#EngVocab: Many Uses of the Word ‘Like’

This article will discuss the many, many uses of the word ‘like.’

Generally we use the word ‘like’ as a verb, to state that we are fond of something or someone.
Example:
“I like the polka dot dress.”

We can also use it as a preposition to signify similarities.
Example:
“The baby’s face is like the mother’s.”

Photo by Cristian Dina on Pexels.com

Let’s discuss other uses of ‘like.’

Noun
We use ‘like’ to refer to a thing or some things of the same kind.
E.g.:
“This is my first time coming across this flower. Have you ever seen the like?”
Lately, with social media being on the rise, ‘like’ also means the amount of positive reaction on a social media post.
E.g.: “Her YouTube channel rakes in/receives millions of views and hundreds of thousands of likes.”

Verb
There are ‘to like’ and ‘to dislike.’
To like = expressing fondness of something or someone.
E.g.:
“I like your dress. Very summertime vibe!”

To dislike = expressing distaste of something or someone.
E.g.:
“I dislike loud vehicles. They’re just too noisy.”

Conjunction
As a conjunction, ‘like’ can mean ‘as’ and ‘as though/as if.’
E.g.:
“They travel abroad monthly like (as) visiting their hometown.”
“She spends money like (as if) it grows on trees.

Adjective
For this use, we inflect/modify ‘like’ to ‘alike’ and ‘unlike.’

‘Alike’ = having similar qualities.
E.g.:
“Her face is so alike her mother’s.”

‘Unlike’ = having different qualities.
E.g.:
Unlike yesterday’s cloudy weather, today we had bright, blue sky.”

Adverb
We can inflect ‘like’ to ‘likely’ and ‘unlikely/not likely.’

Likely = expressing high probability.
E.g.:
“The match is likely to end with a draw.”

Unlikely/not likely = expressing low probability.
E.g.:
“The case is unlikely dropped, now that it gets public attention.”

Informal use
‘Like’ can be used as a filler and as a person’s reported reaction to something or someone.
E.g.
“I was so, like, hyped up and excited.”
“I was like, ‘Why are you so obsessed with me?'”

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, 9 October 2021.

RELATED ARTICLE(S):
#EngTalk: ‘Like’ and ‘Literally,’ Two of the Most Overused Words
#EngVocab: Other Ways to Say ‘Like’
#EngVocab: ‘The Same,’ ‘Similar,’ ‘Like,’ and ‘Alike’
#EngVocab: Ways of Expressing Dislike
#GrammarTrivia: Conditional Sentences Using ‘As If,’ ‘As Though,’ and ‘Like’

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