#EngVocab: ‘The Same’, ‘Similar’, ‘Like’, and ‘Alike’

Hello, Fellas. Our session today is about some vocabularies with similar meaning – “the same,” “similar,” “like,” and “alike” – and how to use them in a sentence.

The same and similar are adjectives. However, same is always preceded by the.

  • Examples:
    • “Jane and Mary have the same personalities.”
    • “Jane and Mary have similar personalities.”
    • “Their personalities are the same.”
    • “Their personalities are similar.”

The other difference between “the same and “similar” lies in the prepositions following them. “As” comes after “the same,” while “to” follows “similar.”

  • Examples:
    • “Your smartphone is the same as mine.”
    • “Your smartphone is similar to mine.”

There may be a noun between “the same” and “as.”

  • Example:
    • “Jane is the same age as Mary.”

There is a slight difference between “like” and “alike.” “Like” precedes a noun, but “alike” never comes before a noun.

  • Examples:
    • The house looks like a palace.
    • The two sisters are alike.

Sources:

  • Betty Schrampfer Azar, Fundamentals of English Grammar: Third Edition
  • Deborah Phillips, Longman Complete Course for the TOEFL Test

Compiled and written by @fathrahman for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, September 28, 2018


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