#EngClass: Clause

Do you know that a sentence consists of one or more clauses?

Clause means:
1. A group of words containing a subject and a predicate and functioning as a member of a complex or compound sentence (according to Merriam-Webster Dictionary).
Note: You can learn more here https://englishtips4u.com/2013/09/01/engclass-sentences/ and here https://englishtips4u.com/2017/05/22/engclass-complex-sentences/

  1. A particular and a separate article, stipulation, or proviso in a treaty, bill, or contract (according to Google Dictionary).

There are two kinds of clauses:
1. Main/independent clause: a clause that can stand alone as a complete, simple sentence; contains a subject and a predicate.
E.g. “He laughed.”

  1. Subordinate/dependent clause: a clause that can not form a sentence by itself.
    E.g. “Justice must be done even if the sky falls.”

There are three types of dependent clause:

a. Adjective/relative clause: a dependent clause that functions as an adjective within a sentence.
You can learn more here https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/08/engclass-relative-clause/ and https://englishtips4u.com/2011/11/09/engclass-relative-clause-2/

b. Noun clause: a dependent clause that functions as a noun within a sentence.
You can learn more here https://englishtips4u.com/2013/02/04/grammartrivia-noun-clause/

c. Adverb clause: a dependent clause that functions as an adverb within a sentence.
You can learn more here https://englishtips4u.com/2011/10/13/engclass-adverbial-clause/

There are seven types of adverb clause:

i. Clause of time: adverb clause to indicate when something happens.
The conjunctions: “after”, “before”, “since”, etc.
You can learn more here https://englishtips4u.com/2016/10/16/engclass-time-related-adverb-clause/

ii. Clause of place: adverb clause to indicate the place where the action happens.
The conjunctions: “where”, “anywhere”, “nowhere”, etc.

iii. Clause of contrast/concession: adverb clause to indicate ideas or actions that are not expected.
The conjunctions: “although”, “in spite of”, “even if”, etc.

iv. Clause of manner: adverb clause to indicate how an action happens.
The conjunctions: “as”, “how”, “like”, etc.

v. Clause of purpose and result: adverb clause to indicate purpose.
The conjunctions: “so that”, “in case”, “in order that”, etc.

vi. Clause of cause and effect: adverb clause to indicate why something happens.
The conjuntions: “because”, “due to”, “therefore”, etc.

vii. Clause of condition: adverb clause to indicate the circumstances of the action.
The conjunctions: “if”, “unless”, “if only”, etc.

Compiled and written by @sherlydarmali for @EnglishTips4U on Sunday, January 21, 2018.

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