#UKSlang: UK slang (10)

Whilst preparing for a session to be delivered on Twitter, I found some slangs that are quite hilarious. I hope you find them fun, like I do. This time, we’ll talk about some slangs that are mostly used in the UK. Like all slangs, they’re suitable only in casual conversation.

Enough with the speech. Let’s start, shall we?

  1. A bunch of fives. Meaning: a punch in the face.
    • Example:
      • “I’ll give you a bunch of fives.”
      • Meaning: “I’m going to punch you in the face.”
  2. Pants. Meaning: not very good, not great.
    • Example:
      • “That’s pants.”
      • Meaning: “That’s not very good.”
  3. Nineteen to the dozen. Meaning: very fast, at a speedy rate at high speed.
    • Example:
      • “She was talking nineteen to the dozen.”
      • Meaning: “She was talking very fast.”
  4. Pear-shaped. Meaning: wrong result, deviate from expectation.
    • Example:
      • “It’s all gone pear-shaped.”
      • Meaning: “It’s all gone wrong.”
  5. A slice short of a loaf. Meaning: not very clever.
    • Example:
      • “That pretty girl is a slice short of a loaf.”
      • Meaning: “That pretty girl is not very clever.”
  6. As bright as a button. Meaning: clever.
    • Example:
      • “She’s as bright as a button.”
      • Meaning: “She’s clever.”
  7. Spend a penny. Meaning: visit the bathroom.
    • Example:
      • “Excuse me. I need to spend a penny.”
      • Meaning: “Excuse me. I need to visit the bathroom.”
  8. Parky. Meaning: cold.
    • Example:
      • “It’s parky outside.”
      • Meaning: “It’s cold outside.”
  9. Curtain twitcher. Meaning: a nosy neighbor.
    • Example:
      • “You’re such a curtain twitcher.”
      • Meaning: “You’re such a nosy neighbor.”
  10. Fluff. Meaning: fart.
    • Example:
      • “Did you just fluff?”
      • Meaning: “Did you just fart?”

That’s all for now, fellas! So, which one do you like best?

Compiled and written by @miss_qiak for @EnglishTips4U on Saturday, April 29, 2017

 

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