#WOTD: RAMBUNCTIOUS

Our #WOTD for this article is ‘rambunctious.’ Having read it on various news portals, I found the word quite intriguing.

Firstly, I like how it sounds and how easy it is to remember. When I read the word for the first time, I thought it came from British English; it just sounded like it did.

As I looked into it further, the word is actually an informal American English word, which means exuberant, lively, cheerful, boisterous. Essentially, ‘rambunctious’ is used to describe someone or something that is overly-energetic and has a cheerful manner.

Photo by Emily Rose on Pexels.com

My guess about the word coming from British English was not entirely baseless, however, as there is another word that has similar meaning, ‘rumbustious,’ and the latter did come from British English.

According to Merriam-Webster, ‘rumbustious’ first appeared in Britain in 1700s. It was probably based on ‘robustious,’ which could mean both ‘robust’ and ‘boisterous.’

‘Rambunctious’ began gaining popularity in the United States by 1830. At that time, the States was a fast-growing nation that encouraged the coinage of some new words and terms that represent the nation’s optimism and exuberance.

Example of ‘rambunctious’ in a sentence:
“Bali beaches are packed with rambunctious people every weekend.”
“The rambunctious puppies apparently chewed on one of my shoes last night.”

On the same note, ‘rambunctious’ could also carry a meaning of being too full of energy that we become noisy and unruly.

Example:
“Rambunctious concert-goers caused injuries to their peers as they pushed each other to get closer to the stage.”

Compiled by @alicesaraswati for @EnglishTips4U on Thursday, 4 February 2021.

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