#EngVocab: Phrasal Verbs with ‘Get’

Hey, fellas! How do you do?

It’s time for us to get along  more and discuss phrasal verbs together!
The previous tweet contains a phrasal verb. Phrasal verb is a phrase that consists of a verb with a preposition or adverb or both. The meaning of phrasal verb is different from the original verb.
Below is the list of the phrasal verb with ‘get’ to enrich your vocabulary.

  1. Get along (with something/someone): be friendly.

E.g.: “My classmates and I get along very well. We eat together in lunch time.”


  1. Get out: to leave; used for telling someone to leave. 

E.g.: “I’m studying here! Please get out of my room!” 

  1. Get over (something): to deal with or gain control of something.

E.g.: “She can’t get over her happy feeling.”

  1. Get through to (something): to go forward to the next step of a process.

E.g.: “He got through to the final round of audition.”

  1. Get by: to survive by using the money, knowledge, etc. that you have.

E.g.: “How are you getting by these days?”

  1. Get away: to leave from a person or place.

E.g.: “We’ve decided to visit countryside to get away from this city.”

  1. Get up: to get out of bed after sleeping. 

E.g.: “My sister gets up at 4:30 every morning.”

  1. Get rid of (something): to remove or throw away something. 

E.g.: “Mr. Jo got rid of their old sofa and bought a new one.”

  1. Get off: to escape a punishment; to stop an action from someone or something.

E.g.: “The suspect will get off with a caution.”

“Would you please get your feet off the table?”
10. Get in: to arrive at home or at work.

E.g.: “She never gets in before 6:50 in the morning.”

That’s all for today, fellas! It’s time for #EngVocab session to get away and let another session take over tomorrow.
Written and compiled by @anhtiss on @EnglishTips4U. Saturday, December 16, 2017

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