#WOTD: Scilicet

Hello, Fellas. Welcome back to #WOTD sesion. How did you do today? This evening I would like to discuss the word “scilicet.” Has any of you heard about this? If so, could you tell us the meaning of “scilicet”?

I found “scilicet” when I accidentally look “word of the day” section in Merriam Webster dictionary.

The dictionary describes “scilicet” is an adverb that is synonymous to “namely.” “Scilicet” is derived from Latin, “scire,” which means ‘to know’ and “licere,” which means ‘to be permitted.’

It is also said that this word is usually can be found in a legal related instruments. In addition, Oxford dictionary states that “scilicet” has a function to explain an ambiguous or obscure statement. There are some words that is synonymous to “scilicet,” they are “namely” and “to wit (that is to say).”

Lastly, here are some example of “scilicet” contained sentences:

  1. “The top ten happiest countries are come from Europe, scilicet Finland, Denmark, and Sweden.”
  2. “In some region funeral can attracts people, scilicet the funeral in Bali (Ngaben) and in Toraja have their cultural value and uniqueness that lead other people to witness the ceremony.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, March 15, 2018

 

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