All posts by Fitrya Nur Baity

#Engvocab: Election

Hello fellas, how are you today? Fellas, on April 17, 2019, we in Indonesia hold a general election to determine the future members of House of Representative and the future president and vice president. Therefore, today, we are going to discuss vocabularies related to election.

An election is a formal group decision-making process by which a population chooses an individual to hold public office. There are several vocabularies that we often hear or read in regards to election terms. Here they are:

1. Campaign
Means the things a candidate does to get elected (shaking hands, giving oration, etc.).
E.g.: “He took a campaign tour of West Java last week.”

2. Debate
Means to argue for or against something.
E.g.: “The topic of tonight’s presidential debate is national defense and security.”

3. Candidate
Means the person who is running in an election.
E.g.: “The Indonesia presidential election in 2019 has two pair of candidates.”

4. Politics
Means the activities associated with the governance of a country or other area.
E.g.: “I told her I was going into politics.”

5. Voter
Means the individual who is voting in an election.
E.g.: “Now the voters will decide.”

6. Ballot paper
Means a piece of paper or a small ball used in a secret voting.
E.g.: “Each person will get a ballot which should be kept confidential.”

7. Supporter
Means the individual who supports a candidate during an election.
E.g.: “All supporters in this campaign are so excited to meet the candidate.”

8. Political party
Means a group of people with similar political goals and opinions whose main purpose is to get candidates elected to public office.
E.g.: “Most of political parties in this election are optimistic about their candidates being elected.”

9. Democracy
Means a system of government by the whole population or all the eligible members of a state, typically through elected representatives.

E.g.: “Indonesia is one of the countries that adapts democracy as its system of government.”

10. Government
Means the governing body of a nation, state, or community.
E.g.: “The first MRT in our city was planned by the previous government.”

Thank you and see you tomorrow!

Compiled and written by @2013happyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, April 10, 2019

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#ENGVOCAB: VOCABULARIES RELATED TO INTERNET AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Hello fellas, how are you? how often do you surf the internet and social media? I am sure that most of you like spending time to check social media and surfing the internet. Today, we are discussing some words and phrases related to internet and social media. Here they are.


http://lime20.com/internet.php

1. To unplug
It means to disconnect and to relax by disengaging ourselves from activities that use internet connection.

E.g.: “Sometimes you need to learn to unplug and just enjoy the peace and quiet at home.”

2. Hot-spot
It refers to a place in public area where there is a computer system with an access point or an internet connection.

E.g.: “The airport was bright and spacious, with large shopping area and Wi-Fi hot-spot lounge.”

3. To multitask
To multitask means to do many things at the same time. 

E.g.: “An interpreter needs a quick, agile mind to multitask, because she or he needs to simultaneously listen to a concept or idea in one language, understand and process it, and translate it to another language.”

4. Down-time
It refers to the time when a computer is not working properly and cannot be used. This could also mean the time somebody needs to relax and recuperate after a hard work.

E.g.: “Once we are done with all the renovation, I am ready for some major down-time.”

5. Pulled to the internet
It means working hard using the internet or being dependent to the internet.

E.g.: “I wish I could do that but I am so pulled to the internet. I manage my own business and I can hardly spend a day without sending emails or checking my website.”

6. To pull the plug
When you pull the plug of something, it means that it no longer has a power source and will switch off.

E.g.: “I am considering just pulling the plug on the whole thing. I have been so busy with my work and I have not had time to be creative or even relax.”

7. Be on the same wavelength
It refers to the same things that have the same origins but can also be used for casual acquaintances. It has the same meaning as being in tune with somebody.

E.g.: “What makes the problem worse is that Howard and Tina are not on the same wavelength about how to deal with it.”

8. No filter
It is usually used to refer to a picture, which is of original quality and has not been edited or modified. The term is also used to refer to an uncensored conversation, usually between friends.

E.g.: “Miranda is my best friend. Sometimes when we are chatting, we can talk with no filter and we laugh at each other.”

9. On fleek
Something is on fleek if it looks perfect and on point.

E.g.: “Did you see what Jason was wearing today? His look is on fleek!”

10. To win the internet
The phrase is usually used as a reaction given by someone who either really likes or really dislikes your post.

E.g.: “This picture wins the internet today. Everything else is dummy.”

That’s all for today, fellas. Hopefully today’s session is useful for you. See you tomorrow!

Compiled and written by @2013happyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, March 27, 2019

#EngTips: HOW TO KEEP A CONVERSATION GOING

Hello fellas, I’m happy to meet you again today. How are you today?

Fellas, as non-native speakers, have you ever felt stuck and confused in the middle of a conversation? Especially since the conversation is done in English.

Sometimes, when we meet with international friends, we must keep a conversation going to give them sufficient details about us. However, when we feel confused because we don’t know what to say, the conversation will stop.

Example:
“Did you have a good weekend?”
“Yes, I did. You?”
“Yeah, it was good.”

The conversation will stop because there is no natural way to continue it. A brief conversation with strangers are fine from time to time, but if it is someone we know, a longer chat will be expected.

Here is how to keep a conversation going:

1. Ask questions and start with 5W + 1H (What, Who, Where, When, Why, How). Avoid yes or no questions.


2. Answer the questions with elaborated details that will help you continue the conversations.

3. Try interesting topics such as family, hobbies, sports, movie, TV shows, culture, music, recent events, travelling, or interesting places in the city where you live. Avoid such topics as religion, politics, sex life, personal finance, or health issues.

Check this long conversation as an example:
James: “Hey, Rachel, how was your weekend?”
Rachel: “Pretty good! I went to a baseball game with my brother.”
James: “Really? What teams were playing?”

Rachel: “The Red Sox and The Yankees. We are huge Yankees fans!”
James: “Yeah? How was the game?”
Rachel: “Very exciting. It was tied until the last minutes, and then we won 2-1.”

You can see from the example that both persons tried to keep the conversation going. James asked questions and Rachel answered enthusiastically.

To have a good conversation in English with your international friends, a regular practice is necessary. That is all for today, fellas! If you have questions about this or previous sessions, don’t hesitate to mention us.

Hopefully today’s topic could help you brush up your English conversation skill. See you tomorrow!

Compiled and written by @2013happyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, March 13,2019

#EngTalk: Horoscope

Hello fellas, how was your day? We meet again in Wednesday session with @Englishtips4u and today we will discuss astrology or also known as horoscope. Do you believe in horoscope? Most of the time, someone checks his or her horoscope out of pure fun. When we open a magazine or a newspaper and we see the horoscope monthly update, we can sometimes read or overlook it.

For those who read it, they do it to search any signs about fortune or lucky happenings in life, for fun. As we are all aware, there are 12 known zodiac signs that are compatible with our birthdays. Can you mention all 12 of them? Yes, they are Capricorn, Aquarius, Pisces, Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, Leo, Virgo, Libra, Scorpio, and Sagittarius.

https://pixabay.com/en/zodiac-astrology-horoscope-2904106/

Strangely enough, millennials tend to show more interest in astrology, more than other generations do, according to this article : https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/horoscopes-millennials-why-do-so-many-believe-zodiac-star-signs-a7531806.html

Do you think the article makes sense? Or does anything happen to us is purely coincidental, regardless of our star sign? Share your thoughts and tweet us. Have you read this article? I find some opinion about millennials and the zodiac sign.

What we must avoid, however, is judging someone based on their zodiac sign. Someone who was born under the sign Libra could say, “It’s not my fault that I’m bad on decision making. I’m a Libra.

The article also mentioned a girl with Leo horoscope, who felt that she didn’t quite relate to her zodiac sign. She said that she would not define herself as someone who liked to be on the spotlight, although she did feel that she was a sociable and a creative type.

Continuing with the businesswoman on the article who was a Libra. She identified strongly with her zodiac sign and believed that she was a ‘typical Libran. The last one was a young girl from London, an Aries, who believed that she found herself always attracted to Aquarius guys, based on the horoscope.

However, as what we mentioned previously, we should avoid prejudice based on zodiac sign. Someone’s characteristics and personality are unique, which means we cannot really be sure that someone is behaving or doing a certain action because of his or her sign.

Similarly, we should not be discouraged either if our zodiac update says that there is something unfortunate to happen to us. It is good to stay optimistic, keep an open mind, and be careful at the same time.

That’s all for today, fellas! Thank you so much for joining today’s session. See you tomorrow!

Compiled and written by @2013happyy for @EnglishTips4U on Wednesday, February 13, 2019.

Exclamatory Sentence

Hello, fellas, how are you doing?

Fellas, do you know what is this?

Burj Khalifa

That is Burj Khalifa in Dubai, UAE, “How amazing it is!

Did you notice the form that I used to compliment Burj Khalifa? Yes, I said, “How amazing it is!“. On that sentence, I used what we call exclamatory sentence, which is going to be our topic for today.

An exclamatory sentence is a sentence that expresses about wonder or a feeling caused by something beautiful or stunning. Usually, the characteristic of an exclamatory sentence is it ends with an exclamation mark (!).

Check these sentences:
How small their house was!” (Betapa kecil rumah mereka!)

How oddly Justin behaved!” (Betapa aneh kelakuan Justin!)

What a surprising conclusion it was!” (Sungguh sebuah kesimpulan yang mengejutkan!)

To make an exclamatory sentence, we can use the following formula.

  • Formula 1:
    How + adjective + subject + auxiliary verb
    E.g.:

    How cheap these shoes are!
  • Formula 2:
    How + adverb + subject + verb
    E.g.:
    How oddly Justin behaved!
  • Formula 3:

  How + adjective + noun + subject + verb

E.g.:

What expensive bags you have!”

Fellas, sometimes, we can remove some word on an exclamatory sentence to make the sentence even better.

E.g.: “What a charming girl!” instead of “What a charming girl she is!” “What beautiful hair!” instead of “What beautiful hair you have!

An exclamatory sentence can also be written as a declarative sentence (which we will discuss next time).

E.g.: “There is the plane now!” (Itu pesawatnya sudah mendarat!)

There is your bus coming!” (Itu dia busnya tiba!)

Fellas, that is all for today, thank you so much for your patience and see you tomorrow!

Compiled and written by @2013happyyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, January 30, 2019

#EngClass: Derivatives

Hello fellas, how was your day?

In this session we will discuss derivative which is a part of grammar in English language. There are several grammatical rules to apply when using English. Today, we will continue with ‘Derivatives.’

Derivatives are word that are derived from other words, which we call root words. Usually, derivatives are formed by adding an affix to the root words.
Let’s see the paragraph below:

At their first session, the lawyer asked Ed, “What things about this woman that attracted you?”
Ed replied, “Her forthrightness, straightforwardness, and frankness
.”

Fellas, did you find any derivatives from that paragraph?
From that paragraph, the words ‘forthrightness,’ ‘straightforwardness,’ and ‘frankness’ are derivatives. Derivatives can also be nouns that we could change into adjectives or adverbs if we add suffix at the end of the words. However, there are some derivatives that still retain their meaning.

1. To form noun derivatives, we add suffixes like -ness, -ty, -hood, -ian, -cy, -er, -or, -sion, -ment, -tion, -ant, -ce, etc.
E.g.: 
Happy – Happiness 
Child – Childhood

Dense – Density
Pregnant – Pregnancy
Good – Goodness

Comedy – Comedian
Assist – Assistance
Friend – Friendship 

2. To form adjective derivatives, we add suffixes like: -full, -less, -ish, -al, – cy, – ary, -able, -ous, -y, etc.
E.g.:
Blue – blueish
Boy – boyish
Help – helpless
Sun – sunny
Danger – dangerous

3. To form verb derivatives, we can add affixes like dis-, re-, -ize, a-, -fy. 
E.g.:
Like – dislike
Agree – disagree 
Check – recheck
Memory – memorize
Summary – summarize

4. Derivatives can also form ‘negative words’ or words that have the negative meaning of the root words. To form these derivatives, we add prefixes un-, in-, im-, etc.

E.g.:
complete – incomplete
happy – unhappy
direct – indirect
mortal – immortal

Sumber: Yulianto, Dian. (2018). Asyiknya Belajar Grammar Dari Kisah-Kisah Jenaka. Yogyakarta: DIVA press.

Compiled and written by @2013happyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, January 23, 2019

#EngClass: The Imperative (2)

Hi fellas, Today we will discuss the imperative and how to use it on sentences.

Fellas, Imperative is a type of sentence that gives instructions or expresses a command. Sometimes, an imperative sentence also expresses a direction, a request, an order or a suggestion. Imperative sentences usually end with an exclamation mark or a period. Check this paragraph and find imperative sentences on this paragraph:

In a second-grade elementary class, an English teacher asked her students to count in English. “Lisa, can you count up to five in English for me?” Lisa said “Yes, Miss. One, two, three, four, five.” The teacher said “Very good. Now Melisa, please continue.

When the teacher asked Melisa to continue counting, she said “Please continue”. It is the imperative.

  1. Imperative sentences can also express prohibition or warning. They can end with either an exclamation mark and period. E.g.:
  • Do not use the lift in the event of fire“.
  • Don’t go there!”
  • Don’t tell anyone that I was here“.
  • Don’t be late!

2. Imperative sentences can also express an instruction. E.g.:

  • Enjoy your meal“.
  • Do start“.
  • Stop talking and open your books“.
  • Ask him, will you? “Write to me, will you?

3. We can write imperative sentence without a subject.

E.g : “Open your mouth and say “Aaah”.

4. We can also write imperative sentence to remind one or more people. E.g :

  • Come on, boys, you’re late”.
  • Come on, Lisa, I’m waiting”.

5. We can also write imperative sentences to make suggestions. Usually, we use “Let’s” in the beginning of sentence. Remember that “let’s” is a contraction of “let us”, which means the pronoun is already plural. E.g :

  • Let’s visit India next month”.
  • Please, let’s just go to cinema tonight, shall we?”.

6. We can also use imperative sentences to give instructions.

E.g : “First, prepare some hot water. Pour the white coffee into a cup. Add some milk and stir the coffee”.

Compiled and written by @2013happyy for @englishtipsforyou on Wednesday, January 16, 2018