#EngVocab: Obsolete words – a trip to the past

As language advances, lots and lots of words are invented. Unfortunately, some words went obsolete because of this. But today we will take a look to some of the obsolete words.

  1. Fudgel. Meaning: pretending to do work while actually do nothing.
    • Example:
      • I got fired because my boss caught me fudgeling.
  2. Brabble. Meaning: to argue loudly about something unimportant.
    • Example:
      • I’m not going to brabble with you. Let’s just go home for now.
  3. Snoutfair. Meaning: it is what you say to a good looking person.
    • Example:
      • Despite of his age, Keanu Reeves is still a snoutfair.
  4. Slugabed. Meaning: a lazy person that stays in bed for too long.
    • Example:
      • Wake up, slugabed! It’s already 11 am!
  5. Hoddypeak. Meaning: ‘fool’ or ‘simpleton.’
    • Example:
      • He’s not very bright; he’s a hoddypeak with a very kind heart.
  6. Jollux. Meaning: a sophisticated way of saying ‘fat.’
    • Example:
      • A: “Honey, do I look fat?”
      • B: “Baby, you’re just a little bit jollux.”
  7. Kench. Meaning: to laugh loudly (LOL).
    • Example:
      • I’m trying so hard not to kench in class while reading your text yesterday!
  8. Gorgonize: Meaning: to have paralyzing or mesmerizing effect on someone.
    • Example:
      • Zooey Deschanel’s eyes gorgonize me. I’m petrified just by looking at her eyes.
  9. Groak. Meaning: to silently watch someone while they are eating, hoping to be invited.
    • Example:
      • Don’t groak! I’ll buy you a doughnut if you stop staring at me like that.
  10. Crapulous. Meaning: to feel ill after eating or drinking (way) too much.
    • Example:
      • I always feel crapulous on holidays, mostly because my mom’s homemade food is too good.

Compiled and written by @bintilvice for @EnglishTips4U on Friday, 8 January 2016

Related post(s):

 

^MD

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2 responses to “#EngVocab: Obsolete words – a trip to the past

  1. Pingback: #EngTrivia: Colors meaning | @EnglishTips4U·

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