#EngClass The Use of Still, Yet, Already, Any More, Any Longer And No Longer

A. Still (Masih)
It is used to show a continuous action, and is used in affirmative sentence. The word “Still” usually goes in the mid-position of the sentence.
Examples:
– She still looks young.
– It’s 8 o’clock and Jimmy is still in bed.
– Do you still want to marry to her?

And is usually used with Present Continuous (Progressive).

Examples:
– I am still doing my homework.
– He is still washing his car.

B. Yet (Belum)
Yet is used to talk about something that is expected to happen, but did not happen till this moment. We use yet mainly in negative sentences and in questions.

The word “Yet” is used at the end of a sentence.

In negative sentences
Examples:
– He hasn’t come yet.
– I don’t want to go home yet.

In questions
Examples:
– Has he come yet?
– Have you read his book yet?

In the Perfect Tense sentence
– He hasn’t replied my SMS yet.


C. Already (Telah)
Already is used to show that something has happened earlier. It is used in the mid-position of the sentence and is usually used with Present Perfect.

Examples:
– I have already told her.
– She has already seen the film.

In American English, it is also possible to use already with the Simple Past.
Examples:
– I already did my homework.
– He already washed the car.

D. Any More / Any Longer (Sudah tidak lagi)
Any More is an adverb, It happened ‘in the past but not now’
We use Not…. Any more or Not… Any Longer. Any More/Any Longer go at the end of a sentence.

Examples:
– We don’t go to Cornwall on holiday any more (or any longer)
(We used to go in the past but not now.)
– Sara doesn’t work here any more (or any longer). She left last month.
( not ‘Sara doesn’t still work here’ )
– Ann doesn’t teach in this university any more/ any longer.

E. No Longer (Sudah tidak lagi/bukan lagi)
No Longer is used when something used to happen or be true in the past but does not happen or is not true now. It can use to say that situation has changed. No Longer go in the middle of sentences.

Examples:
– Ann no longer works here.
– We are no longer workers.
– It’s no longer a secret.

Reference:
Koltai, Anastasia. 2018. When to Use Still, Already, Yet, Just? Retrieved from https://www.myenglishteacher.eu/blog/still-already-yet-just/


Riyanto, Slamet, et al. A Handbook of English Grammar, An Effective Way to Master English. Pustaka Pelajar.

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