data that we purchase from the provider on a one-off occasion or on a regular basis.

Made Wirautama (@wirautama): In Indonesian we call it “paket data”.

4. 4G and 4.5G
4G means the fourth generation of mobile phone connection. It allows a mobile phone to connect to the internet with a relatively high download speed, which is 7-12 Mbps (megabits per second), and converts the phone to a mobile multimedia. 4.5G is an improved version of 4G with faster connection that could reach 14-21 Mbps. At the moment, we’re all excited for 5G, of course.

5. 4K
What is a 4K video? A video with 4K on it means that it was shoot with a lens with 3840 x 2160 pixels. It provides clearer, less fuzzy motions.

6. 720p
720p is currently the most common number to describe screen resolution. ‘P’ means progressive-scan and ‘720’ is the number of horizontal lines on the display. Higher screen resolutions are 1080p, 2160p (4K), and 8K.

7. HD
HD stands for high definition, which is also another name for a video with 720p resolution. 1080p is full HD (FHD). 1440p is Quad HD (QHD). 2160p or 4K is Ultra HD (UHD).

8. Lite
A lite version is a ‘lighter’ version of an application. It typically takes smaller space of the phone memory, displays media with lower resolutions, and has limited features compared to the full version.

9. Beta version
A beta version generally refers to a version of a piece of software that is made available for testing, typically by a limited number of users outside the company that is developing it, before its general release.

10. International roaming
The term refers to a feature that allows us to use the service of the provider in a foreign country where the service is not available. It usually costs more than the regular service.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 10 February 2020.


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#EngTalk: Adverbs without -ly

Hi, fellas! Most of us know that an adverb is a part of speech which is usually (not always) formed by adding the suffix -ly to an adjective.

Example:
Usual –> usually
Regular –> regularly
Beautiful –> beautifully
Angry –> angrily
Actual –> actually
Bad –> badly
Kind –> kindly

ask blackboard chalk board chalkboard
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

In recent years, more people using adverbs without -ly.
Example:
“He spoke loud and clear.”

The sentence still makes sense, too, because we understand that ‘he’ who spoke did so in a loud and clear way.

Naturally, it became a hot topic; should we omit -ly from an adverb? What do you think, fellas?

@pepe_2604: Hello there. I’m an English teacher in Mexico. I’ve found lots of changes in the language, not only a foreign but mine as well, due to media content, among other factors. So, I think it’s not a big issue to avoid -ly in an adverb since we face different problems for spoken production, and if we manage to make our students confident about producing a spoken language, I see no big deal with it. It is not that I don’t care but I can deal with it in further lessons.

 

I personally am used to putting -ly on an adverb. However, languages were developed to help humans understand each other. As long as we could understand what the sentence means, especially on spoken interaction, I think it’s fine.

The case could be different on written materials, where using proper grammar will help us understand the context better. But that’s just my personal opinion. What do you think, fellas?

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 6 February 2020.


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#EngTrivia: ‘to dedicate to’ or ‘to dedicate for?’

Hi, fellas! How are you today? Did you get to see the Grammy award ceremony? Did your favourites win?

During an award acceptance speech/winning speech, often the winner says something that goes, “I dedicate this award ____ everyone who has supported me.”

What is the correct preposition to fill the blank, fellas? We have 2 options, ‘to’ and ‘for.’

Grammy_Award_2002
The Grammy (picture by Wikipedia).

Yes, the answer is ‘to.’

‘to dedicate something to something/someone’ is a phrase that means to reserve something for a particular purpose regarding something else or someone.
E.g.:
“Mom, I dedicated this song to you.”
“She dedicated her life to being a nurse.”

I understand that this can be confusing to us Indonesian, because the direct translation for both ‘to’ and ‘for’ is ‘untuk.’ Sometimes, we might use ‘for’ instead of the correct word, ‘to.’

However, as it is a phrase, we should always try to remember the correct form, ‘to dedicate ____ to.’

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 28 January 2020.


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#EngGrammar: Infinitive Verbs

Hi, fellas, how are you today?

There are several parts of speech in English: noun, pronoun, adjective, determiner, verb, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection.

One of them, verb, specifically infinitive verbs, are our topic for this article. Can you define infinitive verbs? What is the difference between infinitive verbs and base/finite verbs?

text on shelf
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

Base verbs are verbs that can be used in their original forms.
E.g.:
run every day.
check my social media accounts 8 to 10 times a day.

Infinitive verbs are non-finite verbs or verbs that cannot stand independently as the main verbs on a sentence. Infinitive verbs are usually preceded by the word ‘to.’ Infinitive verbs are also usually used after the following words:
Modal verbs (can/could, may/might, must, shall/should, will/would)
E.g.:
She must go to the airport by 3 hours prior to the flight.
John should consider a career in acting; he’s so talented.

Several other verbs
Several other verbs that are followed by infinitive verbs are afford, agree, aim, appear, arrange, attempt, determined, beg, care, choose, claim, dare, decide, demand, deserve, expect, fail, happen, help, hesitate, hope, learn, long, manage, mean, need, neglect, offer, plan, prepare, pretend, proceed, promise, refuse, resolve, seem, stop, swear, tend, threaten, use, volunteer, vow, want, wish, would hate, would like, would love, and would prefer.
E.g.:
The child appears to be ill.
I beg to differ.
It helps to have a friend who is a tech-savvy.
He refused to sign the agreement.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 23 January 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: Common Misconceptions in English Learning

Hi, hello, fellas! How are you?

With the increasing use of English in every field, English proficiency is a must-have skill. We in Indonesia, however, could find a lot of challenges when trying to learn English, some of them came from the misconceptions that we still believe to be true until now.

By changing our mindset about these misconceptions, we will be better prepared to embrace English learning or learning any other foreign languages as a part of our daily life.

What are those misconceptions?

 

abstract blackboard bulb chalk
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

English (or any foreign languages) is hard. I will never be good at it.
Trust me, fellas, I also had the same mindset when I first started learning English. It turned out that it was just in my mind. And so, I tried a variety of learning methods. One that helped me a lot was doing a lot of exercise and practice, whether it was reading, listening, or structure/grammar. Take your time while learning something new and be patient with yourself.

We can learn English better and faster with a native speaker.
Not always true. Most native speakers learn English through language acquisition when they were young, which means they might not experience the difficulty of learning a new language at a later age. Native speakers can often follow English grammar patterns without knowing what that grammar pattern is, so they can use English well but might not be able to teach it.

I can never master the correct British/American/Australian accent.
Again, this is not always true, fellas. With practice, you can acquire the accent, but the more important thing is the correct pronunciation as well as your confidence in yourself to use English on a daily basis.

Grammar is the most important part of English learning.
The correct statement is all elements of English learning are equally important. Grammar at times can be the most intimidating part, but as you grow to love what you are learning and notice the pattern on which a grammar is used, you will find no difficulties using grammar.

Someone who speaks English is more intelligent than others.
Proficiency in English does not equate intelligence, fellas. It’s true that by being proficient in English, the opportunity to learn new things will open widely. However, it will depend on the person whether he/she/they can use the opportunity and the resources well, including understanding the subject.

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 13 January 2020.


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