#EngTrivia: Adverbs of Time (Already, Just, Yet, and Still) (REVISIT)

This article is a revisited version of EngTips: Adverb of Time (Already, Yet, Just, Still)

We’re going to revisit adverbs of time, e.g., already, just, yet, and still. If you have ever wondered when we should use ‘already’ and ‘yet’ and when we use ‘still’ and ‘just,’ this article is for you.

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Adverbs are used to add more details or explanation to verbs, and today we are going to discuss the ones related to time (keterangan waktu).

First, we start with ‘already’ and ‘yet.’ Both are usually found with the present perfect tense (subject + has/have + V3).

We use ‘already’ with questions and sentences that have positive meaning. It’s usually found between have/has and the V3.
E.g.:
“I have ALREADY finished my homework.”

In questions, it’s placed between subject and V3.
E.g.: “Have you ALREADY had dinner?”

Note: we can modify the sentence to, “Have you had dinner already?” or the less formal, “You had dinner already?”

‘Yet’ is used to enquire about something that hasn’t been done. It’s usually placed at the end of a sentence.
E.g.:
“No, I haven’t finished my work YET.”
“Have you watered the plants YET?”

‘Still’ implies an action has been performed on something but it’s not finished yet. The word generally works with any tense.
E.g.:
“I’m STILL trying to find my phone.”
“I STILL live with my parents.”
“They were STILL watching TV when I told them to go to bed.”

Lastly, ‘just’ is used for an action that is finished or completed in recent time, which means it goes with the simple past tense.
E.g.: “I JUST cleaned up my bedroom. Now my sister made a mess again.” Note: It’s of different use with the one that means ‘only.’

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, 22 November 2021.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):
#EngClass: Adverb
#EngClass: ‘Just’ vs. ‘Only’
#EngTips: Adverb of Time (Already, Yet, Just, Still)
#EngVocab: Adverbs of Time
#GrammarTrivia: Using ‘Already,’ ‘Yet,’ ‘Still,’ and ‘Anymore’

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