#EngTrivia: Confusing words (2)

Hello, Fellas. How was your day? In this session we are going to continue our discussion about some confusing words.

‘Harm,’ ‘injury,’ and ‘damage.’

Do you know the difference of those words?

Regarding to Merriam-webster dictinary, if ‘harm’ acts as a verb, it means to make someone/something to be hurt/broken. On the other words, ‘harm’ can also be a noun which is something that has a bed effect on someone or another thing.

Example:

  • “The acidic solutions may harm the metals.”
  • “I mean no harm.”

What about ‘injury’? This word means a physical harm on someone. It is usually cause by an accident.

Example:

  • “I got this injury from falling down of my motorbike.”

Meanwhile, according to BBC ‘damage’ is a physical harm on something (non-living/abstract object), such as economy, impression, electronics, etc.

Example:

  • “This rumor can cause a damage on her reputation.”

‘During,’ ‘while,’ and ‘for.’

If you check on the dictionary, ‘during’ means the entire time of an event/a moment, such as, holiday, school (grade), party, meeting, etc.

Example:

  • “I made this sweater during the term holiday.”

Ecenglish. Com also states that ‘during’ is a preposition to indicate the time of an event.

Example:

  • “There were many interesting performances during last year’s Christmas holiday.”

On the other hand ‘while’ means a short period of time.

Example:

  • “I will take a rest for a while.”

In addition, we can also use ‘while’ as a conjunction when two events happen at the same time.

Example:

  • “I was showering while my brother came home.”

The last is ‘for.’ This word is used to indicate a specific time of an event. So, when we put ‘for’ in a sentence, it is followed by the length of time.

Example:

  • “My mother well be in Paris for two weeks.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, October 12, 2017

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