#IOTW: Idioms related to books and reading

Hello, Fellas. How’s your day? Do any of you love reading? Do you realise that tomorrow is a World Book Day? In order to welcome the day, I would like to share some idioms with the word ‘book.’

The first one is the famous one. I bet you regularly find it in some literature or even in your daily communication.

  1. “An open book.” Meaning: something/someone that is easily to be understand.
    • Example:
      • “My mom always know my way of thinking like an open book.
  2. “To take a leaf out of someone’s book.” Meaning: to imitate someone.
    • Example:
      • “Sometimes my sister irritates me because she always take a leaf out of my book.
  3. “To read between the lines.” Meaning: looking for an implied meaning.
    • Example:
      • “When you feel the world pushing you down over and over again, try to read between the lines. I believe something happens in order to lead you to be better or to a better place.”
  4. “The oldest trick in the book.” Meaning: the dishonest action that had been used over and over again.
    • Example:
      • “Aren’t you bored with the same oldest trick in the book, Matt?”
  5. “In someone’s good books.” Meaning: an expression that show if someone is pleased with you.
    • Example:
      • “His performance was in the jury’s good book.”
  6. “Bring someone to book.” Meaning: to punish someone.
    • Example:
      • “Charlie was brought to the book because of his fight with Ben.”
  7. “Balance the book.” Meaning: a process to make sure that your income and outcome match with your (bank) account note.
    • Example:
      • “I think you should balance the book. It’s strange that you always run out of money before the end of the month.”
  8. “Use every trick in the book.” Meaning: you have used every possible way to get/do something.
    • Example:
      • “I have used every trick in the book to pursue her, but she doesn’t even notice it.”
  9. “Have your nose in the book.” Meaning: to read all the time. On the other hand it also means to refer someone who is being oblivious to her/his surrounding because s(he) is to absorbed to the book.
    • Examples:
      • “She won’t respond if you call her while she’s having her nose in the book. Trust me.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, March 1, 2018

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