All posts by alicesaraswati

Content creator to www.englishtips4u.com

#EngTalk: Generation Equality

Hi, hello, everyone! How are you doing today? Yesterday, we celebrated the International Women’s Day so this article will be related to it.

As we know it, the theme for this year’s International Women’s Day is ‘I Am Generation Equality: Realizing Women’s Rights.’ So what do you think about the theme, fellas?

calendar conceptual data date
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

For me, equality is about no discrimination towards someone regardless of whether the person is a male or female. The same opportunity, the same appreciation, and consequently, the same responsibility. I’d love to read your thoughts about it. I think I was fortunate to grow up in an environment that emphasises how women should be encouraged and supported to be the best version of themselves and I think everyone should have the same chance. Do you agree, fellas?

We have made progress, but there’s still so much to do to ensure that we could become the generation equality. I will start with promoting a safe environment for women to live in and to thrive, be it in a family, at school, or at the workplaces. The work that needs to be done is not necessarily exclusive to one type of sex or gender. We should always respect, support, and care about each other.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 9 March 2020.


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#UKSlang: Slang in Harry Potter Books

Who here is a Harry Potter fan? Even though the books and movies were all released, except for the Fantastic Beasts, I’m feeling a little flashback to Hogwarts. We are sharing some slang used on Harry Potter books.

JK Rowling

 

“Bloody hell!”
We know this one to be used a lot by Ron. It is a common expression in Britain, Australia, and New Zealand. It could express a lot, from surprise to disgust to anger, etc.

Bloody hell

 

“Blimey.”
A popular British word to express surprise. Similar to ‘wow.’

“Bollocks!”
This is a word we should not use carelessly, as it means male genitalia parts. However, it’s used in the same way as ‘nonsense.’

“Codswallop!”
Also means ‘nonsense.’

“Git.”
Somewhat derogatory, git is used to describe a foolish person. Hagrid used it once to refer to Mr Filch.

Mr Filch

 

“Mental.”
Meaning crazy or insane.

Mental

 

“Peckish.”
The feeling of small hunger, wanting to eat but not quite hungry yet.

“Snog.”
To kiss passionately, to make out.

 

Feel free to add more on the comment section below!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 5 March 2020.


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#EngTrivia: Ways to Express Condolences

Fellas, have you ever tried comforting someone who has just lost his/her/their loved ones? What do you usually do or say on such occasion?

selective focus photography of red petaled flower
Photo by Azim Islam on Pexels.com

When someone has just lost someone he/she loves, it is tempting to say something that goes like, “When I lost (insert our loved ones) this is what happened/this is how it went.”

We might think that by saying it, it could help the other person to realise that he/she is not alone. However, a tragedy is a tragedy, whether it happens to us or to someone else. Therefore, refrain from saying something like that as it can be perceived that we are comparing other people’s misery to ours.

We should also avoid saying, “It’s a part of life/it will get better soon/you will feel better soon,” because it could mean that we are trivialising the other person’s loss.

It is also not advisable to ask a grieving person, “Are you okay?” or “How are you feeling?” because of course losing someone we love will never feel okay. This is crucial especially if you are considering to become a journalist who covers the life of famous people.

So what can we do to express our condolences?
Say something that offers sympathy and understanding.
E.g.:
“I’m sorry for the passing of your…”
“I’m sorry for your loss.”
“This must be hard for you.”
“Our sincere sympathy for you and your family.”

Say something that offers help.
E.g.:
“I’m here if you need anything.”
“Take a rest while I take care of everything else.”

Be there for the grieving person.
If it is possible for you to be present, be there for the grieving person. Often a person who has just lost someone he/she loves needs time to process the grief and it is not an easy process. It also doesn’t finish overnight. Be a moral support by ensuring the said person gets enough rest or eat healthy food and try not to exhaust them with the necessity of making a decision.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 26 February 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: Word of the Year

Hi, fellas, did you know that Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year 2019 is ‘climate emergency?’

We face more and more weather and climate-related crisis every year, so it is natural that people all around the world are getting more curious about the term ‘climate emergency’ and decided to look it up on the dictionaries.

As defined by Oxford Dictionaries, climate emergency is “a situation in which urgent action is required to reduce or halt climate change and avoid potentially irreversible environmental damage resulting from it.”

But what is ‘Word of the Year’ and how did this tradition start?

words text scrabble blocks
Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

 

Word(s) of the Year refers to any of various assessments as to the most important word(s) or expression(s) during a specific year.

The first known version of this tradition is the German one, Wort des Jahres, which was started in 1971. The American Dialect Society is the oldest English version, started in 1991. By early 2000s, a lot of organisations began to announce their versions of Word(s) of the Year for various purposes and with various criteria for the assessment.

Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year for the last five years are:

2015: Face with tears of joy emoji or laughing-crying emoji, the first emoji to have ever been selected.
2016: Post-truth.
2017: Youthquake.
2018: Toxic.
2019: Climate emergency.

The American Dialect Society also chose the Word of the Decade, which is ‘web’ for 1990s, ‘to google’ for 2000s, and singular ‘they’ for 2010s. According to the Society, the Word of the 20th century is jazz and the Word of the Past Millennium is ‘she.’

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 20 February 2020.


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#EngVocab: Words Related to Mobile Phone

Nowadays, a mobile phone has become a permanent part to our hands. We check our phones constantly even if there is no notification of incoming messages or calls or anything important on social medias. Do you also experience the same, fellas?

person taking photos of food
Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

This article will discuss words related to mobile phones.

1. Credit
This is a common term for prepaid mobile phone service, where we purchase some amount to use the provider’s service. In Indonesian, the term ‘phone credit’ has the same meaning as ‘pulsa.’

2. Data
(Mobile) data is what connects the phone to the internet when it is not connected to a Wi-Fi network.

3. Plans
Plans mean a package that might include a number of SMS, several minutes of phone calls, and some gigabits of mobile data that we purchase from the provider on a one-off occasion or on a regular basis.

Made Wirautama (@wirautama): In Indonesian we call it “paket data”.

4. 4G and 4.5G
4G means the fourth generation of mobile phone connection. It allows a mobile phone to connect to the internet with a relatively high download speed, which is 7-12 Mbps (megabits per second), and converts the phone to a mobile multimedia. 4.5G is an improved version of 4G with faster connection that could reach 14-21 Mbps. At the moment, we’re all excited for 5G, of course.

5. 4K
What is a 4K video? A video with 4K on it means that it was shoot with a lens with 3840 x 2160 pixels. It provides clearer, less fuzzy motions.

6. 720p
720p is currently the most common number to describe screen resolution. ‘P’ means progressive-scan and ‘720’ is the number of horizontal lines on the display. Higher screen resolutions are 1080p, 2160p (4K), and 8K.

7. HD
HD stands for high definition, which is also another name for a video with 720p resolution. 1080p is full HD (FHD). 1440p is Quad HD (QHD). 2160p or 4K is Ultra HD (UHD).

8. Lite
A lite version is a ‘lighter’ version of an application. It typically takes smaller space of the phone memory, displays media with lower resolutions, and has limited features compared to the full version.

9. Beta version
A beta version generally refers to a version of a piece of software that is made available for testing, typically by a limited number of users outside the company that is developing it, before its general release.

10. International roaming
The term refers to a feature that allows us to use the service of the provider in a foreign country where the service is not available. It usually costs more than the regular service.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 10 February 2020.


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#EngTalk: Adverbs without -ly

Hi, fellas! Most of us know that an adverb is a part of speech which is usually (not always) formed by adding the suffix -ly to an adjective.

Example:
Usual –> usually
Regular –> regularly
Beautiful –> beautifully
Angry –> angrily
Actual –> actually
Bad –> badly
Kind –> kindly

ask blackboard chalk board chalkboard
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

In recent years, more people using adverbs without -ly.
Example:
“He spoke loud and clear.”

The sentence still makes sense, too, because we understand that ‘he’ who spoke did so in a loud and clear way.

Naturally, it became a hot topic; should we omit -ly from an adverb? What do you think, fellas?

@pepe_2604: Hello there. I’m an English teacher in Mexico. I’ve found lots of changes in the language, not only a foreign but mine as well, due to media content, among other factors. So, I think it’s not a big issue to avoid -ly in an adverb since we face different problems for spoken production, and if we manage to make our students confident about producing a spoken language, I see no big deal with it. It is not that I don’t care but I can deal with it in further lessons.

 

I personally am used to putting -ly on an adverb. However, languages were developed to help humans understand each other. As long as we could understand what the sentence means, especially on spoken interaction, I think it’s fine.

The case could be different on written materials, where using proper grammar will help us understand the context better. But that’s just my personal opinion. What do you think, fellas?

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 6 February 2020.


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#EngTrivia: ‘to dedicate to’ or ‘to dedicate for?’

Hi, fellas! How are you today? Did you get to see the Grammy award ceremony? Did your favourites win?

During an award acceptance speech/winning speech, often the winner says something that goes, “I dedicate this award ____ everyone who has supported me.”

What is the correct preposition to fill the blank, fellas? We have 2 options, ‘to’ and ‘for.’

Grammy_Award_2002
The Grammy (picture by Wikipedia).

Yes, the answer is ‘to.’

‘to dedicate something to something/someone’ is a phrase that means to reserve something for a particular purpose regarding something else or someone.
E.g.:
“Mom, I dedicated this song to you.”
“She dedicated her life to being a nurse.”

I understand that this can be confusing to us Indonesian, because the direct translation for both ‘to’ and ‘for’ is ‘untuk.’ Sometimes, we might use ‘for’ instead of the correct word, ‘to.’

However, as it is a phrase, we should always try to remember the correct form, ‘to dedicate ____ to.’

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 28 January 2020.


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#EngGrammar: Infinitive Verbs

Hi, fellas, how are you today?

There are several parts of speech in English: noun, pronoun, adjective, determiner, verb, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection.

One of them, verb, specifically infinitive verbs, are our topic for this article. Can you define infinitive verbs? What is the difference between infinitive verbs and base/finite verbs?

text on shelf
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

Base verbs are verbs that can be used in their original forms.
E.g.:
run every day.
check my social media accounts 8 to 10 times a day.

Infinitive verbs are non-finite verbs or verbs that cannot stand independently as the main verbs on a sentence. Infinitive verbs are usually preceded by the word ‘to.’ Infinitive verbs are also usually used after the following words:
Modal verbs (can/could, may/might, must, shall/should, will/would)
E.g.:
She must go to the airport by 3 hours prior to the flight.
John should consider a career in acting; he’s so talented.

Several other verbs
Several other verbs that are followed by infinitive verbs are afford, agree, aim, appear, arrange, attempt, determined, beg, care, choose, claim, dare, decide, demand, deserve, expect, fail, happen, help, hesitate, hope, learn, long, manage, mean, need, neglect, offer, plan, prepare, pretend, proceed, promise, refuse, resolve, seem, stop, swear, tend, threaten, use, volunteer, vow, want, wish, would hate, would like, would love, and would prefer.
E.g.:
The child appears to be ill.
I beg to differ.
It helps to have a friend who is a tech-savvy.
He refused to sign the agreement.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 23 January 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: Common Misconceptions in English Learning

Hi, hello, fellas! How are you?

With the increasing use of English in every field, English proficiency is a must-have skill. We in Indonesia, however, could find a lot of challenges when trying to learn English, some of them came from the misconceptions that we still believe to be true until now.

By changing our mindset about these misconceptions, we will be better prepared to embrace English learning or learning any other foreign languages as a part of our daily life.

What are those misconceptions?

 

abstract blackboard bulb chalk
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

English (or any foreign languages) is hard. I will never be good at it.
Trust me, fellas, I also had the same mindset when I first started learning English. It turned out that it was just in my mind. And so, I tried a variety of learning methods. One that helped me a lot was doing a lot of exercise and practice, whether it was reading, listening, or structure/grammar. Take your time while learning something new and be patient with yourself.

We can learn English better and faster with a native speaker.
Not always true. Most native speakers learn English through language acquisition when they were young, which means they might not experience the difficulty of learning a new language at a later age. Native speakers can often follow English grammar patterns without knowing what that grammar pattern is, so they can use English well but might not be able to teach it.

I can never master the correct British/American/Australian accent.
Again, this is not always true, fellas. With practice, you can acquire the accent, but the more important thing is the correct pronunciation as well as your confidence in yourself to use English on a daily basis.

Grammar is the most important part of English learning.
The correct statement is all elements of English learning are equally important. Grammar at times can be the most intimidating part, but as you grow to love what you are learning and notice the pattern on which a grammar is used, you will find no difficulties using grammar.

Someone who speaks English is more intelligent than others.
Proficiency in English does not equate intelligence, fellas. It’s true that by being proficient in English, the opportunity to learn new things will open widely. However, it will depend on the person whether he/she/they can use the opportunity and the resources well, including understanding the subject.

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 13 January 2020.


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#EngTips: How to Improve Vocabulary

woman in front of her computer
Photo by Ree on Pexels.com

It is not easy to learn a new language, fellas. Especially with the structure, grammar, and all the tenses. We could also find difficulties adding new words to our vocabulary. We have to know the meaning of the word, how to pronounce it correctly, and in what context it is used.

However, we can always try by learn and learn more. Here are some tips to help you improve your vocabulary:

Read and listen
It might sound simple, fellas, but it is about building a habit. The more we try to find new words by reading English texts, watching the news, or listening to podcast, the more familiar we are with them.

Keep a journal
Writing a word down in a journal could help us memorise it better. You can also use any notes on your mobile phone if you feel more comfortable doing so.

Dictionary and thesaurus are handy
If you are still unsure about the difference between a dictionary and a thesaurus, you can simply think of a dictionary as a list of words in alphabetical order with their meanings and the pronunciation, while a thesaurus shows what words are synonymous or antonymous.
With technology nowadays, install a dictionary and a thesaurus app on your mobile phone to quickly help you when you find a new word.

Use the new words
Never be hesitant to practice by using the words in a written form or in a conversation. You can also ask your studying partner to correct you.

Group words that surround the same theme
Instead of listing the words one by one, try grouping them into the same theme. For example, if you love dining out, then collect words that are related to food and restaurant and cooking. So every time you learn a new word from this theme, it will be easier to remember.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 9 January 2020.


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#EngKnowledge: 2020 Fun Facts

#Page364of365 Today is the last Monday this year and only less than 48 hours before we change the calendar. How excited are you for 2020, fellas?

pexels-photo-3401900.jpeg
Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

I myself am looking into personal growth, doing more voluntary works or charitable activities, and learning some new skills, like sewing. What about you?

While making a list of things we are planning to do in 2020, let’s share some facts about the new year.

  1. The year 2020 will start on a Wednesday and as it is a leap year, will have 366 days.
  2. People all over the world mostly believe that 2019 is the last year of this decade (2010-2019), which means 2020 is the first year of the new decade. However, there are some who believe that the new decade starts in 2021. How is that? Because there are two ways to decide from when to when a decade lasts. The first way is by the same digit. For example, the 1990s started from 1990 and lasted until 1999. The second way is by starting a decade with the last digit ‘1.’ As there is no year ‘zero/0,’ we start counting the years from year 1. By this definition, the 2020 is the last year of the decade and the new decade will begin on 1 January 2021.
  1. The Roman number of 2020 is MMXX.
  2. The Gregorian year 1992 had the exact same calendar as the year 2020.
  3. The Chinese year of Metal Rat will last from 25 January 2020 until 11 February 2021. Rat is the first animal on the Chinese zodiac list so the year of rat is believed to be a new beginning when people from all zodiac signs can prosper.

If you think 2019 was not up to your expectation and 2020 is not going to be any different, plan to try out new things or rediscover your love for old hobbies and idle skills. Who knows what will happen, right? Let’s welcome 2020 with a bang!

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 30 December 2019.


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#EngKnowledge: The Twelve Days of Christmas

Have you ever heard of the phrase ‘The Twelve Days of Christmas,’ fellas? Have you ever wondered what it is and what it means?

‘The Twelve Days of Christmas’ is a Christmas carol that dated back to 1780 when it was first used in England as a chant or a rhyme. It is believe to have a French origin.

It tells a story of accumulating gifts for twelve days since Christmas Day; each day the amount of gift increases from the day before.

assorted color gift boxes
Photo by Giftpundits.com on Pexels.com

The song goes like this (source: Google):

On the first day of Christmas my true love sent to me
A partridge in a pear tree
On the second day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the third day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the fourth day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the fifth day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Five gold rings, four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the sixth day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Six geese a laying, five gold rings, four calling birds
Three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the seventh day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Seven swans a swimming, six geese a laying, five gold rings
Four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the eighth day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Eight maids a milking, seven swans a swimming, six geese a laying
Five gold rings, four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the ninth day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Nine drummers drumming, eight maids a milking, seven swans a swimming, six geese a laying, five gold rings, four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the tenth day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Ten pipers piping
Nine drummers drumming, ten pipers piping
Drumming, piping, drumming, piping
Eight maids a milking, seven swans a swimming, six geese a laying
Five gold rings, four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the eleventh day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Eleven ladies dancing, ten pipers piping, nine drummers drumming
Eight maids a milking, seven swans a swimming, six geese a laying
Five gold rings, four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree
On the twelfth day of Christmas my true love sent to me
Twelve Lords a leaping, eleven ladies dancing, ten pipers piping
Nine, drummers drumming, eight maids a milking
Seven swans a swimming, six geese a laying
And five gold rings, four calling birds, three French hens, two turtle doves
And a partridge in a pear tree, and a partridge in a pear tree

 

There are several variations and versions to this song but all tells a story of cumulative wealth or gifts. There are also similar verses in Scotland, Faroe Islands, and France. The exact origins and the meaning of the song are unknown, although many believe that it came from children’s memory and forfeit game. Each child in succession repeats the gifts of the day and forfeits or is given penalty for each mistake.

Do you want to try to memorise it, fellas?

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 26 December 2019.


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#WOTD: Cast

Hi, fellas, how are you today? I hope your Monday went well.

Today, we are going to discuss the word ‘cast’ on #WOTD. What do you have in mind every time you read or hear this word, fellas?

For me, the word ‘cast’ is always associated with an actor or actress being chosen to play a specific role in a movie.

E.g.: “When I heard that Joaquin Phoenix was cast as the Joker, I really couldn’t wait to see the movie.”

Clapper

 

However, aside of that meaning, there are also other meaning of the word ‘cast.’ Let’s start on how it functions as a verb.

The verb ‘to cast’ means to set or throw something aside, especially with force.
E.g.: “He cast the newspaper aside when he found a misleading article written about him.”

It can also mean to cause a light or a shadow to appear on a certain surface.
E.g.: “The morning sun cast an orange shade over the empty field.”

‘To cast’ can also mean to shape or to mould something (usually of metal) in its molten form and let it cool until it becomes solid.
E.g.: “The ring was cast in Mordor.”

Gif.gif

 

If we ‘cast a look/glance/smile, etc.’ towards something, it means that we throw a look, a glance, a smile, etc. to a specific direction.
E.g.: “As she wasn’t prepared, she couldn’t help casting nervous glances towards her classmates during the quiz.”

There are also ‘to cast a vote,’ which means to vote, and ‘to cast a spell/curse,’ which means to put a spell or a curse on someone.

In past tense and participle tense, the word ‘cast’ retains its form. So, the past form, the participle form, and the passive form of ‘cast’ are still ‘cast.’

As a noun, ‘cast’ generally refers to an object made in a mould. For example, an accident just happened to someone causing his ankle to sprain, so he needs to wear a cast.

 

Written and compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 9 September 2019.


 

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#EngPic: Wholesome Images

Hi, fellas, how was your Monday? I hope it treated you well.

Mondays are always associated with the inclination to stay in bed while we actually have to start another week. Don’t you agree? Therefore, I would use today’s #EngPic session to share some wholesome images to lift up your spirit.

‘Wholesome’ is an adjective that means conducive to or suggestive of good health and physical well-being. However, it changes meaning nowadays on the internet. Nowadays, we use the word ‘wholesome’ to describe an internet content that puts us in a good mood or makes us happy for simple reasons.

James Fridman.jpg
Credit: James Fridman.

 

Beth Evans.jpg
Credit: Beth Evans.

 

Anonymoys.jpg
Credit: Anonymous.

 

Anonymous.jpg
Credit: Anonymous.

 

Chuckdrawsthings.jpg
Credit: Chuckdrawsthings.

 

RespectfulMemes.jpg
Credit: RespectfulMemes.

 

Jeefseq.jpg
Credit: Jeefseq.

 

Lunar baboon.jpg
Credit: Lunarbaboon.

 

Safely Endangered.jpg
Credit: Safely Endangered.
Abdullah Shoaib.jpg
Credit: Abdullah Shoaib.

Written and compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 26 August 2019.

 


 

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#EngClass: Compound Sentences

Hi, everyone! How was your day? Did your favourite football team secure a slot in the quarter-final of #WorldCup2018? Mine was hectic, but I was able to do a lot today.

Notice the last sentence of the previous paragraph. It’s what we call a compound sentence.

tomato pizza
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

A compound sentence is a sentence with more than an independent clause. An independent clause is a clause that can already stand as a sentence. It consists of a subject and a predicate. In Indonesian, a compound sentence is known as ‘kalimat majemuk.’

Example of an independent clause:
“I would like a cup of tea.”
“I would like a slice of cake.”

Even though these clauses are simple and short, they can already function as sentences with actual meaning.

Question:
Could you combine those two examples and create a compound sentence?
Answer:
“I would like a cup of tea and a slice of cake.”

 

From the answer, we can identify two characteristics of a compound sentence.

  1. It has a coordinating conjunction.
    There are seven coordinating conjunctions that we can use to form a compound sentence: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so. We can also use a semicolon (;) to do so.

  2. The ideas for both clauses are related.
    The speaker implied that he would like to enjoy a tea-time with some delicacies, namely ‘a slice of cake.’

 

Exercise:
Create a compound sentence by filling the blanks with the correct conjunction.

  1. What would you like for dinner, pizza _____ salad?
  2. Salad is healthier, _____ pizza means a lot of fun.
  3. When you have decided, order through the delivery service, will you? Don’t forget some side dishes _____ I’d suggest bruschetta, chicken wings, _____ some sausages.
  4. I don’t want more carbs, _____ do I want sausages.
  5. Well, take out the bruschetta, then, _____ it contains a lot of carbs. You’re so skinny, _____ you don’t like carbs.
  6. I think I’ll place the order now, _____ it will be here by the time the game is on.

 

Answer:

1.OR.
The sentence compares two alternatives.

2.BUT.
The sentence introduces a second choice that is contrasting with what has been mentioned.

3.First blanks: (;)
There are two clauses being put together, ‘don’t forget some side dishes’ and ‘I’d suggest bruschetta.’
Second blanks: AND.

4.NOR.
The speaker already mentioned a negative statement, ‘I don’t want more carbs,’ and ‘nor’ introduces another negative statement, ‘nor do I want sausages.

5.First blanks: FOR.
‘For’ explains why the ‘bruschetta will be taken out,’ and it is because ‘it contains a lot of carbs.’
Second blanks: YET.
It explains that despite being skinny, the other person still limits his carbohydrate intake.

6.SO.
It explains that the order will be placed soon, with the aim that it will arrive by the time the game starts.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 2 July, 2018.


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#EngVocab: Eid al-Fitr Tradition

Hi, hello, fellas! How was your Eid al-Fitr holiday? Eid Mubarak for all of you who celebrated it.

While we are still in the festivities, I’d like to share some words related to Eid al-Fitr tradition in Indonesia.

architecture building city dawn
Photo by Indra Gunawan on Pexels.com

Mudik (Ina) = Homecoming trip (Eng)
A trip to our hometown that we usually do at the end of Ramadan.

Bermaaf-maafan (Ina) = forgiving one another (Eng)
It is believed that we should celebrate Eid al-Fitr with a clean mind, body, and soul, and forgiving one another is one way to achieve it.

Kemacetan panjang (Ina) = traffic congestion (Eng)
It is not exactly a tradition, but traffic congestion happens almost every year during homecoming. Luckily, the traffic and road condition have improved a lot this year.

Silaturahmi (Ina) = amity, tight friendship (Eng)
Refers to a close bond between two human beings who might or might not be related by blood.

Halalbihalal (Ina) = Gathering to ask for forgiveness (Eng)
An occasion when family or close friends gather to catch up with each other and ask/give forgiveness.

Ketupat (Ina) = Steamed rice cake wrapped in diamond-shaped palm leaves (Eng)
Similarly, we also have lontong (Ina) = steamed rice cake wrapped in banana leaves (Eng). Phew, quite a mouthful, isn’t it?

Opor ayam (Ina) = chicken braised in coconut milk (Eng)
One of the most popular dishes served during Eid al-Fitr celebration.

Rendang (Ina) = rendang (Eng)
This widely popular dish has been recognized by its own name, even when we are speaking English. We can also refer to it as meat simmered in spices and coconut milk.

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 18 June 2018.


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#GrammarTrivia: Due to vs. Because of (REVISIT)

This topic might be one of the most frequently asked questions that we have ever received. What is the difference between ‘due to’ and ‘because of?’

@ridhoansyori: KINDLY. SOMEONE. EXPLAIN. PLS

Take a look at these two sentences
– Her headache was due to the noise coming from upstairs.
– She had a headache because of the noise coming from upstairs.

person people woman hand
Photo by Public Domain Pictures on Pexels.com

On sentence 1, there is the noun ‘her headache’ and the linking verb ‘was.’ To make sentence 1 a complete sentence, we need a complement. The phrase ‘due to the noise coming from upstairs’ is this complement.

“Her headache                  was                                        due to the noise coming from upstairs.”
Subject                               linking verb                         complement

 

On sentence 2, the subject is ‘she.’ The predicate is ‘had a headache.’

If we write it only as ‘she had a headache,’ the sentence will still be complete. We want to introduce the reason WHY she had a headache. So, we add ‘because of the noise coming from upstairs.’

Although sentence 1 & 2 are similar, sentence 1 was actually meant to say that there was a noise from upstairs and her headache came as a RESULT to this noise.

Meanwhile, sentence 2 explained that THE REASON she had a headache was that noise coming from upstairs.

 

Are you still unsure, fellas? Let’s take the following exercise.

a. My brother’s success is ______ his hard work.
b. My brother is a successful person ______ his hard work.
c. She failed ______ not studying.
d. Her failure was ______ not studying.

@dindaaark: a. Due to. b. Because of. c. Because of. d. Due to.
@notevennurul: A. Due to. B. Because of. C. Because of. D. Due to.
@cynthiatika: a, d : due to. b, c : because of.

 

Answers:
a & d: due to
‘My brother’s success’ came as a result of ‘his hard work.’
‘Her failure’ came as a result of ‘not studying.’

b & c: because of
‘His hard work’ is the reason why ‘my brother is a successful person.’
‘Not studying’ is the reason why ‘she failed.’

 

A couple of tips to decide when to use ‘due to’ and ‘because of’:

‘Due to’ is an adjectival phrase. It gives more detail to the noun. It identifies the result of an event. It always comes after linking verb ‘be’ (is, am, are, was, were, will be, etc.).

‘Because of’ is an adverbial phrase. It gives more detail to the verb. It identifies the reason why something happens. It always comes after subject + verb.

 

Q: @magnifician: Di kamus cambridge online, “due to” bisa menggantikan “because of”, min (contoh kedua)

due to

A: Benar. Namun, contoh kedua lebih tepat jika menggunakan ‘because of.’ Ini versi admin:
A lot of her unhappiness is due to boredom. She is unhappy because of boredom.
The bus’ delay was due to heavy snow. The bus was delayed because of heavy snow.

Q: @magnifician: Ini contoh lainnya…

due to 2

A: Seperti penjelasan admin sebelumnya, ‘due to’ memberi keterangan pada subjek, sehingga jika sudah menggunakan ‘due to,’ frasa yang mengandung verba bisa tidak dicantumkan.
The game’s cancellation was due to adverse weather conditions.
Her five days of work was due to illness.
The captain’s withdrawal from the match was due to injury.
Kalimat 2 & 3 sudah tepat menggunakan ‘due to.’

 

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, 13 June, 2018.


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#EngVocab: Popular Internet Terms as of Mid-2018

Hi, fellas, how was your Monday? I was shook when I realized that we are halfway through 2018.

Does anyone recognize the word ‘shook’ that I used on the previous sentence? Have you ever read it before?

 

@catheramirez: ‘Surprise,’ ‘I can’t believe it.’

Q: @nadirantsy: Does shook have the same meaning with shocked? Same context?
A: Yes, but I think we should limit ‘shook’ to a relaxed, playful context. We don’t use it to express our sadness when hearing a bad news, for example.

 

‘Shook’ is one of the popular internet terms that we are going to discuss tonight. As languages are ever-evolving, these internet terms are actual English words whose meanings have changed over the years.

Here are some popular internet terms that are still used as of mid-2018:

Bamboozled
From the verb ‘to bamboozle’ (informal). It means to fool or cheat someone. It also means to confuse or perplex.
E.g.: “I’m bamboozled by the amount of retweets to my Twitter post.”

Boi/boye
A cute way to spell ‘boy.’ Usually used to a male dog.
E.g.: “Oh, you’re such a good boiiiiii…”

Burn
A reaction we gave when somebody has just been talked back to.
A: “Without the ugly in this world, there would be nothing beautiful.”
B: “Thank you for your sacrifice.”
C: “Burn!!”

Canceled
‘To cancel’ used to describe that an event would not take place OR a force negated another, but nowadays, netizen use ‘canceled’ to describe a dismissed or rejected person or idea.
E.g.: “If you don’t like my doggos, you will be canceled.”

Cringe and cringey
‘To cringe’ is to experience an inward shiver upon seeing or hearing something embarrassing. ‘Cringey’ is used as an adjective to describe something that causes somebody to cringe.
E.g.: “I cringed so hard when I watched her lip-synced performance. It was so cringey.”

Deceased
It was used to politely say that someone has passed away, but now, it is used to describe that something is really cool or awesome or funny that it takes our lives away.
E.g.: “OMG, my brother bought me tickets to a Rich Brian’s concert! I’m deceased!”

Doggo
Basically, it’s a cute way to say ‘dog.’
E.g.: “I just saw a super adorable, squishy, fluffy doggo.” insert crying face emojis

adorable animal beach canine
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

Extra
Something is ‘extra’ if it is done in an exaggerated, over-the-top way.
E.g.: “Rihanna’s outfit at the 2018’s Met Gala is so extra.”

Epic comeback
It used to describe a spectacular return of an artist, most of the time musicians, after a long hiatus. Now, it also means a witty (sometimes harsh) response to an insult.
A: “You’re so fat Thanos will have to snap his fingers twice.”
B: “Yeah, I’m fat, but you’re ugly. At least I can go on a diet.

Feels
All emotions mixed up: sadness, joy, envy, love, etc.
E.g.: “TVXQ’s comeback gave me all the feels.”

HMU
Stands for ‘hit me up,’ which means ‘contact me.’
E.g.: “HMU the next time you visit the city.”

Humblebrag
The act of bragging while appearing humble; the art of false modesty.
E.g.: “Who knew that constant vacations and holidays could be this exhausting?”

Lit
It used to describe the state of being drunk, but it is now used to express that something is exceptionally good.
E.g.: “The latest Arctic Monkey’s album was so lit it set my headphones on fire.”

Noob
A noob is a person who is inexperienced in a particular sphere or activity, especially computing or the use of the Internet. It came from the word ‘newbie.’ However, ‘newbie’ has a more positive connotation while ‘noob’ is intended as an insult.
A: “Hey guys, I’m kinda new here.“
B: “LOL, noob.”

Overproud
A reaction we gave when our nation or something originated from our nation is being talked about in a positive way.
A: “Did you know that an instant noodle brand from Indonesia was marketed worldwide?”
B: “Are you being overproud right now?”

Pwned
A gaming-style spelling of ‘owned,’ meaning being defeated badly.
E.g.: “Oh, snap, I was just pwned!”

Salty
Upset, angry, or bitter, after being made fun of or embarrassed. It can also be used to say that someone is mad.
E.g.: “Gosh, stop being so salty! You broke up with him; now it’s time to move on!”

Savage
Being ‘savage’ is saying or doing something harsh without a regard to the consequences.
A: “You’re so fat Thanos will have to snap his fingers twice.”
B: “Yeah, I’m fat, but you’re ugly. At least I can go on a diet.”
C: “Oooh, that was savage!”

Shady and throwing shade
Shady = suspicious
Throwing shade = talking bad about something or someone, without naming (but the audience knows anyway).
E.g.: “I think her last Instagram post was a shade thrown to me. I don’t know why she’s so shady.”

Shook
Originally, the word has a more serious connotation, as it means ’emotionally or physically disturbed.’ Nowadays, netizen use it as a playful way to say ‘surprised.’
E.g.: “She broke up with him? I’m shook!”

Stoked
It means being excited or euphoric.
E.g.: “When they told me I was on the team, I was stoked.”

Tea
A gossip or personal information belonging to someone else. The phrase ‘spill the tea’ is used the same way as ‘spill the bean’ is used, that is ‘to reveal an information that is supposed to be a secret.
E.g.: “The tea is exceptionally good today.”

Woke
Supposedly has the same meaning as ‘awaken,’ which is being enlightened, always in the know of everything that is happening in the world, more than anyone else.
E.g.: “I never consume any products coming from animals anymore. I guess I can say I’m woke.”

 

As what we always suggest, avoid using slang or internet terms in a formal interaction. If you befriend your employer or boss on social media, for example, both of you are still expected to converse formally. Any school assignments, essays, job applications, letter of recommendations, or business emails should be free from these terms either.

@kaonashily: instantly I feel ‘gaul’ knowing these ‘nowadays’ words.

@babygraace: I think salty isn’t just used when someone is being made fun or embarrassed.  E.g.: omg some people that watch my car vlogs literally get salty at me because I don’t put both my hands on the wheel!

Q: @sakurayujin: What about ‘shooketh?’
A: Even more surprised than ‘shook.’

 

Compiled and written by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 11 June, 2018.


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