#GrammarTrivia: Inverted Subjects and Verbs with Negative Expressions or Comparisons

In the session titled #GrammarTrivia: Omitting If, we have learned the inversions of subjects and verbs in conditional sentences. When a conditional sentence contains should, were, or had, the subject and verb of the if-clause are inverted. Inversion is also possible in sentences with negative expressions or comparisons.

(More on Omitting If: https://englishtips4u.com/2018/11/10/grammartrivia-omitting-if/)

1) Inversion with Negative Expressions

A negative expression, when it precedes a subject and verb, causes them to be inverted. It is to emphasize the negative element of the sentence.
List of negative expressions:
– no
– rarely
– not
– hardly
– never
– only
– neither
– rarely
– nor
– scarcely
– seldom

Examples:
1. Never were they so enthusiastic.
2. Hardly does she attend the class.

2) Inversion with Comparisons

Inverting the subject and verb of a sentence which contains a comparison is optional and rather formal.

Examples:
1. China is larger than Japan.
2. China is larger than Japan is.
3. China is larger than is Japan.

Sources:
Betty Schrampfer Azar, Understanding and Using English Grammar: Third Edition
Deborah Phillips, Longman Complete Course for the TOEFL Test

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Monday, November 19, 2018

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