#GrammarTrivia: Confusing verbs

Hello, Fellas. We meet again. How are you today? This evening we are going to have a discussion about confusing verbs.

Who had felt dilemmatic about the using of ‘make’ and ‘do’ in a sentence? Because sometimes I did.

‘Make’ vs. ‘do’

After I read some references, it is said that we use ‘do’ to indicate an activity/action.

Examples:

  • “Do your homework,”
  • “You should do your work,”
  • “It’s my schedule to do the laundry.”

Likewise, we can also use ‘do’ even if there is no physical object to be shown.

For illustration:

  • “I would do anything for you,”
  • “She didn’t do anything wrong,”
  • “I do nothing since this morning.”

Meanwhile, ‘make’ is used when someone is creating/building/performing something. It is usually something that you can see/touch (physical object).

Examples:

  • “I am making cheesecake,”
  • “Please, don’t make him cry.”
  • “Smartphone makes us communicating with someone easily.”

‘Say’ vs. ‘tell.’

According to Cambridge dictionary, ‘say’ focuses on the words in someone speech. For illustrations,

  • “He said,I want to buy apples.’

On the other hand, ‘say’ also acts as a reporting verb.

Example:

  • “He said he wanted to buy apples.”

Meanwhile ‘tell’ is used to report the message of the speech or to instruct someone.

Example:

  • “He told me that he wanted to buy apples,”
  • “Tell him to buy apples.”

‘Shall’ vs. ‘will.’

In simple future tense, we traditionally use ‘shallafter the first person pronoun (I and we) while ‘you,’ ‘they,’ ‘she,’ ‘he,’ and ‘it’ are followed by ‘will.’

For instances:

  • “We shall go to supermarket to buy some vegetables and meat,”
  • “You will get a good grade if you study harder.”

However, when we want to emphasis something the rules are reversed. The first pronouns are followed by ‘will,’ while ‘shall’ is placed after the second and the third pronouns.

Illustration,

  • “I will not forgive you,”
  • “She shall read the textbooks as her thesis refrences.”

 

Source:

Compiled and written by @mettaa_ for @EnglishTips4u on Thursday, August 31, 2017

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